The Biggest Stoners in Sports

As recreational marijuana use continues to go mainstream, a variety of stoner sports figures have emerged throughout the years to put their foot down and fight for their right to get really, super duper high. 

San Francisco Giants pitcher Tim Lincecum's appreciation for the greener things hardly makes him unusual among professional athletes. High performance sports and getting high

This article originally appeared on www.rollingstone.com: The Biggest Stoners in Sports

Rolling Stone Latest Sports News

BEST DISCOUNT DEAL:

Great deals and discounts on popular styles from Men’s Clearance at Nike.com

Under Armour fires footwear exec as Steph Curry shoes stumble

The epic sneaker battle between NBA stars Stephen Curry and Kevin Durant has claimed another casualty. Under Armour — whose Curry 4 basketball shoes have been dogged by manufacturing delays, even as they have gotten slammed by poor reviews — said Peter Ruppe, who had headed its footwear business for nearly three years, has left…
Business | New York Post

SPECIAL DISCOUNT UPDATE:

Olympic Gymnast Gabby Douglas Says She Was Abused by Team Doctor Larry Nassar

Gabrielle Douglas, the 2012 Olympic all-around champion and three-time Olympic gold medalist, said that national team doctor Larry Nassar had abused her.

The revelation came in a lengthy statement on Instagram in response to a flood of criticism surrounding comments she made in the aftermath of teammate Aly Raisman’s tweet denouncing victim-shaming.

Raisman had recently said that she had been sexually abused by Nassar. A month earlier, another 2012 teammate, McKayla Maroney, also said that she had been sexually abused by Nassar.

Soon after Raisman posted on how victim shaming is wrong, Douglas responded with a now-deleted tweet said that “It is our responsibility as women to dress modestly and be classy. Dressing in a provocative/sexy way entices the wrong crowd.”

Read more: Aly Raisman Opens Up About Sexual Abuse by USA Gymnastics Doctor Larry Nassar

Social media backlash immediately followed, and reigning Olympic all-around champion Simone Biles also joined in, tweeting “shocks me that I’m seeing this but it doesn’t surprise me…honestly seeing this bring me to tears bc as your teammate I expected more from you & to support her.”

Read more: Who Is Larry Nassar, the Former USA Gymnastics Doctor Aly Raisman Accuses of Sexual Abuse?

Douglas issued an apology, hash tagging it #metoo, the tag used for victims of sexual abuse coming forward following revelations that powerful producer Harvey Weinstein sexually harassed multiple women. But Douglas felt the need to explain her comment further. In her latest apology, Douglas alluded to sexual abuse by Nassar. “I didn’t view my comments as victim shaming because I know that no matter what you wear it NEVER gives anyone the right to harass or abuse you. It would be like saying that because of the leotards we wore, it was our fault that we were abused by Larry Nassar. I didn’t publicly share my experiences as well as many other things because for years we were conditioned to stay silent and honestly some things were extremely painful. I wholeheartedly support my teammates for coming forward with what happened to them.”

A representative for Douglas confirmed to USA Today that she was accusing Nassar of abusing her.

Douglas went on to explain that her initial comments were made after attending an event with children and young adults and that “It’s very humbling when many people look up to you as an example. I take my job as a role model very seriously and I always want to do my best to represent all the best qualities that a role model should embody. I admit there are times that I fall short.”

Read more: It Started When I Was 13 Years Old.’ Olympic Gymnast McKayla Maroney Says U.S. Team Doctor Molested Her

Douglas makes it clear that she does not support victim-shaming, saying “I understand that many of you didn’t know what I was dealing with, but it is important to me that you at least know this. I do not advocate victim shaming /blaming in any way, shape or form! I will also never support attacking or bullying anyone on social media or anywhere else.”

Nassar was the USA Gymnastics national team doctor for 29 years, and was also employed by Michigan State University. He resigned from USA Gymnastics in 2015 and was fired from MSU in 2016. He is currently in jail awaiting sentencing for federal child pornography charges and faces hundreds of lawsuits by gymnasts and MSU athletes for sexual abuse.


Sports – TIME

ENTERTAINMENT DEAL UPDATE:

FA charges Everton striker with diving after winning controversial penalty against Crystal Palace

Everton striker Oumar Niasse has been charged with simulation by the Football Association after he won a controversial penalty in Saturday’s Premier League draw at Crystal Palace.

This Is Local London | Premier League

BEST DEAL UPDATE(UK):

What we learned (and didn’t) in Week 11: Players about to get paid

Remember that one-year deal Alshon Jeffery took last offseason? Expect him to do much better in free agency in 2018. He’s not alone. This week’s lessons run through guys in position to land big new contracts.
www.espn.com – NFL
TICKET UPDATE NEWS:

Ticketclub.com 125% Money Back Guarantee! Once Your Order is Accepted, We Guarantee Your Tickets Will Be Valid and Shipped in Time for The Event!

Donald Trump Calls on NFL to Suspend Raiders’ Marshawn Lynch

Donald Trump criticized Oakland Raiders running back Marshawn Lynch on Monday morning for standing during the Mexican national anthem and sitting during the American national anthem prior to Sunday's game against the New England Patriots at the Estadio Azteca in Mexico City. Trump, who recently took aim at the NFL for

This article originally appeared on www.rollingstone.com: Donald Trump Calls on NFL to Suspend Raiders’ Marshawn Lynch

Rolling Stone Latest Sports News

BEST DISCOUNT DEAL:

Great deals and discounts on popular styles from Men’s Clearance at Nike.com

LaVar Ball Is Feuding with Donald Trump Over His Son’s Release From China

(WASHINGTON) — Outspoken basketball dad LaVar Ball questioned the extent of President Donald Trump’s involvement in securing his son’s release from the custody of Chinese authorities during a combative 20-minute CNN interview on Monday night.

The president, in tweets Sunday, said he should have left LiAngelo Ball and two other UCLA basketball players accused of shoplifting in jail because LaVar Ball “is unaccepting of what I did for his son” and “very ungrateful!” LaVar Ball has refused to thank Trump.

LaVar Ball didn’t back down during the CNN interview, telling host Chris Cuomo that Trump has more important things to do than ask for his gratitude.

“That’s on your mind, that a father didn’t say ‘Thank you’? And you’re the head of the U.S.? Come on,” Ball said. “There’s a lot of other things that’s going on. Let him do his political affairs and let me handle my son, and let’s just stay in our lane.”

