How Fenty Beauty Empowers Black Women

There’s a good chance you’ve heard about Fenty Beauty. After all, every girl around the block has!

Rihannas original cosmetic collection was released in September 2017 and since then it has changed the tide of the beauty industry.

More than RiRi’s popularity, the brand garnered attention for its inclusivity as it outsold all other brands by catering to women of all skin tones.The brand’s trademark product is the foundation the Pro Filt’r foundation that offers not ten or twenty shades of skin tones!

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But rather it breaks all boundaries and offers 40 different shades of foundation for the women who had previously been ostracized by the beauty market.T his ‘beauty for all’ motto has hit all the right chords in the consumers!

Why are African-American women feeling empowered by Fenty Beauty?

Now the men reading this may roll their eyes and think this is just makeup. However, we would like to tell you that it may be just makeup for you but for the average women of color, this opens doors to a whole new world. Women with deep tones have finally found a product that speaks to them.

Here are the many reasons why this product matters:

The Campaign

True to her word, RiRi showed the world that she is not ‘all talk’. The brand advertisement steered clear of whitewashing the models and presenting a diverse cast of brand ambassadors. We saw diverse beauties like Duckie Thot, Halima Aden, Slick Woods and Leomie Anderson leading the pack.

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This was the first time our women were represented on the front and center. Before now, a Black model was propped up in the side as an afterthought.

The Emotional Connect

Did you know girls were crying on the counters at Sephora? They had finally found their match!

Retailers may not have all the space for the ‘5o shades of beige’ on their shelves but the consumers definitely have a demand for it! The snide remarks from Sephora employees don’t matter when the brand is being showered with love from all over the world.
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Previously, many Black women with a deep skin tone used to be sent away from the counter. Few makeup brands sold a foundation that perfectly matched their skin. Moreover, those belonging to a mixed background or a different ethnicity were too at a loss for the perfect shade.

However, Fenty Beauty debunked this myth and ‘made a formula that worked for all skin tones’.

The Power

Cosmetics have always given women power. It is seen as a tool to enhance their features and beauty. Fenty Beauty gives our women the power to rock a ‘perfect skin’ with a range that doesn’t make them ‘ashy’.

Here’s to the ‘no makeup’ look we had all only dreamed of!

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Donald Trump Once Considered Pitting Black Against White On ‘The Apprentice’

Donald Trump’s questionable history with racism just added another chapter. After denying having used the N-word on The Apprentice, an old Howard Stern interview features Trump talking about pitting black contestants against white contestants on the show. How has Trump responded to his past racist comments?

Trump has denied ever using the N-word on The Apprentice. The White House Press Secretary, Sarah Huckabee Sanders, however, says that she is not positive that there is not a tape of Trump saying the word. Such a tape has not surfaced, but Trump’s interview with Stern certainly didn’t help the situation.

According to Entertainment Weekly, Trump discussed the racially charged idea during an interview with Stern in 2005. Trump told the radio host that somebody on The Apprentice thought it would be interesting to see nine black people compete with nine whites on the show. Trump was all for the idea because he thought he would handle it without being racially insensitive.

“And it would be nine blacks against nine white, all highly educated, very smart, strong, beautiful people, right?” Trump told Stern.

Stern’s co-host, Robin Quivers, quickly pointed out that Trump would probably “have a riot” if he went through with the idea. In response, Trump told her that it would be a ratings magnet and probably make The Apprentice the most viewed show on TV. Trump and Stern then talked about the skin tone of the people that would make up both sides of the competition.

Trump has not responded to the reports surrounding his interview with Stern. He did tweet about the N-word rumors and assured everyone that a tape of him saying the racial slur does not exist. Rumors of Trump saying the N-word gained ground after the release of Omarosa Manigault Newman’s new book, Unhinged.

In the memoir, Newman discussed her time working as a staffer for Trump and revealed that he used the N-word on multiple occasions. Newman never heard Trump say it, but several sources confirmed to her that he did.

In light of the reports, actor and comedian Tom Arnold has officially gone on the hunt for the missing tapes. Arnold has been an acquaintance with Donald Trump for the past 30 years and filmed his journey to find the controversial recording, called The Hunt for the Trump Tapes With Tom Arnold. Arnold is confident that the tape exists, though nobody has released anything to confirm.

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Little Known Black History Fact: Georg Olden

Graphic designer Georg Olden broke a race barrier in the art world on this day in 1963. The award-winning artist became the first Black designer of a postal stamp, which celebrated the 100th anniversary of the Emancipation Proclamation.

Olden was born November 13, 1920 in Birmingham, Ala., and attended Dunbar High School in Washington. D.C. He then went on to Virginia State College, dropping out just after the Pearl Harbor attack. He joined the Office of Strategic Services, the organization that precedes the CIA, as a designer, working under a colonel who would later become vice president of CBS’ television division. The colonel brought Olden on and the union was fruitful.

Eventually, Olden, one of the few Black people working in television, lead his own staff but moved on in the early ’60’s. His push for innovation in design work earned him several awards, including being a seven-time winner of the Clio Award, which he designed, and a two-time winner of the Art Director’s Club of New York Award.

The five-cent stamp Olden designed featured a broken Black chain on a blue background with white borders. That same year, Olden joined the firm of McCann Erickson, which let him go in 1970, citing economic downturn. Olden suspected otherwise. In the ’70’s, Olden brought a class-action lawsuit against McCann and just as he was making headway with the case, a live-in girlfriend shot him dead in February 1975.

The girlfriend was later acquitted of the charges. Olden was 54.

Olden is the father of author Marc Olden and Georg Olden Jr., a former child actor and real estate professional.

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Kat Graham On Playing The First Black April O’Neil In ‘Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles’ Reboot

(Photo Credit: PR Photos) 

Nickelodeon has ordered a 26-episode second season of Rise of the Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, and the announcement came ahead of the series premiere. The network made the announcement during Viacom’s presentation at TCA last month.

The animated series is set to debut September 17, 2018, but fans were treated with a sneak preview on July 20, when the first 5 episodes of the series were released online the same day.

Ant Ward and Andy Suriano serve as EP’s on this re-imagined series, which will have the Turtles go on new adventures as they seek to unlock the mystical secrets of New York City.

The cast includes Ben Schwartz, Omar Benson Miller, Josh Brener, Brandon Mychal Smith, Eric Bauza, John Cena and Vampire Diaries star Kat Graham voices April O’Neil — a human friend of the Ninja Turtles.

This series’ version of April will be the first-ever black depiction. Her early appearance in the comics is a Caucasian Irish-American red-haired woman.

“They decided to go with an African-American actress and African-American character. I knew that being part of Ninja Turtles was going to be a big deal, but I had no idea the weight of that decision and how important it would be because when I was growing up, there were no young Black cartoon characters — female, anyways — that were in this position,” said Graham during TCA.

Adding, “By the time there were, I was a little older; too much older to appreciate it. My take on this character and what I hope to bring to this character is not just what comes with being a young Black girl, but the fierceness, the being able to hang with the boys, the playfulness, the strength. I want young girls to see this and see that there’s a brown cartoon character that they can relate to, that they can say, “Well, April O’Neil did it, so I can do it too!” If you have a daughter, I want her to watch it and see that she relates to it. So that’s my dream for this character and that’s what I see for her.”

Voiceover actor Robert Paulsen, whose roles include Raphael and Donatello from the 1987 cartoon and 2012 cartoon respectively of Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, serves as voice director for this TV series.

“He’s incredible,” Graham said. “He’s done so many iconic characters, but he has such a demeanor about him and he’s really coached us. When we were doing the first couple episodes, we’re trying to figure out the character. We’re trying to figure out the groove, the rhythm of all that,” she explained.

“And he really — especially for me — he guided me into a really great place for this character. He’s just so humble and so — he’s just a really great person. I know that might sound a little vague but I think that he’s just — I can keep going on and on about Rob Paulsen,” she added.

Besides voice directing, Paulsen will also be providing voice work on the project, which Suriano described as “an exciting cartoon for today’s generation.”

“There’s certain inherent qualities of the Turtle franchise that have been so resilient and popular. I mean it’s 34 years old, from the ’80s comic books, to the cartoons, and all the iterations. So we — Ant and myself, we looked at it and we said what we liked about all of it, what we thought it worked from all of it. We kind of played with it like a chemistry set and distilled the elements that we thought would be, and an exciting cartoon for today’s generation.”

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New Black Political Force Raises $3.5 Million, Prepares for Midterm Election Battles

A new political force has emerged that may help advance the economic and wealth-building status of African Americans. The Black Economic Alliance, an organization of leading African American entrepreneurs and executives, announced today that it has already raised $ 3.5 million to impact highly-competitive gubernatorial, U.S. Senate, and House races in states and districts, respectively, with sizable black populations and where such turnout during the midterm election could prove decisive.

During a press briefing via conference call in which BLACK ENTERPRISE joined other members of the national media, the group also revealed endorsements for a group of Democratic gubernatorial candidates in heated, high-profile campaigns: Stacey Abrams, former Minority Leader of the Georgia House of Representatives seeking to become chief executive of that state; Ben Jealous, a former NAACP CEO and tech financier running for the Maryland statehouse; and Richard Cordray, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau director during the Obama administration who is seeking to lead Ohio. The group also stated that it will back U.S. Senator and 2016 vice presidential candidate Tim Kaine. BEC members say that it will continue raising funds up until the midterms to support congressional candidates in another 10 to 12 contests.

Midterm Election Strategy: Push Economic Agenda 

The BEC came together to use their collective power and wealth to elect representatives who will vigorously push an economic agenda for African Americans, which as a group continues to lag behind their counterparts in homeownership, wages, and access to capital for business expansion despite a reportedly robust economy. Operating under the banner “Work, Wages and Wealth for Black Americans,” the organization has a board that includes the nation’s most influential business people, including co-chair Tony Coles, chairman and CEO of biotech firm Yumanity Therapeutics; co-chair Charles Phillips, CEO of tech company Infor Inc. and one of BE’s Most Powerful Executives; Bruce Gordon, a former NAACP head and ex-Verizon senior executive; and Marva Smalls, Global Head of Inclusion Strategy for Viacom who can be found of BE’s top diversity executives roster, among others.

Said Coles during the press briefing: “We’re in a unique position to understand both the priorities of the boardroom and far-reaching consequences of existing economic policies that disproportionately exclude black Americans from accessing good-paying jobs and benefiting from programs that help build wealth in our communities. We want to bridge the gap between the political candidates and the people most impacted by their policies, so we can increase work, wages, and wealth for black people in this country.”

“Black communities in America continue to suffer from institutionalized economic disparities. With 6.7 million unfilled jobs in this country, it’s more important than ever that we invest in black workers and businesses to make the economy work better for everyone,” said Akunna Cook, BEC’s executive director. “But the only way we get there is with a government that is accountable and responsive to the needs of the nation’s black communities when it comes to jobs, pay, and economic opportunity.”

Black-Owned Businesses Provide Financial Muscle 

There have been other instances when prominent African American business owners have come together to form political action committees. For example, some 20 years ago BLACK ENTERPRISE Publisher Earl G. Graves Sr. brought together CEOs of some of the nation’s largest black-owned businesses to use their financial muscle to create a PAC to support politicians that would advocate for a larger slice of public contracts and jobs for minorities as well as counter fervent anti-affirmative action measures pushed by conservatives at the time.

At yesterday’s press briefing, Jealous, Abrams, and Cordray told BEC officials that they would tackle today’s issues that hamper the economic progress of people of color. For instance, Jealous, a partner with Kapor Capital, a venture fund that backs diverse startups, maintains that “as a civil rights leader and businessman, I know that building an inclusive economy through broad-based reforms will ensure all working people can provide their families with a better future.” In a tough, contentious battle against Gov. Larry Hogan, an incumbent with a huge war chest, Jealous fully embraces BEC’s backing to gain campaign financing and support voter outreach.

Abrams, who has garnered much national attention and candidly spoken of her roughly $ 170,000 in credit card and student debt—which she says has helped her identify with a multi-generational constituency that has faced the same struggles of caring for elderly parents and trying to pay off educational expenses—says she’ll use BEC’s support to promote her message to “work to strengthen our economy of all working people across Georgia, but there is no question it will take direct engagement and a strong vision for addressing historic imbalances that have hurt our black communities in particular.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The post New Black Political Force Raises $ 3.5 Million, Prepares for Midterm Election Battles appeared first on Black Enterprise.

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The problem with saying “women of color” when we’re specifically discussing Black women

The problem with saying “women of color” when we’re specifically discussing Black women


The problem with saying “women of color” when we’re specifically discussing Black women

A few months ago, I was confronted on Twitter about a piece that I wrote last year. It was a feature that I’d pitched, and it was framed as a discussion on how women of color inspire beauty trends.

But the article was centered around Black women, and Black women only.

Since then, I’ve seen how many friends and fellow writers point out the problem of using the term “woman of color” instead of “Black” if you are talking about Black women. Publications and individual people will use the phrases interchangeably—but they aren’t synonyms. When you say “woman of color” and actually mean “Black woman,” you’re not only being misleading—you’re essentially erasing (and likely offending) an entire demographic.

Representation is of major importance in media and writing, and saying exactly what you mean is just as important. When it comes to the headline for that piece, it was definitely my fault and I had to take responsibility. I understood that I wasn’t being personally attacked and reflected on my word choice.

I meditated on why, as a Black woman, I thought I had to use “women of color” in the first place.

I thought back to writing that article pitch. I realized I’d felt like the idea wouldn’t have been approved had I said I wanted to write a piece only about Black women. It felt like a risk that I literally could not afford as a freelance writer.

I thought back to one of the last job interviews I went on. It was for a staff writing position (on an all white team). I expressed that the site needed more Black content, and while I didn’t land the gig, I did get to pitch ideas focused on Black culture. The fact that I wasn’t hired full-time made me think that they only wanted those kinds of topics addressed in small increments. I figured that they preferred to talk about potentially viral Black stories. I couldn’t shake the notion that they were put off by my emphasis on Blackness and Black femme issues in my job interview.

Maybe if I’d said the site needed “content for women of color,” then it would have gone differently.

I’m also reminded of the full time administrative position I once held. Colleagues tiptoed around the word “Black” during the entire time I worked there. My skill as a writer was known in the office, and I was asked to pitch and write pieces “about diversity.” I was never specifically asked to highlight Black women or their hard work, but was essentially asked to be a spokesperson for all women who aren’t white.

This showed me that Black women and women of color are often clumped together by white people, and my coworkers saw no problem with that.

In an effort to stay low and take care of myself financially, I didn’t speak out. I even wrote a few pieces.

A Black woman protests in St. Louis following the police shooting of Michael Brown
Michael B. Thomas/ Getty Images

Though Black women and women of color are all groups who have historically been excluded from “feminist” progress, Black women have different experiences than other women of color. For example, according to Bustle in 2017, Black women are killed more frequently than any other race in America. Black women in America are most likely to die while giving birth because of racism in the medical field. Black women also have to deal with erasure from movements that they started, specifically people like Marsha P. Johnson in the Stonewall Riots.

Black women are not always given the chance to express the same emotional depth as other women of color. I’m thinking specifically about anger. When a Black woman expresses her anger, she is often dismissed as an “angry Black woman.” A Latina woman who expresses her anger will be reduced to the “feisty or spicy Latina.”

Both stereotypes are damaging, but I mention them to show that we experience racism differently: One of these women is demonized because of her anger.

There is also a metric ton of hatred towards Black women in other non-white communities—from Asian women donning Blackface, to the messy Twitter history of R&B singer Sabrina Claudio, to the treatment of Afro-Latina Amara La Negra on Love & Hip Hop, to the exclusion of undocumented Black immigrants in many immigrant spaces. If Black women are not always welcomed and supported by other communities of color,  then it’s completely logical why many Black women would desire to be addressed directly.

***

Until that day on Twitter, I hadn’t explicitly realized how my personal encounters unquestionably shaped how I approached my writing about Black women. I’m not excusing myself, but these are glimpses into how some people think Black women’s narratives will fare in the media.

Using “women of color” terminology instead of saying “Black” shows how Black women and our unique experiences are minimized.

People are so caught up in wanting to “be inclusive” that they don’t realize they are erasing people. Simply put, woman of color and Black mean different things—and moving forward we should be hyperaware of the fact that they can’t be used interchangeably.

The post The problem with saying “women of color” when we’re specifically discussing Black women appeared first on HelloGiggles.

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The evolution of black representation in film

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Meet the Author Advocating for More Black Stay-At-Home Dads

Let’s face it, there are many social constructs changing right now, but a stay-at-home dad is not one of them. However, Jonathan Oliver and his wife, a general cardiologist, decided very early on they would make their own relationship rules.

“We knew that given her career path she would want to work full time and practice medicine so I would be the one to stay home and raise our children,” said Oliver. “Surprisingly, it wasn’t a major decision or something we had to think about for a prolonged amount of time. It just made sense. We now have two beautiful daughters, Journey, 3, and Justice, 3 months. I want to change the stereotype that black men are deadbeat dads. Truthfully, there are a lot of black males who are in their families and in their communities doing the exact same thing that I’m doing. But it’s easier for media to portray the stereotype instead of acknowledging the growth and the positive impact that black men make daily.”

Now, through Oliver’s latest book “Joy In The Journey: 1st Year Chronicles From A Stay At Home Dad,” and coaching practice, Higher Enlightenment, he’s aiming to change the conversation about gender roles and uplift men, especially black men, to become more of their authentic selves. “I want to give all stay-at-home parents, particularly fathers, the information, confidence, and encouragement to fully engage in the parenting process, their marriages, and their communities. I also want people to realize there is a shift occurring and more men are transitioning to the homemaker role than ever before. We as men are more than capable and are wanting and willing to raise our children with the support and encouragement of other parents.”

Below, he details his journey from feeling isolated as a stay-at-home dad to authoring a book and creating a space for community and connection for black men.

Jonathan Oliver

(Photo credit: Jonathan Oliver.com)

Stay-at-home dads face a lot of stereotypes—many of them are negative. What stereotypes are you trying to change?

One stereotype is that men want to be alone. It’s generally lonely being a stay-at-home parent, but it’s even lonelier when you are a male. Now, add being a black male on top of that and now it’s extremely lonely. So I want to connect with other parents, not only for the social skills and development of my daughter but also to have a conversation with an adult who is experiencing what I’m experiencing as a parent.

Another thing people get wrong is that men can’t stay at home or they don’t want to stay at home and raise their children. I’ve spoken with many fathers that wish they could stay home and take care of their child. I have met many people that have questioned if I know what I’m doing. Even when we shared it with our family that we were having our first child, the first question was who is going to take care of the baby? My wife told them it would be me and they looked incredulous because I was a man.

What was the aha moment that inspired you to write the book?

I felt very lonely as a stay-at-home dad. Plus, we moved shortly after the birth of our first daughter to a new city where we knew no one. So to stay connected to myself and to my thoughts and to stay purposeful, I started writing a weekly column about my “adventures” as a stay-at-home dad. It also gave me the ability to give back to other fathers who may be in my shoes. After the first year, I had written 52 columns so I decided to combine those columns into a book and share my experience and what I had learned.

(Jonathan Oliver)

During your first year as a stay-at-home dad, what were you the most surprised to learn about yourself?

I was surprised that I could experience postpartum depression. My life before children consisted of a lot of travel and interacting with thousands of people in a week. So to go from always moving and interacting with different people to being at home alone with an infant that can’t speak was very difficult for me. Add in that I knew no one in our new city, and no one looked like me or was doing what I was doing was very isolating and led me to be depressed.

What’s your favorite chapter and why?

Chapter one: A New Frontier. I love that chapter because it discusses the concept of the importance of being a great husband before focusing on being a great father. Before I have an imaginary tea party or play ball with my daughter, it’s important for her to see that I love her mother. Once my daughter knows and feels, and senses that her mother is loved by her father she now knows she is in a safe environment and this allows her to grow and thrive. Now that she is almost 3, it’s such a joy to see her want to join in a hug when she sees me hugging and kissing her mother. She mimics my love for her mother. Realizing this took away the pressure of being a “perfect parent” and helped me to understand that my first job is to be a good husband to my wife.

The post Meet the Author Advocating for More Black Stay-At-Home Dads appeared first on Black Enterprise.

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Interview: ‘The Predator’ Director Shane Black Talks Aliens, Easter Eggs and the Future of the Franchise

Interview: 'The Predator' Director Shane Black Talks Aliens, Easter Eggs and the Future of the Franchise

 

For 30 years, moviegoers have equally feared and cheered an alien creature known only as the Predator. He stalks, hunts and kills humans for sport, and for the past three decades we've watched the Predator rise to become one of the most recognizable and beloved villains in all of popular culture. On September 14, The Predator (tickets on sale now) reunites audiences with their favorite alien menace, this time from a director very familiar to the series: Shane Black (Iron Man 3,…

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45 GREAT MOMENTS IN BLACK BUSINESS – No. 6: Maynard Jackson Becomes Atlanta’s First Black Mayor

BLACK ENTERPRISE celebrates the 45th anniversary of its roster of the nation’s most successful black businesses—The BE 100s. To commemorate the significance of this collective’s widespread impact on black business and economic development as well as American industry over four decades, we have presented 45 milestone moments. As part of this tribute, we continue our yearlong countdown.  

Maynard Jackson Becomes a Disrupter as Atlanta’s First Black Mayor 

1974: Atlanta Mayor Maynard Jackson establishes first Minority Business Enterprise (MBE) program, which “sets aside” a percentage of government contracts for minority businesses and encourages major corporations to follow suit. That act creates legions of African American millionaires and expands scores of BE 100s companies, including H.J. Russell & Co., the nation’s largest black construction firm. Jackson would eventually launch two BE 100s companies: T.G.I Friday’s franchisee Jackmont Hospitality and investment bank Jackson Securities.

Confronting the ‘Old Boy’s Network’ 

maynard jackson

(Black Enterprise Magazine, November 1975)

Jackson’s plan surfaced when he informed city leaders he was proceeding with the expansion of the then-named Hartsfield Airport. He shook up Atlanta’s old boy’s network with this: 25% of all contracts were allotted for minority firms. That those firms could land a big chunk of the project first valued at $ 450 million.

But some influential men in the South revolted, claiming the act was illegal. They urged the governor and state legislators to seize control of the airport expansion project from the Jackson regime. Yet Jackson did not flinch, reportedly stating: “We simply won’t build [the airport] if you don’t agree to this. You can have 75% of the project or you can have 100% of nothing. What is your choice?”

After a two-year battle, both sides agreed to a re-adjusted set-aside plan: a participation stake of 20% to 25% for minority-owned firms. Jackson action’s also set a benchmark for affirmative action programs nationally, including in big cities with large black populations.

In Atlanta, Jackson boosted the portion of contracts to minorities from under 1% in 1973 to roughly 39% five years later. Jackson’s efforts empowered the black middle-class, helped create many black millionaires and produce many BE 100s companies. Among them: H. J. Russell & Co., the nation’s largest black construction firm and No. 14 on the 2018 Top 100 list with $ 253 million in revenue.

“Jackson was like Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. when it came to ensuring African Americans got a chance to participate in the nation’s economic marketplace,” the late Herman Russell, chairman/CEO of the construction company, told Black Enterprise in 2009.

Russell added that his then $ 300 million company would not have been that size if not for Jackson’s policy. Russell added Jackson helped spur black development not only in Atlanta, but also nationally in cities including Chicago, Detroit, Los Angeles, and Boston.

Another victory for minority firms under Jackson’s watch came when he helped bring the 1990 Olympics to Atlanta. For instance, $ 10.7 million went to minority suppliers, and over 60% of the minority firms were black. Some BE 100 firms tasted the gold, including construction firms H.J. Russell and C.D. Moody, part of the team that won the $ 209 million Olympic Stadium project.

maynard jackson

Mayor Jackson meeting with the International Olympic Committee. (Black Enterprise Magazine, January 1991)

Illustrating his acumen in business, Jackson in 1987 started Jackson Securities L.L.C. It once was (No. 7 on the BE INVESTMENT BANKS list with $ 1.466 billion in senior/co-senior managed issues). In 1994, Jackson, and his daughter, Brooke Jackson Edmond, and food industry veteran Daniel Halpern, launched Jackmont Hospitality Inc., “He had a passion for being in business with his daughter. It was something he really cared about and enjoyed,” Jackmont President Halpern stated.

Based in Atlanta, Jackmont is a food-service management company and one of the fastest growing TGI Friday’s franchisees. It was No. 19 on the 2018 Top 100s list with $ 200 million in revenue.

In 2003, the same year Jackson died, one of the world’s busiest airports was renamed Hartsfield-Jackson Atlanta International Airport as a tribute to him.

The post 45 GREAT MOMENTS IN BLACK BUSINESS – No. 6: Maynard Jackson Becomes Atlanta’s First Black Mayor appeared first on Black Enterprise.

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KKK grand wizard admits to shooting gun at black protester

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Exclusive: Shane Black Wants To Make a Sequel to ‘The Nice Guys’

Exclusive: Shane Black Wants To Make a Sequel to 'The Nice Guys'

Ever since his 1987 script for Lethal Weapon helped redefine the buddy-cop genre, Shane Black has carved out a name for himself as a man who knows how to make a great team-up movie. From Lethal Weapon to The Last Boy Scout to Kiss Kiss Bang Bang and The Nice Guys, Black has spent three decades creating some of the more memorable buddy movies by featuring unique characters tasked with unraveling a deliciously entertaining mystery.

In 2016's The Nice Guys, Ryan Gosling and…

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Breakthrough Research Shows Black Women Need More Vitamin D

You may have seen our last post on vitamin D. We talked about how many women may not be getting enough. Researchers have called vitamin D deficiency a “pandemic,” stating that a lack of sun exposure (which is required for the body to make vitamin D) as well as low …

The post Breakthrough Research Shows Black Women Need More Vitamin D appeared first on Women's Health.

Women’s Health

BEST DEAL UPDATE:

Black cop feels Blue over injustice in the system

Who polices the police?

Matthew Horace asks this in “The Black and the Blue,” his book about America’s justice system, or, maybe, if you’re an African-American man, the injustice system.

If you’re black, Horace writes, you run a far greater risk of being stopped by police officers than a white…

Life Style – New York Daily News

FASHION DEAL UPDATE:

Little Known Black History Fact: Alfred Sam

Alfred Sam was a mysterious figure from West Africa who arrived in America to spearhead what became a failed back-to-Africa movement in 1914. Although he claimed to be a chief from a Gold Coast royal lineage, Sam, was twice accused of fraud and many who invested into his venture lost everything.

Sam was born in the West Akim district of what is now known as Ghana some time in 1880. He was a trader of rubber and other goods, and arrived to America around 1914 to preach the virtues of African-Americans returning to their “ancestral land” and leading the charge. Sam was accused of fraud twice in his time by the United States and United Kingdom and was cleared each time.

His quest to lead the emigration of American Blacks back to Africa came with the promise of fertile lands and riches, and encouraged them to offer a $ 25 investment in his Akim Trading Company – a steep cost for many poor Black residents at the time. Because his promises were that enticing, many of the residents sold all of their possessions just to join in the quest.

By August 1914 and after months of planning, 60 Black men and women set sail on the S.S. Liberia from Galveston, Texas en route to West Africa. Along the way, the ship was detained in Barbados and re-routed to Sierra Leone, a costly diversion that led to many passengers on the ship to exhaust their food and supplies. Further, some passengers succumbed to diseases such as malaria in the long trek.

In 1915, the Liberia landed in Saltpond and the passengers were initially welcomed but soon after, it became clear that Sam’s promises of open land were false. African rulers at the time were not keen to let foreigners inhabit their lands so many found their way back to America while others spread across Liberia and other African nations.

Sam, who died sometime in the ’30’s, reportedly returned to trading and became a notable cocoa buyer but not much of his life after the failed emigration is readily known.

 

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Black America Web

ENTERTAINMENT UPDATE:

Why This Founder Created A Digital Mental Health Platform For Black Men

When Public Health advocate Kevin Dedner was looking for a therapist to treat his depression, he found the process to be exhausting. “I almost gave up, but a friend recommended a therapist who helped me get my life back on track,” said Dedner. This experience was one of several occurrences that inspired him to add mental health and wellness for black men to his life’s mission.

Throughout Dedner’s career in public health, he’s spearheaded policy and system changes in areas such as HIV/AIDS, childhood obesity, and tobacco control. Now, with the launch of Henry Health, Dedner, along with a diverse group of black leaders are on a mission to improve access to mental health for black men and increase the life expectancy of black men by 10 years within the next 25 years. Recently, Henry Health was accepted into the Startup Health accelerator program. Dedner discusses his latest initiative in an interview.

Black Enterprise: Why do you think black men need an exclusive space?

Kevin Dedner: I believe black men are having a unique experience in this country. And, while I don’t believe that you have to be black to treat black people, I do believe you have to be culturally sensitive and competent. It’s naive to think that the experiences that black men have just on a normal day are good for our emotional and mental health. From being accused of plagiarism in college because the professor couldn’t imagine that I could write to being pulled over by the police multiple times as a teenager and an adult, these are examples of what every black man experiences in daily life. These experiences can be traumatic and can have a negative impact on our emotional well-being, physical health, and ultimately—in some cases—our life expectancy once compiled.

How does Henry Health work?  

We have plans to launch the app this September in the Washington, DC metro area. Men will be able to download our app or sign-in on our platform. From there, they will take an assessment. Paying subscribers will be paired with a therapist post-assessment. Our digital app and platform will not only offer culturally sensitive teletherapy to black men, but we also recognize that health outcomes are influenced by many factors including diet, physical activity, setting reasonable goals, and managing stress. All users—subscribers and non-subscribers—will have access to self-care support, tools that support them in taking better care of themselves. We have not finalized our pricing. We feel confident that investors will respond in a way that will enable us to scale very quickly.

black men

(Henry Health)

Can you share three specific ways you hope Henry Health will change the face of mental health and wellness for African American men?