Ball suggested that he and Chinese president Xi Jinping had more to do with securing his son’s release than the president.

“Did (Trump) help the boys get out? I don’t know. If I was going to thank somebody, I probably would thank President Xi. He’s in China. He’s the president of China,” Ball said, later adding: “I helped my son get out of China. I had some people that had boots on the ground that knew the situation.”

Ball also pushed back against Trump’s suggestion that shoplifting “is a very big deal in China.”

“It wasn’t a big deal because being raised in South Central LA, I’ve seen harsher things. I’ve seen 16, 17-year-old kids that have had to go to jail for life, that were my friends,” Ball said. “He wasn’t physical. He returned it. He fessed up to it.”

LiAngelo and fellow UCLA freshmen Jalen Hill and Cody Riley have been suspended indefinitely. They were arrested and questioned about stealing from high-end stores next to the team’s hotel in Hangzhou, where the Bruins stayed before leaving for Shanghai to play Georgia Tech. All three apologized for their actions and thanked Trump for his role in securing their release, which occurred while the president was traveling in Asia.

The trio isn’t allowed to suit up, be on the bench for home games or travel with the team. Without them, No. 23 UCLA lost to Creighton on Monday night in the Hall of Fame Classic.

LaVar Ball is attempting to build an empire around the basketball skills of his three sons — Los Angeles Lakers rookie Lonzo, LiAngelo and prep prospect LaMelo — and his own bombastic personality. He started an apparel company, Big Baller Brand, with shoes that retail for $ 500 or more, and he got in several plugs for his products during the CNN interview.


Sports – TIME

ENTERTAINMENT DEAL UPDATE:

It Took 240 Tons of Explosives (and Just 12 Seconds) to Bring Down the Georgia Dome

The Georgia Dome, former home of the Atlanta Falcons, collapsed Monday morning in a scheduled (and meticulously-controlled) explosive demolition.

The stadium’s 250,000 cubic yards of concrete needed 480,000 pounds of explosives (that’s 240 tons) to take it out. Watch the video above to see the 71,250-seat, concrete stadium get flattened in just 12 seconds, according to the Georgia World Congress Center Authority (GWCCA).

The NFL’s Falcons have moved next door to the Mercedes-Benz Stadium after playing at the Dome for 25 years. A new hotel, parking deck and “Home Depot Backyard” tailgating space will take the Dome’s place right next to the new stadium.

The massive Georgia Dome had been in operation since 1992 and was the only venue to host the Super Bowl, Olympics and the NCCA Men’s Final Four, the GWCCA noted in a press release.


Sports – TIME

ENTERTAINMENT DEAL UPDATE:

Papa John’s Apologizes for Blaming NFL Player Protests on Declining Sales

In a series of tweets on Tuesday, Papa John's apologized for making "divisive" comments, saying they believe in the right to protest inequality and support the "players' movement to create a new platform for change." The pizza chain also gave neo-Nazis the middle finger in their apology after white

This article originally appeared on www.rollingstone.com: Papa John’s Apologizes for Blaming NFL Player Protests on Declining Sales

Rolling Stone Latest Sports News

BEST DISCOUNT DEAL:

Great deals and discounts on popular styles from Men’s Clearance at Nike.com

Wimbledon champion Jana Novotna dies after battle with cancer

PRAGUE (Reuters) – Czech tennis player Jana Novotna, a Wimbledon champion in 1998 and 16-time grand slam winner in doubles and mixed doubles, has died at the age of 49 after a long battle with cancer, the Women’s Tennis Association said on Monday.


Reuters: Sports News

FOOTLOCKER SPECIAL DISCOUNT UPDATE:

Check out the Sales Outlet with prices starting as low as $ 19.99!

Bills’ dumb QB experiment blew up in their face spectacularly

The Bills entered Sunday as the sixth seed in the AFC as they attempt to make the playoffs for the first time since the 1999 season. At the same time, rookie coach Sean McDermott had seen a 5-2 record turn into 5-4, thanks to a no-show 34-21 loss at the Jets and an even-worse 47-10…
Sports | New York Post

EMPLOYMENT SEARCH UPDATE:

UCLA Players Detained in China are Returning Home After President Trump Asked Xi Jinping for Help

LOS ANGELES (AP) — Three UCLA basketball players detained in China on suspicion of shoplifting are on a plane back to Los Angeles.

Pac-12 Commissioner Larry Scott said Tuesday the matter “has been resolved to the satisfaction of the Chinese authorities.”

Freshmen LiAngelo Ball, Jalen Hill and Cody Riley were detained in Hangzhou for questioning following allegations of shoplifting last week before the 23rd-ranked Bruins beat Georgia Tech in their season-opening game in Shanghai as part of the annual Pac-12 China game. Ball is the brother of LA Lakers guard Lonzo Ball.

The rest of the UCLA team returned to Los Angeles last Saturday without the three.

There was no immediate word from UCLA on the players’ status for the team’s home opener Wednesday night against Central Arkansas.

The school said the three players, along with coach Steve Alford and athletic director Dan Guerrero, will make their first public comments about the matter on Wednesday morning in Los Angeles, but won’t take questions.

A person with knowledge of the Pac-12’s decision said any discipline involving the players would be up to UCLA. The person spoke on condition of anonymity because the conference doesn’t plan any sanctions.

Scott thanked President Donald Trump, the White House and the State Department for their efforts in resolving what he called “the incident with authorities in Hangzhou, China.” He indicated that UCLA made “significant efforts” on behalf of its three players.

Trump said Tuesday he had a long conversation about the three players’ status with Chinese counterpart Xi Jinping.

Ball, Hill and Riley were expected to have an immediate impact as part of UCLA’s highly touted recruiting class. All three are Los Angeles-area players.

Ball, a guard, averaged 33.8 points as a high school senior and follows in his brother’s footsteps after Lonzo played one season in Westwood and left early for the NBA draft.

Forwards Hill and Riley, both four-star recruits, figure to bolster 7-foot senior Thomas Welsh in the frontcourt.

The Bruins traveled to China as part of the Pac-12’s global initiative that seeks to popularize the league’s athletic programs and universities overseas. The China Game is in its third year, and while the scandal was developing the league announced that California and Yale will play in next year’s edition.

The game is sponsored by Alibaba Group, the Chinese commerce giant that both UCLA and Georgia Tech visited before the shoplifting incident occurred.


Sports – TIME

ENTERTAINMENT DEAL UPDATE:

Dale Earnhardt Jr. Is Going Out on His Own Terms

NASCAR is not the first place one would look to find a voice of the resistance. Yet after Donald Trump railed against NFL players’ kneeling during the national anthem, the biggest name in the sport took to Twitter with a rebuttal. “All Americans R granted rights 2 peaceful protests,” Dale Earnhardt Jr. posted, adapting a John F. Kennedy quote to 140 characters. “Those who make peaceful revolution impossible will make violent revolution inevitable.”

This was not exactly a popular sentiment among a fan base that tracks closely with the voting bloc that put the President in office. Indeed, Richard Petty, a former NASCAR star and current team owner, said the protesting players “ought to be out of the country. Period.” But Earnhardt, 43, has long been willing to take stands at odds with racing’s core supporters. In 2015 he spoke out against the Confederate flag, which many fans fly atop their RVs at races. Earlier this year, after Trump barred people from seven Muslim-majority countries from entering the U.S., Earnhardt tweeted that his family came from Germany in the 1700s to escape religious persecution.

“I just thought it was important to remember that this country was built on the hard work of a lot of people who came from overseas,” Earnhardt tells TIME in an interview ahead of his final career race, on Nov. 19 at Homestead-Miami Speedway. His support for the right to protest was rooted in a similar perspective. “I just don’t want to be quick to judge someone who wants to raise awareness,” Earnhardt says. “You have to be open-minded and compassionate.”

That Earnhardt says this while remaining NASCAR’s marquee star speaks to his skill on the track, personality off of it and a family legacy like no other. The grandson of NASCAR pioneer Ralph Earnhardt and son of Hall of Fame driver Dale Earnhardt Sr., who died in a crash at the 2001 Daytona 500, he acknowledges inheriting much of his appeal. “I’ll put it to you straight,” Earnhardt says. “My dad was very popular, so there’s no denying that when I came into the sport I had a lot of fans automatically because of his notoriety and celebrity.” Thanks in part to his everyman demeanor, Earnhardt expanded that fan base despite never winning a championship. The same fans who may disagree with his views have voted Earnhardt the sport’s most popular driver for 14 years running. This year will be the last: Earnhardt is retiring after 19 years on NASCAR’s top circuit, with 26 career wins, including a pair of Daytona 500s.

Losing Earnhardt will be a blow for NASCAR at a fraught moment (though he’ll stay involved and is joining NBC’s racing coverage). In recent years stock-car racing has suffered ratings and attendance declines. Viewership for an Oct. 8 playoff race, for example, was down 44% from 2014, according to Sports Media Watch, and admissions revenue for the International Speedway Corp., which owns a dozen NASCAR tracks, fell 47% between ’05 and ’16.

Earnhardt says his decision was made easier by a concussion suffered in a wreck in June. He missed 18 races and had symptoms like blurry vision and a lack of balance. “You get a concussion and forget your keys–you wonder if it has anything to do with your head,” Earnhardt says. “You self-analyze everything. You’ve got that in the back of your mind, and you can’t get rid of it.” Earnhardt has said he will donate his brain to concussion-related research.

Retirement is well-timed: he and his wife are expecting their first child, a girl, in May. Earnhardt says he hopes his daughter passes on the family trade. “Following in my dad’s footsteps was really a challenge,” he says, adding that he would support her if she wanted to become the fourth generation on the track. He would be uniquely equipped to help. “I don’t have the statistics that live up to my father,” says Earnhardt, whose dad won seven championships. “There’s only one him. So you’ve got to enjoy who you are, love yourself and be proud of what you can accomplish. That’s just the only way to go.”


This appears in the November 27, 2017 issue of TIME.
Sports – TIME

ENTERTAINMENT DEAL UPDATE:

Bitcoin’s blockchain technology praised by Wall Street

Last week was a big one for bitcoin. The cryptocurrency went a long way toward developing its Street cred with two major announcements. On the consumer side, Square, the small business payment systems company, is now beta testing some bitcoin transactions. And on the institutional side, the CME, which is the world’s largest futures, options…
Business | New York Post

SPECIAL DISCOUNT UPDATE:

Your Trader Joe’s salad may contain shards of glass, plastic

PHOENIX — Trader Joe’s says it has recalled several packaged salads after a supplier said there may be shards of glass or hard plastic inside. The grocery chain said Saturday on its website that packages of white meat chicken salad, curried white chicken deli salad and turkey cranberry apple salad sold in some areas that…
Business | New York Post

SPECIAL DISCOUNT UPDATE:

UFC Announces Title Fight Between Cris ‘Cyborg’ Justino and Holly Holm

The UFC announced on Thursday that Cris "Cyborg" Justino will defend her featherweight title against Holly Holm at UFC 219 on December 19th in Las Vegas. It's still unknown if the fight will be the night's main event.

Germaine de Randamie defeated Holm at the inaugural Women’s Featherweight Championship earlier this year. She was then stripped off her belt for refusing to defend her

This article originally appeared on www.rollingstone.com: UFC Announces Title Fight Between Cris ‘Cyborg’ Justino and Holly Holm

Rolling Stone Latest Sports News

BEST DISCOUNT DEAL:

Great deals and discounts on popular styles from Men’s Clearance at Nike.com

Gabby Douglas Apologizes for Saying Women Should Dress ‘Modestly’ in Response to Post About Sexual Assault

Gymnast Gabby Douglas has apologized for saying women are responsible for dressing “modestly” in response to her Olympic teammate Aly Raisman‘s social media post about sexual assault.

Raisman on Friday wrote that men don’t have the right the “shame or not believe” women who come forward about sexual abuse just because they might have participated in a “sexy photoshoot” or wore a “sexy outfit” previously.

“Women are allowed to feel sexy and comfortable in their own skin, in fact I encourage you all to wear what you feel good in,” Raisman wrote. “I will not put up with any woman or girl being shamed for wanting to wear a skirt, dress, etc. I do not tolerate it.”

Following Raisman’s statement on victim shaming, Douglas weighed in with the opinion that “it is our responsibility as women to dress modestly and be classy.”

“Dressing in a provocative/sexual way entices the wrong crowd,” she wrote in a since-deleted tweet, prompting immediate reaction and criticism.

Teammate Simone Biles tweeted: “Shocks me that i’m seeing this but it doesn’t surprise me… honestly seeing this brings me to tears bc as your teammate I expected more from you & to support her.”