  • Increase the life expectancy of black men by 10 years within the next 25 years. Our approach to care includes a focus on self-care support and mental health services. We look at this through the lens of five stressors for black men: money and finances, race and racism, jobs and career, relationships and family, and health and illness. Helping them make better decisions in these areas and helping them to develop coping skills will have a great impact.
  • Lead the culture shift conversation around accessing mental health services in the African American community. We are beginning to see celebrities speak publicly about their struggles with mental health issues. For example, Jay-Z has talked about how therapy had helped him. Dwayne the Rock Johnson has talked about his challenges with depression. The next step is an offering of culturally-sensitive services for the community. Our digital campaign, #ReclaimOurStrength in partnership with Alpha Phi Alpha Fraternity Inc. is an example of how we can take a leadership role in facilitating the conversation.
  • Make culturally-sensitive services accessible. Less than 3% of the therapists in the country are people of color so we can’t possibly produce African American therapists fast enough to fill the void. Our intention is to make sure therapists regardless of their color are culturally-sensitive and competent to meet the needs of black men. It doesn’t matter where the men or the therapists live.

The post Why This Founder Created A Digital Mental Health Platform For Black Men appeared first on Black Enterprise.

Lifestyle | Black Enterprise

EMPLOYMENT SEARCH UPDATE:

Today We Recognize Black Women’s Equal Pay Day Because Wage Discrimination is Real

By now, most of us are aware that women earn about 80 cents to every dollar made by a man. But that commonly quoted stat is misleading. In actuality, that ratio is true for white women. Black women, on the other hand, are paid roughly 63 cents on the dollar earned by a white man. As a result, a black woman will have to work 23 years longer than her male counterpart in order to earn the same salary. And, to make matters worse, there is a striking lack of awareness around the pay gap that black women face. According to research data, one in three Americans is not aware of the pay gap between black women and white men, while half of the country is not aware that black women are paid on average 21% less than white women.

This harsh reality underscores the importance of the recognition of Aug. 7 as Black Women’s Equal Pay Day. It’s also important to dispel gender and racial inequality myths, like the argument that the pay gap is caused by black women’s lack of education or choice to accept low-paying jobs. In reality, studies show that black women earn less than white men at every level of education and even when they work in the same occupation.

To raise awareness of the pay gap and its negative effect on black women and families, LeanIn.Org is launching #38PercentCounts to emphasize the fact that black women are paid 38% less than white men. In partnership with Adidas, Lyft, P&G, and Reebok, LeanIn.Org is highlighting the unfairness of this pay gap and the double discrimination that holds black women back.

“The pay gap facing black women is an urgent problem,” said Sheryl Sandberg, COO of Facebook and founder of LeanIn.Org, in a statement. “It has huge financial implications for millions of families. And it signals something deeply wrong in our economy. We need to address the gender and racial inequalities that give rise to this imbalance—and create workplaces where everyone’s labor is valued, everyone is treated with respect, and everyone has an equal shot at success.”

Here are key findings from the 2018 Black Women’s Equal Pay Survey conducted by LeanIn.Org and SurveyMonkey, in partnership with the National Urban League.

 

  • On average, black women are paid 38% less than white men, which amounts to almost $ 870,000 lost over the course of a typical career.

 

  • People are overly optimistic about the state of black women. About half of white men think obstacles to advancement for black women are gone, but only 14% of black women agree.

 

  • Nearly 70% of people who are not black think that racism, sexism or both are uncommon in their company—yet 64% of black women say they’ve experienced discrimination at work.

 

  • When people know there’s a pay gap, they think it’s unfair. When presented with information that black women on average are paid 38% less than white men, 72% of Americans think it’s not fair.

 

  • On average, back women are paid 21% less than white women. Yet 50% of Americans—as well as 45% of hiring managers—think black women and white women are paid equally.

 

  • 77% of working Americans think no gap exists between black and white women in their own organizations.

The post Today We Recognize Black Women’s Equal Pay Day Because Wage Discrimination is Real appeared first on Black Enterprise.

Career | Black Enterprise

EMPLOYMENT UPDATE:

This Author’s Advice for Black Men and Depression: Turn Your Pain into Purpose

Tsanonda Edwards is the author of a book that deals with black men and depression, The extraORDINARY Mr. Nobody: A Beginner’s Guide to Self-Healing, and co-founder of Above It All, a mental-health organization that offers personal, professional and psychiatric rehabilitation programs for children and parents. Although Edwards has a Masters in Human Services, it’s his personal story of battling depression and anxiety that has enabled him to connect authentically with youth and create a blueprint for personal and professional success. Edwards explains why black men face greater mental health challenges and the few steps they can take to turn pain into purpose.

Black Enterprise: Your father committed suicide at a young age and you battled anxiety and depression. When did you realize you could turn this pain into purpose? What are the first steps you took to share your story?

Edwards: I started realizing I could make the pain to purpose transition in college at Morgan State University. I not only found my voice as a writer, but I was also able to hone my abilities as a listener. By listening to my friends in a non-judgmental and empathetic way and then being unafraid to offer my opinion to those who would ask allowed me to see the power in empathy and how that led to healing. The journal entries, years, and numerous stop-and-starts later, my book was born.

If I had to say one event or moment that served as a next-level catalyst for me to share my story, I would have to say my therapy sessions (my therapist Akiami McCoy is incredible!). She did three things that made the book happen: She told me that I wasn’t crazy, she told me that my testimony had power, and then she told me how to publish my book. The biggest power in that is that I actually spoke to a therapist, which is not the most common route for black people, especially black men. It was a 10-year process and I’m thrilled to have it completed.

What holds black men back from sharing their story and seeking treatment?

The first is constantly being told “get over it,” “bounce back,” “no days off,” “stop acting like a woman,” etc. While it’s important to be resilient as our people are known for it (men and women both!), we have to find ways to allow people to come to terms with mental obstacles and embrace ways to cope with them without being told they don’t exist and/or forget about them.

The second thing is fear. Black men have trouble simply going to the doctor. While I do believe we’re actually getting better at identifying issues and seeking help for physical conditions, the stigma surrounding mental health is a real one and it will definitely take time and effort to loosen its stranglehold on the minds of my brothers.

When it comes to supporting men who are battling depression and anxiety, what do you believe is the most underestimated tactic?

Building a true support system. Friends, family, members of your spiritual community, therapists, etc. Again, as men, we’re still expected to be stalwarts and leaders at home, at work, and in the community and rightly so, but depression, anxiety and the like are seen as weaknesses as opposed to mental health barriers that can be embraced and overcome. This often leads men to become “pseudo-actors,” never letting anyone see them sweat. So when you have a true support system that understands the issues you face and are ready to reinforce the efforts we take personally to be our best selves, it speeds up progress.  Yes, it starts with you, but a true support system is priceless.

What is your favorite chapter of your book? 

Chapter 3, ‘A Product of Divorce and Depression.’ I talk about my father’s suicide and his battle with bipolar disorder/manic depression. This chapter pushed me to be open and honest about my own battles with depression. One of my ultimate goals with the book is to let others know that you can lead a happy, successful life despite the mental health issues you face and despite those who are uncomfortable with others having or talking about these issues. Yes, any struggle is a part of you, but it doesn’t define you.

What are three key messages you want people to take away from the book?

  • You are not alone.
  • Your story is valuable. Allow it to be heard and potentially save someone’s life.
  • You’re your own advocate when it comes to personal healing, so be your absolute best you and don’t let others dictate what that looks like.

The post This Author’s Advice for Black Men and Depression: Turn Your Pain into Purpose appeared first on Black Enterprise.

Lifestyle | Black Enterprise

BEAUTY DEAL UPDATE:

Study: Black Women Have the Highest Amount of Student Loan Debt

It can already be challenging in a world where the gender wage gap still exists for college-educated women, but there’s yet another financial disparity in student loan debt that exists for black women.

Updated research from the American Association of University Women (AAUW) indicates that women hold two-thirds ($ 890 billion) of the country’s $ 1.4-trillion student debt, and black women are graduating with at least $ 30,400 in debt—compared with $ 22,000 for their white counterparts.

The research further shows that the “student loan gender gap has nearly doubled in the past four years, and women now graduate with an average of $ 2,700 more debt than men when earning a bachelor’s degree.”

The data, updated via the 2015-16 National Postsecondary Student Aid Study, also shows that women makeup 56% of enrolled college students but are grappling with a whopping 65% of outstanding student loan debt.

“Student debt levels have reached an all-time high, with women carrying a bigger burden of debt than men,” Kim Churches, CEO of AAUW, said in a news release. “This debt is an albatross for many women as they embark on careers and work to support their households and families. And, it only gets worse over time when coupled with the gender pay gap.”

Women were found to take two years longer than men to repay their student loans, and the reason is attributed, in part, to the gender wage gap. College-educated women who work full time make, on average, 25% less than their male counterparts who hold degrees, leaving women with less income to put aside to pay off loan debt. Black women, specifically, make less than even their white female counterparts, earning $ 0.63 for every dollar earned by white men, compared with $ 0.79 for white women, according to reports.

“The imbalances compound. Higher student debt, lower pay, child- and family-care costs, and other factors all add up to leave women at a deficit as they work to maintain financial security,” Churches added in the news release. “With women leading more households today, enough is enough. Solutions are needed now.”

The AAUW offers several recommendations for reducing the student loan gender gap, including the support of more income-driven repayment options and protecting projects like Public Service Loan Forgiveness, providing services such as child care at universities, and increasing state and federal funding for public higher-education institutions.

“With the Higher Education Act, Congress has the opportunity to set today’s students up for success—and that includes making sure they don’t graduate with crippling debt,” Deborah J. Vagins, senior vice president of public policy and research at AAUW, said in the release. “We need to support policies that make higher education accessible and affordable for all students, provide support and protection for student borrowers, and help eliminate the gender and race gaps in student loans.”

The post Study: Black Women Have the Highest Amount of Student Loan Debt appeared first on Black Enterprise.

Money | Black Enterprise

FASHION DEAL UPDATE:

Shop select Free People sale and clearance items at Bloomingdales.com!

Black cop feels Blue over injustice in the system

Who polices the police?

Matthew Horace asks this in “The Black and the Blue,” his book about America’s justice system, or, maybe, if you’re an African-American man, the injustice system.

If you’re black, Horace writes, you run a far greater risk of being stopped by police officers than a white…

Life Style – New York Daily News

EMPLOYMENT SEARCH UPDATE:

Cops Called On Black Student Eating Lunch

 

Smith college is investigating after police were called on a black student who was eating lunch in a common room.

“This shouldn’t happen to anyone at all,” Oumou Kanoute said through tears to CBS Boston.

Kanoute is a rising sophomore at the college. She was reading in the dining hall at a dormitory on July 31, reports CBS Boston.

“Next thing you know, I see the cop walk in with a Smith employee whom I’ve never seen before and the man said, ‘We were wondering why you’re here?”‘ Kanoute told CBS Boston.

According to CBS BostonPolice told her that an employee called to report a suspicious black man. She recorded the incident on her phone and shared her experience on Facebook.

“It just still upsets me to just talk about it because I don’t even feel safe on my own campus and I’m away from home. I’m the first in my family to go to college. I’m doing this not only for me but for my family, for my ancestors,” Kanoute told CBS Boston.

Smith’s president sent a statement apologizing and assuring her that “she belongs in all Smith spaces. This painful incident reminds us of the ongoing legacy of racism and bias in which people of color are targeted while simply going about the business of their daily lives. … Building an inclusive, diverse and sustainable community is urgent and ongoing work.”

Kanoute appreciates the apology but wants the name of the caller to be released.

According to CBS Boston, Smith’s administration says privacy laws prevent them from releasing the name, so Kanoute has turned to social media with a plea for help.

“I tried to like shake it off. I didn’t even want to speak up and speak out because I know not everyone’s going to agree with what you need to say. Not everyone’s going to listen to you,” Kanoute told CBS Boston. “I’m just so upset.”

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Black America Web

ENTERTAINMENT UPDATE:

How Many Black Male Teachers Did You Have Growing Up?

Vincent Cobb II and Rashiid Coleman are the founders behind The Black Male Educators Convening, an organization on a mission to triple the number of highly-effective black male teachers in Philadelphia public schools to 1,000 by 2025. Through a series of programs including a yearly conference, purpose career fair, two-year paid summer program, and membership alliance for black male educators, BMEC is sending a clear message: only 2% of teachers are black and male—and it’s not enough.

On Oct. 12 – 14, the second annual BMEC conference will be held to advance and celebrate the development, recruitment, and retention of black male educators. This year’s lineup includes Marc Lamont Hill, a journalist, author, activist, and television personality; Dr. Chris Emdin, an associate professor and author of For White Folks Who Teach in the Hood… And the Rest of Y’all Too; Ericka Pittman, chief marketing officer at Aquahydrate Inc; Shavar Jeffries, American civil rights attorney, and more. In the midst of planning the conference, we caught up with the founders to learn more about their plans to increase the percentage of black male teachers in Philadelphia and beyond.

black male teachers

(Photo credit: BMEC)

Why do you believe it’s important to get more black male teachers in the classroom?

This is not just about numbers, skin color, and gender, this is an equity problem in our school systems that often are filled with barriers of attracting and retaining quality diverse talent.

The education workforce is predominantly white and our public school districts are increasingly black and brown. Students deserve to see a more realistic representation of society and when they see us (BMEs), they see more possibilities of what they can be. Research shows that black boys from low-income neighborhoods are 39% more likely to graduate and attend college when they have been impacted by a highly effective black male teacher. Suspension rates go down and black students are more likely to do better in school, overall. Representation in the classroom matters!

Reportedly, only 2% of teachers nationwide are black men, in what ways is your organization planning to increase this number of black male teachers?

We elevate the voices of the 2% through our advocacy work with policymakers and systems leaders where BMEs get the opportunity to share the solutions and voice challenges in schools through policy roundtable talks on key barriers to black men getting into the profession. The Fellowship has partnered with over 20 organizations to develop targeted programs to dramatically bolster the representation and retention of black men throughout the career life cycle of an educator. This includes:

  • The fellowship membership alliance – a brotherhood of socially conscious educators dedicated to bringing justice to the classroom.
  • Purpose: A career fair – an annual opportunity for prospective black male educators to connect with the region’s top recruiters.
  • Protégé: high school student chapters growing the next generation of black male educators.
  • The Du Bois Awards recognizing outstanding black educators across greater Philadelphia’s public schools.
  • The agenda: public policy & research to help shape the discourse promoting the recruitment, development, and retention of black male educators. Read our latest research here.

Besides increasing the number of black male teachers, what other changes would you like to see in the educational field?

We must incentivize the pipeline to attract more quality talent to the field. School districts, teacher colleges, educator residencies all realize that if we want to see more diversity then we have to offer more opportunities that will increase pathways into education beyond the traditional routes. Overall, the education profession has been degraded by teachers themselves who often talk about the terrible work conditions, unfair pay, and high stress but I think we re-frame the work to see teaching as an opportunity for social impact and change. Teaching is a revolutionary act. Schools are ground zero in our collective struggle against the nation’s long history of inequity.

You are hosting a conference in October. Who should attend this event?

BMEC is focused on bringing together the best and brightest minds and influencers to ally with our mission regardless of what sector you come from. This is a convening that is just not for black men but for everyone who believes in equity, social justice, and re-writing the narrative that teaching is a worthy profession. We are looking for all black male educators, college students and high school students along with school leaders, policy makers, activists and community members who can help advance our cause in increasing the number of black men in schools. TWO PERCENT IS NOT ENOUGH! This must be a collective effort even with corporate partners and celebrities who see how having one black male teacher in a student’s life can make all the difference.

The post How Many Black Male Teachers Did You Have Growing Up? appeared first on Black Enterprise.

Career | Black Enterprise

EMPLOYMENT UPDATE:

Say What Now? Safeway Grocery Store Employees Call the Police on a Black Woman in the Parking Lot Donating Food to a Homeless Man

Employees at a California supermarket called the police on a Black woman who was simply donating food to a homeless man.

The employees accused her and her family of being involved in an alleged grocery heist.

via NYDN:

Erika Martin told the Daily News she was in the parking lot of the Mountain View Safeway July 8 to give a homeless man food for his dog with her sisters Faith and Ashley when she was approached by two police cars.

Martin said she explained to the officers what she was doing, and they asked if she was waiting on someone, like a husband, to exit the store – which she was not. She said the officer then told Martin someone had been stealing items from the store, and that the suspect was wearing a blue spaghetti strap shirt.

“I said, ‘What! Wait, are you kidding me?’ I never even stepped foot inside of Safeway, I was in my car the whole entire time I was there,” she wrote, noting that she was not wearing the spaghetti strap shirt in question.A spokesperson for the Mountain View Police Department told the Daily News it received a phone call from the store that day reporting a possible theft in progress. When police arrived, employees identified a male, a female and several children they believed were connected with the alleged theft.

The spokesperson said when police spoke with the accused group, they were “extremely helpful” and “cooperative,” and cops quickly determined no crime had been committed.

The heavily redacted incident report says employees believed Martin was taking goods out of the store and that children were “grabbing goods from the shelves” and bringing them back to an awaiting car.

Martin said the accused children were her 13-year-old niece, 11-year-old nephew and 9-year-old son, who had entered the store to use the bathroom.

She also said the incident greatly affected her son, who had sought free cookie samples from the bakery during the bathroom break, as he frequently does.

“He broke down in tears as if he was afraid for his life,” Martin said of her son’s “confession.” “He said, ‘I didn’t mean to do anything wrong. I didn’t steal anything, mom’… He thought he did something wrong. He thought the police were going to arrest him for looking behind the counter. To see my child in so much fear broke my heart.”

She said the incident was especially hurtful as she frequents the store and is known to employees.

“We were there to do a good deed and we left feeling humiliated, embarrassed, hurt and shocked,” she wrote.

A representative for Safeway said in a statement that the police were called concerning an “adult male with a history of suspected shoplifting” at the story. The rep said it was “not entirely clear” why the police spoke to Martin, and that an internal investigation had been launched.

“Safeway is committed to fostering an environment of treating everyone with courtesy, dignity, and respect. We have strong policies against racial discrimination and we do not tolerate violations to the policy,” the statement read. “Safeway contacted Ms. Martin to sincerely apologize for the misunderstanding and we look forward to continuing the discussion regarding her concerns. “

Martin said she received an apology from a store employee who was not working the day of the incident, but is still awaiting a call from the location’s two managers and the company’s corporate offices.

“It’s like they don’t care, they’re brushing it under the rug,” she said, adding that she was also racially profiled at a PetCo in October. “I’m so tired of the craziness in this world.”

Safeway’s going to have to do a LOT better than that. This is completely unacceptable.

The post Say What Now? Safeway Grocery Store Employees Call the Police on a Black Woman in the Parking Lot Donating Food to a Homeless Man appeared first on lovebscott – celebrity gossip and entertainment news.

lovebscott – celebrity gossip and entertainment news

BEST DEAL UPDATE:

Top Executives Salute Diversity Pioneer Who Turned ‘Black Rage’ Into Corporate Empowerment

Dr. Price Cobbs was considered one of the most important change agents we have seen in corporate America when it comes to diversity and inclusion, and having it incorporated into global business/cultural strategies. He had everyone’s ear. Ronald C. Parker, Former President & CEO, Executive Leadership Council

Legions of African American executives share that sentiment as they continue to honor the renowned psychiatrist deemed as a transformative force in corporate America and guiding light for generations of black professionals. Cobbs not only advocated for inclusive corporate environments for five decades but gained the national spotlight when he and his colleague William H. Grier wrote the book Black Rage, considered “one of the 20th century’s most critical examinations of racism and African American life.” The New York Times bestseller published in 1968—a turbulent year marked by the assassination of civil rights leader Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.—broke new ground in detailing, through a series of case studies, the magnitude of centuries-long oppression of African Americans as well as the psychological impact of grief and depression rooted in black America.

diversity

At 89, Cobbs died of heart and lung failure after traveling from his San Francisco home to Philadelphia for his grandson’s high school graduation. With assistance from the ELC, we offer reflections and remembrances from top black executives and the organization’s members on Cobb’s lasting impact throughout this article.

For more than 30 years, Cobbs could be found on the pages of BLACK ENTERPRISE for his revolutionary work and powerful insights. He told BE that the diversity thrust greatly expanded after he converted his private practice into Pacific Management Systems, a San Francisco-based consulting service for multinational corporations, government agencies, community organizations and corporate executives. Among his blue-chip clients: Procter & Gamble, Digital Equipment, Fannie Mae, PepsiCo, and Walmart.

Dr. Price Cobbs was an exceptional leader, who became a mentor, colleague, and friend. He was a counselor to corporate giants and helped prepare African American leaders to join the top ranks of public companies and boards. His legacy lives on through all who benefited from his commitment to cultivating greatness. He will be sorely missed.” —Bernard J. Tyson, Chairman and CEO, Kaiser Permanente

In 1988, BLACK ENTERPRISE named Cobbs to our inaugural roster of “America’s Leading Black Doctors,” earning him the distinction of being one of the nation’s top 15 African American physicians at the time. The University of California – Berkley and Meharry Medical College graduate told BE of his findings during the formative years of a practice with black and white patients from varied backgrounds and income levels. “As I pushed people past the myth of color-blindness, I began to see black people, whether they were middle class, unemployed or young professionals trying to get started, were angry.” He also shared that, in many cases, such “repressed frustration” contributed to a host of deadly ailments suffered by African Americans, including hypertension and heart disease.

diversity

During that interview, Cobbs also shared his development of innovative techniques. After receiving a grant from University of California -San Francisco to explore ways of reducing the level of racism on college campuses, he delved into “group discovery and the dimensions of rage, blackness, whiteness and cultural stress.” As a result, Cobbs developed the revolutionary ethnotherapy model which he viewed as an instrument to change attitudes and assumptions arising from racial, ethnic and value differences. He told BE about its therapeutic value: “I began to see that the more clear and healthy people were about their identity, the better able they were to clear up their conflicts, neuroses and baggage.”

In a release, the ELC cited how Cobbs’ ethnotherapy model, which earned him The Pathfinder Award from the Association for Humanistic Psychology, was applied at P&G with considerable success. In fact, it helped spawn contemporary D&I practices in corporate America.

Dr. Cobbs was a corporate whisperer and a masterful cultural interpreter. For many of us, his approach was to help us understand, and even appreciate, the unwritten rules of corporate America. By the same token, he was instrumental in getting corporate America to suspend some assumptions about us as African American executives. In the end, each side came to the table with a level of clarity and honesty that heretofore had been missing. For someone like me who knew little about how companies actually worked, but was otherwise very capable, it was a huge help. Maurice Cox, former vice president, diversity & inclusion development, PepsiCo Inc.

BLACK ENTERPRISE Publisher Earl G. Graves Sr. always valued Cobbs as a resource of empowering information and strategic counsel to African Americans seeking career advancement. So he tapped him to conduct professional success workshops at the Black Enterprise Professional Exchange series of networking forums in the 1980s. Cobbs’ advice to attendees: “To access personal power, we must develop a mindset that we are entitled to exercise power.”

A prolific researcher, writer, and producer, he collaborated on a series of books and films that explained racial dynamics in corporate settings while providing tools to elevate black executives. In fact, 35 years after Black Rage, he co-wrote with Judith L. Turnock another seminal work, Cracking the Corporate Code. It featured first-person interviews with 32 senior African American executives on their career trajectories, challenges and successes at major companies like General Electric, IBM, PepsiCo, and Prudential, among others. The book became a must-read reference guide for African Americans trying to achieve management success.

How does one describe a man who walked with SO many people on their personal journeys as African Americans in corporate America? Each of us trailblazers with unique backgrounds, experiences, hopes, and dreams. All of us creating new paths on terrains that were most often inhospitable. Dr. Price Cobbs was my North Star. He guided me through uncharted pathways and, most importantly, shared his wisdom on sustaining myself while on the journey. —Ann Fudge, former Chairman & CEO, Young & Rubicam Brands

Cobbs was always ready to guide black executives—from those engaged in trench warfare to others immersed in boardroom deliberations. For more than 20 years, he served as a consultant with ELC, the preeminent membership organization of black senior executives, and once again demonstrated his commitment to the expansion of the number of global black executives at the C-suite level and within the corporate governance ranks. He also served as a co-founder of The Diversity Collegium, an international think tank focused on addressing issues of inclusion and equity. Cobbs influence has been felt from Wall Street to Silicon Valley. Whether driving organizational diversity in group sessions or helping to infuse a black senior manager with a sense of entitlement via one-on-one counseling, his advocacy and action will be replicated as a result of the numerous careers he advanced and countless lives he touched.

I first read about Price in 1977, during the start of my tenure at HP. We scheduled a meeting and soon after that, our partnership began. He provided outstanding wisdom and guidance, which served as the genesis of our early efforts in diversity and inclusion at HP. Our relationship grew and we became close. With a skill for being direct and nonjudgmental, he gave sage advice. Like for many others, he became my mentor; and I valued our time together. In fact, I have consulted with Price on every major professional decision that I have made since our first meeting. He became my mirror. He helped me face my fears and trepidations. He also taught me an important lesson —that age is just a number. Something he obviously lived as he wrote his last book in his 80s and was still giving great career advice until his passing. I will miss him greatly but his legacy will live on. —Kenneth L. Coleman, Chairman, Saama Technologies

The post Top Executives Salute Diversity Pioneer Who Turned ‘Black Rage’ Into Corporate Empowerment appeared first on Black Enterprise.

Career | Black Enterprise

EMPLOYMENT UPDATE:

Octavia Spencer to play first black, self-made female millionaire Madam C.J. Walker in Netflix series produced by Lebron James

Octavia Spencer is set to play the nation’s first black, self-made female millionaire in an upcoming Netflix series.

The 46-year-old Oscar winner will play Madam C.J. Walker, an entrepreneur who built a beauty and hair care empire in the early 1900s, Netflix announced Sunday.

Walker, whose real…

/entertainment – New York Daily News

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Black, White, and Belonging: My Brush With Curlfest

Photo Illustration by The Daily Beast

As a little girl, my hair salon was the living room floor. I would sit in front of my mother as she listed my options—ponytails, braids, half-up/half-down. All were relatively easy, but none were painless as I sat tearfully while a standard hairbrush ripped through the knots in my curly hair.

Being mixed was a fact of my life, but not something that I considered notable. People asked me all the time what race I was, and I’d tell them and think nothing more of it. My hair was thick and curly because my dad was black. But it wasn’t “black hair” because my mom was white.

My curly hair looked like a dream to friends and passersby but was a nightmare to live with it due to the lack of mainstream products and education for my thick locks. No one in my family knew how to take care of mixed hair in the ’90s.

Read more at The Daily Beast.

The Daily Beast — Fashion

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New LGBTQ Summer Read Challenges Notions of Black Masculinity

Hardships. Growing pains. Revelations. Triumphs. Victories. Being a free black man in America has its advantages as well as disadvantages and Darnell L. Moore’s No Ashes in the Fire: Coming of Age Black and Free in America is a journey by a member of the LGBTQ community that many of us can relate to. Born into tough circumstances; his ideal of masculinity questioned, the Camden, New Jersey-reared author stopped running from himself, confronted his enemies, and fully realized his lifelong purpose. Moore opens up about his life in a curated recollection that provides a look inside how society, whether your secular orientation and socio-economic strays, is shaped by cultural  and sub-cultural normals alike.

Black Enterprise: This project, No Ashes in the Fire: Coming of Age Black and Free in America, is not a tell-all. What is the best way to describe this book?

Moore: “It’s a memoir that is both a personal and a social study into a complex, beautiful and messy world of a young black person who came of age in an era that forced one to wear the mask as well as bite the bullet in order to survive. I tried my best to offer snapshots of my life, and the various forces that shaped me.

Healing and survival, and in your case, death, are central themes throughout this book. How are your own interactions with youths grappling with these themes similar to your own?

I was honest about my dances with depression and suicidal attempts in the book. But I was also honest about the many people who aided in my survival. We cannot expect young people to be so strong and so self-loving as to navigate life on their own. Young people need communities who can wrap them in support. I’ve spent a little more than two decades working with young people in my role as an educator, therapist, program director, and much more. I’ve spent a considerable amount of that time working with LGBTQ youth of color.

LGBTQ

 

Pride Month seems to be more important than ever given the current administration’s stance on gay rights and the more recent Supreme Court ruling in favor of the Colorado baker refusing to serve a same-sex couple. But we have positives: FX’s Pose and Viceland’s My House, which both highlight the black and Latino ballroom scene. Just as those ‘houses’ serve as a sense of community how will your book foster the same?

I wrote the book for the 16-year-old version of me. I wrote it for young people, and the many individuals and institutions charged with their care. I hope that black young people can see semblances of themselves, as well as their struggles and joys, in it. And I hope some reader will feel as if they are understood.

What advice or steps would you give aspiring authors on the art of writing a book from conceptualizing to securing a deal to completion to marketing?

Know what it is you want to write. Know who it is you are writing to and in conversation with. Be clear. Be specific. And know the reason you want to write a book before beginning the journey to publishing. Talk to folks who have written published books. All of my connections, to my agent and publishing house, were forged by friends and writing peers. Build a community of peers and through that community; reach out to people who may be able to help you.