After deleting her initial tweet, Douglas apologized, saying, “I didn’t correctly word my reply.”

“I am deeply sorry for coming off like i don’t stand alongside my teammates,” Douglas tweeted. “Regardless of what you wear, abuse under any circumstance is never acceptable.”

Raisman’s post comes after she became the latest in a string of high-profile gymnasts to accuse former USA Gymnastics team doctor Larry Nassar of sexual abuse.

Nassar is currently awaiting sentencing in Michigan after pleading guilty to child pornography charges. He has pleaded not guilty to charges of sexually abusing his former patients and a family friend.

A lawyer for Nassar told TIME earlier this month that a gag order in his pending case prevented him from commenting on Raisman’s allegations.


Sports – TIME

ENTERTAINMENT DEAL UPDATE:

Aly Raisman: Victim Shaming Is Why ‘So Many Survivors Live in Fear’

On Friday, Aly Raisman shared a lengthy message on Twitter in which she asked her followers for their help so that she create change in regards to the treatment of women and victim shaming. In the message, the three-time Olympic gold medalist wanted to clarify that a sexy photoshoot or sexy outfit "does not give a man the right to shame [a woman] or not believe her when she comes forward

This article originally appeared on www.rollingstone.com: Aly Raisman: Victim Shaming Is Why ‘So Many Survivors Live in Fear’

Rolling Stone Latest Sports News

BEST DISCOUNT DEAL:

Great deals and discounts on popular styles from Men’s Clearance at Nike.com

NFL Quarterback Jameis Winston Under Investigation for Allegedly Groping an Uber Driver

(TAMPA, Fla.) — The NFL is investigating an allegation that Jameis Winston groped a female Uber driver in 2016, and the Tampa Bay Buccaneers quarterback has denied the allegation on his social media accounts.

The Buccaneers acknowledged the allegation on Friday and released a statement saying they are in the “process of obtaining further information regarding today’s media report. We take these matters seriously and are fully supportive of the investigation that is being conducted by the NFL.”

The NFL also released a statement saying that it has reached out to Uber to request more information.

The Uber driver told BuzzFeed News the incident stems from a 2 a.m. ride after a party in Scottsdale, Arizona, on March 13, 2016. Driver said Winston was the only passenger, and that he sat in the front seat and was yelling homophobic slurs at pedestrians. She said he then asked the driver to stop for food, and while waiting in a drive-thru, reached over and placed his hand on the woman’s crotch.

A representative for Winston, Russ Spielman, issued a statement denying the allegations. He said the only reason Winston’s name is attached to the allegation is because his Uber account was used to call the ride.

Winston reiterated his denial in postings on Twitter and Instagram on Friday.

“A news organization has published a story about me regarding an alleged incident involving a female Uber driver from approximately two years ago,” the quarterback wrote. “The story falsely accuses me of making inappropriate contact with this driver. I believe the driver was confused as to the number of passengers in the car and who was sitting next to her. The accusation is false, and given the nature of the allegation and increased awareness and consideration of these types of matters, I am addressing this false report immediately. At the time of the alleged incident, I denied the allegations to Uber, yet they still decided to suspend my account.

“I am supportive of the national movement to raise awareness and develop better responses to the concerns of parties who find themselves in these types of situations, but this accusation is false. While I am certain that I did not make any inappropriate contact, I don’t want to engage in a battle with the driver and I regret if my demeanor or presence made her uncomfortable in any way.”


Sports – TIME

ENTERTAINMENT DEAL UPDATE:

CTE Was Confirmed in a Living Person for the First Time. And It’s a Veteran NFL Player

A former NFL player is reportedly the first living person ever accurately diagnosed with CTE, or chronic traumatic encephalopathy, the disease found in the brains of dozens of ex football players.

This breakthrough, which was made in 2012, but only published this week in the journal Neurosurgery, could help doctors identify and treat patients while they are still alive. CTE was previously only identifiable through a brain examination after death.

The subject of the diagnosis was not named in the study, but was reported by CNN to be Fred McNeill, who died in 2015 at age 63. McNeill played 12 seasons as a linebacker for the Minnesota Vikings before retiring in 1985.

The disease, which is linked to repetitive head injury, has symptoms including memory loss, anger and depression. Another study, published last year, found CTE in the brains of 110 out of 111 deceased NFL players examined. The NFL acknowledged the link between CTE and football for the first time in 2016.

The new breakthrough involves using an experimental brain scanning technique, where a radioactive ‘tracer’ that attaches itself to proteins associated with the disease can be picked up by a PET scan.

The report confirmed that a study of the patient’s brain after his death revealed the CTE diagnosis had been correct. The new scanning process has been used on at least a dozen other retired players, however McNeill’s case is the first to be confirmed via autopsy.


Sports – TIME

ENTERTAINMENT DEAL UPDATE:

NBA Coach: Athletes Who Protest Are ‘Patriots of the Highest Order’

In an article for Time magazine, Detroit Pistons head coach Stan Van Gundy calls athletes who speak out on social issues such as racial injustice "patriots of the highest order." Van Gundy cites Muhammad Ali,

This article originally appeared on www.rollingstone.com: NBA Coach: Athletes Who Protest Are ‘Patriots of the Highest Order’

Rolling Stone Latest Sports News

BEST DISCOUNT DEAL:

Great deals and discounts on popular styles from Men’s Clearance at Nike.com

Cris ‘Cyborg’ Justino will battle Holly Holm in UFC 219

Cris “Cyborg” Justino is finally getting a dream UFC opponent. The company announced its women’s featherweight titleholder will fight former bantamweight champion Holly Holm at UFC 219 on Dec. 30 in Las Vegas. The two are arguably the most well-known female fighters in the company and two of the most accomplished women strikers ever in…
Sports | New York Post

EMPLOYMENT SEARCH UPDATE:

Trump to UCLA Basketball Players: ‘Give a Big Thank You’ to Xi Jinping for Your Release

(WASHINGTON) — President Donald Trump is exhorting three suspended UCLA basketball players to thank Chinese President Xi Jinping for their freedom following a shoplifting incident while they were in China.

Trump had tweeted Wednesday: “Do you think the three UCLA basketball p layers will say thank you President Trump. They were headed for 10 years in jail.”