Orators and oral history are mentioned several times starting with your great-grandmother to work as a feminist, activist, and Black Lives Matter supporter. Touring, with numerous stops in small and renowned bookstores, allows your readers to connect with you on a more spiritual, personal level. What voice will readers discover throughout this memoir?

It’s an honest and vulnerable voice. Sometimes it’s sermonic. Sometimes it’s poetic. Sometimes it’s analytical. But it’s always gesturing toward a love for black people.

How has queerness and masculinity appeared in your life and shaped your character throughout the years?

The idea of manhood and masculinity have functioned like cages in my life. I am finally getting free. Cages aren’t doorways. Queerness, or rather, defying norms and rules have been a key to my freedom. It’s been a journey, and still is, but it’s been worth it.

To read more about Moore’s journey and purchase his book,  visit www.darnelllmoore.com.

 

The post New LGBTQ Summer Read Challenges Notions of Black Masculinity appeared first on Black Enterprise.

Lifestyle | Black Enterprise

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Black Journalist Orgs Slam News Station for Airing Controversial Photo of Nia Wilson

Several prominent black media groups are condemning a local television news station that aired a photo that they say criminalizes a slain African American teenager.

While reporting on the fatal stabbing of 18-year-old Nia Wilson, who was viciously attacked by a white ex-felon at a Bay Area Rapid Transit train (BART) station July 22, KTVU FOX 2 News showed a photo during the July 23 noon newscast of what appeared to be Wilson holding a gun. Later that day, KTVU issued an apology on Facebook and on its Ten O’clock News. However, black journalists say that’s not good enough.

In a statement, the National Association of Black Journalists (NABJ), the Bay Area Black Journalists Association (BABJA), and the Robert C. Maynard Institute for Journalism Education (MIJE) called the photo “unethical” and are demanding a meeting with KTVU. According to them, the picture, which was originally posted by Wilson on social media, implied that she was “dangerous” and deserved to be killed. They also argued that it triggers unconscious racial bias toward black victims.


The use of the photo can be seen as an attempt to dismiss her humanity and silence those who view her death as a racially-motivated attack. It was also in violation of copyright laws, reads the statement.

 

Such depictions reinforce unconscious bias, particularly against people of color, who are over-represented in stories about crime and violence. Please see the study “Young men of color in the Media” from the Joint Center Health Policy Institute.

 

Although KTVU anchor Frank Somerville offered a sincere apology Monday via Facebook and during the Ten O’clock News, we submit that swift action needs to be taken by the station.

 

Given previous editorial lapses, we would have hoped KTVU would’ve been more careful. The station made an embarrassing error when it read the fake names of four Asiana Airlines pilots on-air in 2013. These incidents would appear to illustrate a lack of cultural competency and training around unconscious bias among station staff and leadership.

 

NABJ, BABJA and the Maynard Institute have requested a meeting with executives at the station this week or at the NABJ Convention next week to discuss how KTVU will avoid making such an egregious error in future stories, particularly as it relates to its portrayals of persons of color.

The post Black Journalist Orgs Slam News Station for Airing Controversial Photo of Nia Wilson appeared first on Black Enterprise.

Lifestyle | Black Enterprise

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Congressional Black and Hispanic Organizations Receive $1 Million Each from Walmart

With the purpose of expanding internship opportunities for youths of color, and in an effort to help place more blacks and Hispanics on Capitol Hill, Walmart gave the Congressional Black Caucus Foundation Inc., (CBCF) and the Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute (CHCI) one $ 1M apiece.

According to a press release, the funds “will help provide career pathways on Capitol Hill for students and young professionals through education and hands-on experience in the nation’s capital.”

“The CBCF is committed to increasing diversity on Capitol Hill and in the public sector by creating a new generation of informed and engaged citizens and leaders,” said Congresswoman Sheila Jackson Lee, Chair, CBCF Board of Directors via the press release. “Internships are a critical component toward building a career in public policy. Through Walmart’s continued support and dedicated partnership, the Congressional Black Caucus Foundation has successfully increased the number of scholars who have access to the intern-to-staffer pipeline.”

congressional black

“Walmart has led the way as the Founding Partner for CHCI’s Congressional Internship Program by significantly investing in our nation’s future leaders, “said Rep. Joaquín Castro, chair of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus Institute in the same press release.” We value Walmart’s support of CHCI’s mission to address [the] underrepresentation of Latinos on Capitol Hill by providing transformative experiences and the critical skills needed to embark on careers in public service.”

Both the CBCF and CHCI offer fellowships and internships. The CBCF also awards more than 100 scholarships to students across the country, according to its website.

Back in April, the Walmart Foundation—the company’s philanthropic arm—announced it has awarded $ 4 million to 12 organizations including several that are committed to helping communities of color.

The organizations included Coalition for Queens, a group that teaches coding and professional skills to talented adults from diverse and low-income backgrounds; The Women’s Foundation of Greater Memphis, which is focused on advancing opportunities for young women of color; and The National Black Justice Coalition, which works to further inclusion of members of the LGBTQ community at HBCUs.

 

 

The post Congressional Black and Hispanic Organizations Receive $ 1 Million Each from Walmart appeared first on Black Enterprise.

Lifestyle | Black Enterprise

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Emma Thompson Joins the New ‘Men In Black’; Here’s Everything We Know

Emma Thompson Joins the New 'Men In Black'; Here's Everything We Know

If you’ve been wondering how exactly the new Men in Black spin-off will tie to the original trilogy, the latest casting news for the movie offers part of the answer. According to The Hollywood Reporter, Emma Thompson will reprise her role as Agent O, head of MIB, first introduced in the last installment, 2012’s Men in Black III (above).

So far, Agent O (who was also played by Alice Eve in younger form in MIB3) seems to be the only link and franchise gateway to the new movie. It…

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45 GREAT MOMENTS IN BLACK BUSINESS – NO. 8: Black Business Leaders Rebuke Japanese Prime Minister’s Racist Remarks

BLACK ENTERPRISE celebrates the 45th anniversary of its roster of the nation’s most successful black businesses—The BE 100s. To commemorate the significance of this collective’s widespread impact on black business and economic development as well as American industry over four decades, we have presented 45 milestone moments. As part of this tribute, we continue our yearlong countdown.  

1986: Black Business Leaders Clapback at Racist Statement

After making what many considered derogatory remarks about blacks and other American ethnic groups, Japanese Prime Minister Yasuhiro Nakasone got a strong rebuttal from some of the nation’s top black business leaders infuriated with the comments.

The controversy came in 1986 when the former prime minister was speaking to his ruling Liberal Democratic Party, reportedly telling them that blacks, Latinos, and, other minorities tug down the educational levels of the United States.

Responding to the Japanese leader’s speech suggesting that the racially homogeneous country was “intellectually” superior to the U.S. because of “black people, Puerto Ricans and Mexicans,” African American business leaders led by BE 100 CEOs including Clarence Avant, Comer Cottrell, George Johnson, Byron Lewis, and Earl G. Graves, pressed for an apology and reciprocal trade in a full-page ad in The New York Times.

black business

Nakasone apologized for his remarks a week after making them. “Let me make one thing very clear,” Nakasone said in the apology. “I have always firmly believed that America’s greatness derives from the dynamism and achievements of her many ethnic communities. It was not my intent whatsoever to imply any racial discrimination nor to criticize any aspect of American society.”

Still, Nakasone never recanted his statements, attracting strong negative reactions from African Americans across the country and members of Congress. At the same time, the then Reagan administration did not offer an immediate reaction, according to the Chicago Tribune.

Rep. Esteban Torres (D-Calif.), chairman of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus, urged Nakasone to retract the statement. The Congressional Black Caucus sent a telegram to the Japanese Embassy in Washington asking for an urgent clarification of the remarks.
Prominent black leaders, including Earl G. Graves, founder and publisher of Black Enterprise; Clarence Page, a member of the Chicago Tribune Editorial Board; and, civil rights leader, the Rev. Jesse Jackson, were among those who denounced Nakasone’s statements.

Some Japanese-Americans joined black, Hispanic, and other leaders in demanding an apology from Nakasone. During a meeting at the time with the Japanese Ambassador, Nobuo Matsunaga, the leaders, spearheaded by Jackson, called Nakasone’s remarks an ”insult” to all Americans, but especially the mentioned groups, and demanded an immediate apology.

”Whether the meaning of the words had to do with intelligence or literacy, it was an insult,” Jackson said in a letter delivered to Ambassador Matsunaga. ”We in this country have spent too much time fighting stereotypes, including those against Asian-Americans, to tolerate the perpetuation of stereotypes from Asians against our own people.”

 

The post 45 GREAT MOMENTS IN BLACK BUSINESS – NO. 8: Black Business Leaders Rebuke Japanese Prime Minister’s Racist Remarks appeared first on Black Enterprise.

Career | Black Enterprise

EMPLOYMENT UPDATE:

Scientists confirm Einstein’s supermassive black hole theory

A team of international scientists observing a star in the Milky Way have for the first time confirmed Einstein’s predictions of what happens to the motion of a star passing close to a supermassive black hole.


Reuters: Science News

BEST DEAL UPDATE:

Spire.io – Over 50 Million Minutes of Calm Discovered!

Porsha Williams Is Rocking A Black Outfit & Her Pink Hair At A Friend’s Baby Shower – There’s No Sign Of A Baby Bump

Porsha Williams attended one of her BFF’s baby shower and congratulated the future mom. She also documented the party on her social media account, and she let her fans know she was with her boo at the party.

Porsha wore an all-black outfit, and we have to admit that there’s no sign of a baby bump.

She became surrounded with all these pregnancy rumors after she posted on Instagram that she’s got baby fever and her fans went crazy with excitement saying that she is definitely pregnant.

They have been searching for all kinds of signs that would point out the fact that she’s expecting a child, but it may not be the case.

‘#SWIPE💙👶🏽Congratulations baby cuz @ladytford I can’t wait to meet your prince!! 🎉💙 #BabySeason #Blessings #BabyShower fam,’ Porsha captioned her post which includes lots of pics from the baby shower.

‘HEY PORSHA! Huge fan of yours and I would love to be of service to you when you come to my hometown, Jackson, MS.. please check out my work and hopefully we will be in touch. ❤’ one of her fans said in the comments section.

‘Needless to say, we are competitive af! 😂 I & bae refuse to lose… BUT we lost that day lol #CoupleBabyShowerGames @ladytford 👶🏽💙 #ImSoAggressive’ – this is how Porsha captioned another post in which she’s playing a game at the baby shower with her BF.

Fans were desperately trying to find out who he is: ‘Who else reading the comments tryna figure out who Porsha bae is 😂🤔👀

Celebrity Insider

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Black Conservatives Claim Uber Driver Kicked Them Out Because of ‘MAGA’ Hats

A group of young, Black congressional interns claim their Uber driver discriminated against them for being conservatives after realizing they were holding “Make America Great Again” hats as they entered his vehicle. “To me, what happened took me back to the 60’s when black Americans were told they couldn’t sit in the front of the […]

The post Black Conservatives Claim Uber Driver Kicked Them Out Because of ‘MAGA’ Hats appeared first on EBONY.

EBONY

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How Black Husbands Can Help Wives Cope With Miscarriages, Depression And Suicidal Thoughts

Millions of women have battled depression and suicidal thoughts, including Erica Campbell, a Grammy-winning gospel singer and star of TV One’s “We’re The Campbells.” She revealed her devastating struggle during an episode on the reality show that aired Tuesday.

Viewers saw and heard an openhearted Campbell talk about her miscarriage and how she once contemplated suicide. Campbell discussed her miscarriage — the traumatic loss of pregnancy that happens to Black women at higher rates than their white counterparts — with a trusted friend during the episode. The singer, like many other Black women, put on a strong front for the world after the emotional event, saying she didn’t take the time to properly grieve and kept it moving. More women should talk about the experience, with the “hardest part” being the “falling out of love” with your baby that you “fell in love with,” she also said.

A transparent Campbell also detailed her fight with depression and suicidal thoughts as a 12-year-old teen in another moment during the poignant episode. Warryn Campbell, her husband, was shocked to hear that his wife had contemplated taking her own life. (African-American adults are 20 percent more likely to report serious psychological distress than adult whites, and Black teens are more likely to attempt suicide than white teens according to Mental Health America.)

However, the singer’s story served as a testimony that she survived and went on to have a joyous life as a wife, mother and successful music artist.

It is women like Campbell who show the power of opening up about painful experiences to your inner circle and how healing is an attainable goal. There are also organizations and resources that women can turn to for help. Here are steps Black woman can take when life is overwhelming:

Find a Mental Health Professional

Searching these websites can connect women to someone who is trained to assist and support them.

Black Women Birthing Justice

African-American Mental Health Providers

Therapy For Black Girls Directory

Find A Sister Circle

These organizations can connect women with others who are going through trauma and seeking empowerment.

The California Black Women’s Health Project – Sisters Mentally Mobilized Community

Sister Circle Collective

Find Healing Activities

Writing, reading, dance, art and other creative outlets can help women tell their stories, chart their successes and soothe their souls.

Black Girl + Mental Health Blog

Unapologetically Us

The Siwe Project

Black Women In The Arts

The Black Girl Healing Project

The Black Girl Bravado

Here are resources for women who need more immediate help or a list of additional resources: Black Girls Smile and Suicide Prevention Resource Center – Lifeline.

 

Life & Style – Black America Web

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Meet the First Black Woman to Own a Male Professional Sports League in the U.S.

Evelyn Magley has made history as the first African American woman to ever own a male professional sports league in the United States. Magley and her husband, retired NBA player David Magley, are the founders of The Basketball League (TBL), a newly formed minor professional basketball league which acquired the North American Premier Basketball (NAPB) league and is scheduled to debut next year.

“I am thrilled to start a league that treats our players with the greatest level of respect thereby impacting our community in a manner that is consistent with our faith, by serving those who need it the most,” said Magley in a statement. She was named as the CEO of the league while her husband operates as president.

The league has targeted 40 markets in the U.S. and Canada and expects to start with 12 to 16 teams in January 2019. Some of the teams include the Kansas City Tornados, Ohio Bootleggers, Nevada Desert Dogs, Vancouver Knights, Raleigh Firebirds, Tampa Bay Titans, and San Diego Waves. Each team will play 32 games that will be available via livestream.

TBL offers athletes who don’t make it in the NBA or G-League another option to play ball professionally and earn anywhere from $ 1,500 to $ 7,500 a month. TBL is also dedicated to providing families with affordable and quality entertainment as well as community support through the launch of an upcoming philantropic arm, youth camps, clinics, and nonprofit organizations. Plus, the league gives individuals and groups an opportunity to own a professional sports business with a relatively low cost barrier to entry.

David Magley, who most recently served as the Commissioner of the National Basketball League of Canada, said Mrs. Magley brings a “unique vision” to the new league as the wife of a pro athlete and the mother of four children who played sports collegiately. “Her passion for people allows us to build on a vision of impacting community through giving young men opportunities that do not exist today, then leveraging our platforms to engage each local market to benefit the youth and non-profit initiatives she is so very passionate about,” said the former Cleveland Cavaliers small forward in a statement. He was drafted in 1982.

According to her bio, Magley is the former Director of Community Engagement for the Brampton A’s of the NBL Canada, where she scaled the forward-facing programming of the NBL team and nonprofit organizations within the community at large. She graduated from the University of Kansas and worked as a professional music educator and music therapist. She also co-founded an inner-city ministry focused on mentoring children through the gospel, academic services, food, and music called Children with Purpose.

The post Meet the First Black Woman to Own a Male Professional Sports League in the U.S. appeared first on Black Enterprise.

Lifestyle | Black Enterprise

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For Black Women in South African Film Biz, Equality Still a Struggle

DURBAN   — When filmmaker Zamo Makhwanazi takes meetings with execs at some of South Africa’s biggest production companies, she finds herself asking a simple question: “Where are the black women?” For an industry grappling with questions of racial and gender transformation that cut to the heart of the current global debate, South Africa has […]

Variety

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Sean ‘Diddy’ Combs Says ‘Black Panther’ Was A ‘Cruel Experiment’ In Hollywood

Business mogul Sean “Diddy” Combs appears on Variety’s latest cover, in which he touches on a wide range of topics, including his thoughts on the massive success of Black Panther, which he refers to a “cruel experiment.”

Black Panther was a cruel experiment because we live in 2018,” Diddy said, “and it’s the first time that the film industry gave us a fair playing field on a worldwide blockbuster, and the hundreds of millions it takes to make it.”

Combs doesn’t view Black Panther as an outright game-changer. He told Variety that all industries suffer from allowing black men and women hold top-level positions.

“For all the billions of dollars that these black executives have been able to make them, [there’s still hesitation] to put them in the top-level positions,” Diddy said of industries at large. “They’ll go and they’ll recruit cats from overseas. It makes sense to give [executives of color] a chance and embrace the evolution, instead of it being that we can only make it to president, senior VP. … There’s no black CEO of a major record company. That’s just as bad as the fact that there are no [black] majority owners in the NFL. That’s what really motivates me.”

Diddy pointed out that when black creators are given the proper resources in any industry, they always “over-deliver.”

“You can’t do anything without that money, without resources,” Diddy told Variety. “But when we do get the resources, we over-deliver. When Adidas invests in Kanye and it’s done properly, you have the right results. When Live Nation invests in artists and puts them in arenas the same way U2 would be, you have the right results. ‘Black Panther,’ ‘Black-ish,’ fashion; it’s all about access. If you’re blocked out of the resources, you can’t compete. And that’s my whole thing — to be able to come and compete.”

Black Panther is currently the highest grossing superhero film in the U.S. with $ 699 million. The film is expected to be a rare Oscar contender for the superhero genre early next year.

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Entertainment – Black America Web

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AME Church and Black Banks Launch New Partnership for Black Wealth

The black church, among the most prosperous institutions in America, has long led movements for the spiritual, social and civic uplift of black people. When the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated on April 4, 1968, he had just launched the Poor People’s Movement, which quickly fizzled after his death.

With this historic backdrop, the African Methodist Episcopal Church – with a legacy of leadership in its own right – has announced an innovative economic partnership with black-owned banks across the country. The partnership aims to be a catalyst to spur business development, homeownership and wealth in the black community.

“We are now pleased to announce a partnership with the presidents of the 19 black banks in the United States, with the goal of increasing black wealth,” said Bishop Reginald T. Jackson, president of the Council of AME Bishops. “This initiative will strengthen black banks across the United States and increase their capacity to lend to small businesses, to secure mortgages, to provide personal lines of credit, and to offer other forms of credit to AME churches and our members. This, of course, includes enabling members and their families to become homeowners.”

AME Church

Bishop Reginald Jackson, president, Council of AME Bishops (Photo: Klarque Garrison/Trice Edney News Wire)

Bishop Jackson made the announcement during a press conference held during the 2018 Council of Bishops and General Board Meeting in Atlanta June 26. The specific details of a memorandum of understanding are being formulated and will be announced this summer. But the goals are as follows:

· Increase deposits and loans with black banks;

· Increase black homeownership to over 50 percent nationwide. This means 2,000,000 more black homeowners than now exist; and

· Grow the number of black businesses from 2.6 million to 4 million and total gross receipts from an average of $ 72,500 to $ 150,000.

“The spirit in which you all have shared the commitment to the community, to the banks and to what we can do together is outstanding,” responded Preston Pinkett, III, chairman and CEO of the City National Bank of New Jersey and chairman of the National Bankers Association. “Thank you for your willingness to step outside of the norm to do something that I would say is extraordinary here in America and extraordinary in the world.”

AME Church

Preston Pinkett, chairman,National Bankers Association (Photo: Klarque Garrison/Trice Edney News Wire)

 

Pinkett says the church-bank partnerships are already beginning around the nation. “It is safe to say that this kind of commitment; this kind of demonstration will go a long way in supporting our banks and the banks to be able to support the community…With God’s blessings, we will accomplish great things.”

Amidst an atmosphere of excitement, the bankers, bishops and supporters of the movement packed into a meeting room in a Downtown Atlanta hotel. Jackson was surrounded by all 20 Bishops of the 231-year-old denomination as well as supporters of the movement. They included principals of the growing economic movement, Black Wealth 2020, which Jackson credited as inspiration for the idea.

“This partnership grows out of an initiative formed in Washington, DC in 2015, called Black Wealth 2020 which is providing an economic blueprint for black America,” Jackson said.

Michael Grant, one of the founders of Black Wealth 2020, presided at the press conference. He connected the new partnership directly with the movement begun by Dr. King.

“The great civil rights movement led by Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and others has now morphed into a full-fledged movement for economic empowerment,” Grant said. “The offspring of African slaves and their unrewarded labor have catapulted a small Colonial outpost into the greatest industrial giant the world has ever known. Now, as a people, we are turning our efforts toward our own enrichment. We must now create those economic opportunities for ourselves.”

Opening the press conference, Grant underscored the historicity of the moment. “For those of you who are students of history, you would not be surprised that the Church of Richard Allen would be leading an effort to close the wealth gap across the United States of America.” Allen, among America’s most influential black leaders, founded the AME church in 1794. It was the first independent Black denomination in the U. S. “And we do this with malice towards none,” stressed Grant.

Bishop James L. Davis, of the Second Episcopal District, likened the partnership to a marriage – a marriage between a church and its community. “It is a marriage that says a church that is concerned about its people, concerned about the good and the bad, all of the things our people have had to go through.”

The prophetic voices of black church leaders not only articulate ideas, but strategies.

“In the next decade in the global church and in the AME church and in black banking, we will see both evolution and revolution. Banks must reinvent themselves, not just to respond to the pressures of the day, but to be flexible enough to adapt to the world of tomorrow. The ecclesia, the church, must also evolve its business knowledge, educational platform, and its missional thrust without losing its stance in the Word of God,” said General Board Chair Bishop Vashti Murphy Mckenzie. “Both of our institutions are dealing with increasing assertive governmental intrusion, higher membership and customer demands along with increasing change in the wider world.”

AME Church

Bishop Vashti Murphy Mckenzie, General Board Chair, AME Church (Photo: Klarque Garrison/Trice Edney News Wire)

The announcement of the new partnership was met with applause from national civil rights leaders.

“Thank you and your fellow bishops for making economic development a priority of your denomination,” wrote civil rights icon Georgia Congressman John Lewis in a letter to Bishop Jackson. “Hopefully, your visionary leadership will inspire other denominations to replicate your efforts nationwide.”

National Urban League President/CEO Marc Morial also weighed in with a letter: “I want to express the support of the National Urban League for your leadership and initiative in addressing the challenges of black homeownership and the need to increase the support, viability and profitability of our African-American businesses,” he wrote.

Morial is among economic leaders who have determined that among the reasons homeownership among African-Americans is disparately low is, in part, because of discriminatory lending practices.

Mortgage Banker Lois Johnson, president/CEO of Salt Lake City-based United Security Financial, said she takes “great pride in our HUD designation as a fair practice lender. We provide loans to all who meet the minimum criteria, especially people of color who have been denied the opportunity to have their own homes.”

Johnson, who is licensed to operate in 49 states, says she intends to travel to each of the AME church’s episcopal districts to “create hope and opportunities.”

The principals agreed that the key to the success of the partnership must be mutual respect for black spending power and mutual support of black businesses.

“We hear about black folks have a trillion dollars in spending power,” said Ron Busby, president/CEO of the U. S. Black Chamber, Inc. and co-founder of Black Wealth 2020. “But that’s usually White folk talking about our dollar sand how can they get their share of it. We came together to say how can we deal with the black wealth, the gap of it and really to move our agenda forward inside our own community.”

Busby pointed to the USBC’s new AP called the USBC Mobile Directory with 109,000 black-owned businesses in order to help consumers make targeted purchases inside the black business community.

Robert James, CEO of the Carver State Bank in Savannah discussed how the movement will be sustained. “There was a time that no church got financed in Savannah Georgia unless we financed them at Carver State Bank,” James said to applause. “This program will get us back on the path.”

James says he knows the relationship can be sustained because the bishops have authority to oversee and encourage AME church leaders to do business with black-owned banks. “We can talk to the Bishops about those local churches. And you can talk to your elders and your preachers,” he said.

Bishop Jackson underscored the fact that the U. S. partnership is only the beginning. He indicated that the movement will also expand abroad. “The possibilities extend throughout the Diaspora. The African Methodist Episcopal Church has over 4,000 churches in Africa, the Caribbean, West Indies and Europe. These churches and members can also benefit from this partnership,” he said.

To augment this expansion, Her Excellency Dr. Arikana Chihombori-Quao, ambassador for the African Union, spoke to the Bishops the day before the press conference, promising to encourage Africans in America to also put their deposits in black banks. She stressed the need for black-owned institutions to unify, cooperate and not turn on one another.

AME Church

Her Excellency Dr. Arikana Chihombori-Quao, ambassador for the African Union, addressed the Council of AME Bishops the day before the press conference. (Photo: Klarque Garrison/Trice Edney News Wire)

“I hope we will all come together and support the idea of putting all of our money in black banks. I have already taken the initiative and listed all of the black banks in the country on our website,” Chihombori-Quao said. “I’m already encouraging all black people when I do presentations to say we’ve been stupid for too long. We drive past black banks to give our money to people who don’t give a hoot about us. And they take our money so they can get rich; not only here, but in Africa. We’ve got to change this.

-Report courtesy of TriceEdneyWire.com

 

The post AME Church and Black Banks Launch New Partnership for Black Wealth appeared first on Black Enterprise.

Money | Black Enterprise

FASHION DEAL UPDATE:

Shop select Free People sale and clearance items at Bloomingdales.com!

The First Black Woman to be Crowned Miss Universe Great Britain Speaks Out

Dee-Ann Kentish-Rogers, a dark-skinned beauty with dreadlocks, became the first black woman to be crowned Miss Universe Great Britain in the pageant’s 66-year history on Saturday. As a result, the 25-year-old will go on to represent the United Kingdom at the international 2018 Miss Universe competition later this year.

Originally from Anguilla, a British territory in the Caribbean, Rogers never aspired to be a beauty queen. Instead, she played competitive sports, dreamed of becoming an Olympic heptathlete, and competed in the Commonwealth Games twice. However, a knee injury deterred her from the Olympics. That’s when she decided to pursue pageantry while simultaneously studying for the bar exam—which she recently passed—in order to become a barrister.

“My dream kind of reinvented itself and it shifted into pageantry because in pageantry you have the same reach,” she told BBC News. “Miss Universe Great Britain was the pageant equivalent of becoming an Olympic athlete for Great Britain.”

Ironically, Rogers says preparing for the Miss Universe Great Britain competition was more challenging than training for a sports match. “They’re very similar, but being in a pageant you have to undergo a kind of surgical examination of yourself, your ambitions, things that people don’t do until they’re very, very old.” She added, “most of the preparation for the Commonwealth Games is done on the track…but in pageantry, the mind is the focal point, and the mind is, I think, the hardest muscle to master.”

Dee-Ann Kentish-Rogers

(Twitter.com/AsToldBy_Dee)

Following her historic win, she received an outpouring of support from around the world via social media, which she admitted “kind of startled” her. “Although I’ve been preparing for this pageant for a long time, I’ve just been preparing as Dee-Ann,” she said. “Now that I’ve won the pageant, I’ve come to the realization that I’ve not only won the pageant as Dee-Ann, but as a black woman.” Nevertheless, she described the win as “a great achievement.”

Prior to her win, the University of Birmingham graduate told Pageants News that she believes she is the first woman to compete in Miss Universe Great Britain with dreadlocks. “To my knowledge, I am the first dreadlocked woman to walk across a Miss Universe Great Britain stage and that is absolutely most exciting to me,” she said. However, she also admitted that she was questioned on whether or not she’d consider straightening her hair for the competition. She refused. “I felt that it was very important for me to represent my cultural identity and to represent myself truly on this platform. This is a part of who I am. If you’re going to take one part of me, you’re going to take all of me.”

Should she win the Miss Universe pageant in December, Kentish-Rogers would join this list of women of color who earned the crown.

The post The First Black Woman to be Crowned Miss Universe Great Britain Speaks Out appeared first on Black Enterprise.

Lifestyle | Black Enterprise

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Black Conservative Group Angry After Uber Driver Refuses To Transport Them

A group of young, Black conservatives on their way to a Make America Great Again “meet-up” at the Trump International Hotel in Washington, DC claim they were refused service by an Uber driver because of their political views.

“To me, what happened took me back to the 60’s when Black Americans were told they couldn’t sit in the front of the bus, they had to sit at the back of the bus, or eat at the same restaurant, or go to the same school or would be hosed in certain neighbors,” Matthew Handy told CBN News.

“So now we are going to discrimination not based on race but on political standing. We are gonna see people not welcome in places because they are conservative or liberal. So, that is more disturbing to me than any other aspect of this.”

Handy, who’s participating in the Rocky Mountain Black Conservatives internship program, said the group had their MAGA hats in their hands when they got in the car and the Uber driver asked, “Is that a MAGA hat? Well, I can’t do this ride.”
He thought the guy was joking, but then the driver repeated, “No, I’m not doing this ride. Get out of my car.

Handy says he contacted Uber to register a complaint and only received a “generic response.”

“It doesn’t seem like, to me, that they are taking this issue seriously and I think they should,” Handy told CBN News. “I think they should look into this situation because it’s discrimination. They should fire this driver. I don’t want free rides, I want action,” he said.

“It caught me by surprise but it didn’t. When you look at Sarah Sanders and with the teenager at Whataburger… but then you’ve got people like Maxine Waters calling for it,” he said.

“The Democrats say, ‘When they go low, we go high,’ and I’m not seeing that at all, when things like Maxine Waters calling, basically, for violence for all supporters and all who work for the president. What she said is not ok. So, when something happens she’s gonna say the blood’s not on my hands but it is because she is the one who initiated it. This is not OK in America.”

Handy is aware that Trump’s own aggressive verbal and tweet attacks are part of the mix but he says none of that matters.

“When you’ve got people coming at you from the left, right, front, back – you’ve got to have your defenses on. You have to be somewhat ahead of the game, ready to defend yourself at all costs. I think he’s defending himself. Is it right how he does it? No. But he’s got to do it,” Handy explained to CBN News.

He also believes there’s a huge double-standard with the liberal and progressive Democrats.

“If I were a Democrat and I was wearing something supporting them and this happened, you’d see all the Black leaders coming to my defense, but you don’t see that happening because I don’t classify myself as a Democrat or a liberal.”

The Rocky Mountain Black Conservatives internship program was founded two years ago and its goal is to “defeat the narrative that the Left pushes out that black people shouldn’t be a part of the Republican party.”

The first year of the program there were eight interns. Now in its second year, there are 18.

Handy acknowledges that there still aren’t many Blacks or other minorities in leadership on Capitol Hill and this program aims at changing that.

“After my experience on the Hill and through this program, it’s inspired me to get out there and get involved and to run for office someday,” he told CBN News.

“It’s been a learning experience. It’s one I’ll carry for a lifetime. My Congressman has been very supportive – Rep. Mike Bost from Illinois’ 12th district has been very helpful,” he said.

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How Black Women Can Show We’re Ready to Lead

Black women can achieve power in corporate America, if we get real about the barriers we’re facing, if we’re united in our quest to overcome them, and if we’re willing to engage advocates and allies to help us get there.

That was the message at a special session during this year’s Women of Power Summit for the 40 Bank of America employees in attendance.

“We did this entire research project on what’s keeping black women from advancing to the C-suite. And we wanted to take this research on the road,” says Calandra Jarrell, senior vice president of Global Diversity and Inclusion, who moderated the candid conversation “Black Women: Ready to Lead—Speaking Truth to Power.”

“We’re exploring black women’s pursuit of powerful jobs and what’s getting in the way—unique challenges that affect brown girls. And having real-talk dialogue about what it feels like to be black in corporate America and a woman at that,” Jarrell says.

That research, Black Women: Ready to Lead, was conducted by the Center for Talent Innovation and co-sponsored by Bank of America. It showed that black women are 2.8 times more likely than white women to aspire to a powerful position with a prestigious title.

But despite the intention, and the fact that almost half of black women (43%) are confident they can succeed in a position of power, the numbers of black women in top positions in corporate America just aren’t adding up.

“We’re not broken; it’s not about performance,” Jarrell says. “It’s about how do we gain the necessary exposure—the same things our counterparts already have. And how do we brainstorm what our company and other leaders can do to really empower us and give us an equal chance.”

The panel featured Tiffany Eubanks-Saunders, senior vice president and market sales executive for U.S. Trust; Michelle Avan, director, Supervision Executive Wealth Management for Merrill Lynch; Ebony Thomas, senior vice president of global employment branding and enterprise diversity recruiting executive; along with the company’s highest-ranking black woman, Chief Diversity and Inclusion Officer Cynthia Bowman.

black women in corporate america

The Black Women: Ready to Lead session at the 2018 Women of Power Summit

“As black women in corporate America, we experience it day in and day out that we have to work twice as hard to get half as much. If you think of all of the ethnicities and the genders, black women are literally the last in everything. We have to get real creative about how we can change the dynamic,” Eubanks-Saunders said at the event.

Other nuggets of wisdom were dropped during the conversation about how we can make sure all black women succeed:

Be honest about what more you could be doing. “If we’re gonna be real, real, real with each other, no we don’t always encourage each other. We need to be kind to each other, love up on each other, and say ‘I see you,’” Avan said. “We have an obligation to give to one another support and understanding and to put it forward to model for young women.”

Have the courage to ask for help. “Black girl magic is a gift and a curse. The whole notion of magic is that it’s supernatural—you see it but you don’t believe it. But that magic hurts us. It means we can’t be vulnerable. We can’t ask for help,” Thomas said. “We might have to expose ourselves if we want those allies to be a part of our journey.”

Take care of each other along the way. Sharing what we know, even when it comes to sensitive topics, it’s the only way we’re going to overcome disparities, like the pay gap. “If you have information, don’t just hold it to yourself. If you know it, I want to hear it. School me,” Avan said.

Speak up, even when you’re not the one affected. “We all have a role. We all have the power within us to make a difference. Even if it’s small, collectively we have a broader impact. If you’re silent on an issue, you’re condoning it,” Bowman said.

The session was part of a series of discussions dubbed “Courageous Conversations,” which have been organized by employee networks at the company since 2015 to bring employees together, create awareness of their different experiences, and encourage open dialogue.

More than 60,000 employees have participated in a Courageous Conversation to date, on topics such as social justice and the role of the majority in diversity.

It’s just one of the initiatives Bank of America, where more than 40% of the U.S. workforce is racially or ethnically diverse, has in place to help develop and support black employees.

The Black Professional Group, one of the company’s oldest employee networks with more than 10,000 members, is bolstered by the Black Executive Leadership Council, which works to advance talent and increase representation, and the Diverse Leaders Sponsorship program, which engages senior leaders to promote the visibility of diverse protégés.

Such openness and connection are essential to disrupting the forces that prevent true inclusion. Said Bowman: “If you don’t address the real heart of the issues and have a dialogue around the brutal facts, it’s hard to make progress.”

The post How Black Women Can Show We’re Ready to Lead appeared first on Black Enterprise.

Career | Black Enterprise

EMPLOYMENT UPDATE:

Black models claim they were turned away from casting

Two black models are claiming they were turned away from a casting during Miami Swim Week because of their race. Models Joia Talbott and Ka-Cey took to social media to share their experience, saying the two of them, along with 10 to 15 other women “were dismissed from a casting today because they told us…
Fashion News, Photos, and Video | New York Post

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10 Black Wash. U Students Accused Of Dining And Dashing

The Clayton police department issued an apology after 10 Washington University students were falsely accused of not paying their bill at an IHOP restaurant on July 7,2018.

All of the students were black and incoming freshmen. They were leaving the IHOP  when they were stopped by police, school officials reports News 4. Clayton police officers then had the students walk back to the restaurant, even though they were shown some receipts that prove the students had paid for the food.

When they got back to the restaurant police learned that the students were not the suspects. An IHOP manager contacted police to report a customer that did not pay their bill, which is the correct procedure according to IHOP policy.

According to News 4,the CPD said it is open to ways in which it can perform better in similar situations.

They said,”our department has and will continue to study what could have been done better in this and in all incidents where we have complaints,” the Clayton PD said in its statement. “Even without any apparent policy or legal violations, we look for ways to improve and make our officers even more effective in positive interactions.”

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TV Review: ‘Orange is the New Black’ Season 6

It was hard to know how “Orange is the New Black” would — or could — come back after its fifth season, which was as ambitious as it was ultimately disastrous. The show became as scattered and chaotic as the inmate protest-turned-riot it was trying to depict, sending every character spinning seemingly for the sake […]

Variety

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Cate Shortland to Direct Marvel’s ‘Black Widow’; Here’s Everything We Know

Cate Shortland to Direct Marvel's 'Black Widow'; Here's Everything We Know

After Marvel Studios reportedly vetted more than 70 women filmmakers for the job, then the selection was down to three shortlisted favorites, Cate Shortland has been hired to direct the solo Black Widow movie, according to The Hollywood Reporter. 

Shortland is a relatively unknown filmmaker who hails from Australia. But she's been a big deal on the festival circuit with award-winning shorts and features, the latter including the 2012 Nazi drama Lore and last year's Sundance…

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Former Firefighter Pleads Guilty After Hanging Noose Outside Black Family’s Apartment

Glenn Halfin, Noose, former firefighter

A White former firefighter pleaded guilty to a federal charge of interfering with a Black family’s housing rights after he hung a noose outside their apartment, CBS DFW reports. Glenn Eugene, 64, intimidated, interfered and threatened force on a Texas family because they were African-American and living above his apartment, according to court documents obtained […]

The post Former Firefighter Pleads Guilty After Hanging Noose Outside Black Family’s Apartment appeared first on EBONY.

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Beyonce and Balmain Launch Beychella-Inspired Apparel to Benefit Black Students

Beyoncé fans will be able to relive the Beychella experience thanks to a new capsule collection inspired by the wardrobe that Queen Bey wore during her epic performance at the 2018 Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival. The superstar singer teamed up with French luxury fashion house Balmain to create a six-piece collection that includes hoodies and T-shirts emblazoned with her initials in Greek letters and other sorority-style graphics. They will come in pink, yellow, and black.

Back in April, Beyoncé became the first African American woman to headline Coachella and delivered an unapologetically black performance that paid tribute to HBCUs and black Greek fraternities and sororities, in addition to Malcolm X, Nina Simone, and African queen Nefertiti. The prices for the new Beyoncé x Balmain collection, however, will be too steep for the average college student. T-shirts are expected to cost about $ 290.95, while sweatshirts will run around $ 1,785.22. As an alternative, fans have the option to shop online for Beyoncé‘s “Homecoming” collection, which offers fraternity and sorority-styled gear at more affordable prices.

Beyonce vegan app

Beyoncé at Coachella (Image: Instagram)

According to Vogue, the 36-year-old entertainer and Balmain’s creative director, Olivier Rousteing, developed the idea to launch an apparel line while Rousteing’s team was designing the looks Beyoncé wore at Coachella. It took months to craft each custom-made costume, which included a Nefertiti-inspired cape and headpiece along with several logos that referenced black Greek college culture.

“I can say today, with absolute confidence, that collaborating with Beyoncé on her Coachella concerts is destined to be one of the most important and treasured memories of my career,” said Rousteing in a statement, according to The Hollywood Reporter. “She’s a goddess, blessed with an incredibly beautiful voice and a moral vision to match … Her level of obsessive perfectionism matches mine, so we loved poring over everything — literally everything — together; making sure that we agreed on every tiny, teeny detail of the two enormous collections that we created together for her, her family, and her 200-plus dancers and band members.”

All proceeds from the Beyoncé x Balmain collection benefit the United Negro College Fund (UNCF) to help students of color attend college. Rousteing said the UNCF was selected in response to their “need to repay an obvious debt for the inspiration we received from the signature spirit and legacy of America’s historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs).”

The capsule will be released Friday, July 13, at the Balmain flagship store in Paris and online on Saturday, July 14.

The post Beyonce and Balmain Launch Beychella-Inspired Apparel to Benefit Black Students appeared first on Black Enterprise.

Lifestyle | Black Enterprise

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The Black Eyed Peas “Get It,” Troy Ave “Uhohhh” & More | Daily Visuals 7.12.18

The Black Eyed Peas have really been going hard with their social-political content and their latest video continues to put a shine on today’s injustices and racial bias from law enforcement.

For BEP’s visual to “Get It” the Cali group demonstrates how law enforcement specifically target the Black and Hispanic community while Donald Trump enjoys watching White Supremacists and Trumpians who walk the streets freely. We seem close to living in Purge-ish times for real.

Speaking of which, Troy Ave landed himself a spot on the soundtrack to The First Purge and for his clip to “Uhohhh” he recreates the lawless atmosphere in which the film takes place.

Check out the rest of today’s drops including work from Mura Masa featuring Octavian, Asian Doll, and more.

BLACK EYED PEAS – “GET IT”

TROY AVE – “UHOHHH”

MURA MASA FT. OCTAVIAN – “MOVE ME”

AD FT. MAXO KREAM – “FROM THE BLOCK”

ASIAN DOLL – “CRUNCH TIME”

CASEY VEGGIES FT. 03 GREEDO – “BROKE”

DENZEL CURRY – “CLOUT COBAIN”

KWAMIE LIV – “FOLLOW MY HEART”

YBN CORDAE – “KUNG FU”

The Latest Hip-Hop News, Music and Media | Hip-Hop Wired

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Report: Nope, Not the Smartphone. Radio Is No. 1 Audio Platform for Black People

A new Nielsen report reveals that when it comes to content platforms, radio is No.1 for black and Hispanic consumers.

Nielsen’s Audio Today report analyzes the audio habits of black and Hispanic audiences. It found over 75 million black and Hispanic listeners tune-in to radio each week; that’s a breakdown of 92% of black consumers and 96% of Hispanics.

Surprisingly, perhaps, radio is more of what is referred to in the report as a “reach vehicle” than the smartphone. For 81% of blacks and 80% of Hispanics, their smartphone serves as their main device for consuming audio content.

Another interesting revelation—blacks and Hispanics are more likely to use smart speakers and audio streaming services than white consumers. Nineteen percent of blacks versus 18% of whites have a smart speaker in their household. Smart speakers can range from Bluetooth devices from vendors such as JBL and Sony; to smart home assistants such as Google Home and the Apple Homepod.

Fifty-two percent of blacks use audio streaming services including Spotify, iHeartRadio, TuneIn, Pandora, Apple Music, Soundcloud, etc., versus 40% of whites.

radio

(Nielsen)

The report also delves deeper into black people’s radio habits. On average, blacks listen to 13 hours and 32 minutes of radio per week. Most of that listening is done from 3 PM–7 PM, Monday–Friday during the work commute home.

Overall, urban adult contemporary is the No. 1 radio format listened to by blacks in all age groups. Generation Z and millennials favor urban contemporary over all other formats. The top five advertisers vying the most for the ears of black consumers are McDonald’s at No. 1, and then Comcast Xfinity, Optima Tax Relief, T-Mobile, and Metro PCS, respectively.

Radio has been one of the fastest and perhaps most welcoming platforms for black voices, especially during times when it was rare to see African Americans on television or in the movies, other than negative portrayals. Brian Ward, a University of Florida history professor, says that “black radio stations and disc jockeys often were as important as ministers and politicians in mobilizing support for the civil rights movement of the 1960s.”

Black wealth has also been made via radio. Berry Gordy created what was one of the nation’s largest black businesses for many years as well as the careers of iconic music stars with the Motown sound.

And Cathy Hughes took Radio One and built it into a multimedia empire, Urban One Inc. with annual revenues of more than $ 400 million.

The post Report: Nope, Not the Smartphone. Radio Is No. 1 Audio Platform for Black People appeared first on Black Enterprise.

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Black Scientist Awarded Over 100 Patents To Be Honored

George Njoroge, Ph.D., has been awarded over 100 patents for his work in cancer and immunology research and discovery. Although all of Njoroge’s patents and accomplishments were all in the United States, a quick search online reveals media coverage largely from African publishers. This weekend the scientist will be honored with the Pioneer Award for Impact in Science and Medicine at Face2Face Africa’s FACE List Awards.

With over 30 years of experience in research, Njoroge is currently a senior research fellow at global pharmaceutical corporation Lilly. He was formerly a director in the Department of Medicinal Chemistry at Merck Research Laboratories where he oversaw chemistry program in infectious diseases platform. Through research leadership at Merck, an anti-HCV viral drug Victrelis™ (also known as Boceprevir or SCH 503034) was discovered. This medicine was approved by the FDA on May 13, 2011, as the first-in-class therapy for Hepatitis C treatment and is currently in the market.

Set to begin Thursday, July 12 at the Metropolitan West, the weekend kicks off with the Pan-African Women’s Forum (PAWF), which is in its second year. PAWF will provide the platform for attendees to engage and network with groundbreaking and industrious women.


The Women’s Forum will be followed by the IAAPA Networking, Business and Career Expo on the second day of the PAW. The expo will connect Pan-African professionals and local businesses through exhibitions, networking, interactive breakout sessions, and more. The weekend will wrap up on Saturday, July 14 with the FACE List Awards—where leaders who have had tremendous impact on the Pan-African community are recognized for their achievements.

“At Face2face Africa, our mission is to change the Pan-African narrative and establish innovate platforms to help foster a more unified and empowered black diaspora community,” said Sandra Appiah, CEO of Face2Face Africa. “The FACE List Awards gala is just one of the ways we do this each year. We highlight the contributions of people of African descent by celebrating and honoring modern-day pioneers and trailblazers who are making an impact in the world.”

Njoroge, along with three other nominees, will be honored at the FACE List Awards. Gregg Bishop, the commissioner for New York City’s Department of Small Business Services (SBS) who is charged with running the city’s agency focused on equity of opportunity that leads to self-sufficiency and mobility for New York’s diverse communities, will receive the Community Development Award.

Rev. Dr. DeForest B. Soaries Jr., who has served as the senior pastor for First Baptist Church of Lincoln Gardens (FBCLG) for the past 27 years in Somerset, New Jersey, will receive the Pioneer Award for Impact in Advocacy and Community Development. Millen Magese, world-renowned fashion model and humanitarian, will be awarded the 2018 Global Ambassador for her significant contributions to charities such as the Tanzania Education Trust, African Rainforest Conservancy, and the MacDella Cooper Foundation. She has also established the Millen Magese foundation to empower women and girls of Tanzania.

An organization devoted to being the voice of the voice of the emergent generation of African descendants, Face2Face Africa established the FACE List Awards in 2011 as a platform to acknowledge, celebrate, and honor the outstanding achievements of Africans and Africans in the diaspora who are contributing toward a more dynamic and advanced global community.

For more information on registering to attend visit paw.face2faceAfrica.com.

The post Black Scientist Awarded Over 100 Patents To Be Honored appeared first on Black Enterprise.

Career | Black Enterprise

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Little Known Black History Facts: Beatriz Nascimento

Beatriz Nascimento was a key figure in Brazil’s “Movimento Negro,” or widely know as “The Black Movement of Brazil.” Through her studies, Nascimento raised awareness of “Quilombos,” settlements that housed and even served as sanctuaries for Afro-Brazilians like herself.

Nascimento was born on this day in 1942 as one of 10 siblings. The family was raised in the Cordovil neighborhood of Rio de Janeiro. In 1971, Nascimento graduated from the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro with a degree in history, which became the hallmark of her academic career and activism.

While at university, Nascimento became involved in “Movimento Negro,” and worked as an intern for the country’s national archives while studying at Fluminense Federal University. She married Jose do Rosario Freitas Gomes and the pair had a daughter. It was during this period that Nascimento began looking into Quilombos, which loosely translates into “camp site” or “slave hut,” which have long existed in Brazil as havens of African culture and preservation,

Nascimento famously noted in her research that the settlements were far more than havens for Afro-Brazilians but that they were “autonomous spaces of Black liberation.”

As her profile rose, so did Nascimento’s distaste for the racism of the Brazilian Academy of the Sciences.  She began a long career as an outspoken advocate for non-Anglo women across the African diaspora. In 1989, the documentary Ori focused on Nascimento, the movement and the importance of women within in it.

Nascimento’s life was tragically ended in 1995 ]when she was murdered by a man who suspected Nascimento of telling his wife to leave him. She is remembered in academic circles as one of the first prominent Afro-Brazilian women to speak on the history of Black people in the South American nation.

PHOTO: Fair Use

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How Black women in media and beyond are shaping the future

How Black women in media and beyond are shaping the future


How Black women in media and beyond are shaping the future

Since the start of this country, Black people have transformed their lived experiences into beautiful art that challenges societal and cultural perceptions of what it means to be Black in America. They’ve found light and joy in oppressive spaces through art forms like song and film. Their influential presence is felt throughout the world, ushering cultural change in an industry that has historically silenced their voices for speaking truth to power — as was the case with such legends as Dorothy Dandridge and Eartha Kitt.

During the 2018 BET Awards in June, Strong Black Lead — an initiative spearheaded by Black employees at Netflix — released an ad called “A Great Day in Hollywood,” invoking the spirit of “A Great Day in Harlem” (a photograph depicting popular jazz musicians of the 1950s). The 47 Black entertainers featured in the Netflix ad inspire future generations of Black creatives to trust their visions, despite the industry standards reinforcing society’s message of unworthiness: “We’re not a genre because there’s no one way to be black. We’re writing while black. Nuanced and complex; resilient and strong.”

Black women who appear in the ad, including Lena Waithe and Ava DuVernay, are examples of our culture’s creative legacy. Waithe and DuVernay utilize their art and platforms to educate viewers about political and personal issues, like the lived experiences of queer individuals and those suffering from mass incarceration, respectively.

When people of the African Diaspora are represented in media, it can transform perceptions of Blackness and challenge viewers to initiate social change.

Increased representation of Black experiences, as seen in the record-breaking films Black Panther and Girls Trip, showcased to the world that Black stories and voices matter. The intergenerational composition of the Netflix ad speaks to this larger cultural movement where Black creatives shape media narratives of their own lives and communities, continuing the historical innovations of artists before them.

This is also an accessible Black media movement where audiences can engage in conversations around Black popular culture through social media platforms like Twitter and Instagram. Young Black creators like Issa Rae, Quinta Brunson, and Franchesca Ramsey have transformed their social media presences into successful careers. Through skillful and humorous storytelling, this movement uplifts and supports work that exposes the harsh realities of being Black in this society.

In a way, this type of media brings to life the Afrofuturist dreams of author Octavia Butler — birthing a future where Black girls and women are given ownership of their lives and stories.

This movement spans beyond entertainment, too. Yes, we have Lena Waithe paving the way for Black women screenwriters, Beyoncé Knowles taking space at Coachella to celebrate Historically Black Colleges and Universities, and Janelle Monáe defining what it means to be a pansexual “free-ass-motherfucker.” But we also have Tarana Burke, who is advocating for Black women sexual assault survivors and helping get their voices heard by policymakers. We have elected representatives like Congresswoman Maxine Waters, as well as community organizers like Black Lives Matter co-founder Alicia Garza and BYP100 National Director Charlene Carruthers. When it comes to social justice, countless Black women are leading the charges in their own fields.

Angela Davis, the mother of Black feminist academic thought, said, “Black women have had to develop a larger vision of our society than perhaps any other group. They have had to understand white men, white women, and Black men. And they have had to understand themselves. When Black women win victories, it is a boost for virtually every segment of society.”

And thanks to the visions of today’s artists and activists, Black girls are growing up in an era when they can see Black women reclaim power structures that have long impacted their lives. Following the footsteps of elders who broke barriers before them, they are ensuring the future leadership of young Black girls across the world.

I believe there is an unspoken language and sisterhood among Black women. It’s evident in the magic of our voices and our desire to uplift each other, and it’s time for the world to not only hear the voices that have always spoken up — but to affirm and magnify them.

So to Ava, Lena, Beyoncé, Solange, and every Black woman changing the world through art and activism, this is a love letter to you. I — and so many others — see you, hear you, thank you, and celebrate you.

The post How Black women in media and beyond are shaping the future appeared first on HelloGiggles.

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Michael Ian Black & Bradley Cooper’s ‘Wet Hot American Summer’ Wedding Was Ahead Of Time | PeopleTV

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http://www.acrx.org -As millions of Americans strive to deal with the economic downturn,loss of jobs,foreclosures,high cost of gas,and the rising cost of prescription drug cost. Charles Myrick ,the President of American Consultants Rx, announced the re-release of the American Consultants Rx community service project which consist of millions of free discount prescription cards being donated to thousands of not for profits,hospitals,schools,churches,etc. in an effort to assist the uninsured,under insured,and seniors deal with the high cost of prescription drugs.-American Consultants Rx -Pharmacy Discount Network News

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http://www.acrx.org -As millions of Americans strive to deal with the economic downturn,loss of jobs,foreclosures,high cost of gas,and the rising cost of prescription drug cost. Charles Myrick ,the President of American Consultants Rx, announced the re-release of the American Consultants Rx community service project which consist of millions of free discount prescription cards being donated to thousands of not for profits,hospitals,schools,churches,etc. in an effort to assist the uninsured,under insured,and seniors deal with the high cost of prescription drugs.-American Consultants Rx -Pharmacy Discount Network News

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First Black Woman on ‘America’s Test Kitchen’ And Her Mission For Women Chefs of Color

As the first woman of color on America’s Test Kitchen—a PBS TV cooking show, Elle Simone, doesn’t view her “test cook” role as just a job. She believes it’s part of her life’s mission to advance the representation for women of color and provide them with a platform for mentorship, sisterhood, and job placement in the culinary world. “Through my social enterprise SheChef, I’m most proud of the women chefs that I’ve been able to mentor directly, said Simone. Their products are on the shelves of Whole Foods, they’re cooking for celebrities, and food styling with Food52.

“I would like to see the full dismantling of the “good old boys club” ideologies. The ones that condone mental, verbal, and emotional abuse as a measure of gaining respect or shaping chefs. I want more support for those who are choosing to go against the grain of these concepts in order to create positive kitchen cultures. I would love to see our male counterparts stop pretending that it’s such a phenomenon that women chefs are equally capable, and often more so, in the kitchen.”

As a culinary activist, Simone is also passionate about creating safe spaces for all women. “The culinary industry is no stranger to the types of behaviors that spearheaded the “#MeToo movement” and since women are largely the minority of our industry, it is easy for us to slip under the radar,” she said. I’ve always felt that women chefs, especially those of color, needed a place for support and guidance; figuring out how and what that looked like, became a priority for me. I believe it’s great to create beautiful content and create social settings for women chefs but what good is any of that if we don’t feel safe, affirmed, and represented?

Below, Simone shares her insight on how she plans to bridge the culture cap for women of color in the culinary world.

Talk about your role on America’s Test Kitchen.

On the PBS show, America’s Test Kitchen, my role is that of a test cook. The test cooks at ATK work long hours to test and develop recipes to get them to the level of perfection that the company strives for. On the show, the test cook shares with the host some of the challenges of the recipe and the ways in which they overcame those challenges in testing; essentially, making all the mistakes so that the ‘home cook” doesn’t have to. I’m also the food stylist for all the food on ATK TV and our secondary show, Cook’s Country.

What is the biggest thing you’d like to see changed in the culinary industry, and how are you working toward making that change happen?

This year, I moderated two very important panels on the “good old boys club” topic. The first was offered by SheChef Inc. at SXSW in Austin, Texas, about how women create and curate culinary careers. Our panelist were women who have used their unique career paths to start their own food business and how they’ve been able to foster positive kitchen cultures. The latter was with WCR (Women Chefs & Restaurateurs) Conference in Minnesota, where we discussed ways in which women chefs can speak up and show up for each other; reinforcing and strengthening our leadership voices and skills. People can feel exhausted from hearing these conversations time and time again, especially over a long period of time. But my feeling is that until the culinary industry is safe and fully inclusive, the dialogue should continue.

You’re in the midst of launching the Art of the Hustle Event Series for people pursuing culinary endeavors, what’s the purpose behind those events?

These events are a place where women in culinary can have a platform to teach and share about ways they have become successful and also share the mindsets and actions that may have hindered them. The goal is for everyone to walk away with several new ideas to implement that can help sustain their business. I always hope that networking will happen but I’m hoping for a sisterhood that will become the pulse and vein of SheChef Inc.

What’s the one thing you wish you had known before going into the culinary world?

I wish I had known that there are many paths that can be taken in this industry. You don’t have to be a restaurant chef! You can be a purchaser of a food distributing company, you can be a food stylist, you can be a nutritionist! I wish someone would’ve told me that the possibilities were endless, perhaps also that as a black woman, it’d be a bit more difficult but that despite that, I could do anything I wanted.

 

The post First Black Woman on ‘America’s Test Kitchen’ And Her Mission For Women Chefs of Color appeared first on Black Enterprise.

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For The First Time In Its 216-Year History, West Point Gets First Black Superintendent

West Point, America’s premier military college, which didn’t graduate its first black cadet until Reconstruction in 1877, now has its first black superintendent.

For the first time in its 216-year history, Lt. Gen. Darryl Williams, who has held high-ranking posts in Europe and Asia, will become the first black officer to command West Point. He will take over from Lt. Gen. Robert L. Caslen Jr. who is retiring after more than 40 years in the Army, also serving five years as West Point’s superintendent.

William’s appointment, according to the Associated Press, comes less than a year after cadet and Rhodes Scholar, Simone Askew, a black woman from Fairfax, Virginia, was selected as first captain of the Corps of Cadets last summer and graduated in May.

A 1983 graduate of the military college and native of Alexandria, Williams has served first, as deputy chief of staff for the Army in Europe and deputy commanding general for support for the 2nd Infantry Division in South Korea. Recently, he was the commander of NATO’s Allied Land Command in Turkey.

Founded in 1802 along the west bank of the Hudson River 50 miles north of New York, West Point didn’t graduate its first black cadet until 1877. Throughout the 20th century, the military college didn’t graduate another black cadet until Benjamin O. Davis Jr. arrived there in 1932. During his stay, Davis ate alone, roomed alone, and was shunned by fellow cadets because he was black. After his graduation in 1936, he would go on to command the Tuskegee Airmen during World War II, retiring as an Air Force general in 1970. West Point’s newest barracks, per AP, was named after Davis.

For the past couple of years, the U.S. has increasingly shifted its focus on diversifying its ranks, with policies that emphasized inclusion, and marketing campaigns that targeted underrepresented communities. Of the 1,200 incoming members of West Point’s class of 2020, 186 are African Americans.

The post For The First Time In Its 216-Year History, West Point Gets First Black Superintendent appeared first on Black Enterprise.

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‘We Don’t Support Black Business Owners’ Note Left At Indiana Business

An Indiana business that hasn’t even opened up shop yet is being harassed simply because the owners are black. The owners of Level UP Gaming Lounge in Irvington, Indiana, told FOX 59 that an anonymous note was delivered to his business in June after a gaming event was held at the location.

“Close Shop! We don’t support black business owners!” the note read. Owner Sami Ali has already reported the incident to police. “I made a police report to document that people are doing hate crimes towards our business. Thank god it was just a note. No broken windows or anything,” Ali told FOX 59.