The trio apologized later Wednesday and publicly thanked Trump, who was in Asia last week, for his help. On Thursday morning, the president sent another tweet saying, “You’re welcome. go out and give a big Thank You to President Xi Jinping of China who made your release possible.”

In the same tweet, Trump said, “HAVE A GREAT LIFE! Be careful, there are many pitfalls on the long and winding road of life!”


Sports – TIME

ENTERTAINMENT DEAL UPDATE:

Nelson Peltz wins P&G board seat in vote recount

Now it is Procter and Gamble’s turn to demand a recount. One month after the Bounty and Crest maker declared victory over billionaire activist investor Nelson Peltz in the largest proxy fight ever waged, a second vote count has overturned the results and handed Peltz a razor-thin victory, according to a report on Wednesday. Peltz,…
Business | New York Post

SPECIAL DISCOUNT UPDATE:

Wall St. traders secretly used chat rooms to rig Treasury bond prices: suit

Wall Street banks secretly shared client information in online chat rooms in order to rig auctions for the $ 14 trillion US Treasurys market, according to an explosive lawsuit filed in Manhattan federal court on Wednesday. The move wrongly fattened the banks’ profits and picked profits from clients, the suit claims. The new accusations, leveled by…
Business | New York Post

SPECIAL DISCOUNT UPDATE:

Colin Kaepernick and the NFL’s Problematic Treatment of Black Quarterbacks

While much of the focus on the NFL this season has been on the African-American quarterback who is not in the league, it is also important to give attention to the ones who are. As much as Colin Kaepernick deserves to be on a team based on his talent, we can safely say that if he's been blacklisted from the NFL it is not because he is black. And we can assume this because many of the

This article originally appeared on www.rollingstone.com: Colin Kaepernick and the NFL’s Problematic Treatment of Black Quarterbacks

Rolling Stone Latest Sports News

BEST DISCOUNT DEAL:

Great deals and discounts on popular styles from Men’s Clearance at Nike.com

UCLA Players Return Home After President Trump Intervened When They Were Detained Over Shoplifting Claim

LOS ANGELES — Three UCLA basketball players detained in China on suspicion of shoplifting returned home, where they may be disciplined by the school as a result of the international scandal.

Freshmen LiAngelo Ball, Jalen Hill and Cody Riley arrived at Los Angeles International Airport late Tuesday afternoon after a 12-hour flight from Shanghai. They ignored reporters’ shouted questions while making their way through a horde of media outside and getting into a van that took off from the departure level.

Pac-12 Commissioner Larry Scott said the matter “has been resolved to the satisfaction of the Chinese authorities.”

The players were detained in Hangzhou for questioning following allegations of shoplifting last week before the 23rd-ranked Bruins beat Georgia Tech in their season-opening game in Shanghai as part of the Pac-12 China game. The rest of the UCLA team returned home last Saturday.

A person with knowledge of the Pac-12’s decision said any discipline involving the trio would be up to UCLA. The person spoke to The Associated Press on condition of anonymity because the conference doesn’t plan any sanctions.

UCLA Chancellor Gene Block said the school is weighing its options.

“I want to be clear that we take seriously any violations of the law,” he said in a statement. “In this particular case, both Athletics and the Office of Student Conduct will review this incident and guide any action with respect to the involved students. Such proceedings are confidential, which limits the specific information that can be shared.”

There was no immediate word on the trio’s status for the team’s home opener Wednesday night against Central Arkansas.

The school said the three players, along with coach Steve Alford and athletic director Dan Guerrero, will make their first public comments about the matter at a campus news conference Wednesday, but won’t take questions.

Scott thanked President Donald Trump, the White House and the State Department for their efforts in resolving what he called “the incident with authorities in Hangzhou, China.” He indicated that UCLA made “significant efforts” on behalf of its athletes.

It wasn’t clear under what terms the players were freed to return to the U.S.

“We are all very pleased that these young men have been allowed to return home to their families and university,” Scott said.

Trump said Tuesday he had a long conversation about the three players’ status with Chinese counterpart Xi Jinping.

Ball, Hill and Riley were expected to have an immediate impact as part of UCLA’s highly touted recruiting class. Instead, they are being talked about solely for their actions off the court.

Ball, a guard whose brother Lonzo is a rookie for the Los Angeles Lakers, averaged 33.8 points as a high school senior. The elder Ball played one season in Westwood and left early for the NBA draft.

The Balls’ outspoken father, LaVar, was in China at the time of the incident. He spent some time promoting the family’s Big Baller Brand of athletic shoes with his youngest son, LaMelo, while his middle son was detained.

Forwards Hill and Riley, both four-star recruits, figure to bolster 7-foot senior Thomas Welsh in the frontcourt.

The Bruins traveled to China as part of the Pac-12’s global initiative that seeks to popularize the league’s athletic programs and universities overseas. The China Game is in its third year, and while the scandal was developing the league announced that California and Yale will play in next year’s edition.

The game is sponsored by Alibaba Group, the Chinese commerce giant that both UCLA and Georgia Tech visited before the shoplifting incident occurred.


Sports – TIME

ENTERTAINMENT DEAL UPDATE:

Nats’ Scherzer, Indians’ Kluber win Cy Young Awards

(Reuters) – Washington Nationals ace Max Scherzer won his second consecutive Cy Young Award as the National League’s top pitcher on Wednesday while Corey Kluber of the Cleveland Indians took home American League honors.


Reuters: Sports News

FOOTLOCKER SPECIAL DISCOUNT UPDATE:

Check out the Sales Outlet with prices starting as low as $ 19.99!

UCLA Players Apologize for Shoplifting in China and Thank President Trump for Helping Secure Their Release

Three UCLA basketball players have apologized after returning home from China, where they were detained for shoplifting.

UCLA’s Steve Alford said the players, three of his biggest stars, be suspended indefinitely from the Bruins.

Freshmen LiAngelo Ball, Jalen Hill and Cody Riley were in Hangzhou before a game with Georgia Tech as part of the Pac-12 China Game when they were accused of shoplifting from a Louis Vuitton store. They were briefly detained, but then released to their hotel and told not to leave.

President Trump reportedly intervened to secure their release, and on Wednesday morning, Trump tweeted that he doubted the basketball players thank him:

All three players did thank Trump during the press conference, with Cody Riley saying, “To President Trump and the United States government, thank you for taking the time to intervene on our behalf.”