Ali, who grew up on the east side of Indianapolis and has put thousands of dollars into the gaming lounge, said he is making an investment in the neighborhood.

“A place to come in and meet people face to face and then the adults can sit there and enjoy a glass of wine. It bothers me that people still think that way but it is not going to stop me from doing what I want to do,” said Ali.

The note he said does not represent the support that he has received from other Irvington businesses who are upset and disappointed. Wolfe, who owns a coffee shop just across the street from Level UP, said the area is ready for the gaming lounge to open.

“Honestly, I was shocked. It sounds like something out of the 1960s. It is difficult enough to get people to come in and now for people to behave this way…that is just ridiculous,” Wolfe said.

Ali is remaining optimistic though. He said he is ready to open the doors even sooner.

“We got your note but we are not going to back down. We are going to push forward and maybe open up sooner,” said Ali.



The post ‘We Don’t Support Black Business Owners’ Note Left At Indiana Business appeared first on Black Enterprise.

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Black Man Tasered by Lancaster Police Files Lawsuit

Sean Williams, 27, is suing a Lancaster, Pennsylvania cop and the city’s police department after he was shot with a taser last Thursday while sitting on a curb waiting to be arrested. The civil rights lawsuit alleges that Officer Philip Bernot used excessive force and that Williams was racially profiled and received inadequate medical attention. According to […]

The post Black Man Tasered by Lancaster Police Files Lawsuit appeared first on EBONY.

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10 Of The Most Generous Black Women In Hollywood

Hollywood can be a place associated with the superficial, but many stars use their platforms and their fortunes to help those in need. For many Black actresses who’ve made it to A-list status, staying in touch with the community is a way of life.

Here are our top picks for the most generous Black women in Hollywood.

TIDAL X: Brooklyn - Arrivals

Source: Kevin Mazur / Getty

Beyoncé:

Beyoncé has quietly donated to causes special to her heart for years, choosing to keep her charitable actions under the radar. But they’ve still been extremely significant. From helping the victims of the Flint water crisis to the homeless, she’s given away millions of her own money to help those in need.

Most recently, when a devastating hurricane struck her hometown of Houston, Texas, the Grammy-winner’s charity BeyGOOD provided aid in the form of baby products, blankets, toiletries, cots and food to the victims who lost their homes and belongings. She also personally handed out food and posed for photos with the victims before hosting a star-studded telethon to raise millions for recovery,.

Oprah Winfrey:

Celebrity Sightings in Los Angeles - June 11, 2018

Source: Hollywood To You/Star Max / Getty

From her Oprah Winfrey Leadership Academy in South Africa to the Angel Network to fueling the careers of entrepreneurs like Rachael Ray, Nate Berkus, Ava Duvernay and Iyanla Vanzant, Oprah is one of the world’s most renowned philanthropists.

 

Rihanna:

Paris Fashion Week Men's - Louis Vuitton - Arrivals

Source: WENN.com / WENN

Far from just her music and fashion, Rihanna has quickly become one of the most generous women in Hollywood, donating millions to build a cancer research facility in her native Barbados and raising massive amounts of donations from her Diamond Ball for women pursuing their education around the world. She’s been so generous with her wealth that she was named Harvard University’s 2017 Humanitarian of The Year.

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Omari Hardwick Turns the Tables Spotlighting Young Black Man During Award Acceptance Speech

There was no lack of events this past weekend during BET Experience. Icon Talks held up its side of the bargain by honoring black men who are making major moves in the entertainment industry. The organization partnered with the Motion Picture Association of America to host its annual celebration and this year’s event was filled with heartfelt speeches and awards presented to Harry Belafonte, Robert Townsend, Omari Hardwick, Quincy Brown, Kevin Forston, and Roc Nation’s Lenny Santiago.

Omari Hardwick and Guests (Image: file)

Omari Hardwick and guests, Icon Talks (Image: file)

 

When accepting his award, Omari Hardwick decided to turn the spotlight from himself to someone else. A young man approached him on the red carpet right before the show, hugged him, and said, “Man, you saved me, you saved me. I was like a broke kid in Maryland. Sunday nights just watching your character, I could see your character in that character.”

Hardwick was so moved by the man that he brought him on stage to revisit the interaction. “I thought man, all I ever wanted to do was tell stories,” said Hardwick, as the man stood next to him with tears streaming from his eyes. “It’s amazing to be able to tell stories and make money doing it, but you tell stories and…you affect so many people. My father used to say, you never know who’s looking at you.”

The awards ceremony took place at the SLS Beverly Hills and it is clear that the mission of this organization is working. “Icon Talks will continue to pay homage to our modern image-makers—both in front of the camera and behind the scenes,” said John Burns, co-founder of Icon Talks. “This past year has been an exceptional push for diversity in film and television, and with the incredible contributions of our honorees, it is fitting that we celebrated the future of entertainment and its continued steps on the path to inclusion.”

Icon Talks was generously sponsored by the Motion Picture Association of America, AT&T, Planned Parenthood, Ciroc, and Porsche Cars North America.

About Icon Talks

Icon Talks is an avant-garde platform offering intimate discussions, insights, and performances with icons from various walks of life—from music moguls to professional athletes, CEOs, actors and activists. These performances and conversations explore paths to success and provide a platform to engage, entertain, and inspire.

For additional information about Icon Talks, click here.

The post Omari Hardwick Turns the Tables Spotlighting Young Black Man During Award Acceptance Speech appeared first on Black Enterprise.

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Olympic diver Tom Daley and his husband Dustin Lance Black celebrate birth of their baby

OLYMPIC diver Tom Daley and husband Dustin Lance Black have announced the birth of their first child with a notice in The Times.

Getty – Contributor

Dustin Lance Black and Tom Daley are overjoyed at becoming dads to Robert Ray Black-Daley[/caption]

They said Robert Ray Black-Daley was born on Wednesday, after previously revealing they were expecting via a surrogate in the US in February.
At the time Tom, 24, hit back at critics who sniped at the use of a surrogate.
He said: “There are lots of people in this world that can’t have kids, whether it’s due to fertility issues or health issues, whatever it may be, I don’t think there would be as much drama if it was a straight couple.”

AFP or licensors

Tom represented Great Britain at the Olympics and won a bronze medal[/caption]

The pair have not said which of them is the biological father but Dustin said they want to have “biological connection” to their child.
He said: “There was something for both of us where we felt deeply that we’d like to complete that connection first when creating our family, and to have a biological connection to our past, to bring that into our present and let that grow into the future. At least at first, for the first couple.”

Getty Images – Getty

Tom Daley specialises in the 10-metre platform event[/caption]

Earlier this year Daley, who has won two Olympic bronze medals, said the prospect of fatherhood had already changed him.
Dustin, 44, is an American film director and writer, who won the best original screenplay Oscar for the 2008 film Milk.

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Prosecutor: Pittsburgh Police Officer Had ‘No Justification’ for Killing Unarmed Black Teen

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A white East Pittsburgh police officer who was sworn into duty only hours before he shot and killed an unarmed black teen last week was charged with criminal homicide Wednesday morning, according to court records.

Allegheny County District Attorney Stephen A. Zappala Jr. told reporters that officer Michael Rosfeld, 30, had “no justification” to fire at 17-year-old Antwon Rose, whose hands were raised in the air as he fled a vehicle.

“Rose never committed any crimes,” Zappala said. “Rosfeld’s actions were intentional and brought about the result he was looking to accomplish.”

Read more at The Daily Beast.

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http://www.acrx.org -As millions of Americans strive to deal with the economic downturn,loss of jobs,foreclosures,high cost of gas,and the rising cost of prescription drug cost. Charles Myrick ,the President of American Consultants Rx, announced the re-release of the American Consultants Rx community service project which consist of millions of free discount prescription cards being donated to thousands of not for profits,hospitals,schools,churches,etc. in an effort to assist the uninsured,under insured,and seniors deal with the high cost of prescription drugs.-American Consultants Rx -Pharmacy Discount Network News

CHARITY UPDATE:

Click today to request your free ACRX discount prescription card and save up to 80% off of your medicine!

SPECIAL DONATION REQUEST UPDATE:

Please help American Consultants Rx achieve it’s biggest goal yet of donating over 30 million discount prescription cards to over 50k organizations in an effort to assist millions of Americans in need. Please click here to donate today!

How the Supreme Court Ruling on Labor Unions Will Affect Black Workers

Dealing a major blow to public sector labor unions, conservatives on the Supreme Court on Wednesday ruled that it is unconstitutional for public employee unions to require non-union workers to pay fees that go toward collective bargaining.

According to the Washington Post, the 5-4 decision “overturned a 40-year-old precedent and said that compelling such fees was a violation of workers’ free speech rights.” 

“It is hard to estimate how many billions of dollars have been taken from nonmembers and transferred to public-sector unions in violation of the First Amendment. Those unconstitutional exactions cannot be allowed to continue indefinitely,” Supreme Court Justice Samuel Alito wrote for the majority, joining Chief Justice John G. Roberts Jr. and Justices Anthony M. Kennedy, Clarence Thomas and Neil M. Gorsuch.

Those who are pro-labor were quick to point out the adverse effects the ruling would have on labor unions and the working class.

“Unions will always be the most effective force and vehicle to propel working people into the middle class. Despite this unprecedented and nefarious political attack—designed to further rig the rules against working people—nothing changes the fact that America needs unions now more than ever,” said Lee Saunders, president of the American Federation of State, County and Municipal Employees.

Many feel that anything that weakens labor unions will disproportionately affect black workers.

“The aggressively activist decision today by five members of the Supreme Court in Janus is an attack on unions and working families that will further rig our economy and democracy in favor of corporations and billionaires. Today’s decision further threatens the economic security of working people, including women and people of color, by weakening the ability of public sector union members like firefighters, teachers, social workers, and police officers to earn a decent living,” Seema Nanda, executive vice president and COO of The Leadership Conference on Civil and Human Rights, said in a statement.

“We must continue to organize, hold our elected leaders accountable, and fight back against efforts to weaken America’s middle class. Unions play a critical role in securing higher wages, improved access to health care, anti-discrimination policies, and equality in the workplace,” Nanda continued.

The National Black Worker Center Project (NBWCP), a national organization focused on addressing the multi-dimensional job crisis for black workers, said the ruling, “would have allowed public employee unions to … cover the costs of collective bargaining and enforcing contracts that protect all workers.”

“To be clear, African Americans have as much at stake in maintaining strong unions as anyone with regards to economic security, affordable healthcare and retirement benefits. But, the union advantage disappears with Supreme Court decision and changes the landscape for the 20% of African Americans who work in public sector jobs. The implications of the Supreme Court siding with Janus in this case means that workers will face the uncertainty of stagnate or diminished wages, job insecurity and the possibility of retiring into poverty.”

The post How the Supreme Court Ruling on Labor Unions Will Affect Black Workers appeared first on Black Enterprise.

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Celebrity Stylist Zerina Akers Opens Up About Her Personal Journey, Black Designers, and Working with Beyoncé [Photos]

If you’ve been wondering why Beyoncé’s fashion game has been on point lately, it’s because of celebrity stylist Zerina Akers.

As Beyoncé’s “personal stylist and wardrobe curator,” Zerina is the woman responsible for the looks you see on Bey’s Instagram as well as recent music videos.

Blessings on Blessings! #StyledbyZerinaAkers #Beyonce

A post shared by Zerina Akers (@zerinaakers) on

Look-by-look and client-by-client, Zerina’s continuing to make a name for herself in MAJOR ways.

In an interview with Le Magazine Noir, Zerina keeps it real about how she manages her work ethic, the importance of uplifting Black designers, and her proudest moment.

Check out a few excerpts:

On managing her work ethic: I recently turned 30 and I’ve decided that my 20s were for working hard, my 30s will be about working smart, and I will enjoy it all in my 40s. I don’t have a lot of time so I try to spend it wisely. When I have moments to just be with my people and be in my home, I make sure to cherish it and make it count. For me, now is about investing my time into what I want to create, and who I want  to be. In between pulls or running errands, I’ll try to catch up with my friends and family over the phone and make sure that no matter what they know that I think about them and I love them.

On Black designers: “There is so much talent in the World and often not enough resources for some people to truly express themselves through their craft. I have watched many young designers grow but I have also watched many designers stray away from their dreams. I just try to support them as much as I can because sometimes it’s the most simplest moment that can completely launch someone’s career and completely change their life.”

On working on Beyoncé’s ‘Formation’ hat look: “That was the fist time I realized that I can create work that will OUTLIVE MYSELF. That look was composed of all INDIE designers and became it’s own moment, it’s own image.”

You can read more of what Zerina has to say here.

The post Celebrity Stylist Zerina Akers Opens Up About Her Personal Journey, Black Designers, and Working with Beyoncé [Photos] appeared first on lovebscott – celebrity gossip and entertainment news.

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The Black Films and TV Shows We Can’t Wait To See This Summer

A number of black-oriented movies and television shows debuted at the American Black Film Festival earlier this month, celebrating the brilliance and creativity of black art. But don’t fret if you missed the festival; there are a lot of black films and TV shows to look forward to this summer. Here’s a list of seven must-see productions showcasing the talent of black casts, producers, directors, and writers.

Insecure (Season 3)



On Monday, HBO released the first trailer for the highly anticipated third season of Insecure, revealing that Issa, played by lead actress and show creator Issa Rae, may finally be over her ex Lawrence (Jay Ellis). In the clip, she is seen enjoying single life with her best friend Molly (Yvonne Orji), Tiffany (Amanda Seales), and Kelli (Natasha Rothwell). However, she may rekindle her fling with Daniel (Y’lan Noel), who also makes an appearance in the promo.

Official synopsis: Modern-day black women might be described as strong and confident; in other words, just the opposite of Issa and Molly. As the best friends deal with their own real-life flaws, their insecurities come to the fore as together they cope with an endless series of uncomfortable everyday experiences. Created by co-star Issa Rae and writer/comic Larry Wilmore (The Daily Show With Jon Stewart), the comedy series looks at the friendship of two black women in a unique, authentic way. It features the music of both indie and established artists of color, and touches on a variety of social and racial issues that relate to the contemporary black experience.

Network: HBO

Release date: August 12


Superfly



Superfly puts a modern-day spin on the 1972 blaxploitation classic, starring Trevor Jackson as the snazzy antihero. Set in Atlanta, the movie is filled with fancy cars, hip-hop, and strip clubs. The Sony and Silver Pictures’ reboot debuted on June 13 earning an estimated $ 1.2 million.

Official synopsis: Cocaine kingpin Youngblood Priest realizes that it’s time to get out of the game after surviving a violent attack from a crazed rival. Hoping for one last score, Priest and his partner travel to Mexico to arrange a deal. The career criminal now finds himself trying to outmaneuver the cartel, two corrupt police officers and all the double-crossers that threaten his path to freedom.

Release date: June 13


Luke Cage (Season 2)



Cheo Hodari Coker’s adaption of Marvel’s Luke Cage has been a fan favorite since the streeaming series first premiered in 2016. The gritty superhero series features an all-star cast of actors of color, including Mike Colter, Simone Missick, Alfre Woodard, Mustafa Shakir, Gabrielle Dennis, and Rosario Dawson.

Official synopsis: After clearing his name, Luke Cage (played by actor Mike Colter) has become a celebrity on the streets of Harlem, with a reputation as bulletproof as his skin. But being so visible has only increased his need to protect the community and find the limits of who he can and can’t save. With the rise of a formidable new foe, Luke is forced to confront the fine line that separates a hero from a villain.

Network: Netflix

Premiere date: June 22


Love Is __



Love Is_ is a new romantic series that promises to bring all the delicious feels of ‘90s nostalgia. The show is based on the real-life romance of award-winning producer Mara Brock Akil—the mastermind behind GirlfriendsThe Game, and Being Mary Jane— and her husband Salim Akil. Set in 1990s L.A., actors Michele Weaver and William Catlett play Mara and Salim when they first started dating back in 1997.

Official synopsis: Michele Weaver and Will Catlett star in OWN’s new romantic drama Love Is___, from award-winning producers Mara Brock Akil (Girlfriends, Being Mary Jane, The Game) and Salim Akil (Black Lightning). Set primarily in 1990s Los Angeles against the backdrop of Black Hollywood, Love Is___ follows Nuri (Michele Weaver) and Yasir (Will Catlett), a couple from seemingly opposite worlds, as they chase their dreams and learn to follow their hearts. Told from the perspective of the couple’s present-day selves, the romantic drama also revisits the social issues and vibrant black culture of that time reflecting on how it all aligned to shape the couple they have become nearly 20 years later—a power couple navigating a complex set of social codes while also balancing successful careers and a beautiful family. Drawing inspiration from creators Mara Brock Akil and Salim Akil’s own relationship journey, the series explores the highs, the lows, and the magic of falling (and staying) in love.

Network: OWN

Premiere date: June 19


Sorry To Bother You



Sorry To Bother You is a surreal Afro-futuristic comedy that pushes an anti-capitalist message. Mic describes Sorry to Bother You as a likely “cultural sensation” that “deftly captures the folly of these times.”

Official synopsis: Sorry To Bother You is an alternate present-day version of Oakland. Telemarketer Cassius Green (Lakeith Stanfield) discovers a magical key to professional success, propelling him into a macabre universe. The ensemble cast consists of Lakeith Stanfield, Tessa Thompson, Armie Hammer, Terry Crews, Steven Yeun, Omari Hardwick, Jermaine Fowler, and Danny Glover. The film is written and directed by Boots Riley and produced by Nina Yang Bongiovi, Forest Whitaker, Charles D. King and George Rush with distribution by Annapurna Pictures.

Release date: July 6


The First Purge



The First Purge is based on a social experiment that lifts all laws in America for 12 hours on Independence Day. The cast includes several actors of color like Y’lan Noel, Lex Scott Davis, and Joivan Wade.

Official synopsis: Behind every tradition lies a revolution. Next Independence Day, witness the rise of our country’s 12 hours of annual lawlessness. Welcome to the movement that began as a simple experiment: The First Purge.

To push the crime rate below one percent for the rest of the year, the New Founding Fathers of America (NFFA) test a sociological theory that vents aggression for one night in one isolated community.  But when the violence of oppressors meets the rage of the marginalized, the contagion will explode from the trial-city borders and spread across the nation.

Release date: July 4


BlacKkKlansman



Extraordinary filmmakers Spike Lee and Jordan Peele teamed up to produce one of the most highly anticipated movies of the summer, BlacKkKlansman.

Official synopsis: From visionary filmmaker Spike Lee comes the incredible true story of an American hero. It’s the early 1970s, and Ron Stallworth (John David Washington) is the first African-American detective to serve in the Colorado Springs Police Department. Determined to make a name for himself, Stallworth bravely sets out on a dangerous mission: infiltrate and expose the Ku Klux Klan. The young detective soon recruits a more seasoned colleague, Flip Zimmerman (Adam Driver), into the undercover investigation of a lifetime. Together, they team up to take down the extremist hate group as the organization aims to sanitize its violent rhetoric to appeal to the mainstream. Produced by the team behind the Academy-Award® winning film Get Out.

Release date: August 10


Queen Sugar (Season 3)



Season 3 of Queen Sugar debuted with a two-part premiere on May 29 and 30, picking up exactly where season 2 left off. The premiere addressed both the prospective sale of the mill and the resolution of Ralph Angel and Darla’s relationship.

Official SynopsisQueen Sugar tells the story of the estranged Bordelon siblings in Louisiana. At the center of the family are Nova, a journalist and activist; Charley, the wife and manager of an NBA player; and formerly incarcerated father Ralph Angel, who is searching for redemption. Following a tragedy in the family, the siblings must put their complicated lives aside so that they can come together to run the clan’s struggling sugar cane farm. Also involved in the farm are Aunt Violet and family friend Remy Newell.

Premiere date: May 29 and 30

The post The Black Films and TV Shows We Can’t Wait To See This Summer appeared first on Black Enterprise.

Lifestyle | Black Enterprise

EMPLOYMENT SEARCH UPDATE:

Therapy for Black Girls: Meet the Woman on a Mission To Reduce Mental Health Stigma

After watching the first Black Girls Rock awards show Joy Harden Bradford, Ph.D. was inspired to create Therapy for Black Girls, a platform encouraging the mental wellness of black women and girls. Over the years, Dr. Joy has expanded the platform from a blog to a podcast with listeners in 158 different countries, a Facebook group called the “Thrive Tribe” with over 13,000 women and a therapist directory which has grown to over 700 therapists in less than a year. “My work has always been heavily focused on black women and girls,” says Dr. Joy. I think too often we’re so busy taking care of other people that we aren’t always paying attention to what’s going on with us. I wanted a platform that helped sisters put the focus back on themselves.”

We caught up with Dr. Joy to get some insight on self-care, the stigma of mental health in the black community, and cliché phrases to avoid when trying to help a depressed loved one.

What are the stigmas that often hold people of color back from therapy and what services or programs do you offer to combat these stigmas?

I believe that many people of color have been socialized to believe that talking about private matters should only happen within the confines of the family (the whole idea of airing dirty laundry so to speak). Also, many people still don’t know how therapy works or believe that only “crazy” people need therapy. There are also many people who still view mental illness and needing to go to therapy as a sign of a weak faith relationship, which, of course, is not the case.

The Therapy for Black Girls podcast is helping to reduce that stigma. The podcast episodes are designed to help people get an idea of the millions of different reasons someone might benefit from therapy. Listeners are also exposed to a variety of therapists that are guests on the show. This format helps them to realize that we all have different personalities and work differently so there is likely a therapist out there that’s a great fit for everyone. I also do live video chats on both Instagram & Facebook at 12 noon ET every Thursday. I call it Three for Thursday and I share three tips about a topic and then open the floor for general questions. I think it’s a great opportunity for people to get accurate information about mental health and to dispel any myths they may have about how therapy works, etc.

To date, what are your top three episodes? 

  1. Self-Worth 
  2. Slaying Your Anxiety 
  3. This Isn’t What I Imagined 

When it comes to mental health, what is the one thing that you think women overlook in maintaining self-care?

Boundaries! I think far too many of us don’t say NO enough. No to that extra task at work, no to that friend who never shows up for us, no to that ex who keeps trying to come back into our lives, etc. I don’t think we always realize the cumulative impact that taking on other people’s stuff can have on our mental health.

What cliché phrases should we avoid when trying to help a depressed loved one?

  • Just pray about it.
  • Your life is so good, what do you have to be depressed about?
  • Life is hard for everyone, toughen up.

While people may be well-intentioned when trying to help a loved one, these sentiments typically only make people feel like you don’t understand them and that you’re not someone they can go to in the future. A nice alternative for this would be something like “I’m sorry to hear that you’re struggling. Do you want to talk more about how you’re feeling?”

What do you believe people can do to reduce the stigma of depression and anxiety?

I think sharing more openly about our own struggles and experiences with therapy helps. I also think we have to be careful with our language. It’s important to remove stigmatizing language from our vocabulary, so saying things like “she’s so crazy” or “this gives me OCD” is something to avoid.

The post Therapy for Black Girls: Meet the Woman on a Mission To Reduce Mental Health Stigma appeared first on Black Enterprise.

Lifestyle | Black Enterprise

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[Breaking] San Francisco Now Has Its First Black Woman Mayor

London Breed will be the first black woman mayor of San Francisco after her opponent conceded the election results, reports CNN. 

Breed claimed victory after her opponent, Mark Leno, a former California state senator, conceded in a tight election race. Breed and Leno battled for the position after the untimely death of San Francisco Mayor Ed Lee, who died from a heart attack in December 2017.

African American women have been particularly energized in the 2018 election season. Stacey Abrams recently made history as the first female gubernatorial nominee for any major party in Georgia.

And in December of last year, African American voters showed up in massive numbers at the voting booth on Tuesday, helping Democrat Doug Jones defeat Republican Roy Moore for the U.S. Senate seat.

According to exit polls by The Washington Post—African Americans voted almost unanimously for Jones. The Democrat received 96% of the black vote. Jones was particularly helped by black women; receiving 98% of their vote. And 93% of black men voted for him. Still, it was a tight race with Jones receiving 50% of the overall vote versus Moore’s 49%..

Additionally, many grassroots initiatives have sprung up to get more people of color involved in politics.

 

—Editor’s Note: This is a breaking story and will be updated. 

 

 

 

The post [Breaking] San Francisco Now Has Its First Black Woman Mayor appeared first on Black Enterprise.

Career | Black Enterprise

EMPLOYMENT UPDATE:

Say What Now? Former Trump Campaign Manager Tells Black Fox News Panelist He’s Out of His ‘Cotton-Picking Mind’ [Video]

David Bossie, a former deputy campaign manager for Donald Trump, told a Black Fox News guest he was out of his “cotton-picking mind” in the middle of a debate on rhetoric surrounding the Trump administration’s immigration policies.

via NYDN:

Bossie hurled the phrase — bringing to mind the work of slaves in the old South — at Democratic strategist Joel Payne on “Fox & Friends” Sunday morning after the two spoke about former CIA director Michael Hayden sharing a photo of Auschwitz on Twitter.

“Michael Hayden posted a picture of Auschwitz,” Bossie said, to which Payne replied, “Yeah, that liberal Michael Hayden, that screaming liberal Michael Hayden.”

Bossie then responded, “Look, you’re out of your cotton-picking mind.”

Payne was quick to reply: “Cotton-picking mind? Brother, let me tell you something. I got some relatives who picked cotton. And I’m not going to allow you to attack me like that on TV.”

Bossie responded with an incredulous, “Attack you how?” and continued to declare Payne “out of (his) mind.”

Ed Henry, a Fox News host and the discussion’s moderator, issued a statement once the show returned from a commercial break and said that while he wasn’t sure what Bossie meant by the phrase, it “clearly offended” Payne and others.

“I want to make sure that Fox News and this show, myself, we don’t agree with that particular phrase,” he said. “It was obviously offensive and these debates get fiery, that’s unfortunate. We like to have honest and spirited debates, but not phrases like that, obviously. And so I will just leave it at that.”

What is this world coming to?

The post Say What Now? Former Trump Campaign Manager Tells Black Fox News Panelist He’s Out of His ‘Cotton-Picking Mind’ [Video] appeared first on lovebscott – celebrity gossip and entertainment news.

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Human Rights Crisis at the Border: Black Leaders Weigh In On Zero-Tolerance Immigration Policy

The images are heart-wrenching: toddlers in tears, a chorus of children’s voices wailing for their mothers and fathers, boys sitting forlornly in cages. In April, the Trump administration put into effect a “zero-tolerance” immigration policy that is escalating into a human rights crisis at the United States’ southern border. With the new policy, the administration is prosecuting as many people crossing the border as possible. Many of these migrants cross the border with children. As The Washington Post explains, when the adults are prosecuted, they are taken into Department of Homeland Security (DHS) custody. The children are separated from the adults, their parents, in most cases, and are placed in internment centers or “tender age” shelters since children cannot be detained by DHS. According to The Washington Post: 

Adding it all up, this means the Trump administration is operating a system in which immigrant families that are apprehended at the border get split up, because children go into a process in which they eventually get placed with sponsors in the country while their parents are prosecuted and potentially deported.

Human Rights Council, Spiritual Leaders Call For Policy’s End 

Journalists have traveled to the detention centers where these children are being held. The images and reporting have sparked outrage around the world. “The Department of Homeland Security facilities do not meet the basic standards for the care of children in residential settings,” the American Academy of Pediatrics stated in a released document. The head of the United Nations’ Human Rights Council called separating these migrant families “unconscionable,’” and called for the end of the practice (shortly after, the Trump administration announced that it was withdrawing the U.S. out of the Human Rights Council accusing the organization if being “a cesspool of political bias.”)

Historically, there has been a covert effort to drive a wedge between African Americans and immigrants. Alan Jenkins, executive director of The Opportunity Agenda wrote in an essay, “The mainstream media have fixated on potential points of black/immigrant tension, looking for a conflict storyline. And that storyline has been amply fed by conservative anti-immigrant groups intent on driving a wedge between the two communities.”

And yet, the harrowing images of migrant children held captive in tent cities and cages; sleeping under blankets made of aluminum foil, have black leaders speaking out. When Attorney General Jeff Sessions quoted biblical passages as justification for the zero-tolerance policy, African American religious leaders pushed back. CBS News reports that leaders at The Council of Bishops of the African Methodist Episcopal Church said, “The Bible does not justify discrimination masked as racism, sexism, economic inequality, oppression or the abuse of children.”

Rev. Al Sharpton accused the Trump administration of enacting this policy because these are children of color. “There is a different policy here, and that is playing hardball with the future of these young people,” he said at a news conference in Washington, D.C. yesterday. Sharpton and other activists plan on visiting the immigrant children at the border.

Black Congressional Members Have Their Say 

Perhaps some of the sharpest criticism has come from Rep. Elijah Cummings. Cummings called the new immigration policy “the key moral and ethical issue of the day.”

“We sent letter after letter, letter after letter, asking these [House] committees to investigate the Trump administration’s policy which is now resulting in child internment camps, that’s what I said, child internment camps,” he said during a House Oversight Committee hearing on Tuesday. He went onto to say that no matter one’s views on immigration, “We should all be able to agree, that we will not keep kids in child internment camps indefinitely and hidden away from public view. What country is that?



Rep. Maxine Waters thanked members of Jeff Sessions’ church when they sent him a letter with over 600 signatures condemning the zero-tolerance policy and accusing the administration of child abuse.

“Kick him out in the name of the Lord!” urged Rep. Waters on Twitter.


Michelle Obama tweeted support for Laura Bush’s public disapproval of the policy.


Kamala Harris also weighed in.