Ball, whose brother Lonzo plays for the L.A. Lakers, said, “I’d like to start off by saying sorry for stealing from the stores in China. I didn’t exercise my best judgment, and I was wrong for that.”


Sports – TIME

ENTERTAINMENT DEAL UPDATE:

The Young Bucks on Bullet Club T-Shirts, WWE Rivalry, DIY Wrestling

If you've gone to a pro wrestling show this year, then you've undoubtedly seen a Bullet Club T-shirt in the crowd. The black-and-white skull-style shirts advertising the independent wrestling faction have blanketed pro wrestling crowds in recent years, but never more than in 2017 after Hot Topic inked a deal to sell the shirt in its stores across North America.

The growing popularity of

This article originally appeared on www.rollingstone.com: The Young Bucks on Bullet Club T-Shirts, WWE Rivalry, DIY Wrestling

Rolling Stone Latest Sports News

BEST DISCOUNT DEAL:

Great deals and discounts on popular styles from Men’s Clearance at Nike.com

Donald Trump and LaVar Ball Really Do Deserve Each Other

At the start of this year, if you would have told me I’d be interviewing a China scholar about a deal in which President of the United States asks his Chinese counterpart, Xi Jinping, for help to free three UCLA basketball players who’ve been held in a Chinese hotel for allegedly stealing sunglasses, I would have scoffed. If you said that one of those UCLA players was LiAngelo Ball, son of LaVar Ball — proprietor of $ 495 shoes, controversial and outspoken father of Los Angeles Lakers rookie Lonzo Ball — I would have laughed even harder.

Bet the under on that one, since I had to call up UCLA’s Shirley Wang Endowed Chair in US-China Relations & Communications, Min Zhou, to talk about LaVar Ball.

In hindsight, however, that LaVar Ball and Donald Trump would cross paths in the frenetic, utterly unpredictable 2017 news cycle was all but inevitable. Before returning home from a 12-day trip through Asia, President Trump on Tuesday confirmed that he asked President Xi, during Trump’s state visit to Beijing, to intervene on behalf of UCLA freshman basketball players Ball, Jalen Hill, and Cody Riley, who were arrested on shoplifting charges while in Hangzhou for UCLA’s opening game against Georgia Tech on Nov. 10. “They’re working on it right now,” Trump said. The players boarded a flight back to Los Angeles today.

“What they did was unfortunate,” Trump told reporters before leaving Manila and returning to Washington. Shoplifting penalties can vary greatly in China, but the players could have conceivably faced multiple years in jail.

Yes, Trump’s rescue of the Ball family is shrouded in symbolism. The President and LaVar Ball are classic carnival barkers who relish the media limelight. (Among LaVar Ball’s most outrageous statements: that Lonzo, the Lakers rookie, is the best player on the planet. He’s averaging 9.5 points per game, on an unseemly 31.3% shooting, for the 6-8 Lakers) They both appeared in WWE matches. They’re creations of our reality show world — while Trump had The Apprentice, Ball offers Ball In The Family on Facebook. They provoke strong reactions, positive and negative. Many people on social media have imagined Trump and Ball holding a joint press conference in the wake of the shoplifting charges. That would be quite a show.

This story, however, is more than an amusing sidelight. It does raise questions about selective justice. While the UCLA players go free, what about the human rights activists still imprisoned in China? “It’s easier for China to release American students than political dissidents,” says Zhou, the expert in China-U.S. relations, in a phone interview. “That’s a much more sensitive issue.”

The high-profile status of the UCLA players likely helped expedite their release. The Wall Street Journal noted that Detroit-native Wendell Brown, who was coaching a local American football team in China, is still in a Chinese jail after a September 2016 bar fight (he was charged with intentional assault).

China’s release of the basketball players carries diplomatic consequences as the world’s two largest economies haggle over trade and the North Korea nuclear threat. “It’s very important,” Zhou, a member of UCLA’s sociology department. “It’s a positive sign that the countries can work together.” The timing of the arrests helped the freshmen. Trump was also in China, on a state visit, when goodwill between countries generally ratchets up a level. Zhou’s happy China didn’t overtly use the detained students bargaining chips with the U.S. But don’t be surprised, she says, if China expects something in return down the road. “There’s still some sort of bargaining involved,” she says. “I’m doing you favor.”

Zhou’s thrilled that the students are returning home. “Kids make mistakes, and they should be given second chances,” she says.

Where does everyone go from here? UCLA coach Steve Alford will likely hand down some sort of suspension for his players. But at this rate, go ahead and expect LiAngelo Ball to hit the shot that sends UCLA to the Final Four, while his dad waves his Big Baller Brand kicks in the crowd. It’s November 2017. Anything goes.

 


Sports – TIME

ENTERTAINMENT DEAL UPDATE:

See Bill Murray Heckle, Cheer Players in New Unscripted Baseball Series

Bill Murray and his brother, Brian Doyle-Murray, are taking their love for baseball on the road in a new, unscripted series called "Bill Murray and Brian Doyle-Murray's Extra Innings."

Extra Innings

This article originally appeared on www.rollingstone.com: See Bill Murray Heckle, Cheer Players in New Unscripted Baseball Series

Rolling Stone Latest Sports News

BEST DISCOUNT DEAL:

Great deals and discounts on popular styles from Men’s Clearance at Nike.com

Panthers’ Cornerstones Come Up Big in Dominant Win Over Dolphins

A healthy Luke Kuechly and a Cam Newton performance reminiscent of his 2015 MVP campaign were too much handle for the Dolphins in a 45-21 shellacking on Monday Night Football. 

Latest News

BEST DEAL UPDATE:

Get the perfect pair of shoes at SKECHERS! Shop the latest casual & performance styles for men, women, and kids now!

Derek Jeter working to figure out how to deal his biggest star

Marlins president of baseball operations Michael Hill said his new boss, Derek Jeter, “is in the office every day” Monday through Friday, 9 to 5, and that he has a good line of communications with the former Yankees star. The largest immediate item on the docket for the franchise is learning what teams are interested…
Sports | New York Post

EMPLOYMENT SEARCH UPDATE:

Aly Raisman Opens Up About Sexual Abuse by USA Gymnastics Doctor Larry Nassar

Aly Raisman says the knock came at eight o’clock at night. The future Olympic gold medalist was competing in Rotterdam, Netherlands in her first year at the coveted senior level, the group from which world and Olympic teams were selected. She was thousands of miles away from home, nervous about the competition to come, and without her usual support system of her parents and siblings. She opened the door and saw the team doctor for USA Gymnastics, Larry Nassar.