Celebrities and Influencers Express Outrage 

In addition to political and spiritual leaders, black influencers and celebrities have also criticized the policy. John Legend, who has been vocal about his disdain for President Trump, sent this tweet after Paul Ryan posted a picture of his family on Father’s Day:


Actor Jesse Williams posted on Instagram.

FUCKING DISGUSTING, VIOLENT, SLOPPY & MALICIOUS: THE AMERICAN WAY. KEEP CALLING YOUR LOCAL OFFICIALS! 202-224-3121, Since early May, more than 2,300 children have been taken from their parents at the U.S.-Mexico border, resulting in a new influx of young children requiring government care. The government has faced withering critiques over images of some of the children in cages inside U.S. Border Patrol processing stations. Decades after the nation's child welfare system ended the use of orphanages over concerns about the lasting trauma to children, the administration is standing up new institutions to hold Central American toddlers that the government separated from their parents. The United Nations, some Democratic and Republican lawmakers and religious groups have sharply criticized the policy, calling it inhumane. Alicia Lieberman, who runs the Early Trauma Treatment Network at University of California, San Francisco, said decades of study show early separations can cause permanent emotional damage. "Children are biologically programmed to grow best in the care of a parent figure. When that bond is broken through long and unexpected separations with no set timeline for reunion, children respond at the deepest physiological and emotional levels," she said. "Their fear triggers a flood of stress hormones that disrupt neural circuits in the brain, create high levels of anxiety, make them more susceptible to physical and emotional illness, and damage their capacity to manage their emotions, trust people, and focus their attention on age-appropriate activities." via #AP

A post shared by jesse Williams (@ijessewilliams) on


And in an Instagram video, Oprah said that this is a story that is “important to all Americans.”

A post shared by Oprah (@oprah) on


 

 

 

 

 

,

The post Human Rights Crisis at the Border: Black Leaders Weigh In On Zero-Tolerance Immigration Policy appeared first on Black Enterprise.

Lifestyle | Black Enterprise

BEAUTY DEAL UPDATE:

Slideshow: Everything You Missed at the American Black Film Festival 2018 Including Future, Kofi, and Coogler

If you were seeking to break into the film industry or you love black movies and television shows, the only place to be on this planet was the 22nd Annual Black Film Festival. Held in Miami, the event was sold out—and for good reason.

ABFF Ventures CEO Jeff Friday created the film festival more than two decades ago as the premier professional development and networking platform for African American filmmakers, artists, and industry influencers. This year, filmmakers, producers, and actors sought to elevate themselves within the industry by gaining essential training through a series of master classes taught by seasoned pros, which included “Becoming A Showrunner;” “Film Financing;” and “Nailing Your Audition.” Others gained the inside track through “Business of Entertainment” seminars sessions that demystified film distribution deals; evaluated television writers’ rooms; and shared how Netflix Original Films seeks to diversify talent in front of and behind the camera, among other topics.

Attendees also gained access to premier entertainment and interviews. For instance, HBO, which has been an ABFF partner for 21 years, sponsored the side-splitting Comedy Wings Competition as well as diverse, powerful slate of indies featured as part of its short film competition. Moreover, filmmakers and film lovers alike packed Miami’s New World Center to view an exclusive interview with ABFF alum and filmmaker of the moment: Black Panther Director Ryan Coogler.

SEE ALL THE PHOTOS: 

Sony Pictures Reception at the ABFF Premiere of “Superfly” – June 13, 2018

 

 

The post Slideshow: Everything You Missed at the American Black Film Festival 2018 Including Future, Kofi, and Coogler appeared first on Black Enterprise.

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Here Is A Listing of Black Banks in the United States

If ever there was a time for community-building and cultivation, that time is right now. Though the need to strengthen our communities is apparent, many are left wondering exactly what can be done or what role a single person can play to ultimately generate a lasting impact. Here’s a start: housing your hard-earned money in black banks.

Black-owned banks have perhaps never before been in so bright a spotlight, nor have they drummed up so much excitement in the African American community until recently. The revived interest is considered to have been sparked by the words of rapper Killer Mike during a widely viewed Town Hall meeting held by MTV and BET. “We can’t go out in the street and start bombing, shooting, and killing. I encourage none of us to engage in acts of violence. I encourage to take our warfare to financial institutions,” he said during the event.

Killer Mike went on to propose that 1 million people should open $ 100 accounts with black-owned banks. And people did. In fact, OneUnited Bank thanked Killer Mike personally for giving rise to the #BankBlack movement. OneUnited Bank, which is the nation’s largest black-owned bank, posted on its site that 12 months after Mike’s economic call-to-arms, over $ 50 million in deposits had been made to black-owned banks.

Black banks, in turn, have been trying to modernize, and woo black millennials. Mechanics and Farmers (M&F Bank), the North Carolina financial institution founded in 1908, created a Millennial Advisory Board, to understand the banking needs of the younger generation.

The following is a listing of the headquarters of African American banks, according to the National Bankers Association:

ALABAMA
Commonwealth National Bank
2214 St. Stephens Rd.
Mobile, AL 36601

CALIFORNIA
Broadway Financial Corp. (Broadway Federal Bank)
5055 Wilshire Blvd., Ste. 500
Los Angeles, CA 90036

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA
Industrial Bank
4812 Georgia Ave. NW
Washington, D.C. 20011

GEORGIA
Citizens Bancshares Corp. (Citizens Trust Bank)
75 Piedmont Ave. NE
Atlanta, GA 30303

ILLINOIS
Illinois Service Federal (ISF Bank)
4619 S. Martin Luther King Jr. Drive
Chicago, IL 60653

LOUISIANA
Liberty Bank & Trust Company
P. O. Box 60131
New Orleans, LA, 70160

MARYLAND
(Harbor Bancshares Corp.) The Harbor Bank of Maryland
25 West Fayette St.
Baltimore, MD 21201

MASSACHUSETTS
OneUnited Bank
100 Franklin St., Ste. 600
Boston, MA 02110

MICHIGAN
First Independence Bank
7310 Woodward Ave., Ste. 101
Detroit, MI 48202

NEW JERSEY
City National Bank of New Jersey
900 Broad St.
Newark, NJ 07102

NEW YORK
Carver Federal Savings Bank
75 W. 125th St.
New York, NY 10027

NORTH CAROLINA
M&F Bancorp Inc. (Mechanics & Farmers Bank)
2634 Durham Chapel Hill
Durham, NC 27707

TENNESSEE
Citizens Savings Bank & Trust Co.
1917 Heiman St.
Nashville, TN 37208

Tri-State Bank of Memphis
4606 Elvis Presley Blvd.
Memphis, TN 38116

TEXAS
Unity National Bank
2602 Blodgett St.
Houston, TX 77004

 

 

 

-Editor’s Note: The BE articles cited were originally published in July 2016 and May/June 2017

 

 

The post Here Is A Listing of Black Banks in the United States appeared first on Black Enterprise.

Money | Black Enterprise

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Shop select Free People sale and clearance items at Bloomingdales.com!

Search for a ‘Black Widow’ Director Narrows to Three; Here’s Everything We Know

Search for a 'Black Widow' Director Narrows to Three; Here's Everything We Know

Fans have been begging Marvel for a Black Widow movie for almost a decade and now the dream is finally coming alive. The presumably titled Black Widow will likely feature Scarlett Johansson in the title role, which she's portrayed already in six installments of the Marvel Cinematic Universe, including this year's Avengers: Infinity War. 

The latest status update on the project is that Marvel is still trying to decide on a director best suited for the spin-off. The…

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Nas Isn’t Upset with Jay-Z for Dropping ‘Everything Is Love’ the Day After His Album, Happy for ‘Black Excellence’

Jay-Z and Beyonce dropping their surprise album the day after Nas released his may have been shade on Jay’s part, but Nas sources say it’s all love on his.

via TMZ:

Sources close to Nas tell us the Queensbridge rapper isn’t fuming about “Everything Is Love” being released on Saturday, and doesn’t think the Carters will steal any thunder from his new album, “Nasir.” We’re told Nas fully appreciates the fact Jay and Bey are hip-hop royalty at this point, and actually really likes their new record.

If you don’t know, and you should, Nas and Jay had a huge feud going in the late ’90s and early 2000s. They went at each other in songs and interviews for years before burying the whole thing in 2005.

They’ve been friends ever since, and we’re told Nas is more interested in “black excellence” these days … rather than drama.

That’s a relief. We can’t handle any more rap feuds at this moment.

The post Nas Isn’t Upset with Jay-Z for Dropping ‘Everything Is Love’ the Day After His Album, Happy for ‘Black Excellence’ appeared first on lovebscott – celebrity gossip and entertainment news.

lovebscott – celebrity gossip and entertainment news

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LeToya Luckett and Mack Wilds Kick Off ABFF With ‘Black Hollywood Now’ Luncheon, Presented By Cadillac

Cadillac – which returned as a partner of ABFF for the eighth consecutive year – held an exclusive luncheon Wednesday, where actors LeToya Luckett and Tristan “Mack” Wilds spoke about the importance of the event.
MadameNoire

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Don Cheadle, Regina Hall Comedy ‘Black Monday’ Headed To Showtime

Showtime has given a series order to the comedy “Black Monday,” which stars Don Cheadle, Andrew Rannells, and Regina Hall, reports Variety.

The show, which was ordered to pilot under the name “Ball Street,” goes back to October 19, 1987 – aka Black Monday, the worst stock market crash in the history of Wall Street.

The film tells the story of how a group of outsiders took on the blue-blood, old-boys club of Wall Street and ended up crashing the world’s largest financial system, a Lamborghini limousine, Don Henley’s birthday party, and the glass ceiling.

Showtime has ordered a 10-episode first season and is slated for a 2019 debut.

Cheadle, also an executive producer on the series, returns to Showtime after he starred for five seasons on the premium cabler’s series “House of Lies.”

The cast also includes Paul Scheer, Yassir Lester, Michael James Scott, and Eugene Cordero. Casey Wilson will appear in a recurring guest star role with Ken Marino and Kurt Braunohler guest starring.

“’Black Monday’ is a scathing comic commentary on the excess of the ’80s,” said Showtime president and CEO David Nevins. “Don Cheadle, Andrew Rannells and Regina Hall lead a hilarious cast that takes on blue-blooded Wall Street as the Bad News Bears of Wall Street trading firms.”

The series was created by David Caspe and Jordan Cahan, who will serve as executive producers and showrunners. Seth Rogen and Evan Goldberg, who will also executive produce, directed the pilot. “Black Monday” is a co-production between Showtime and Sony Pictures Television Studios.

[ione_media_gallery id=”439938″ overlay=”true”]

(Photo Credit: Pr Photos)

Entertainment – Black America Web

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Message to Black Board Members: Speak Out and Make a Difference

John Rogers and James Bell not only represent two of America’s most powerful corporate directors but the unwavering, outspoken advocates for diversity and inclusion among board members. Rogers, chairman and CEO of Ariel Investments L.L.C. (No. 1 on the be asset managers list with $ 11 billion in assets under management), serves on the boards of S&P 500 companies McDonald’s and Exelon and is co-founder of the annual Black Corporate Directors Conference, which brings together scores of African American corporate directors to grapple with such issues. Bell, the retired EVP, Corporate President, and CFO of Boeing and corporate director on the boards of JPMorgan Chase, Dow Chemical, and Apple, has been vocal about the underrepresentation of African Americans within major corporations and as part of public forums.

Black Board Members and Business Leaders Need to Take Stand and Demand Parity in Corporate America

BE recently had the opportunity to hold an in-depth discussion with these two on effective corporate governance. In their Q&A with Editor-in-Chief Derek T. Dingle, they reviewed everything from continued imbalance in the boardroom to the need for African Americans—from seasoned corporate directors to individual investors—to take a stand and demand parity in corporate America.

Black Enterprise: In developing this year’s list of the Most Powerful Black Corporate Directors, we reviewed the entire universe of the S&P 500 and found 40% did not have black board members. When we evaluated the S&P 300 last year, the percentage was 30%. From your vantage point, why is there such a great disparity?

John Rogers: When you go from 300 companies to the entire S&P 500, part of the issue is that smaller companies don’t feel the same pressure to diversify their boards. I spent 34 years investing in small and mid-sized companies, and when I talk to those management teams about the lack of diversity on their management team or boards, they’ll say, “No one’s ever challenged me on this issue.” The larger companies are used to being challenged.
be: So how do you diversify the boards of those companies?

board members

John Rogers

James Bell: The smaller companies just don’t think it’s a priority. Maybe it’s a lack of awareness. Maybe they don’t feel their customer base demands it because they’re B2B. Those companies are suppliers to big companies where diversity is a priority. We have to put pressure on the larger companies to look at their supply base to make sure that their diversity initiatives flow down to them. If you’re on the board, you have a great opportunity to do that.

BE: So you’re making the case that suppliers should embrace the same policy as their corporate customers as it relates to diversity, including having African American corporate directors.

Bell: Exactly. I think it’s fair to ask that your whole supply base value diversity, and then you should hold them accountable.

Rogers: When James was the CFO and interim CEO of Boeing, he made sure those suppliers were working with minority businesses and putting pressure on them. I’ve also seen that happen with [former McDonald’s CEO] Don Thompson, who would often meet with local suppliers throughout the United States. If he saw that their workforce and boards were not diverse, he reminded them that McDonald’s was an important customer, and the next time he came to visit he was expecting to see a diverse workforce and leadership group.

Lack of Black Board Members in Silicon Valley

BE: We have had a huge focus on tech. When we started our list, Apple did not have an African American board member. Now, James is on the board. Google/Alphabet didn’t have an African American board member. TIAA CEO Roger Ferguson is now a corporate director. But still there’s no African Americans on the boards of Amazon, Netflix, and Intel. Given today’s environment, why do we still see such resistance in that sector to African American board representation?

Bell: Either their customer base hasn’t made it a priority or they don’t understand the value of diversity in the organization. If your market is global, most of the people around the world are people of color. All of those companies sell products in the black community so I would think they would want to look like the markets they serve from top to bottom.

board members

James A. Bell

BE: John, each year, you hold the Black Corporate Directors Conference. One approach shared has been for directors to meet with CEOs and nominating committee heads to push for more black board members among their peer groups. What has been the outcome?

Rogers: I’ve been involved with boards with robust diversity programs, wonderful spending programs, minority professional services companies … just great history. Then you wonder whether those folks on that board are exporting it to other institutions.

You don’t see enough CEOs who are leading organizations that are doing the right things; taking those practices and then pressuring, pushing, nudging, and encouraging other CEOs to do exactly the same thing.

BE: Both of you have made diversity a priority on the boards in which you serve. Do you believe all black board members should have that mandate as part of their board service?

Rogers: We started the Black Corporate Directors Conference 15 years ago to exactly address this issue. We were getting more African Americans on corporate boards but we weren’t fighting for the civil rights agenda once in the boardroom. Too often, we were just happy to be there. We were uncomfortable making the white leadership uncomfortable. So we sort of sat there and, in effect, gave cover for the status quo to stay the same.

“We Have a Responsibility to Fight for Our Community…”

What we do every year is bring in what we call the “Conscience of the Conference,” someone [like Harry Belafonte, Rep. John Lewis, Rev. Jesse Jackson] to remind those of us who have been fortunate to be on a corporate board that we have a responsibility to fight for our community once we’re in the boardroom. If we don’t speak out nothing will change, because the traditional leadership has other agendas. They’re worried about profit margins, growth rates, and all the rest. They’re not thinking about us unless we remind them of how important it is, and hold them accountable for the commitment and promises they’ve made about diversity and inclusion. If I’m on a board, I’m helping management teams do their job by reminding them to live up to those values and commitments.

Bell: John has also had current board members speak to this topic at the conference, and specifically me last year. I really thought it was interesting, some of the questions I got about when is a good time to bring up diversity in the boardroom. And I was like, ‘You’ve got to be kidding me.’ Anytime. When you’re talking about the strategic plan, when you’re talking about a big debt deal, when you’re talking about any aspect of strategy, we should be thinking about inclusion. We should think about how we can keep differentiating ourselves from our competition. It should be part of the discussion just like the return on investment.

BE: I am struck by a recurring theme at the conference of courage. It surprised me since it is an assemblage of some of the most powerful people in global business, black or white.

Rogers: I was fortunate in my career to get to know Maynard Jackson very, very well. The late mayor of Atlanta made such an impact throughout his career around diversity and inclusion. Right before he passed away, he was talking on diversity and inclusion issues and the fact that he felt too many of us who were getting on boards had a chance to make a difference but weren’t doing it. He said they had this “scared Negro disease.” He talked about that so thoughtfully. And one of the directors got up at the end of the conference and said, “I think I was afflicted with that disease.”

We remind people that it does take courage to speak out to make a difference. It’s so much easier to make people comfortable, accept the check and be there. But we have a responsibility.

So when we’re on governance committees or nominating committees making decisions about prospective board members—whether it’s a nonprofit or corporate board—we must make sure that individual has a history of fighting for our community. It’s not enough that they come from a big company, had a nice career path, and got the right title. They need to be vetted on what they’ve done to make a difference in our community before I’m going to suggest that person go on the board. That’s really something that we just don’t do enough.

“Only 60% of the S&P 500 have African Americans on Boards”

Bell: That’s so important. You mentioned that only 60% of the S&P 500 have African Americans on boards. For most of those companies, only one. In some cases, you may have two. So when you get down to it, it has to be the right one. On average, boards have 10 to 12 people. So if you don’t have one of color that’s speaking up on the right things then you don’t have anybody that’s leading that charge. John says it’s a responsibility; I believe it’s an obligation. It’s not about us just saying, “Well, I don’t want to carry the weight. I don’t think I should be the one that stands up.” It’s about having an obligation to make sure this subject is talked about in an objective and sensitive way. But it’s not just a moral application of it; it does make good business sense.

BE: So what roles should investors and asset management firms play?

Rogers: Lay investors often invest directly in mutual fund companies or sit on investment committees of their church, university, or 401(k) plan at work. So they can ask all those people buying asset management services to demand that those asset managers be more progressive. They do it when it comes to socially responsible investing. Individual investors pushed their asset managers to divest from South Africa, which was something that was very important 40 years ago, or not to invest in tobacco stocks, or [to focus on] the environment. They know how to push on those issues and asset managers listen and companies respond. So we can do the same thing when it comes to race and diversity and inclusion.

If we as asset managers demand that our companies look like America and live up to the values they say they care about, they will change. Unfortunately, most money managers are not asking those questions. They talk about profit margins and growth, and what’s happening with the stock price and valuation, but not pressing that management team on those issues.

That’s something that’s very distinctive about Ariel. We push hard on the companies we invest in to be diverse, and we’ve had a lot of success with getting African Americans on boards and into leadership roles by pushing companies to do the right thing.

Why African American Board Representation Matters

BE: That begs another question. Why should the average consumer or employee, who is far removed from the boardroom, care about African American board representation? How does it have a direct impact on their lives?

Bell: A lot of those average consumers are people of color, and people like them should have opportunities in these companies. As John said earlier, we’re not asking for something special or a disproportionate share. We just want these companies to look like the rest of America. They do business with these communities and people that buy their products ought to get some benefit. I mean, why should you go to a store every week and spend a substantial amount of your money, and not look around to see if people of color work there? And if they don’t, why wouldn’t you ask yourself should I still support this store, or ask management “Why don’t you have people of color working here?”

BE: Are there other access points to diversify the pipeline?

Rogers: Private equity now is so dominant in today’s economy. These giant companies literally control hundreds of companies and have 500,000 or a million employees. And often their customers are the biggest public pension funds, biggest college endowments, hiring firms like Blackstone and KKR. No one has been asking those private equity companies, until recently, about lack of diversity in their management teams and boards of the companies they control. The private equity firms determine who will be the first eight to 10 board members on those companies before they go public.

African Americans are often in charge of public pension funds. If we demand that the private equity firms not only be diverse but diversify the boards and management teams of companies they control, we can make a difference.

Bell: Diversity programs within large companies are so important. You have to make sure that we’re getting enough people that would have the fundamental requirements to compete to be on these boards or to be considered for them. You’re going to always have a gap on these big company boards because we don’t have enough senior executives coming from the large companies. That’s a problem we’ve got to fix.

Rogers: We have to ask these questions, not only pushing for stronger minority businesses but stronger minority leadership in majority companies, particularly professional services. We can create a whole opportunity set for people of color to join boards in the next generation.

The post Message to Black Board Members: Speak Out and Make a Difference appeared first on Black Enterprise.

Career | Black Enterprise

EMPLOYMENT UPDATE:

Meet the Black Woman Behind the Video That Led to the Trump Clemency of Alice Johnson

You may not know the name Topeka Sam as well as you know Kim Kardashian, but you should. Sam, a prison reform activist, facilitated the viral Mic video that moved Kardashian to take a meeting with President Donald Trump to plead the case of Alice Johnson, a black woman who was granted clemency June 6 after serving 21 years for a nonviolent, drug-related crime. Though Kardashian helped put a worldwide spotlight on Johnson’s case, Sam was a major leader in a community of activists, legal professionals, and entrepreneurs who worked on her behalf for years before the day she was finally freed.

Sam, a formerly incarcerated woman herself, has advocated for female inmates’ rights, prison reform, and empowerment for women through spiritual renewal, education, and entrepreneurship since her own 2015 release. “My parents were franchise business owners for the first 20 years of my life,” Sam says. “They owned a Carvel franchise in Brooklyn, N.Y., and after that, they ran their own restaurant in Harlem until they retired. I’ve always been exposed to what [owning a business looked like]. I think it was just in my DNA, that I was going to be a business owner at some point.”

The founder of The Ladies of Hope Ministries and Hope House NYC, was bitten by the entrepreneurship bug in her youth, and she has since promoted the freedom and power of entrepreneurship as a viable and sustainable option for formerly incarcerated individuals.

“Prior to going to prison, I’d launched several small businesses, [from] a concierge service to throwing parties. I started a customized mobile-phone case boutique for brands with a friend of mine, who’s still an entrepreneur,” Sam recalls. “When I was inside, God gave me the name The Ladies of Hope Ministries and Hope House. I had a business plan and everything. …I wrote out what my ideas were, like the Bible says, ‘Write it down and make it clear, and at the appointed time, it will come to pass and will not tarry.’  That’s exactly what I did.”

In launching Hope House NYC, Sam has combined entrepreneurial knowledge with her personal experience of prison life for women, and she also uses knowledge she’s gained while serving as a Columbia University Beyond the Bars fellow, a Justice in Education Scholar, and director of dignity for the Van Jones-helmed Cut50 initiative to keep the Bronx-based facility going. At the home, women and girls affected by incarceration can get educational, vocational, spiritual, and entrepreneurial resources and housing, and find a safe space of support from other women.

“It’s everyday work, not only because you’re a social entrepreneur or systems entrepreneur, [but because] you have people’s lives in your hands,” Sam says. “You have to make sure the bills are paid so that women can remain safe [at Hope House NYC] and they can thrive in their lives. I have to make sure the resources we are providing are viable.”

She takes pride in the impact she can make through starting something she is in charge of, and knows how entrepreneurship or launching your own platform can have a positive effect on lives beyond that of the business owner.

“With entrepreneurship, it allows you to hire people who have been impacted by incarceration and give opportunities to people so that when they come home, they don’t have to worry about applying for a job and being told they’re being terminated because of a prison conviction,” Sam says. “When you think about entrepreneurship, it doesn’t mean you have to build an organization. Speaking about your experience, you get paid to speak, that’s a business. …I speak across the country. … Whatever you’re good at, you can make a business out of it. Every time a woman comes through my organization, the question I ask them is, ‘what do you want to be [moving forward]?”

Building a foundation of business smarts and tenacity helped Sam balance her process of transitioning into life after prison, sharing her story through panels and speaking engagements and fulfilling a vision to help others. She knew she had to strengthen herself through research and education in order to accomplish the freedom of running her own show.

“I think because I had the understanding of what it took to start a business, because of my past, I knew [I had to do my due diligence]. … We’re creating an entrepreneurial course and partnering with a large corporation to do it. I believe education is extremely important for people to change their lives. …Skills education leads to business, and business leads to entrepreneurship. [Through entrepreneurship], I have the freedom to do this as I want to, and I don’t have to worry about people putting [limitations] on me [as a formerly incarcerated woman.]”

Watch the Mic video that led Kim K. to go to Trump: https://www.facebook.com/MicMedia/videos/miss-alice-is-serving-life/1687918217897628/

Video of Johnson’s release:



 

 

The post Meet the Black Woman Behind the Video That Led to the Trump Clemency of Alice Johnson appeared first on Black Enterprise.

Lifestyle | Black Enterprise

EMPLOYMENT SEARCH UPDATE:

South Africa’s Black Economic Empowerment Law To Earn Black Investors $1.3 Billion

Vodacom Group, Africa’s second largest mobile communications company, will pay out approximately $ 1.3 billion to its black investors as part of the company’s participation in the black economic empowerment (BEE) effort, enforced by South African law.

The company said on Monday that it had “entered into an agreement of up to R17.5 billion with its existing black economic empowerment (BEE) partners and a newly formed staff scheme” that will see the partners swap their current holdings in Vodacom South Africa for shares in its parent company, Vodacom Group.

Vodacom Group has agreed terms with Royal Bafokeng Holdings (RBH), Thebe Investment Corporation (Thebe), YeboYethu (existing BEE partners) and a newly formed staff scheme, whose combined interests will be consolidated into a new YeboYethu BEE structure that will own shares in Vodacom Group,” the company said in a news release.

In the approximately $ 1.3 billion agreement, BEE partners will exchange their current holdings in Vodacom South Africa for a shareholding of between 5.8% and 6.25% in Vodacom Group, the company said.

WHAT EXACTLY IS BEE?:

After its transition from Apartheid in 1994, South Africa’s African National Congress government decided to address the inequalities of Apartheid by redistributing assets and opportunities to South African blacks, Coloreds and Indian citizens, not available to them under White rule.

From South Africa’s own Treasury:

It is an integrated and coherent socio-economic process. It is located within the context of the country’s national transformation programme, namely the RDP (Reconstruction and Development Programme). It is aimed at redressing the imbalances of the past by seeking to substantially and equitably transfer and confer the ownership, management and control of South Africa’s financial and economic resources to the majority of the citizens. It seeks to ensure broader and meaningful participation in the economy by black people to achieve sustainable development and prosperity.”

In essence, BEE attempts to “create a degree of economic equality which would not itself be a natural market outcome” of the newly created political and socio-economic climate in the country. In plain English, the affirmative program is meant to level the playing field and spread the wealth to the historically oppressed people during Apartheid.  

VODACOM’S SHARE EXCHANGE:

Vodacom Group Limited, solely known as Vodacom, is a South African telecommunications company which provides voice, messaging and data services to over 55 million customers operating in over 40 African countries. The company is wholly owned by Vodafone Group plc, a British multinational telecommunications conglomerate.

In 2007, South Africa instituted the Broad-Based Black Economic Empowerment. The goal is to spread the wealth across a broad spectrum of disadvantaged South Africans, which is in contrast to the original BEE which was narrow-based and focused only on equity ownership and management representation. The new law ensured that black employees and citizens were able to purchase shares in privately held and public corporations.

The three investment groups named in the $ 1.3 billion share swap: Royal Bafokeng Holdings (RBH), Thebe Investment Corporation (Thebe), YeboYethu (existing BEE partners) are all community, South African and black-controlled investment groups. Royal Bafokeng Holdings (RBH), for example is a community investment company, entrusted with the unique responsibility of preserving and growing the financial capital of the Royal Bafokeng Nation (RBN), an ethnic homeland of the Bafokeng people. Although Thebe Investment Corporation’s ownership structure has changed over the years, the ANC still has a controlling stake in the empowerment group (investment firm) through Batho Batho Trust, founded in 1992 as an ANC investment company, ensuring that black wealth is passed down to generations of black South Africans.

The third investment group, YeboYethu Limited, a publicly traded company, was formed in 2008 as an employee stock ownership plan to buy and hold Vodacom SA shares for the benefit of its shareholders. When Vodacom formed the company in 2008, it issued 14.4 million YeboYethu ordinary shares at R25 each ($ 1.88 in 2018 USD) and as a result a public offer, more than 102,000 qualifying black investors bought a stake in Vodacom SA.

WHAT BLACK INVESTORS GET:

When October comes around, Vodacom will unwind the empowerment transaction it initiated in 2008 and there will be R3 billion ($ 226 million) dividends for participants to share. At R67.28 per share, that represents a return of 2.7 times on their original investment, Vodacom said. Also, investors will now have shares in Vodacom International group rather than Vodacom SA.

  • YeboYethu will remain listed on the BEE segment of the Johannesburg Stock Exchange
    5.8% – 6.25% deal that consolidates the BEE shareholding, through YeboYethu, at Vodacom Group level
  • Transaction delivers R7.5Bn of value to existing BEE shareholders, 6.7 times the original capital investment
  • R3.0bn special dividend to current BEE shareholders, representing 2.7 times their original equity contribution
  • Will increase Vodacom Group’s effective BEE ownership to 20%

The post South Africa’s Black Economic Empowerment Law To Earn Black Investors $ 1.3 Billion appeared first on Black Enterprise.

Money | Black Enterprise

FASHION DEAL UPDATE:

Shop select Free People sale and clearance items at Bloomingdales.com!

Little Known Black History Fact: Richard Allen

Bishop Richard Allen, the founder of the A.M.E. Church, was a hero to many and a bust erected in his honor in 1876 is thought to be first of its kind created by and for African-Americans. The monument was unveiled in Philadelphia’s Fairmount Park during the Centennial International Exposition of 1876, the first official “World’s Fair.”