“I thought you could use a massage,” she says he told her. She was 16.

It wasn’t the first time she says Nassar had appeared at her door at night, offering a massage under the guise of therapy. And it wouldn’t be the last, as Raisman disclosed in an interview with TIME and in her new book, Fierce.

It first happened several months earlier, when she was competing in Melbourne, Australia. At that meet, an official with USA Gymnastics, the sport’s governing body, saw Raisman wincing through practice with sore heels and an aching back and suggested that she see Nassar. He was a great doctor, Raisman says the official told her, and she should consider herself lucky that he would work with her. So when Nassar appeared at her door again, Raisman opened it and let him and let him “work” on her, the term that USA Gymnastics and the gymnasts used for Nassar’s treatments.

Those treatments, it turns out, weren’t necessarily treatments at all. According to Raisman and other gymnasts who have described the procedures, Nassar’s so-called therapy seemed to consist primarily of invasive massage, touching the girls around their pelvic areas and vagina. Gymnasts were sent to Nassar for any pain — whether it was in the back, hip, or muscle — and he often suggested massage as the treatment, according to interviews with gymnasts. He rarely used gloves when working with the girls, and would touch them with his bare hands, including penetrating their vagina with his fingers.

Raisman is the latest high-profile gymnast to accuse Nassar of sexual abuse. In October McKayla Maroney, her teammate on the squad that won gold at the 2012 London Olympics, said Nassar abused her for years, beginning when she was 13 years old. In all, more than 100 athletes have filed suit against Nassar and USA Gymnastics, alleging that the organization was complicit in not addressing reports of sexual abuse adequately. The plaintiffs in the various lawsuits also include athletes at Michigan State University, where Nassar had been employed.

Nassar pleaded guilty to child pornography charges in July and is awaiting sentencing in Michigan. He pleaded not guilty to charges of sexually abusing former patients and a family friend.

Nassar resigned from USA Gymnastics in the summer of 2015. When contacted for this story, Nassar’s attorney said a gag order in his client’s pending case prevented him from commenting on Raisman’s claims.

Raisman, 23, opened up about her experiences in a recent interview with TIME at her family home in a quiet wooded neighborhood in Needham, Mass., outside of Boston. A rec room off the kitchen is filled with mementos from her record-setting career: with six medals won at the 2012 and 2016 Games, she’s America’s second-most decorated female Olympic gymnast. But as her mother, Lynn, lit a fire in the living room, Raisman settled into a deep brown leather couch and talked about how it could have all been derailed by abuse.

She says Nassar often closed his eyes and would be out of breath while working on her. Unaware that she was being molested, and still believing she was receiving medical treatment that would help her, she attributed his behavior to his being tired or jetlagged from the trips to competitions around the world.

Now Raisman says she knows better. “I know people will say ‘Why didn’t she tell her mom? Why didn’t she say anything?’ But those questions are unfair,” she says. “The fact is I didn’t really know it was happening to me. What people don’t get is that he was a doctor. I would never have imagined that a doctor would abuse me or manipulate me so badly.”

After years of making excuses for what she calls Nassar’s “weird” behavior during the treatment sessions, in July 2015 — three years after winning three medals at her first Olympics — she says she finally realized that Nassar had been sexually abusing her. Raisman says she received a call from USA Gymnastics president Steve Penny, who asked her to speak to an investigator who would be coming to Raisman’s home. He wouldn’t tell her what the visit was about.

She says the investigator, who was hired by USA Gymnastics to address complaints about Nassar, asked if Raisman felt safe, and if anyone had been making her feel uncomfortable. Then she asked specifically about Nassar, about what he did, how he treated her, how many times, and whether other people were present during the treatment sessions. At first Raisman continued to make excuses for Nassar, admitting that she often felt uncomfortable but also adding that he was a doctor, and didn’t mean to make her uncomfortable, and frequently brought her and the other girls gifts.

When the investigator left, Raisman thought back on her encounters with Nassar and realized that the treatments had not been medical in nature but that she had been sexually abused. She declined to go into detail about the nature of the abuse. When Raisman called USA Gymnastics back the following day and asked to speak to the investigator again, she says she was told that the investigation was ongoing. She also received a text from an official asking her to stop talking about her experiences with Nassar, so as not to jeopardize the investigation. Requests for comment to Penny’s attorney were not immediately answered.

Raisman says that the culture of success at all costs, and the power that USA Gymnastics wields over the gymnasts and their families vying for coveted Olympic spots, can allow sexual abuse to go unchecked as victims feel that it’s easier and potentially beneficial to stay quiet.

Raisman says she now feels betrayed, by both Nassar, whom she trusted as a doctor, and by USA Gymnastics, whom she trusted not to put her in harm’s way.

Nassar, who was a licensed osteopath, was a volunteer at USA Gymnastics. Throughout her career, Raisman was told by the organization’s officials that Nassar was a talented doctor, one that the gymnasts were fortunate to work with. She trusted that advice, as did her parents. “When I went to a parents meeting, they would tell us your children are so lucky to have the best doctor, they are so lucky to work with Dr. Larry,” says Lynn Faber Raisman.

Nassar went out of his way to exploit that trust, according to Raisman and others who worked with him. He attended many of the elite training camps at the secluded Texas ranch run by the influential coaches Bela and Martha Karolyi, who led the U.S. Olympic team. The camp was invitation only, and a call to attend was considered a top honor for Olympic hopefuls. Once a month during the season, elite teams would gather at the ranch with their coaches and national trainers — but no family — for five days of intensive drills. The gymnasts lived in spartan dorms and their days consisted of little more than training, eating and sleeping. Cell service is spotty, so athletes barely communicated with their families during camp.

In that setting, Raisman says Nassar became their confidante and cheering squad, bestowing gifts and sweets, and much-needed encouragement and support. For young girls whose entire lives consisted of hours and hours of performing to impress others, Nassar seemed like an ally.

“He was always, always, always on my side,” says Raisman. “He was always that person who would stick up for me and make me feel like he had my back. The more I think about it, the more I realize how twisted he was, how he manipulated me to make me think that he had my back when he didn’t.”

Raisman says she is still processing her experience, and admits to being anxious about seeing male doctors. She has not yet retired from gymnastics, and has not ruled out trying to make a third Olympic team in Tokyo 2020. She hopes that her story, and those of others who have come forward, will change the way USA Gymnastics addresses reports of sexual abuse.