Allen was born into slavery on February 14, 1760, and though details of his place of birth have been heavily debated, some saying Delaware is his birth state. After hearing a white Methodist preacher rail against slavery, Allen converted to Methodism at 17, and was later able to buy his freedom for $ 2,000 to relocate to Philadelphia.

In 1799, Allen became the first Black ordained minister of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and in 1816, with the help of other Black Methodist churches, founded the African Methodist Episcopal church. Bishop Allen was a vocal opponent of slavery who inspired enslaved and free Black people who shared his passion to see all people free.

The bust of Allen was on display at the exposition but later ended up in the hands of Wilberforce University in Ohio into where it sat, neglected and in storage. In 2010, Wilberforce loaned the bust out for a ceremony marking Allen’s 250th birthday at the First District A.M.E. headquarters.

 

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ENTERTAINMENT UPDATE:

Grilled corn, black bean & avocado salad

by

Lindsay Weiss

posted in Life

This is HANDS DOWN my favorite thing I’ve made so far this summer. I could face plant right into a bowl of this and die happy. It’s a perfect combo of flavor and texture and couldn’t be prettier — a perfect compliment to any grilled meat OR a meal in and of itself.

Grilling the corn first (vs. opening a can and dumping it in) takes a few extra minutes but is the difference between okay and freakin’ phenomenal so grill the corn, mmmkay? It also looks prettier.

This salad will keep in the fridge for a few hours because of the lime juice (avocados, I’m lookin’ at you) so go ahead and make it a little early. The flavor actually gets better after an hour or two when all the lemon, lime, garlic and salt have had time to cozy up with the corn, black beans and avocado.

Grilled Corn, Black Bean & Avocado Salad

3-4 ears yellow corn
1 can (15 oz) black beans, drained and rinsed
1 cup chopped tomatoes
2 large avocados, chopped
1/4 cup chopped red onion
1/4 cup chopped cilantro
1 tablespoon olive oil
1 tablespoon fresh lime juice
1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice
1 clove garlic, minced or pressed
1/2 teaspoon salt

To make grilled corn:
Heat the grill to medium.

Pull the outer husks down the ear to the base. Strip away the silk from each ear of corn by hand. Fold husks back into place, and place the ears of corn in a large bowl of cold water with 1 tablespoon of salt for 10 minutes.

Remove corn from water and shake off excess. Place the corn on the grill, close the cover and grill for 15 to 20 minutes, turning every 5 minutes, or until kernels are tender when pierced with a paring knife. Remove the husks and use a knife to remove the kernels.

Assemble the salad:
Combine grilled corn, black beans, tomatoes, avocado, red onion, and cilantro in a mixing bowl. Stir together to combine.

In separate small bowl, combine olive oil, lime & lemon juice, garlic, and salt. Stir with a
fork and pour over the salad. Stir together until combined. Let sit in fridge for 1-2 hours before serving.

BabyCenter Blog

BABY CARE UPDATE:

Perfect Gifts for the Perfect baby

Food Truck Owner Arrested After Throwing Hot Sauce at Black Woman

A video shows the owner of the Small Pharoah’s food truck, arguing with and throwing a bottle and hot sauce at a Black woman, who claims he called her the N-word after she tried to pay with quarters. The alleged victim Carlotta Washington recorded part of the altercation with her cellphone, reports Willamette Week. In […]

The post Food Truck Owner Arrested After Throwing Hot Sauce at Black Woman appeared first on EBONY.

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BEST DEAL UPDATE:

NABJ Aims to Take Control of Black Male Images in Media

“No one is coming to save you,” said Access correspondent Scott Evans. There was some real candor during the Los Angeles chapter of the National Association of Black Journalists’ “Images of Black Men in Media” panel this past weekend.

“No one is coming to show you, you,” Evans continued. “It’s your responsibility to show us, you. If you have an Instagram page, if you have a YouTube Channel, you can craft stories with our perspective and reach people who need to hear it. You don’t have to wait until you’re on Netflix, on NBC, in an Oscar-winning film or on a trailblazing news magazine format show to do it.”

NABJ’s nationwide Black Male Media Project, which aims to help change the narrative around the lives and images of black men in the news and in society, hosted a diverse panel of entertainment and media personalities including, Queer Eye host Karamo Brown, Access correspondent Evans, actor and comedian Lil’ Rel Howery, and TMZ producer Van Lathan. The panel was moderated by NABJ-LA Vice President Jarrett Hill.

black men

“Images of Black Men in Media” Panel, NABJ-LA Vice President Jarrett Hill, Queer Eye host Karamo Brown, Access correspondent Scott Evans, actor and comedian Lil’ Rel Howery, and TMZ producer Van Lathan (Image: Instagram)

 

“The great thing now is we are putting ourselves in positions to executive produce, star in and write and tell our own stories,” said comedian Lil’ Rel. “Before I did my show on Fox, I was on The Carmichael Show and I was impressed by the way Jerrod [Carmichael] really worked every level of it. He wasn’t just taking the credits, he was actually doing the work, same thing with Issa [Rae], same thing with Donald [Glover]. They inspire me. From this point on, there is no reason why I shouldn’t run my show. I should be able to tell my story and be able to sit in the writer’s room with the other writers and create these stories.”

This event was a part of a bigger conversation that took place at various chapters nationwide. The organization hosted multiple NABJ affiliate chapter conversations in several cities, including Atlanta, Baltimore, Chicago, Dallas, Los Angeles, Miami, Pittsburgh and St. Louis, simultaneously. The initiative is designed to inspire, support, and develop training and mentorship opportunities for black men working in or aspiring to work in journalism and media.

“It’s important that we have a part in the crafting of the images we see of ourselves in media because of the way they influence us, the way they impact what we believe about ourselves and what others believe about us,” said Hill.

The post NABJ Aims to Take Control of Black Male Images in Media appeared first on Black Enterprise.

Lifestyle | Black Enterprise

BEAUTY DEAL UPDATE:

Drake Can’t be Black in His Music but Mixed in the Real World [Opinion]

In a recent rap battle with fellow rapper Pusha T, Drake was exposed for wearing blackface in photos that he took in 2008. The Canadian-born rapper’s reasoning for these photos was that he was trying to shed light on the lack of opportunities that black actors faced when trying to get roles in movies and television. I understand his message and what he was trying to say, I just believe this wasn’t the right way to go about it.

Blackface, predominantly used during the 19th century, represented a time when black people were portrayed as the butlers, the maids, the drivers, and the servants. It also contributed to many racial stereotypes that still exist today, so it baffles me that Drake can take these pictures thinking it was a good idea. As I stated, I understand his interpretation/idea, but when you are a public figure (which he was at the time as an actor on Degrassi: The Next Generation) you have a responsibility to not be insensitive about how people perceive your actions and words.

Drake’s claim was that he was an advocate for black actors 10 years ago, but why hasn’t he been an advocate for black people in the last 10 years? Why have we never seen Drake at any rallies for issues affecting African Americans? Why has he never spoken on police brutality, racism, prison reform, etc.? Drake is arguably the biggest rapper that we have in the genre, which means he has one of the biggest platforms, and you mean to tell me he can’t even retweet topics concerning blacks? In a nutshell, Drake wants to be accepted by black culture and be able to say the n-word in his lyrics, but when it is time to speak for us he is silent. He is not above reproach just because he’s one of the biggest-selling artists of all time; we must hold him accountable for his actions or lack thereof.

Rappers like J.Cole, T.I., Jay-Z, and Nipsey Hussle, just to name a few, have all at one point been advocates for black social issues. They don’t think that just because they are millionaires they no longer have a responsibility to their culture and community. Why has Drake never used his voice in the past?

Drake has this clean-cut image that would be affected if he said anything controversial or made people nervous.  He has to protect his sponsorship from companies like Apple, Sprite and Adidas.  Drake can’t be black in his music but mixed in the real world. That is not how it works.

 

The post Drake Can’t be Black in His Music but Mixed in the Real World [Opinion] appeared first on Black Enterprise.

Lifestyle | Black Enterprise

BEAUTY DEAL UPDATE:

Shaun and Rai King Talk Candidly About the Benefits of Marriage Counseling | Black Love | OWN

OWN

SPECIAL NEWS BULLETIN:

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Black Woman Amputee On Overcoming Adversity, and ‘Joy’ Versus ‘Happiness”

Donna Hopkins underwent surgery to remove fibroids but experienced a blood clot, and other surgical complications, which caused doctors to amputate her left leg. But despite the personal tragedy, the athlete and two-time breast cancer survivor found the courage to set goals from her hospital bed. Relying on her faith in God, family, friends and new found love for rowing, Hopkins turned her life-changing experience into a book about overcoming adversity, Getting to the Other Side of Victory. The autobiography is a story of hope and action to teach people how to hit the reset button, tap into their hidden strengths, and rebuild their lives after crisis and loss.

Today, the active competitor in track and field also runs Hopkins Breast Cancer Inc., an organization that financially helps people battling breast cancer in the Washington, D.C., metropolitan area, and she works with prosthetic companies to help test new prosthetics for the amputation community. Hopkins spoke with Black Enterprise about her journey.

Let’s go back to that moment at the hospital when you learned doctors had to amputate your left leg.  What self-limiting beliefs, vulnerabilities, or insecurities did you have about your future?

When I was finally able to understand what happened, so many things were running through my head. I thought about what it would mean for me as an athlete to just work out. I thought about relationships, how people would see me, and mainly how men would look at me, and thinking what man would want me now with part of my left gone. I was anxious, worried, nervous in every aspect of my life, what this all meant looking forward. I thought about getting older with the amputation and concern arose, but through it all, even if I didn’t see the rainbow in my life as I looked to the future, God saw it for me.

When taking off my clothing, I saw my life’s battle scars, but the most revealing was the internal scars that weren’t showing on the surface. The first step was learning to love me all over again and accepting that person. I didn’t want other people treating me any differently, or looking at me any differently, yet I was doing just that. Despite what I looked like, I had to remember that I was still the same person, and a friend reminded me of it. He said that he wasn’t going to treat me any differently despite my amputation because I hadn’t changed behind all that had happened. Little did he know how much those words made me feel good; they did more than any natural medicine could do. It was healing to my spirit and soul.

Donna Hopkins personal tragedy

Photo: Donna Hopkins

How long did it take you to bring joy back into your life after the tragedy?

When I was in the hospital, I was already setting a goal on how to get back up on my feet and move forward. In my book Getting to the Other Side of Victory, I talk about happiness and joy and the differences between the two. Happiness comes and goes, you can be happy one minute and sad the next, but if you have joy it’s always there, it will leap up at the most needed moment. So, the joy was never taken from my life; it is the thing that kept me going with every tragedy.

Despite the fact that you’re an amputee, you used rowing to aid in your recovery—yet you don’t know how to swim. What mindset shifts helped you to work through your fears and embrace your new reality?

overcoming adversity

Photo: Donna Hopkins

I was at a turning point in my life. I wasn’t going to allow people to put me in a box anymore and make me think or act like they thought I should after coming through 2010. The only opinion that mattered at this point was God’s.

It was also the competitive person in me. Despite not knowing how to swim, don’t tell me I can’t do something I will prove you wrong. Rowing was good because I didn’t have anything to measure it by. It became a source of therapy, treatment, and renewal to rebuilding. It took me to a place of victory in some areas that I needed.

I went back to what I knew, track and field, and I just missed out on making the Paralympic trials in the 100 by .33 seconds. However, it was a win for me still in so many ways. The amputation didn’t stop me. In fact, it allowed me to look at life and how we waste so many precious hours that we can never get back again by not just living life versus just existing.

I believe, no matter what happens to you, you can find something that inspires you to keep going. It is OK to cry about your circumstances, the devastation, destruction, and adversity, but don’t drown in your tears. Don’t allow them to be the anchor that keeps you from coming up again.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The post Black Woman Amputee On Overcoming Adversity, and ‘Joy’ Versus ‘Happiness” appeared first on Black Enterprise.

Lifestyle | Black Enterprise

FASHION DEALS UPDATE:

Black Unemployment Rate Reaches Record Low

Black women, gender wage gap, Black unemployment rate

The latest jobs report was released on Friday and the Black unemployment rate fell to its lowest level since the government started keeping track of it in 1972. The unemployment rate for Black Americans sits at 5.9% in May, according to CNN Money. The latest number is a sharp decrease from April’s figure when the unemployment […]

The post Black Unemployment Rate Reaches Record Low appeared first on EBONY.

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Outfit Formula: Summer Column of Black

Black is traditionally a heavy, Winter colour, but here are three ways to wear a column of black in Summer and still look Summery. First, showcase skin to break up the expanse of black clothing on the body. Second, choose non-black footwear and accessories. Third, choose lightweight, sheer and dainty fabrics. 

Here are some combinations to get you started. If black is not your thing, feel free to substitute it with ink blue, navy or charcoal grey.

1. Tunic, Crops & Metallic

A tunic is more of a concept, than a length. A long top that is worn over pants or jeans is a tunic. Tunic lengths vary from mid-thigh to well below the knee. Longer tunics like the one shown here look elegant and fresh to my eye. Tunics with diagonal hems create structure and are extra flattering. Wearing a dress as a tunic is very effective.

Combine a sleeveless or short-sleeved black tunic/dress with black cropped straights or flares. The skin comes through by sporting a sleeveless tunic and cropped pants. Finish off the look with metallic footwear, bag and jewellery.

Rachel Rachel Roy Sleeveless Cascade Tunic Dress

2. Black-Lite

Combine a black top with dark blue bottoms. Finish off the outfit with white footwear. Or swap things around with a dark blue top and black bottoms. Make sure the sleeves are short or sleeveless, and showcase some leg. I like the fashion-forward voluminous proportions shown here, although it’s not conventionally flattering.

COS Merino Top with Raised Neck

3. Casual Dress & Flats

This is the easiest of the lot. Choose a casual black frock, and some sort of jersey knit is a good way to go. Make sure you show skin on the arms and legs. Finish of the look with white flats like slides or mules and a bag to match. Feel free to throw in cognac or red footwear and bag instead of white.

JAMES PERSE Ruched Stretch-cotton Midi Jersey Dress

4. Shorts, Silk & Straw

Last, combine black shorts with a silky black top. Black harem pants are another way to go. Scrunch the sleeves to showcase skin if the sleeves are long. Finish off the vibe with tan footwear and bag, or a straw bag. Blush shoes and bag work well too.

EQUIPMENT Signature Washed-silk Shirt

The black in my wardrobe is minimal, which is just the way I want it since I favour other neutrals and non-neutrals. That said, I enjoy a smattering of black in very specific wardrobe items. My versions of this outfit formula are threefold.

  1. I combine a casual black Summer dress with a micro polka dot with a red or white support act.
  2. I combine black cropped flares with an embroidered black silk dress that I sport as a tunic. I finish off the vibe with a white support act.
  3. I wear silk black harem pants with a cropped black lace top. Black lace is another effective way to break up the expanse of black.

Here are the exact items from my wardrobe. White pearls accompany every outfit.

Over to you. Do you like to wear black-on-black in warm and hot weather?

NOTE: Some rich content in this post was omitted because it isn’t supported by the feed. Please visit the post on youlookfab.com to see the additional content.


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Devale and Khadeen Ellis on the Laughable Price of Early Childhood Education | Black Love | OWN

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http://www.acrx.org -As millions of Americans strive to deal with the economic downturn,loss of jobs,foreclosures,high cost of gas,and the rising cost of prescription drug cost. Charles Myrick ,the President of American Consultants Rx, announced the re-release of the American Consultants Rx community service project which consist of millions of free discount prescription cards being donated to thousands of not for profits,hospitals,schools,churches,etc. in an effort to assist the uninsured,under insured,and seniors deal with the high cost of prescription drugs.-American Consultants Rx -Pharmacy Discount Network News

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Rev Run and Justine Simmons Urge Others to Consider Adoption | Black Love | Oprah Winfrey Network

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http://www.acrx.org -As millions of Americans strive to deal with the economic downturn,loss of jobs,foreclosures,high cost of gas,and the rising cost of prescription drug cost. Charles Myrick ,the President of American Consultants Rx, announced the re-release of the American Consultants Rx community service project which consist of millions of free discount prescription cards being donated to thousands of not for profits,hospitals,schools,churches,etc. in an effort to assist the uninsured,under insured,and seniors deal with the high cost of prescription drugs.-American Consultants Rx -Pharmacy Discount Network News

CHARITY UPDATE :

Click today to request your free ACRX discount prescription card and save up to 80% off of your medicine!

SPECIAL DONATION REQUEST UPDATE:

Please help American Consultants Rx achieve it’s biggest goal yet of donating over 30 million discount prescription cards to over 50k organizations in an effort to assist millions of Americans in need. Please click here to donate today!

Little Known Black History Fact: Sojourner Truth

On this day in 1843 at the age of 52, Isabella Baumfree became Sojourner Truth and devoted the next 40 years of her life into liberating her people and spreading the gospel.

Born in New York State presumably around 1797 as Isabella Baumfree, she was bought and sold for much of her young life. In 1815, she met and fell in love with a slave from another farm, Robert, and had a daughter, Diana. The pair would never see each other again, and Baumfree was forced to marry another slave, Thomas. The pair eventually had three children.

New York was close to passing a law to abolish slavery in 1826 when Baumfree’s owner denied her the freedom he’d promised. She escaped with her daughter that year. Her five-year-old son, Peter, was illegally sold to a man in Alabama and Baumfree successfully sued to gain her son’s freedom, one of the first instances of such success.

Baumfree converted to Christianity and moved to New York City with her son in 1829. She did domestic work for a church and alleged cult leader, enduring hardships and accusations that she poisoned a popular rival church leader. Truth successfully sued the couple who brought the false claims. After losing her son a second time in 1842 when he took a job on a whaling ship, she began life as Sojourner Truth in 1843.

Embracing the ideals of Methodism and the abolition of slavery, Truth joined an abolitionist society and connected with great minds of the movement such as Frederick Douglass and William Lloyd Garrison.  At the 1851 Ohio Women’s Rights Convention, Truth delivered her famous “Ain’t I A Woman” speech which cemented her as a leader in the women’s rights movement.

Truth worked tirelessly into her old age to continue to help liberate free or escaped slaves while focusing on prison reform, women’s suffrage and other causes.

Sojourner Truth passed in 1833 at the age of 92.

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‘Black Ops 4’ vs ‘Battlefield V’: Co-Op, Campaigns, and Competitive

It’s shaping up to be an interesting year for FPS. There aren’t many shooters aiming for the “normal FPS” crowd right now, but this is the era of the battle royale, and the Battlefield V vs Call of Duty: Black Ops 4 battle will be framed around how they respond to the progression of FPS.

It seems these two franchises have switched places. Once upon a time, it was unheard of for a Battlefield game to have singleplayer component. Now it seems to have wrested that role away from Call of Duty, which won’t have a campaign at all in Black Op 4.

But while Battlefield games are DICE’s domain, development of Call of Duty is split between three studios. We’ve been told the decision to eschew singleplayer is limited to Treyarch and not a franchise-wide trend.

There’s a strong focus on your squad, or your “company” in Battlefield V. It’s a progression and customisation system that you’ll take into multiplayer, though every mode will add to it.


Black Ops 4 sniper co-op campaign
There won't be a singleplayer campaign in Black Ops 4.

BFV vs BO4 — Co-Op and Campaigns

The Battlefield V developers see its singleplayer campaign as a necessary element to set the tone for the game.

Say what you want about its “new setting” being World War 2 – again – but the fact that we’ll be exploring African, Norwegian, and Dutch locales might benefit from some setting up in a campaign.

Battlefield V will continue the last instalment’s popular War Stories mode, highlighting lesser known tales of battlefield heroism in playable form.

On the campaign front, the Battlefield V vs Black Ops 4 battle is a default victory — Black Ops 4 having ceded that territory to Battlefield V.

But co-op is more complicated.


Battlefield V company customisation squad co-op campaign
Much of Battlefield V feeds back into your customisable company.

Treyarch has teased a somewhat co-op sounding mode in Black Ops 4 to get to know its “specialists.” These are characters taking the form of classes, much like the previous game, and much like Rainbow Six Siege before it. Some are better for team communication, some for fortifications, some for explosives, etc.

As we noted in our multiplayer hands-on, it’s unlikely this will be anything resembling a campaign. It could just be a way to learn the ins and outs of each specialist. But if they find a clever way to do it in co-op form, that can only be a plus. It could also just be objectives and pieces of story within multiplayer missions, as it has been said this aspect will live in the “multiplayer setting.”

Treyarch’s goal with this is to tell the story of each specialist, give players a “deeper connection” to them, and flesh out why they’re working together. It’ll also provide some bridges between the stories of Black Ops 2 and Black Ops 3.


Black Ops 4 specialists firefight
We'll get pieces of playable story for each Black Ops 4 specialist.

Last but not least, zombies mode will also be returning in Call of Duty: Black Ops 4.

Battlefield V will have a four-player co-operative mode called Combined Arms. From descriptions, it sounds like there will be an element of risk/reward to this — pushing your luck as far as it’ll go against randomly generated objectives before choosing to extract. The rewards will benefit your company and carry over into competitive multiplayer.

We’ll wait to hear more about Black Ops 4‘s mysterious co-op mode, but until then, this section of the Battlefield V vs Call of Duty: Black Ops 4 battle goes the way of Battlefield V.

BFV vs BO4 — Competitive Modes

Battlefield V is specifically targeting high action periods punctuated with lulls in its gameplay. A lower ammo count will make players more cautious — two or three kills and you’ll be out of bullets, though you can replenish some from enemy bodies. Fortifying capture points will replenish ammo as well.

We’ll see the return of Conquest mode, as well as a new multi-day event mode called Grand Operations.

This will be played over multiple days, modes, and maps. The developers have described a Rotterdam map which degrades as the city is bombed. What happens on one day will affect the scenario the next day.


Black Ops 4 specialist Firebreak co-op pvp competitive
Firebreak is a Black Ops 4 specialist with lots of area denial.

Paratroopers might jump out of a plane in a fashion similar to a battle royale game, choosing which area to target. Once they’ve secured some territory, the next day might involve the usual Battlefield system of respawn tickets as you try to secure the foothold. Depending on how the scenario goes, you might be pushed into additional days in which both sides are tired. In these situations, there will be no respawns and only one magazine per player.

It very much sounds like existing modes will be strung together to make a narrative, using new maps that are separate but thematically connected.

Call of Duty usually likes to include something a bit different in its mix of modes. Last year’s WWII had Gridiron mode, a low-tech version of Uplink. It also had War Mode, and we don’t care how shamelessly it stole it from Battlefield. It was fun.

We’ve heard less about the different modes that’ll be in Black Ops 4, but it would be uncharacteristic of the franchise to have nothing new to offer. War Mode might be limited to WWII/Sledgehammer, but we sincerely hope not. We were also big fans of the Hammer Cam, and we hope Black Ops 4 continues this trend of make FPS esports more spectator-friendly.


Battlefield V tank tow aa anti-armour gun competitive
Tanks can now tow guns that would normally be stationary.

BFV vs BO4 — New Features

Both Battlefield V and Black Ops 4 have opted for static recoil patterns this year. This is the Counter-Strike philosophy of bullet spray, in which every time you hold the trigger, your bullets will deviate in the same shape. It effectively gives a higher skill ceiling to each weapon, allowing players to learn and specialise in specific patterns.

Battlefield V has brought some level reconstruction to go along with its destructive elements. Each player will have a building tool which can be used to make sandbags, repair structures, and build fortifications that replenish ammo and other things.


Prone firing while on back in Battlefield V
Battlefield V will let you fire while on your back.

Towing AA guns will also be allowed, and the oft-quoted example is using a tank to tow an AA gun behind it. This may rid the tank of its weakness to air somewhat. It could perhaps even change the meta so controlling the air isn’t on a higher tier than controlling armour.

Both games have revamped healing. Call of Duty: Black Ops 4 now requires you to dedicate a few seconds to injecting yourself with magical FPS healing fluid — an eternity when waiting around a corner, also trying to reload. It has a cooldown of around 13 seconds. Battlefield V will let anyone heal a squadmate now, to a limited degree. Medics will heal much faster and for a much higher amount.

Standard Black Ops 4 play is brought to 5v5 now, which Treyarch felt gave its mix of specialists more emphasis. We also noted a few intriguing systems in our hands-on that’ll improve positional awareness. Muzzle flare (and its reflections) is noticeable now, and you’ll be able to determine the direction of bullets when you can’t see the shooter. Stealthy players should enjoy both features.

DLC and Extra Content

Another important point here is that Battlefield V has committed to not splitting its community. It won’t be selling map packs. All additions to the game will be free. Because everything EA does needs to be branded – even the absence of doing something – this new system is being called Tides of War.

There will, however, be three different release dates for Battlefield V depending on if you’ve preordered and if you’re subscribed to Origin Access.

Though we can’t be sure yet, it looks like Black Ops 4 might be following suit. After the big global reveal, there’s no mention of a Season Pass or Deluxe Edition. No pages for these items exist on retailer websites.

We won’t know for sure until Activision confirms it, but we’re daring to dream.


Black Ops 4 Blackout mode battle royale
Blackout mode will be a combination of popular Black Ops 4 maps

Black Ops 4‘s Royale Flush

Surprise, surprise, Call of Duty is throwing its helmet into the battle royale arena. Black Ops 4’s new Blackout mode is promised to be “more PUBG than Fortnite,” sporting a map 1000 times larger than Nuketown. The play space will be who’s who of popular Call of Duty maps rolled into one Frankenmap.

While Battlefield V has no battle royale mode in the game currently, it would be fairly easy to add one. The developers have even said as much recently. The franchise has always featured large maps, and it would be a good fit. Whether it’s announced before or after release, a new battle royale mode in Battlefield V would not be a shocking turn of events.

We’re still of the opinion that this is too close to call. In the Black Ops 4 vs Battlefield V battle, this round is currently going to Black Ops 4. But this story is still unfolding.

Hands On With ‘Call of Duty: Black Ops 4’: Boots Down, Funs Up

The post ‘Black Ops 4’ vs ‘Battlefield V’: Co-Op, Campaigns, and Competitive appeared first on FANDOM.

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D.L. Hughley’s Fear for His Son with Autism: Defiance Could Get Him Killed | Black Love | OWN

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http://www.acrx.org -As millions of Americans strive to deal with the economic downturn,loss of jobs,foreclosures,high cost of gas,and the rising cost of prescription drug cost. Charles Myrick ,the President of American Consultants Rx, announced the re-release of the American Consultants Rx community service project which consist of millions of free discount prescription cards being donated to thousands of not for profits,hospitals,schools,churches,etc. in an effort to assist the uninsured,under insured,and seniors deal with the high cost of prescription drugs.-American Consultants Rx -Pharmacy Discount Network News

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Click today to request your free ACRX discount prescription card and save up to 80% off of your medicine!

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Black Soldier Found Dead In Maryland’s Deadly Flash Flood After Helping Stranger

The body of a Black National Guardsman who disappeared during treacherous floods in Maryland on Sunday was found in the Patapsco River Tuesday afternoon, Howard County police confirmed to Baltimore’s WBAL.

Local emergency crews used swift water rescue, truck, and ATVs in their search for Eddison Hermond, 39, an Air Force veteran and active-duty member of the Maryland Army National Guard, on Monday. Hermond, wearing a White t-shirt and Black shorts, was pulled underneath the water after he helped rescue a woman and her cat during devastating flooding in Ellicott City on Sunday afternoon, The Baltimore Sun reported. “He stepped over the ledge to try to get to me, and he was washed away,” Kate Bowman, who was helped by Hermond, said.

But what led Hermond to Bowman before his tragic disappearance and death? Here is what else we know about Hermond:

Hermond, who was 6 feet tall with an athletic build, had been visiting a local bar with friends when his day took a turn for the worse, Howard County Police Chief Gary Gardner said. The historic downpour ravaged homes and streets, with the water tragically carrying Hermond away seconds after he helped Bowman. Witnesses last saw the soldier being carried by the current toward the Patapsco River, Bonnie Hoppa, Hermond’s friend wrote on Facebook.

One of the soldier’s friends filed a missing person report with Howard County Police Department after his disappearance.

A “Hope altar” was erected for Hermond, with friends being encouraged to gather around it on Tuesday. Hoppa’s Facebook post was updated after learning about Hermond’s body being recovered, saying that she was waiting for confirmation on his death from official sources after Hermond’s family and next-of-kin had been notified.

There were no other reported deaths from the flood, making Hermond the only fatality as of Tuesday.

 

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The Conservative War on Hip-Hop: White Scapegoating and Black Respectability

Photo Illustration by The Daily Beast

There has always been an uneasy, often-exploitative relationship between black creativity and white consumption. That conflict is most obviously crystallized in contemporary culture via hip-hop, an art form born of the triumph and tragedy of black experience and expression. So often, when black art presents black humanity unashamedly—that is, flaws and all—that presentation is used to justify the dehumanizing of black folks. Rappers say bad words and rap about bad things, so it justifies black people being viewed badly—that’s the general argument for most who blame rappers for racism.

And that argument has sadly been prominent among the more elitist corners of black culture. “Pull your pants up and the cops won’t shoot you.” But that position has always been inherently racist, and it’s long past time for the upwardly mobile black folks to stop co-signing the racism.

White pundits have made hip-hop the “problem” with black culture for years, and they’ve had lots of help. Jazz legend Wynton Marsalis, for what seems like the 100th time, recently reiterated his disdain for hip-hop. The crotchety Pulitzer Prize winner has been railing against the rappity rap music for years, and in a recent appearance on The Washington Post’s podcast Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart, he talked about hip-hop, the recent removal of Confederate monuments and what he feels is damaging to race relations in America.

Read more at The Daily Beast.

The Daily Beast — Entertainment

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The Conservative War on Hip-Hop: White Scapegoating and Black Respectability

Photo Illustration by The Daily Beast

There has always been an uneasy, often-exploitative relationship between black creativity and white consumption. That conflict is most obviously crystallized in contemporary culture via hip-hop, an art form born of the triumph and tragedy of black experience and expression. So often, when black art presents black humanity unashamedly—that is, flaws and all—that presentation is used to justify the dehumanizing of black folks. Rappers say bad words and rap about bad things, so it justifies black people being viewed badly—that’s the general argument for most who blame rappers for racism.

And that argument has sadly been prominent among the more elitist corners of black culture. “Pull your pants up and the cops won’t shoot you.” But that position has always been inherently racist, and it’s long past time for the upwardly mobile black folks to stop co-signing the racism.

White pundits have made hip-hop the “problem” with black culture for years, and they’ve had lots of help. Jazz legend Wynton Marsalis, for what seems like the 100th time, recently reiterated his disdain for hip-hop. The crotchety Pulitzer Prize winner has been railing against the rappity rap music for years, and in a recent appearance on The Washington Post’s podcast Cape Up with Jonathan Capehart, he talked about hip-hop, the recent removal of Confederate monuments and what he feels is damaging to race relations in America.

Read more at The Daily Beast.

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http://www.acrx.org -As millions of Americans strive to deal with the economic downturn,loss of jobs,foreclosures,high cost of gas,and the rising cost of prescription drug cost. Charles Myrick ,the President of American Consultants Rx, announced the re-release of the American Consultants Rx community service project which consist of millions of free discount prescription cards being donated to thousands of not for profits,hospitals,schools,churches,etc. in an effort to assist the uninsured,under insured,and seniors deal with the high cost of prescription drugs.-American Consultants Rx -Pharmacy Discount Network News

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A Former NFL Player Explains How Money and Fame Intensify People’s Vices | Black Love | OWN

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http://www.acrx.org -As millions of Americans strive to deal with the economic downturn,loss of jobs,foreclosures,high cost of gas,and the rising cost of prescription drug cost. Charles Myrick ,the President of American Consultants Rx, announced the re-release of the American Consultants Rx community service project which consist of millions of free discount prescription cards being donated to thousands of not for profits,hospitals,schools,churches,etc. in an effort to assist the uninsured,under insured,and seniors deal with the high cost of prescription drugs.-American Consultants Rx -Pharmacy Discount Network News

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Why This Man Took Ownership of His Wife’s Emotional Affair | Black Love | Oprah Winfrey Network

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http://www.acrx.org -As millions of Americans strive to deal with the economic downturn,loss of jobs,foreclosures,high cost of gas,and the rising cost of prescription drug cost. Charles Myrick ,the President of American Consultants Rx, announced the re-release of the American Consultants Rx community service project which consist of millions of free discount prescription cards being donated to thousands of not for profits,hospitals,schools,churches,etc. in an effort to assist the uninsured,under insured,and seniors deal with the high cost of prescription drugs.-American Consultants Rx -Pharmacy Discount Network News

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Click today to request your free ACRX discount prescription card and save up to 80% off of your medicine!

SPECIAL DONATION REQUEST UPDATE:

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Nurse Alice: Study Shows Black Doctors Have More Positive Attitudes Toward Patients

In a recent Johns Hopkins School of Medicine study it was found that black doctors generally had more positive attitudes toward the patient. Additionally, the study affirms what some other studies have already shown, specifically that black doctors and African American clinicians have more positive attitudes toward patients with sickle cell disease, an illness only found among African Americans.

The study’s results demonstrate that healthcare workforce diversity and more culturally sensitive training is needed in the healthcare industry. Just like social injustice, ignorance and inequalities that have taken center stage publicly around other issues, unfortunately parallel issues exist in healthcare and are reflected in how patients are medically treated.

Another recommendation that results from reviewing this study: physicians who use stigmatizing language in their patients’ medical records may affect the care those patients get for years to come. The study found that physicians-in-training who read charts with stigmatizing patient chart notes were significantly more likely to have a negative attitude toward the patient than those who read charts containing more neutral language.

How You Can Protect Yourself as a Patient 

Everyone should review their medical record and know what is being documented about them. These findings are not new and will continue until those doing it are held responsible. And, unless something went wrong, there aren’t medical record police that are reviewing charts for stigmatizing language. But as consumers of health, you can check your healthcare provider.

In addition, the clinical information in medical records should never be of surprise to patients but unfortunately this happens at times. Cases have come up in which patients have been blindsided. One example is of a person who was complaining of chest pain and came to the hospital for a heart attack work-up. The patient was told by a doctor he didn’t have a heart attack, however, in the medical documentation it listed subendocardial infarction as a patient problem, which is medical lingo for heart attack.

Be aware that in some cases, it’s not always done in malice. As many doctors are overworked, overwhelmed with many patients, and underpaid for all their responsibilities, they tend to focus on the top problem that brought you in. Sometimes, something else that may be of a brewing or future concern but isn’t currently causing you issues can be overlooked. So, Ask! Ask! Ask! The doctor and healthcare team work for you. You have every right to know about potential issues and to fully understand what’s being documented in your medical record.

The post Nurse Alice: Study Shows Black Doctors Have More Positive Attitudes Toward Patients appeared first on Black Enterprise.

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Tony Awards 2018: The Best Black Actress You Never Heard Of Is Up for a Tony

Seconds after this year’s Tony Award nominations were announced, director Kenny Leon’s phone started blowing up. Lauren Ridloff, the star of Broadway’s revival of Children of a Lesser God, was officially in the race for Best Lead Actress in a Play.

While the announcement may have come as a surprise to some—including Ridloff herself—it only validated what the play’s Tony Award-winning director knew all along.

“I am over the moon excited about it,” Leon said in a phone interview the next day, recalling that the texts flew between them for an hour and a half. “She was surprised! I wasn’t surprised, because she gave one of the most vivid and unforgettable performances on Broadway I’ve ever seen.”

The backstory of Ridloff’s road to the most coveted nomination a stage actor can get is great fodder for its own fairytale script with Leon, who won a Tony for directing the 2014 revival of A Raisin in the Sun, playing a leading role.

Tony Awards

(Twitter)

Begin with the fact that Ridloff is 40 years old, deaf since birth and, when Leon discovered her, she wasn’t an actress at all. She was an at-home mom and former kindergarten teacher whom he hired to tutor him in American Sign Language (ASL). As Leon mulled the idea of reviving the 1979 play about a deaf woman who refused to read lips or speak, he was soon intent on hiring Ridloff in a broader role, as a consultant if the play launched. She would be able to keep the story true to the deaf experience. Ultimately, he asked her to star in the show.

Ridloff was game from the start. Although she has rarely even seen a play (stage productions rarely accommodate the needs of deaf people), she identified with the the script’s main character, Sarah Norman.

Like Sarah, Ridloff decided at age 13 that she would not speak. Through an interpreter, Ridloff told The Interval, a theater website, that it was an act of self-preservation.

Small, bookish, biracial, and mainstreamed in a school where almost everyone else could hear, “I felt there was enough oddness about me,” she recalled. “I didn’t want to face any bullying. I didn’t want to face strange gazes from other people. I didn’t want to be judged based on my voice because that was not a reflection of my intelligence or my personality or who I was.”

It is a testament to Leon’s vision and courage that he cast Ridloff, a woman of color, in a role that had previously only been played by white women (remember Marlee Matlin in the 1986 film?). “I thought it was a given that Sarah was a white deaf woman,” Ridloff told Variety magazine. “So, it was a big surprise to find out that Sarah is now a woman of color, and I’m so proud to present that new Sarah to the world.”

It is a testament to Ridloff’s talent and courage that she agreed to take it on, all the way to the big lights (and brutal critics) of Broadway. The risks have paid off.

“She keeps saying I opened the door, but it’s not about me,” says Leon, arguably one of today’s most sought after and respected directors. “She is a fierce, courageous woman who wants to change what people think about deaf people. She is a gifted artist who wants to be a part of changing the world. With this performance, she’s already doing that.” The Tony Awards will air June 10 on CBS.

Full disclosure: I saw this play on opening night, and could not take my eyes off of Ridloff—not only because she signs throughout the entire play, but because she is one of the most expressive people I’ve ever seen. Physically small, she has massive presence as she literally embodies her role, communicating with her eyes, her face, her posture and entire being in a way that rings clear and true.

In an age when much is made of the need for women to raise their voices and speak their truths, in opting to withhold her spoken voice as a teenager, Ridloff found her true one, and in Children of a Lesser God , everyone hears her, loud and clear.

 

 

 

 

 

The post Tony Awards 2018: The Best Black Actress You Never Heard Of Is Up for a Tony appeared first on Black Enterprise.

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Minnesota Student Beats Black Teacher But Walks Free

A Minnesota student who viciously beat a Black teacher was released without bail Thursday after a court hearing.

Corey David Burfield, 18, of St. Paul, was charged with one count of first-degree assault and one count of third-degree assault in the violent beating of school aide Mohammed Dukuly on Tuesday (May 22) at Harrison Education Center, an alternative high school in Minneapolis.

District Judge William Koch determined that Burfield, who is white, was not a flight risk during the student’s appearance in Hennepin County District Court. Burfield was allowed to walk, only having to submit to electronic home monitoring and keeping away from Dukuly. The student also is required to meet with a mental health professional, the Minneapolis Star Tribune reported.

Burfield’s case mirrors that of several white males who get slaps on the wrist for violent crimes because they are seen as “lone wolves” or mentally unstable individuals. Verdicts such as Koch’s are often offered as examples of White males using privilege to get leniency.

Though Dukuly made a miraculous recovery, the fact stands that he was still brutally assaulted. The decision to release Burfield without bail didn’t sit well with the teacher’s family.

“Quite frankly, we are disappointed,” Imam Mohammed Dukuly, the victim’s uncle, said. “For a serious case like this, I think he should’ve been on bail.”

The scary incident involving Burfield and Dukuly also sheds light on a turbulent and disturbing history of assault at Harrison. Several violent events between students and administrators have occurred as community members have complained that special needs children’s issues have gone unaddressed, the Star Tribune said.

Dukuly’s assault may also further conversations about special education, with stronger efforts for improvement across the nation.

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Five Prominent But Lesser-Known Black Dignitaries At Prince Harry and Meghan Markle’s Royal Wedding

The Royal Wedding of Prince Harry and now, Meghan Markle, Dutchess of Sussex, had the world’s attention over the weekend. For about 15 minutes, The Most Reverend Michael Bruce Curry’s impassioned speech on love captivated hearts, too. Even more talked about were some of the black celebrities in attendance, such as Oprah Winfrey, Idris Elba, and Serena Williams.

Also in attendance were some high-ranking black notables who work in different sectors of British and American societies:  

Rose Hudson-Wilkin

For years, Hudson-Wilkin had been tipped to be in the first cohort of women to become bishops in the Church of England. Since 2014, the 64-year-old priest has been Priest-in-Charge of St Mary-at-Hill, City of London. She also holds the roles of Chaplain to the Speaker of the House of Commons, priest vicar at Westminster Abbey, and the first black female chaplain to the queen. She was previously vicar of Holy Trinity Church, Dalston and All Saints Church in Haggerston.


Colleen Harris

Harris held a senior communications position in the Prime Minister’s Office before being appointed Press Secretary to the Prince of Wales. She handled the media for the prince during some of the most turbulent years, and also media-managed the emergence of Princes William and Harry into the public eye. Her career has included senior posts in the Deputy Prime Minister’s Office and the Cabinet Office, as well as in non-departmental public bodies. She has worked in Britain and abroad as a consultant with private companies, non-profit organizations and U.N agencies, including the World Health Organization.

Bishop Michael Curry

Michael Curry made history in 2015 after his installation as the Episcopal Church’s presiding bishop over its 1.8 million members—becoming the denomination’s first African American spiritual leader. Having been on the job for less than a year, Curry took a public stance supporting gay marriage, a move that earned the Episcopal Church a three-year sanction by the Anglican Communion. Anglican leaders then stripped the Episcopal Church of any role in deciding doctrine or determining how the Anglican Communion operates for three years. Curry was born in 1953 in Chicago to Dorothy Curry and Rev. Kenneth Curry, who was a Baptist before becoming an Episcopalian priest. He said his father became part of the church after he and his mother had been allowed to drink from the same chalice being passed among white parishioners in racially segregated Ohio. Bishop Curry became the talk of social media with his heartfelt sermon at the royal wedding. 



Sheku Kanneh-Mason

Along with an orchestra made up of instrumentalists from the BBC National Orchestra of Wales, the English Chamber Orchestra and the Philharmonia Orchestra, Sheku Kanneh-Mason played three songs during the couple’s Signing of the Register. At just 19, Kanneh-Mason is the first black cellist or musician to ever win BBC’s Young Musician of the Year award in its 38-year history. He reached the semi-finals of Britain’s Got Talent in 2015, and he was a member of the Chineke! Orchestra, the first professional orchestra in Europe that is made up of mainly musicians of color. His sister Isata, and brother Braimah are also members.  


Tessy Ojo 

Tessy Ojo

Tessy Ojo (Photo courtesy of the Diana Awards)

Tessy Ojo is the Chief Executive Officer of the Diana Awards, the only charity that bears the name of the late Princess Diana of Wales. Established in 1999 to recognize young people for extraordinary work in their local communities, the charity benefits from the support of The Royal Highness, Prince William and Prince Harry, as well as the UK Prime Minister. Ojo is a fellow of the Royal Society of Arts, a member of the Institute of Directors. She was awarded The Precious Award, Inspiring Leader in 2015, Women in Business Rising Star, and Excellence Award from Eva Longoria’s Global Gift Foundation. Prior to joining the Diana Award, Ojo worked in the corporate sector for over 10 years and helped implement the operational planning systems for IBM UK and Borders UK. Along with her role at Diana Awards, Ojo is on the boards of two charities and sits on the governing board of a chain of academies in London.

The post Five Prominent But Lesser-Known Black Dignitaries At Prince Harry and Meghan Markle’s Royal Wedding appeared first on Black Enterprise.

Lifestyle | Black Enterprise

EMPLOYMENT SEARCH UPDATE:

The Broke Black Girl: How a Facebook Group Became A Financial Movement for African American Women

Dasha Kennedy was a wife and mother with a corporate job in her 20s but she was still broke. Broken not just financially, but emotionally.

After a short marriage, Kennedy and her husband divorced in 2015 over irreconcilable differences—mostly financial—and she began raising her two sons as a single mother. At the time, she was struggling to provide for herself and her family, living paycheck to paycheck, and depended on bonuses from her job to sustain them. Kennedy reached a turning point, however, when she broke her foot and realized how unprepared she was for a financial emergency.

Determined to make a change, she learned how to balance her finances and began documenting her journey toward economic freedom on social media. That led her to create a Facebook group in November 2017 called The Broke Black Girl where she shared tools and resources for fiscal success with other black women. The group ballooned into an active platform where African American women around the country would share their own financial trials, tribulations, and tips. Members also encourage one another and hold each other accountable. Within six months, the group had 30,000 members. Today, Kennedy says The Broke Black Girl boasts around 40,000 members from over 32 states and 68 countries and has generated over $ 10,000 in revenue.

“What was birthed from hardship evolved into the key to financial freedom for black women everywhere. A brand built on faith and social responsibility, The Broke Black Girl aims to equip every black girl, young and old, with the means necessary to live their best life, mentally, physically, and financially,” writes Kennedy on the Facebook page.

In addition to being the force behind the growing Facebook group, Kennedy works full time as an accountant for an insurance company and as a default counselor, assisting clients that have defaulted on their loans due to financial hardships. In an interview with Black Enterprise, the St. Louis native opened up about the mission of The Broke Black Girl, how she monetized the group, and the impact that it is having on black women.

black girl

Dasha Kennedy, founder of The Broke Black Girl

BE: What is the mission of The Broke Black Girl?

The mission of the group is to provide financial literacy and basic money management skills to African American women across the world all while building positive friendships with each other. The group provides a safe and supportive space for women to openly discuss their financial hardships and seek free assistance from the professionals in the group, such as myself, with credit restoration, budgeting, money management, and wealth building.

 

BE: What tips would you share with other black women about maintaining financial stability?

As black women, we face a stigma regarding our overwhelming “need” to be beautiful by another’s standards. We have to understand that the world’s definition of beauty does NOT define us. The group lives by the motto “priorities over prettiness.” What is the point of expensive acrylic nails, hair extensions, new clothes, and shoes when you are struggling to meet your basic necessities?

We have to take control of our finances by becoming conscious of our spending habits, setting a monthly household budget, and cutting back on expenses that ultimately leave us financially strapped. How can we enjoy a life of luxury when we’re struggling to pay our bills due to the expense of that luxury? The fight starts when we admit that we have made poor financial choices, decide that enough is enough and take control of our finances.

 

BE: What have you learned from managing the group? 

Watching the group grow from one member to more than 41,000 members, I have learned that we can do so much more together financially than we could ever do alone. I have witnessed women take the initiative to create budgets, update résumés, [and] donate clothes and furniture to women that have experienced fires and floods. Being in a group with so many powerful and educated women has [also] allowed me to witness black women in a light that has been dimmed for so many years.

I’ve also learned a lot about building and managing a community. We’ve established rules so that members know what is and isn’t allowed, and to ensure that conversations remain respectful. To keep members engaged, the group has a topic schedule that we stick to and the structure of the group allows continuous learning. I also use membership questions to make sure that the most relevant people who request to join the group are allowed to join so that the group remains a safe and supportive place.

I have witnessed the love between black women and their ability to educate and provide other women with a lifelong skill: money management. The group has taught me that we are all on different financial walks but we are equally capable and responsible for helping each other along the way.

 

BE: Have you monetized the group? How?

Yes, I have monetized the group and at this current time, I have earned a least $ 11,000. The largest part of the revenue comes from events such as meet and greets, speaking engagements, mass budget classes, and merchandise. The first event, [which] was held in February 2018, was a Pancake, Pajamas and Priorities-themed vision board party for 100 girls from the group.

Since then, I have worked with girls from the group one-on-one for a fee. Using my background in finances to prepare personal and business budgets, I have sold merchandise with the name of the group as well as received payments through paid partnerships. I partner with other women that offer a financial service that I do not in an attempt to create a team effort in wealth building.

By this summer, Kennedy says she hopes to become a full-time entrepreneur.

 

-Editor’s note: This interview has been lightly edited for brevity and clarity.

The post The Broke Black Girl: How a Facebook Group Became A Financial Movement for African American Women appeared first on Black Enterprise.

Money | Black Enterprise

FASHION DEAL UPDATE:

Shop select Free People sale and clearance items at Bloomingdales.com!

Trump Grants a Posthumous Pardon to Jack Johnson, Boxing’s First Black Heavyweight Champ

President Donald Trump granted a rare and historic posthumous pardon to Jack Johnson on Thursday, clearing the first African American heavyweight boxing champion of a racially-motivated conviction.

“Today I’ve issued an executive grant of clemency, a full pardon, posthumously, to John Arthur ‘Jack’ Johnson,” said Trump during an Oval Office ceremony, reports CNN. “The first African-American heavyweight champion of the world, a truly great fighter. Had a tough life.”

Trump described the charges against Johnson, who was arrested in 1912 for traveling with his white girlfriend, as unjust. “Jack Johnson was not treated fairly, and we have corrected that, and I’m very honored to have done it,” said the president.

Among those in attendance at the ceremony included Johnson’s great-great niece Linda Bell Haywood, current heavyweight champion Deontay Wilder, and actor Sylvester Stallone, who nudged Trump to grant the pardon last month. Johnson’s pardon marks the third posthumous pardon granted in U.S. history.


Who Was Jack Johnson?

Johnson was born in 1878 to former slaves in Galveston, Texas. He began amateur boxing as a teenager before making his professional debut in 1898. Ten years later he was crowned as the first African American world heavyweight boxing champion after defeating Tommy Burns in Sydney, Australia, in 1908. He held the title until 1915.

In 1910, he faced off against boxer Jim Jeffries, who white fans referred to as the “great white hope” in anticipation that he would take Johnson’s heavyweight crown. Johnson, however, won the match dubbed the “fight of the century,” triggering riots from angry white mobs that sabotaged African American communities around the country. Twenty people were killed. Most of the victims were black, including one who was tied to a lamppost.

“This was white-on-black race riots in every corner of the United States, where groups of whites unhappy that Jeffries had lost went into black neighborhoods to kill African-Americans simply because of the color of their skin, simply because Jack Johnson was unforgivably black,” documentary filmmaker Ken Burns told CNN.

Johnson’s multiple relationships with white women also sparked controversy and even led to his arrest in 1912. After crossing state lines with his white girlfriend, he was charged with violating the Mann Act, a law that banned human trafficking and the transportation of women and girls for an “immoral purpose.” He was convicted in 1913 by an all-white jury, but Johnson fled the U.S. and spent years in exile fighting overseas. In 1920, Johnson turned himself over to U.S. authorities and served 10 months in prison. He died in a car crash in 1946 at the age of 68.

Johnson is not the only black person deserving of a presidential pardon post-mortem. Social justice advocates have called for a pardon for Marcus Garvey, the legendary leader of the black nationalist movement who was convicted in 1923 on what his family called “politically motivated and bogus” charges of mail fraud. In addition, California lawmakers have called for the exoneration of 50 black sailors convicted of mutiny during World War II for refusing to load ammunition following two deadly explosions at the Port Chicago naval munitions base in 1944.

 

 

 

The post Trump Grants a Posthumous Pardon to Jack Johnson, Boxing’s First Black Heavyweight Champ appeared first on Black Enterprise.

Lifestyle | Black Enterprise

BEAUTY DEAL UPDATE:

Little Known Black History Fact: Freedom Riders

Freedom Rider George Raymond

The goals of the courageous “Freedom Riders,” a collective of Black and white civil rights activists who rode buses into the deep South to protest segregation on bus lines, faced major odds in the early ’60’s. On this day in 1961, 27 riders were arrested amid a warning from then Attorney General Robert F. Kennedy to consider another option.

The group of riders made their way from Montgomery, Alabama to Jackson, Mississippi with measurable support despite efforts by law enforcement to break their ranks. The riders were arrested at the Jackson bus station and detained at Parchman, an infamous maximum-security prison in the city. According to reports, the judge in the matter famously turned his head as the riders offered their defense. Ultimately, the NAACP appealed the convictions all the way to the U.S. Supreme Court and had them all overturned.

Kennedy’s statement carried a sense of foreboding as protesters and counter-protesters alike gathered between Alabama and Mississippi. He noted that racial tensions were high and all of the media fervor about the protests would also attract unwanted attention from bystanders not partial to either cause. In his statement, Kennedy wrote “a mob asks no questions” in reference to the potential for violence that did occur.

Despite the best efforts of whites who resisted the Freedom Riders movement, the Interstate Commerce Commission, with broad support from the administration of President John F. Kennedy, prohibited the segregation of interstate transit terminals in the fall of that year.

 

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ENTERTAINMENT UPDATE:

Liam Neeson Joins the New ‘Men In Black’; Here’s Everything We Know

Liam Neeson Joins the New 'Men In Black'; Here's Everything We Know

Liam Neeson is taking a break from his usual set of thrillers to join another sci-fi franchise. The actor, best known for his roles in the Star Wars, Dark Knight and Taken series, as well as his Oscar-nominated performance in Schindler's List, is in talks to join the Men In Black spin-off/reboot, possibly titled MIB, which is coming to theaters next year.

According to Variety, Neeson would play the head of the UK office of the MIB, basically the British counterpart to Rip Torn's…

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John Lewis And Other Black Leaders Reject Black Female Challenger In Boston

As Democrats finalize their primary election picks on who will do battle against Republican candidates in November, friction between local and national political black leaders may jeopardize what was supposed to be a unified front in the fight for seats congressional seats come November. On Saturday, inside the brick-lined walls of the Twelfth Baptist Church in Boston, Georgia’s Democratic Rep. John Lewis showed up to campaign for Rep. Michael E. Capuano, a white liberal Democrat, who is being challenged by Ayanna Pressley, a black progressive.

Pressley was the first woman of color to be elected to Boston’s City Council in its 108-year history. In fact, all members of the Congressional Caucus’ Political Action Committee endorsed Capuano over Pressley, according to The New York Times.

“People who have been around for awhile, they know their way around,” Lewis said. “They know where all the bodies are buried and they know how to get things done.”

Lewis’ case for Capuano: His experience, and seniority—which he said will be needed for Democrats’ fight against President Donald Trump, rather than the youthful energy of Pressley’s grassroots campaign. “It’s important to keep a leader, a fighter, and warrior like Mike Capuano around,” he said.

The Seventh Congressional District that is up for grabs stretches from Boston’s Dorchester and Roxbury neighborhoods to the communities of Cambridge and Somerville across the Charles River. It is the state’s only district where the majority of residents are not white and Mr. Capuano, who is white, has never faced a serious primary challenger in his 10-term tenure in Congress.

According to the New York Times, Rep. Gregory Meeks (D-N.Y.), chairman of CBC’s political action committee said, “the group endorsed Mr. Capuano largely because of his longtime personal relationships with its members and his senior position on the House Financial Services Committee.” While he supports diversity in the House, Meeks said new candidates “should focus on unseating Republicans—not on defeating “a Democrat who has worked hard in the caucus.”

Local black politicians in Boston said they would have preferred the CBC follow Elizabeth Warren and Edward Markey’s lead in staying neutral in the local race. Marie St. Fleur, a former state representative questioned the black caucus’s understanding of local issues. Bennie Wiley, a powerful civic leader in Massachusetts and supporter of Pressley said she was “disappointed, but not surprised.” Even Ministers at the Twelfth Baptist Church expressed concerns.

“For me, I kind of recoil and I know many leaders recoil at the idea that we’re supposed to sit back and wait our turn because someone else has voted within our interests,” Rev. Jeffrey Brown, an associate pastor who decided to skip the town hall, said.

Michael Capuano’s track record:

  • Introduced the most bills compared to Massachusetts Delegation: Capuano has introduced 22 bills and resolutions—the most bills compared to other legislators.
  • Got bicameral support on the fewest bills compared to Massachusetts Delegation: The House and Senate often work on the same issue simultaneously by introducing companion bills in each chamber. 0 of Capuano’s bills and resolutions had a companion bill in the Senate. Working with a sponsor in the other chamber makes a bill more likely to be passed by both the House and Senate.
  • Got the 3rd fewest cosponsors on their bills compared to Massachusetts Delegation: Capuano’s bills and resolutions had 88 cosponsors in 2017. Securing cosponsors is an important part of getting support for a bill, although having more cosponsors does not always mean a bill will get a vote
  • Got his bills out of committee the 3rd least often compared to Massachusetts Delegation: Most bills and resolutions languish in committee without any action. Capuano introduced 1 bill in 2017 that got past committee and to the floor for consideration.
  • Was 18th most present in votes compared to Serving 10+ Years: Capuano missed 0.7% of votes (5 of 710 votes) in 2017
  • Ranked 95th most liberal compared to All Representatives
  • Powerful Cosponsors: 1 of Capuano’s bills and resolutions in 2017 had a cosponsor who was a chair or ranking member of a committee that the bill was referred to. Getting support from committee leaders on relevant committees is a crucial step in moving legislation forward.
  • Committee Positions: Capuano held a leadership position on 0 committees and 1 subcommittee, as either a chair (majority party) or ranking member (minority party), at the end of the session.
  • Joining Bipartisan Bills: Capuano cosponsored 249 bills and resolutions introduced by other Members of Congress. Cosponsorship shows a willingness to work with others to advance policy goals.
  • Government Transparency: GovTrack looked at whether Capuano supported any of 21 government transparency, accountability, and effectiveness bills in the House that we identified in this session. We gave Capuano 0 points, based on one point for cosponsoring and three points for sponsoring any of these bills.
  • Laws Enacted: Capuano introduced 0 bills that became law, including via incorporation into other measures, in 2017. Keep in mind that it takes a law to repeal a law. Very few bills ever become law.
  • Writing Bipartisan Bills: Capuano tends to gather cosponsors only on one side of the aisle. 6 of Capuano’s 22 bills and resolutions had both a Democratic cosponsor and a Republican cosponsor in 2017.

 

All data is gathered from GovTrack.us, a website that tracks the United States Congress.

The post John Lewis And Other Black Leaders Reject Black Female Challenger In Boston appeared first on Black Enterprise.

Lifestyle | Black Enterprise

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‘Dear White People’: Inside the series taking on what it means to be black in America

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First Look: Infidelity and Accountability on “Black Love” | Black Love | Oprah Winfrey Network

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SPECIAL NEWS BULLETIN:

http://www.acrx.org -As millions of Americans strive to deal with the economic downturn,loss of jobs,foreclosures,high cost of gas,and the rising cost of prescription drug cost. Charles Myrick ,the President of American Consultants Rx, announced the re-release of the American Consultants Rx community service project which consist of millions of free discount prescription cards being donated to thousands of not for profits,hospitals,schools,churches,etc. in an effort to assist the uninsured,under insured,and seniors deal with the high cost of prescription drugs.-American Consultants Rx -Pharmacy Discount Network News

CHARITY UPDATE :

Click today to request your free ACRX discount prescription card and save up to 80% off of your medicine!

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Please help American Consultants Rx achieve it’s biggest goal yet of donating over 30 million discount prescription cards to over 50k organizations in an effort to assist millions of Americans in need. Please click here to donate today!