In response to Raisman’s claims, USA Gymnastics said in a statement, “We are appalled by the conduct of which Larry Nassar is accused, and we are very sorry that any athlete has been harmed during her or his gymnastics career. In the past year, Aly has become an advocate for many issues, and sharing her personal experience of abuse takes great courage. We are committed to doing what is right, and we want to work with Aly and all interested athletes to keep athletes safe.” The organization has adopted a Safe Sport Policy meant to prevent similar instances of abuse, and Steve Penny resigned as president in March 2017. Kerry Perry, a former sports marketing executive, was appointed the new president and CEO beginning Dec. 1.

Those decisions are a start, says Raisman, but she wants to see other steps, including the creation of a separate body independent of USA Gymnastics that is responsible for handling reports of sexual abuse. “One day when I have a daughter I want to put her in gymnastics,” she says. “I want to make the sport fun, and make it safe. I love the sport, but winning doesn’t make the abuse OK.”


Sports – TIME

ENTERTAINMENT DEAL UPDATE:

Chipotle’s stock hit after Jeremy Jordan says he got violently sick

Chipotle’s shares took a hit Monday after “Supergirl” star Jeremy Jordan said he got violently ill from eating at one of the chain’s burrito joints late last week. The stock tumbled as much as 6 percent to $ 263, and was recently off 1.6 percent at $ 275. The Broadway performer posted an account of his ordeal…
Business | New York Post

SPECIAL DISCOUNT UPDATE:

Bitcoin surges more than $1,000 after a painful slide

Bitcoin surged on Monday, recovering more than $ 1,000 after losing almost a third of its value in less than four days as traders bought back into the volatile cryptocurrency. Bitcoin tumbled as low as $ 5,555 on the Luxembourg-based Bitstamp exchange on Sunday, a slide of almost 30 percent from a record high just shy of…
Business | New York Post

SPECIAL DISCOUNT UPDATE:

Michael Bennett Stands for National Anthem on ‘Salute to Service’ Night

Seattle Seahawks defensive end Michael Bennett, who has been sitting during the national anthem this season to protest police brutality and social injustice, stood up in support of the military before a Thursday night game against the Arizona Cardinals, who were hosting their "Salute to Service" night.

It marks the second time Bennett has stood for the national anthem this season,

This article originally appeared on www.rollingstone.com: Michael Bennett Stands for National Anthem on ‘Salute to Service’ Night

Rolling Stone Latest Sports News

BEST DISCOUNT DEAL:

Great deals and discounts on popular styles from Men’s Clearance at Nike.com

After Aaron Hernandez, CTE Has Become the NFL’s Biggest Problem

On Thursday, Dr. Ann McKee, the Boston University neuropathologist who has diagnosed chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) in dozens of deceased NFL players, gave a slide presentation that left physicians in the audience gasping.

McKee showed that Aaron Hernandez, the former New England Patriots tight end, who was convicted of murder in 2015 and committed suicide in prison in April of this year, had levels of CTE — a degenerative brain disease associated with repeated impacts to the head — never seen in someone younger than 46 years old.

Hernandez was 27 when he died. Images of his brain left no doubt that he had a significant buildup of tau proteins (named after the Greek letter) that destroy brain tissue in the frontal lobe — the area of the brain that moderates behavior, judgment and decision making — and the hippocampus, which controls memory.

The NFL, the unquestioned king of American sports about a decade ago, is facing all sorts of problems this season. Ratings are down 5.5% through the first nine weeks of 2017, according to Nielsen.

President Trump has regularly chided the league for refusing to punish athletes who, in an effort to raise awareness of social injustices, choose not to stand during the national anthem. Some fans are boycotting the league because of the anthem controversy. Papa John’s, the pizza chain, is blaming the NFL’s failure to quell the anthem issue for lagging sales of its pies. Colin Kaepernick has meanwhile filed a collusion grievance against the league; Kaepernick, the ex-San Francisco 49ers quarterback who started the protest movement last year, remains unemployed while teams sign quarterbacks with far inferior performance metrics.

Then there’s the dizzying Ezekiel Elliott case, which has wormed its way through the court system, stealing even more attention from the games on the field. In August, the NFL suspended Elliott for six games due to an alleged domestic violence incident. Elliott has appealed the decision in court and has been able to stay on the field during the litigation; on Thursday, however, the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit terminated a temporary stay on the suspension.

Elliott will now sit out at least the next four games: he’ll return to court on Dec. 1. Cowboys owner Jerry Jones, aggrieved by Goodell’s punishment of his star running back, has reportedly threatened to sue the NFL over Goodell’s contract. He’s claiming that members of the NFL’s compensation committee misled owners about the number of votes needed to approve an extension for Goodell. (Jones was once one of Goodell’s biggest supporters. But Goodell wasn’t benching a marquee Cowboy in those days.)

As if the off-field activity wasn’t painful enough for the NFL, the on-field product hasn’t been all that compelling. Injuries have wiped out the seasons of a bevy of superstars, like New York Giants wide receiver Odell Beckham Jr., Houston Texans defensive end J.J. Watt, and Deshaun Watson, the Houston rookie quarterback who was tearing up the league before he tore a knee ligament in practice on Nov. 2. Aaron Rodgers broke his collarbone in October; he could return this season.

To be sure, some of these woes and squabbles largely serve as sideshows. But the Hernandez case can do much more damage to the NFL long-term. Football is now a public health issue; safety remains an existential threat to the game. Hernandez wasn’t some grizzled veteran offensive lineman who pounded heads on every play from scrimmage. He spent only three years in the NFL.

In her presentation, McKee offered one crucial caveat. She said she couldn’t “connect the dots” between Hernandez’s severe diagnosis and his violent behavior. She said Hernandez also had a genetic marker associated with brain diseases. Still, the results raised alarms. “We can’t take the pathology and explain the behavior,” McKee said. “But we can say collectively, in our collective experience, that individuals with CTE, and CTE of this severity, have difficulty with impulse control, decision-making, inhibition of impulses for aggression, emotional volatility, rage behaviors.”

The question on the minds of so many parents across the country — would you let your son play football? — just got much more difficult to answer. Or maybe not. Maybe now it’s a harder no.

 


Sports – TIME

ENTERTAINMENT DEAL UPDATE: