Documentary traces the comic genius of Robin Williams

Robin Williams left behind a rich comic legacy when he died in August 2014 at the age of 63. The manic, lightning-quick standup comedian rocketed to stardom on the 1978 ABC sitcom “Mork & Mindy” and fashioned a remarkable career in standup, movies and on television including four Grammys, two Emmys and a 1997 Oscar…
Entertainment | New York Post

SPECIAL DISCOUNT UPDATE:

Famed Marvel comic book artist Steve Ditko dies

Famed comic book artist Steve Ditko — who teamed up with Stan Lee to create Spider-Man and Doctor Strange — died in New York, police said Friday. The 90-year-old Ditko was found dead inside his apartment at 150 W. 51st Street on June 29, cops said. No one had heard from Ditko in about two…
Entertainment | New York Post

SPECIAL DISCOUNT UPDATE:

Hannah Gadsby and Nanette: What You Need to Know About the Comic and Netflix Special Everyone Is Talking About

Hannah Gadsby, NanetteYou should know this name: Hannah Gadsby. However, if you ask your neighbor who Hannah Gadsby is, they probably won’t be able to tell you. That’s about to change. Gadsby and her Netflix…

E! Online (US) – TV News

SPECIAL TIP UPDATE!

What to Expect From the Future of DC Comic Book Movies

What to Expect From the Future of DC Comic Book Movies

While some film franchises like to set up release dates far in advance, DC Entertainment is no longer on that path. Walter Hamada, the relatively new head of DC's movie production, is against that and other recent Hollywood trends, according to The Hollywood Reporter. The "DC Extended Universe" no longer seems intent on aping Marvel's design, if it's even really a crossover mega-franchise anymore. Hamada has no interest in a writers' room, either. He appears to be into…

Read More

Read Comments

Fandango Movie News

MOVIE APP UPDATE:

‘True comic voices are getting killed right now’: ‘Mrs. Maisel’ creators say there’s an attack on

Associated Press

SPECIAL NEWS BULLETIN:

http://www.acrx.org -As millions of Americans strive to deal with the economic downturn,loss of jobs,foreclosures,high cost of gas,and the rising cost of prescription drug cost. Charles Myrick ,the President of American Consultants Rx, announced the re-release of the American Consultants Rx community service project which consist of millions of free discount prescription cards being donated to thousands of not for profits,hospitals,schools,churches,etc. in an effort to assist the uninsured,under insured,and seniors deal with the high cost of prescription drugs.-American Consultants Rx -Pharmacy Discount Network News

CHARITY UPDATE:

Click today to request your free ACRX discount prescription card and save up to 80% off of your medicine!

SPECIAL DONATION REQUEST UPDATE:

Please help American Consultants Rx achieve it’s biggest goal yet of donating over 30 million discount prescription cards to over 50k organizations in an effort to assist millions of Americans in need. Please click here to donate today!

Eiza Gonzalez and More Joining Vin Diesel in Comic Book Movie ‘Bloodshot’; Here’s Everything We Know

Eiza Gonzalez and More Joining Vin Diesel in Comic Book Movie 'Bloodshot'; Here's Everything We Know

Update: With the start of production set for July, the casting process for the comic book movie Bloodshot is drawing some new faces. Eiza Gonzalez (Baby Driver, above), Michael Sheen (Passengers) and Sam Heughan (TV's Outlander) are all in talks to join the cast, according to Variety. Here's all we know, drawn from our previous posts on the film. 

Who will star? 

Back in March, Vin Diesel was confirmed to star in the sci-fi/action movie, based on Valiant comic…

Read More

Read Comments

Fandango Movie News

MOVIE APP UPDATE:

Kathy Griffin defends comic Michelle Wolf after WHCD jokes backlash

ABC News

SPECIAL NEWS BULLETIN:

http://www.acrx.org -As millions of Americans strive to deal with the economic downturn,loss of jobs,foreclosures,high cost of gas,and the rising cost of prescription drug cost. Charles Myrick ,the President of American Consultants Rx, announced the re-release of the American Consultants Rx community service project which consist of millions of free discount prescription cards being donated to thousands of not for profits,hospitals,schools,churches,etc. in an effort to assist the uninsured,under insured,and seniors deal with the high cost of prescription drugs.-American Consultants Rx -Pharmacy Discount Network News

CHARITY UPDATE:

Click today to request your free ACRX discount prescription card and save up to 80% off of your medicine!

SPECIAL DONATION REQUEST UPDATE:

Please help American Consultants Rx achieve it’s biggest goal yet of donating over 30 million discount prescription cards to over 50k organizations in an effort to assist millions of Americans in need. Please click here to donate today!

Black Panther’s Dora Milaje are Getting Comic Book Spin-Off

The Dora Milaje the female warriors who serve and protect the Wakanda kingdom and T’Challa are finally getting a comic book spinoff. Marvel editor Wil Moss announced on Friday that the elite force would appear in a collection of one-shot comics Wakanda Forever.

Nnedi Okorafor will write the comics. In an interview with Vogue Okorafor said of the female protectors, “Typically when you see them, they’re with T’Challa, representing and protecting him. Now you’re going to see the Dora Miljae for the first time as an independent entity; they’re not under the shadow of the throne.”

Alberto Alburquerque will do the art. The comics will follow Okoye, Ayo, Aneka and the Dora Milaje as their stories move through Amazing Spider-Man, Avengers and X-Men. The first issue will see the ladies head to New York with Peter Parker to “investigate a threat to national security.”

In a moment Okorafor said was “coming for a long time,” the first issue arrives in June, followed by X-Men: Wakanda Forever in July and Avengers: Wakanda Forever in August.

The post Black Panther’s Dora Milaje are Getting Comic Book Spin-Off appeared first on EBONY.

EBONY

BEST DEAL UPDATE:

Remember When We Were Sidekicks? – BLACK PANTHER and COMIC BOOK POLITICS

Minor spoilers ahead

This isn’t so much a review as a reflection. It’s well documented how I feel about Black Panther. I pushed for Black Panther’s inclusion in the Avengers years ago. In April 2013, I wrote “It’s Time For Black Panther On The Big Screen.” If you’re just tuning in, you can look back through my archives for my previous Panther posts. Here’s Cary Darling’s Houston Chronicle article I was featured in “Houston fans are pumped for ‘Black Panther’ superhero movie with virtually all-African-American cast

Well, I saw it.

Black Panther was one of the best movie experiences of my life.

First, this film isn’t “homework.” Typically, movies featuring a black cast feel as if they need to instruct audiences about the ills of society past and present. Black creatives know we may never have the media mic again, so we don’t waste any moments. In my humble opinion, you’re grown, and it’s unrealistic to burden a mainstream movie with responsibility to make you a better person. That cake is baked. The only hope for a better tomorrow lies within the children. Which is why the stories they see and hear about heroic people that look like them, and don’t, are vital. Blissfully, there are no sermons in Black Panther. White colonizers never even knew the technocratic marvel of Wakanda existed, so Wakandan society flourished atop a mountain of the most precious metal on earth, unmolested.

But, to director Ryan Coogler’s and Marvel Studios’ credit, Black Panther doesn’t shy away one iota from speaking truth to power about the broader consequences of isolationism, classism or societal injustice. Thematically, the tone of the film is a tasty gumbo of an Aesop fable and James Bond political pot-boiler with a side of Game of Thrones court intrigue and a dash of hot sauce. The strongest nations throughout history learn the greatest threats are not from without but within; Wakanda is no different. No one can escape the consequences of the choices they’ve made, whomever you are, from a lowly orphan to a mighty King, to a nation of millions, as Malcom X said famously, “Your chickens will always come home to roost.”

There has been some buzz by angry white fanboys with absurd notions regarding Black Panther. They’ve declared comic book characters or stories must somehow be “apolitical”. And that the political agenda surrounding this film makes them “uncomfortable.”  (Aw, pobrecito!)

However, black folks continue to celebrate the creative, cultural and financial success of the only big budget comic book movie featuring a black cast and crew undeterred.

The tone-deaf reaction of some can be expected. Wonder Woman debuted to similar trolling about sexism (against men) and uproars about Alamo Drafthouse Theaters’ woman-only screeings. Racism, sexism and pop culture fandom aren’t mutually exclusive, in fact, any female, non-gender specific person, Bleek, cosplayer, collector, or actor of color can relay incidences of racism, sexisim or homophobia they’ve encountered. This harassment both online; like John Boyega for the crime of being a black stormtrooper in “The Force Awakens” or at cons where “Cosplay is not Consent” has to be repeatedly drummed into grabby Comic Con attendees.

I’ve been trolled by white men I don’t know from Adam with the caucasity to tell me I had “no right to speak about Black Panther because I’m not a real comic book fan.”  Now, not liking or even hating Black Panther doesn’t make you a racist. Telling me I can’t love it does. And using the fig leaf of “political agendas have no place in Comic Book Movies” to hide your bigotry only exposes your own political agenda.

As hard as it may be for you to believe, Jimothy, this movie isn’t about you…

White Supremacy is a Hell of a Drug

In his Forbes’ article chronicling Black Panther’s unprecedented success, Scott Mendelson (a white guy so you can trust him, Jimothy) titled “Box Office: ‘Black Panther’ Crushes Conventional Wisdom With Record $ 218M Debut” had this to say regarding Black Panther:

This isn’t just a blow to conventional wisdom about minority-led blockbusters, it’s a blow to conventional wisdom concerning the MCU. One of their more outside-the-box offerings, one of their most director-driven films and one of their most overtly political pictures yet, one that plays more like a drama than an action spectacular, is now on pace to be one of their very biggest movies. Like Pixar, I hope the MCU is realizing that its (stereotypically) riskiest bets turn out to be their biggest wins. Playing it safe is no longer the safe choice.”

Let’s talk a little about “politics in comics” before we move forward. Because this will come up more often as women, blacks, Asians, non-binary folks and others underserved in the pop media landscape take the lead on both sides of the camera and all phases of production in Hollywood. Let’s look at an example of how political thought not only has always been a part of comics, it grounds the greatest heroes and drives the best stories.

Captain America was created by cartoonists Joe Simon and Jack Kirby, his first appearance was Captain America Comics #1 published in 1941 by Timely Comics, a predecessor of Marvel Comics. Captain America was designed as a patriotic supersoldier who fought the Axis powers of World War II and was Timely Comics’ most popular character during the wartime period. Steve Rogers, “the skinny kid from Brooklyn” that became America’s enduring champion and the “First Avenger” in Marvels MCU, was 4F but wanted desperately to serve his country like his only childhood friend Sgt. Buchanan “Bucky” Barnes. Steve endured bullying with courage and tenacity, he knew what it meant to be powerless, which is why Dr. Erskine, the lead scientist of the super soldier program, believed Rogers was the ideal candidate.

Dr. Abraham Erskine: The serum amplifies everything that is inside. So, good becomes great. Bad becomes worse. This is why you were chosen. Because a strong man, who has known power all his life, will lose respect for that power. But a weak man knows the value of strength, and knows compassion.
Steve Rogers: Thanks. I think.
Dr. Abraham Erskine: [he pours two drinks] Whatever happens tomorrow, you must promise me one thing. That you will stay who you are. Not a perfect soldier, but a good man.”

Rogers, now a super soldier, dressed in red white & blue named Captain America quit touring with the USO selling war bonds, went to the front lines and punched Nazis in the face on a daily basis.

That’s a political statement.

It’s endemic to who he is. Rogers believes in, if not America as it is, the aspirational ideal of what America SHOULD be for all her people. He’s such a patriot, once he leaned the truth about what the American government was doing in our name? He helped take down SHIELD, fought Iron Man, and became a fugitive from justice. Can you separate Captain America’s political views or core beliefs about freedom and justice from his character?

Of course not. Nor should you. That’s WHY we love Captain America. It’s what makes him a hero.

-Amnestic fanboys must have forgotten political stances made in The Avengers and all three Captain America Movies. SHIELD/HYDRA. Steve Rogers RAFT breakout after Civil War. The Sakovia Accords; UN oversight of “enhanced” individuals that split the Avengers. The political asylum granted by Wakanda. The entire X-Men comic run since Mutants were allegories of blacks during the Civil Rights Era of the 1960’s. MUTANT REGISTRATION ACT. TRASK Sentinel Program. The Legacy Virus that decimated fictional mutants concurrently during President Reagan’s silence on the spread of HIV in the 90’s that cost millions of real people their lives. Or, the second episode of Superfriends that spoke out against man-made climate change and promoted ocean conservation in the 1970’s.

I could go on.

Decades of the politics of the day driving comic book stories that no one cared about, that is, when blacks were sidekicks. This changed last Thursday.

Black Panther is a movie about the heir to the throne of a fictional African nation who wears the hereditary mantle of both monarch and protector of his realm “The Black Panther.” Is it possible to ignore or separate his blackness and his unique Afrocentric culture or world view from this character? Should every narrative he’s a part of ignore the plight of black people that do not enjoy the privilege of Wakandan citizenship?

Of course not.

One of the most powerful Black Panther comic book stories was the Jungle Action series of the seventies featuring Black Panther vs. The Ku Klux Klan. How do you de-politicize a black king taking on the the Klan? Why should we even want to? Like Cap’s political stance and core beliefs, Black Panther’s ethnicity & culture are central to his narrative and endemic to the character.

Black Panther is a powerful, resonant, self-reflective exercise that pays homage to both the source material and the African diaspora. It represents with unconditional love, deep respect, unique style, and an effortless flourish, yet still remembers to be a hell of a good time at the movies!

Black Panther was more than I could possibly ask for and one of the best examples of what a comic book movie can be. Period.

#wakandaforever

Editor’s Note: This article is excerpted from a longer piece. Read the article in its entirety at The Good Men Project 

 

 

The post Remember When We Were Sidekicks? – BLACK PANTHER and COMIC BOOK POLITICS appeared first on Black Enterprise.

Lifestyle | Black Enterprise

EMPLOYMENT SEARCH UPDATE:

‘Logan’ Breaks Comic Book Barrier With An Oscar Nomination

Newsy

SPECIAL NEWS BULLETIN:

http://www.acrx.org -As millions of Americans strive to deal with the economic downturn,loss of jobs,foreclosures,high cost of gas,and the rising cost of prescription drug cost. Charles Myrick ,the President of American Consultants Rx, announced the re-release of the American Consultants Rx community service project which consist of millions of free discount prescription cards being donated to thousands of not for profits,hospitals,schools,churches,etc. in an effort to assist the uninsured,under insured,and seniors deal with the high cost of prescription drugs.-American Consultants Rx -Pharmacy Discount Network News

CHARITY UPDATE:

Click today to request your free ACRX discount prescription card and save up to 80% off of your medicine!

SPECIAL DONATION REQUEST UPDATE:

Please help American Consultants Rx achieve it’s biggest goal yet of donating over 30 million discount prescription cards to over 50k organizations in an effort to assist millions of Americans in need. Please click here to donate today!

NFL’s Marshawn Lynch Proves Comic Book Superheroes Exist IRL

You may be a fan of superheroes in comics but did you know superheroes exist in real life? Just look to the NFL and Marshawn Lynch for proof.

Former Seattle Seahawks and current Oakland Raiders running back Marshawn Lynch has been known to Hulk out during games and is known for his “Beast Mode” runs, most famously seen in the 2011 Wild Card game against the New Orleans Saints. It’s a perfect example of how humans can pull off crazy, superhuman feats.

Describing the run won’t do it justice, so check out the “hulked out” version in the video above and see how it compares to the real deal here.

The NFL playoffs begin this Saturday, January 6th.

The post NFL’s Marshawn Lynch Proves Comic Book Superheroes Exist IRL appeared first on Fandom powered by Wikia.

Fandom powered by Wikia

ENTERTAINMENT DEAL UPDATE:

Comic Book Reviews for December 20, 2017

2017 may be winding down, but the comic book industry sure isn’t. This week saw the release of another stellar issue of Batman, the latest chapter of Dark Nights: Metal, and the debuts of Marvel Two-In-One, X-Men: Grand Design, Backways and the relaunched Quantum & Woody.

Scroll down to check out our reviews for these and various other new releases, and be sure to let us know your favorite books of the week in the comments below.

DC COMICS

STL066113

Continue reading…

IGN All

SHOPPING DISCOUNT UPDATE:

GameStop, Inc.

This comic strip nailed exactly what it’s like to be a freelance creative in just four panels

This comic strip nailed exactly what it’s like to be a freelance creative in just four panels


This comic strip nailed exactly what it’s like to be a freelance creative in just four panels

If you’ve ever dreamed of becoming a freelancer and working for yourself, one comic strip nailed exactly what it’s like to be a freelance creative. Long-story short? It’s not as easy as you may think. Being a freelancer requires serious self-discipline, self-motivation, and balancing several responsibilities at once — to name just a few requirements. And then it comes with plenty of awkward complications. Like figuring out how to file your taxes.

Plus, there’s the whole getting-paid-thing, which is a whole other issue — how much money to charge, how quickly your client(s) will pay you, etc. And, let’s say you’re a writer or artist — some places may want you to work for free. Yup, FREE. Think about other jobs, an architect for instance. Can you imagine a client asking them to work for free? Here, design this building for us, but we can’t pay you… Luckily, one comic artist knows our pain.

This comic strip nails those freelance creative annoyances on the head.

As funny as this comic is, anyone who’s an artist or writer can likely relate — and the fact that a newspaper had printed it is ironic since some print and online publications ~don’t~ pay and ~do~ believe exposure is payment enough.

Want to know more? The artist is Rick Detorie.

You can find his work online and on Amazon. We’re grateful that @XenoStateOfMind, the Twitter user who shared the strip, went out of their way to give the artist credit. They also explained why they shared it online — and it wasn’t for personal exposure.

Hear, hear! And the Twitterverse found it just as relatable.

It’s not easy to hack the freelance life. But seeing comics like this from other creatives who get it makes it a little bit easier. When you find an artist or writer you love, support their work. We know we’ll definitely be keeping an eye out for Rick Detorie in the future.



HelloGiggles

BEST DEAL UPDATE:

The Business of Black Comic Books

This industry had revenue of $ 1.03 billion last year and it’s not the technology sector— it’s comic books. Comic book sales are soaring as the demographics of the average comic book fan broaden. Sales are up in all forms of comics including month-to-month titles and graphic novels.

The lion’s share of those dollars (about 60% of sales) goes to the “Big Two” comic book publishers, Marvel and D.C.

A sliver of the indie market is comics created by people of color. Sure, there are a handful of comics written and drawn by black people working for DC or Marvel (Christopher Priest, Ta-Nehisi Coates, and Reginald Hudlin, are some of the most prominent to come to mind). Yet, many black writers and artists are increasingly going the indie route, some using funding sources such as Kickstarter to launch their titles.

 

(Image: Joseph Illidge)

 

In interviewing several of the most buzzed-about independent black comic book creators today, the consensus is that while the goal is to create a profitable comic title, the true joy of being a black indie comic book publisher is freedom of expression, despite myriad struggles to get one’s work noticed.

 

The Makings of the Black Comic Book Cottage Industry

 

Ask just about any professional in the comic book industry how they ended up in their line of work, and most will say it began with collecting comics as a child. Many dream of writing or drawing their way to comic book success by working for Marvel or DC, or the next-largest publishers, Dark Horse or Image Comics.

However, as in the tech field, diversity in the comic book industry is an issue making the business even harder for people of color to gain access. While Marvel or DC Entertainment did not provide workforce diversity statistics for this article, Marvel did claim in an emailed statement, that it has ‘interesting news upcoming that adds to Marvel’s diversity in both its creative team and in its storylines,’ but did not elaborate.

Joe Illidge, a comic book industry veteran who started his career at Milestone and went on to become the first black person in DC’s editorial department for Batman, agrees.

(Joseph Illidge reads a Solar Man comic book. Image: Joseph Illidge)

 

 

“I don’t think the goal should be to try and break into DC and Marvel,” he says. “I think the goal is we have to build our own houses and then in time be as big as DC and Marvel,” says Illidge who launched his own title, Solar Man, with Harris and is currently a senior editor with Lion Forge. 

The black comic book business has grown since the launch of Milestone Comics in 1993, credited at the time as “the industry’s most successful minority-owned and operated comic company,”  founded by Dwayne McDuffie, Denys Cowan, Michael Davis, and Black Enterprise’s own Derek T. Dingle.

 

(Milestone title cover. Image: Milestone Media LLC)

 

 

With competition fierce to work for either Marvel or DC many comic book creators are forced to go solo in developing, marketing, and selling their products. Today, many tools are available to make creating a comic book an easier overall process than before helping comic book producers of color get their work out.

The game-changer contributing to the rise of independent, black-owned and created comics such as P.B. Soldier, Matty’s Rocket, Solar Man, E.X.O, and Eating Vampires is technology.

“If you are kind of daunted by the disturbingly large amount of money it takes to get a comic done, go on Tumblr, go to Instagram…these things are free,” advises Micheline Hess, the creator of young adult fantasy adventure comic, Malice in Wonderland. …” says Hess.

 

(Image: Micheline Hess)

 

Digital comics have somewhat lowered the cost of creating a comic book. But revenue data reveals that the preference for many fans is still the print. Digital comic book sales in the North American market tallied $ 90 million in 2015, as But print sales accounted for $ 940 million.   

“Right now with Watson and Holmes at best I was looking at 20-25% of print sales,” says Brandon Perlow, publisher and artist of New Paradigm Studios which creates Watson and Holmes—an urban take on Sir Arthur Conan Doyle’s detective duo.

“[Digital] is lower [cost] than print,” Perlow explains, “but you’re pretty much limited to Comixology and Amazon….so it’s less income per book after distribution fees.” His conclusion on digital comics is that he’s unsure it will replace print.

 

The Unique Challenges of the Black Comic Book Creator

 

Despite the availability of digital comic platforms, technology tools for writing and art, and social media for promoting comic books, the uncertainty of bringing home a steady paycheck as well as costs associated with printing and marketing, makes the comic book business a precarious venture. This is especially true for African Americans who don’t often hail from families with the means to support the unsteady financial life of an artist or writer.

“In our community, our parents, rightfully so, are concerned about us becoming artists,” says Regine L. Sawyer, owner and founder of Lockett Down Productions which produces the comic books Eating Vampires, Ice Witch, and The Rippers.

(‘Evelyn & Madix’ from “Eating Vampires” comic book. Image: Regine L. Sawyer, Lockett Down Productions)

 

“Yes, [young people] can make a living from comics and we give them the breakdown of how they can do that,” says Sawyer, who is also an advocate for women, particularly women of color, in the comic book business.

For some, the unrealized dream of not “making it” in the industry can be devastating.

“I know an artist that was on Facebook just about to announce his suicide,” says N. Steven Harris, an award-winning artist who has worked for both DC and Marvel on titles including Deadpool.

The artist was distraught about not receiving work from either DC or Marvel, explains Harris. “Some people worked him through this funk he was going through and got him back on board.”

 

(Image: N Steven Harris)

 

Harris says many young comic book creators are too caught up in the mystique of Marvel, DC, or Dark Horse—a comic book publisher of popular titles including Hellboy, Sin City, and Mass Effect.

Financing is another roadblock for many black comic book companies. Diletantte J. Bass is the marketing director for PBS Media, creator of the comic book P.B. Soldier and has first-hand experience in financing a title.

 

(“P.B. Soldier Episode 1” comic book. Image: Naseed Gifted)

 

“When you are a small comic book the price it takes for you to make your comic book is so costly,” he says. Bass also points out that many inexperienced in the business don’t factor in other costs.

“You have the issue of events like Comic-Con and they are charging $ 2,000 per booth,” says Bass. He says creators have to factor in other trade shows to promote their product, not to mention traveling expenses which are rarely reimbursed.

Roye Okupe quit his job as a full-time web designer to launch his comic title, E.X.O.—about an African superhero (Okupe is originally from Lagos, Nigeria).

About working as an independent comic book publisher, Okupe says, “It’s not a glamorous thing. I haven’t bought new clothes in two years but at least I can make my rent.”

Okupe says as with any business, to launch a comic book requires capital. In addition to angel and private equity investors, some independent publishers are turning to crowdsourcing funds. He just launched his third Kickstarter campaign for his latest comic book, Malika: Warrior Queen.

 

(“Malika: The Warrior Queen.” Image: Roye Okupe, Kickstarter)

 

For black comic book creators, solidarity is the ultimate way of receiving and lending support, be it financial, artistic, or emotional. All of the artists and writers interviewed in this article are acquainted, some knowing each other for years.  Overcoming the challenges comic book creators face, especially those of color, is by “uniting and coming together and forming that collective,” says Bass.

Comic Books as Social Statement

One advantage for black comic book developers in going independent is the opportunity to make strong political and social statements through their art; an opportunity that would perhaps be subject to more scrutiny working for one of the big publishers.

Naseed Gifted, the founder of PBS Media, is the writer and creator of his company’s comic book P.B. Soldier. The book is designed to teach youth about STEM (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics). Gifted, who works as an administrator in the Newark, New Jersey public school system, has an engineering degree.

“We’re trying to get students interested in STEM,” says Gifted. “We use the comic book as a vehicle.”

George Carmona, artists, designer, and founder of creative studio Fist Full of Art also sees the comic book as a teaching tool. “You can use comic books as a ‘gateway drug’ to literacy.”

Perhaps the single greatest motivator for these creatives is developing characters and storylines with which they can identify.

African Americans who grew up consuming Spider-Man, Captain America, Iron Man, Batman and other iconic titles enjoyed reading the adventures of these superheroes, yet their lives and backstory were often foreign to a black reader’s life experience.

It wasn’t until well into the late 60’s and 70’s that Marvel and DC started to take a more multicultural turn. Black Panther debuted from Marvel in 1966; followed by an African American Green Lantern from DC, Luke Cage, and X-Men’s Storm.

However, these superheroes of color were written by white men. Stan Lee and famed comic book artist Jack Kirby created Black Panther; Archie Goodwin, John Romita Sr., and George Tuska developed Luke Cage; Storm was created by Len Wein and Dave Cockrum. African American writers and artists in the comic book genre then were few and while numbers have increased, are still scant.

And once people of color do manage to get a coveted position at a comic book publisher, their longevity is sometimes doubtful. Christopher Priest was one of the earliest African American hires at DC and Marvel. He left the industry, frustrated by being regulated as the “black writer,” although he worked on Batman, Spider-Man, and other best-selling titles. 

That is of course when people of color actually get hired. As recently as July 2016, Marvel went from having zero black female writers, to three in its almost 80-year existence. Those numbers are comparable to DC’s black female editorial staff.

With the lack of diversity, the big comic book houses can often overlook the familiar touches that can make a black, or Hispanic, Asian, or Muslim character more relatable to readers of color.

“For the black male heroes you do see in comics, none of them are usually in your neighborhood,” says Illidge. “[Solar Man]’s from East New York. “If a white kid gets powers and a black kid gets powers they are going to go through two entirely different experiences.”

Karama Horne a comic book, animation, and movie fan and analyst, as well as the founder of BlerdGurl, says that even when black comic book creators get hired to do mainstream work, it’s not taken seriously, or promoted that well.

“On the indie side, black creators often battle the stigma of their work being considered inferior, simply because it’s not being distributed by a major studio. Even by other black people. And it’s even worse for black women, who often are simply ignored,” says Horne.

(Karama Horne, aka @blerdgurl. Image: Karama Horne)

 

Black women in the comic business are often underestimated says, Hess. “The key to overcoming these obstacles is in being very consistent, often doggedly so.”

Sawyer feels people think her comic books will be “really cutesy and Care Bears” because she is a woman. Her comic titles are not sugar and spice, “There’s a lot of bloodshed here,” she says about her books.

Despite the hurdles in getting hired, financing and launching one’s own comic book, and obtaining recognition in the industry for comic book creators of color; in the end, it’s all about the creative process.

“Creativity can take you anywhere,” says Sawyer. “Including getting a job, and living, and thriving. Whatever your dreams you can make it happen with hard work and determination.”

A longer version of this article appears in the July/August issue of Black Enterprise Magazine. Get it and subscribe now

 

 

Small Business – Black Enterprise

FASHION DEALS UPDATE:

Here Are Five of the Coolest Things We Did at New York Comic Con

It’s a wrap on New York Comic Con! We hope you were able to check out Team FANDOM’s coverage: from a preview of the upcoming blockbuster Pacific Rim 2 to fan favorite panels like The Walking Dead and Star Trek Discovery. And of course, all the fantastic cosplay!

But NYCC also has fun experiences for the fans. We checked out some of the best activations at the Javits Center.

Jigsaw Escape Room

Tied to the release of the upcoming horror film Jigsaw, this escape room experience put fans face-to-face with actors dressed as Billy the Puppet (the creepy white-faced doll). The film — the latest in the Saw franchise — opens October 27.

FANDOM’s Sharon Kehoe screamed so much that she actually lost her voice!

War For the Planet of the Apes Motion Capture Simulation

In one of the more interesting activations at New York Comic Con, FOX paired up with special effects company WETA to recreate a chase scene from War For the Planet of the Apes, out on digital October 10 and Blu-ray/4K Ultra HD on October 24.

Fans got to don WETA’s motion-capture gear and transform into Caesar as he is chased by other apes on horseback.

FANDOM’s Lawrence Yee actually lasted on the horse gimble longer than most, but hit a branch and fell off.

Nissin Cup Noodles’ Noods Before Dark

The Highline Ballroom was transformed into an exclusive party hosted by Tyler Posey. The Teen Wolf heartthrob and guests were able to customize their Cup Noodles instant ramen cups (both original and Very Veggie versions) and get their #slurpface on.


tyler posey teen wolf
Tyler Posey shows his slurp face while enjoying Nissin Cup Noodles. Photo by Noam Galai/Getty Images for Nissin.

Since we were in Manhattan, we had to ask Tyler about the 15th anniversary of the romcom Maid in Manhattan. Check out his favorite memory, below:

XBox One X’s Drop Zone

Joel McHale previewed Doritos and Mountain Dew’s upcoming XBox One X Drop Zone event, where fans can participate in an augmented reality capture-the-flag game to win their own XBox One X. The event will take place November 10 weekend in New York, Los Angeles, Chicago and San Francisco. Fans can visit Every60Seconds.com to learn more.

Check out the hilarious interview to see what type of gamer the comedian/actor is, and be sure to stick until the end.

Hang Like Spider-Man Activation

To celebrate the 4K Ultra HD, Blu-ray and DVD release of Spider-Man Homecoming on October 17, fans were treated to a recreation of Peter Parker’s bedroom from the movie — with everything upside down.

FANDOM’s Jack DeVries got a chance to talk to Spidey’s bestie Ned to learn more about the inspiration behind the scene-stealing character.

The post Here Are Five of the Coolest Things We Did at New York Comic Con appeared first on Fandom powered by Wikia.

Fandom powered by Wikia

ENTERTAINMENT DEAL UPDATE:

Ralphie May, ‘Last Comic Standing’ Comedian, Dead at 45

Ralphie May, the stand-up comedian who turned a second-place finish on Last Comic Standing into a successful career in comedy, died Friday in Las Vegas. He was 45.

May died of cardiac arrest following a brief battle with pneumonia, Variety reports. In

This article originally appeared on www.rollingstone.com: Ralphie May, ‘Last Comic Standing’ Comedian, Dead at 45

Rolling Stone Latest Culture News

BEST DISCOUNT UPDATE:

New ‘Back to the Future’ Comic Book Answers Burning Questions

New 'Back to the Future' Comic Book Answers Burning Questions

Answers? Where the Back to the Future franchise is going, we don't need answers.

But we're getting them anyway! And they should be fun nonetheless. While fans will likely never see another sequel to the 1985 time-travel classic, there have been new comic book series depicting "untold stories and alternate timelines" and more. Another one will apparently be even more tied to the original trilogy. 

According to Bob Gale, who wrote the movies and now works…

Read More

Read Comments

Fandango Movie News

MOVIE APP UPDATE:

Cosplayers create their costumes ahead of the 2017 New York Comic Con

With New York Comic Con just around the corner, dedicated cosplayers are getting their video game, comic book, movie, and anime-inspired costumes ready for the world to see. Daily News photographer Bryan Pace got a behind-the-scenes look at the rigorous process cosplayers Becka Noel and Dhareza Maramis went through to create their female Superman, Wonder Woman, and Iron Fist outfits ahead of the big event, which runs from October 5-8, 2017.
Life_Style Rss

FASHION DEAL UPDATE:

Fall TV: 5 Shows For Comic Book Fans

Gotham

September 21 – (8/7c, FOX)

Comic book fans have been waiting to see a live-action Batman on screen for decades. This year Gotham will give fans their wish. The young Bruce Wayne, who has been coming of age in Gotham City these last few seasons, will finally put on a mask and take to the streets. While he’s not quite the “Batman,” he will be known as a “Dark Knight.” Gotham Season 4 promises to also wade into even deeper comic book waters this Fall TV season, especially as the Penguin, the Riddler, the Scarecrow and other DC Comics villains complete their comic transformations.

The Gifted

October 2 – (9/8c, FOX) New

Comic book fans rejoice! The X-Men are coming to FOX this fall in the form of a new show titled The Gifted. Following a family with newly awakened mutant powers, The Gifted will show audiences a world where X-Men Days of Future Past‘s Sentinel Services won and mutants are hunted. Gone is the Brotherhood of Mutants. In its place has risen a resistance. Thunderbird, Polaris, Eclipse, and Blink lead this mutant underground. Set in an alternative X-Men universe, The Gifted is sure to delight any fan of Marvel this Fall TV season.

Supergirl

October 9 – (8/7c, The CW)

For the last two seasons of Supergirl, Kara Danvers has wrestled with her identity. Is she Kara Danvers, daughter, sister, human? Is she Kara Zor’El, daughter, superhero, alien? This season her struggles will come to the forefront in a classic comic book dilemma: how do you protect the people you love if you’re not one of the them? This is a struggle every superhero must go through and a storyline comic book fans really shouldn’t miss. This season could be the one Kara fully embraces her identity as Supergirl, and we can’t wait.

DC’s Legends of Tomorrow

October 10 – (9/8c, The CW)

After the Legends defeated the Legion of Doom and destroyed the Spear of Destiny in the Season 2 finale, they returned to 2017. The world was in complete chaos, with different eras in time spilling out into the present. During Season 3, the Legends will have to restore time itself, a task that will take them to Victorian England, old Hollywood, and even Ancient Rome. Legends of Tomorrow Season 3 will also show Amaya that her family has a dark future, one that will catch up to them as they travel further into the future. Fans of the comics will be happy to know that the Legends are sure to run into some classic DC Comics characters, including Gorilla Grodd, Kuasa, Zari AKA Isis, and more.

Happy!

December 6 – (10/9c, Syfy) New


Happy Syfy Fall TV
‘Law & Order: SVU’ actor Christopher Meloni stars as Nick Sax in SyFy’s ‘Happy!’

If you’ve ever read a Grant Morrison graphic novel, you know they can get a little crazy. SyFy’s new series Happy! is no exception. When former police officer turned hitman Nick Sax (Christopher Meloni) starts hallucinating, he believes he’s lost it for good. What’s he hallucinating you ask? A flying horse named Happy! Comedian Patton Oswalt (Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.) voices Happy, who serves as a strange conscious of optimism for Sax. The graphic novel also featured a Christmas-themed villain, so this will be the perfect twisted comic book show to watch around the holidays.

Check out Fandom’s full list of new and returning Fall TV shows below.

Fall TV Schedule 2017: See When ‘Gifted,’ ‘Star Trek’ and More Buzzy Shows Air

The post Fall TV: 5 Shows For Comic Book Fans appeared first on Fandom powered by Wikia.

Fandom powered by Wikia

ENTERTAINMENT DEAL UPDATE:

Wayans has comic chops, but ‘Marlon’ tries too hard for laughs

“Marlon” is an amiably silly summer burn-off meant to showcase the talents of Marlon Wayans — a funny, clever guy who seems constrained by the trappings of the sitcom format. As a result, the comedy doesn’t take off as it might have were it not trying too hard to be a family comedy. Wayans, a…
Entertainment | New York Post

SPECIAL DISCOUNT UPDATE:

Lingerie brand Yandy releases Disney and comic book-inspired lingerie costumes

Online lingerie boutique Yandy is putting a sexy spin on undergarments for witchcraft and wizard fans and beauties looking for their beasts in their new ‘Fantasy’ collection, which gives looks from Disney and Harry Potter a risque updated look.
Life_Style Rss

EMPLOYMENT SEARCH UPDATE:

Sophie Turner’s Plaid Comic Con Suit Is Giving Us Major “Clueless” Vibes

Sophie Turner wore a plaid suit to Comic Con 2017 that has her channeling Cher from “Clueless.”
Allure
We chatted with the hair stylist/makeup artist behind Paramore’s lead singer Hayley Williams to learn more about her latest beauty looks.
Allure
MillionaireMatch.com - the best dating site for sexy, successful singles!
MillionaireMatch.com – the best dating site for sexy, successful singles!

This Black Queer Love Story Is Exactly What The Comic World Needs

Black queer love between two women often goes underrepresented in any medium. 

Writer Tee Franklin wants to help change this with her forthcoming comic “Bingo Love.” It follows the fictional story of Hazel Johnson and Mari McCray, beginning from the time they fall in love as teenagers in 1963.

Their parents find out and forbid them from seeing each other again. The women lead separate lives, marrying men whom neither of them love. Hazel and Mari reunite at a bingo hall and old feelings surface. They divorce their husbands and live out their truth as a married couple, a light in which audiences rarely see elderly black women. Their love story extends all the way to 2030. 

The 80-page graphic novella is one of the first of its kind.

Franklin told The Huffington Post that some of her experiences as a queer woman of color helped inform her writing in “Bingo Love.” She said that she’s kept her sexual identity a secret out of fear and that she’s inadvertently coming out to her extended family as bisexual with this novella.  

“I know that there are black women and men who have had to hide their sexuality due to the time era and I know that there are some that are still hiding it,” she said. “As someone who’s been married, sometimes you stay for the kids ― even though you know that the love is gone. Hiding your sexual orientation for decades and not truly being happy inside is what I wanted to touch on with this story.”

Franklin, who created #BlackComicsMonth in 2015 to promote diversity in the straight white male-dominated industry, said inclusive stories like “Bingo Love” are crucial. She said that sometimes white superheroes aren’t as exciting as representation in comics.  

“It’s rare in the comic industry to have two black women leads, especially written by a disabled, queer black woman,” she said. “Now to have these protagonists queer and older? This will never happen in the comics industry unless someone does it on their own.”

The only superpowers Hazel and Mari have is the confidence to leave their past lives in their 60s and spend the rest of them together living their life to the fullest.
Tee Franklin, writer

With her Kickstarter campaign, Franklin wants to raise at least $ 19,999 to pay for her small, diverse creative team ― artist Jenn St-Onge, colorist Joy San, letterer Cardinal Rae and editor Erica Schultz ― printing and shipping. The writer said the response to her novella has been overwhelmingly positive. Her campaign has already raised more than $ 16,500 in only five days.

Franklin said she’s aiming to have the comic distributed before the end of the year. She said she hopes the novella shows readers that love is love, no matter what it looks like.

Love has no boundaries and it lasts forever. If there can be an Ellie and Carl from Disney’s ‘Up,’ there can be a Hazel and Mari in ‘Bingo Love,’” she said. “Once again, these topics aren’t discussed in comics and there definitely aren’t older queer black women around. But, you can have a Magneto who’s in his, what, 60s? 70s? The only superpowers Hazel and Mari have is the confidence to leave their past lives in their 60s and spend the rest of them together living their life to the fullest.”

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

Weddings – The Huffington Post
FASHION NEWS-Visit Shoe Deals Online-Fashion News today for the hottest deals online!

We Need to Know More About Nick Offerman’s Homoerotic Chris Pratt Comic Strip

Oh, hello.

Lifestyle – Esquire

SHOPPING DEALS UPDATE:


Superman Comic Book Tablet Case

Superman Comic Book Tablet Case


Wish you had a not-so-mundane way to keep your tablet protected while you’re on the go… maybe even a super way? This Superman Tablet Mighty Case is perfect! It’s resistant to stains and tears, it’s lightweight and water resistant, just like the Man of Steel! It’s designed to hold the iPad (even accommodating the Smart Cover) but will also hold the NOOK, Kindle & Kindle Fire and many other tablets!
List Price: $ 20.99
Price: $ 14.99

The Dead Alive: Or The Double Funeral. A Comic Opera. In Two Acts. With Additions And Alterations. As Performed By

The Dead Alive: Or The Double Funeral. A Comic Opera. In Two Acts. With Additions And Alterations. As Performed By


The 18th century was a wealth of knowledge, exploration and rapidly growing technology and expanding record-keeping made possible by advances in the printing press. In its determination to preserve the century of revolution, Gale initiated a revolution of its own: digitization of epic proportions to preserve these invaluable works in the largest archive of its kind. Now for the first time these high-quality digital copies of original 18th century manuscripts are available in print, making them highly accessible to libraries, undergraduate students, and independent scholars.The eighteenth-century fascination with Greek and Roman antiquity followed the systematic excavation of the ruins at Pompeii and Herculaneum in southern Italy; and after 1750 a neoclassical style dominated all artistic fields. The titles here trace developments in mostly English-language works on painting, sculpture, architecture, music, theater, and other disciplines. Instructional works on musical instruments, catalogs of art objects, comic operas, and more are also included. ++++The below data was compiled from various identification fields in the bibliographic record of this title. This data is provided as an additional tool in helping to insure edition identification:++++<sourceLibrary>Library of Congress<ESTCID>W031674<Notes>Libretto only. The music was composed by Samuel Arnold. Cf. Grove''s dictionary of music and musicians, 3rd ed. Booksellers'' advertisements, p. [47-48].<imprintFull>New-York : Printed by Hodge, Allen, and Campbell; and sold at their respective book-stores, M.DCC.LXXXIX. [1789]. <collation>[2],iv,[1],8-46,[2]p. ; 12deg
List Price:
Price:

Visionair Felix Comic Book 4 Piece Set

Visionair Felix Comic Book 4 Piece Set


The Felix the Cat Comic Book’d 4 Piece Set from Visionair is an excellent fashion luggage set with a hardside exterior and spinner wheels. This set uses ergonomically designed airfcraft aluminum extended handles to guide the 4 spinner wheels smooth and easily. Fully lined interior features cross strap tie downs and zippered dividers to keep your things organized and in place.
List Price:
Price:

Mom Creates Comic To Teach 7-Year-Old Daughter To Accept Her Natural Beauty

When 7-year-old Natalie McGriff struggled to embrace her natural black beauty, her mom was the first one to encourage her to love her hair and her beautiful brown skin and to apply the confidence that comes with self-acceptance.

But it wasn’t easy.

Natalie didn’t see herself reflected on TV and among the toys she owned — and because of this lack of representation began to describe herself as “ugly,” said her mother, Angie Nixon.

Nixon was determined to teach her daughter valuable lessons on self-image and self-love.

“I started a Facebook group called ‘Natalie You Are Beautiful’ where strangers and friends could post positive affirmations for her,” Nixon told The Huffington Post. “She enjoyed reading them but it still wasn’t helping her.”

Invested in her mission, Nixon took a more creative approach. She hit on the idea of a comic book that would portray the 7-year-old as a superhero with crime-fighting afro puffs. The hero’s curly hair, a trait that Natalie found hard to accept, became her crowning glory that came with special magical powers.

Natalie was immediately on board. She gave her mom story ideas for the comic and the two made the book together.

Shortly after, the pair launched The Adventures Of Moxie Girl, a comic starring a fictional Natalie who activates the superpowers in her magical puffs to fend off book-eating monsters that attack her local library.

“I was hoping to improve and raise the self-esteem of my daughter. I also wanted to instill in her a love for reading,” Nixon said. “I wanted her to realize how powerful she is and that she shouldn’t have to change for anything.”

moxie girl

Nixon submitted the comic book to a crowdfunding festival in their hometown of Jacksonville, Florida, where attendees cast ballots on who would take home the large cash prize.

It turned out Natalie wasn’t the only one who fell in love with Moxie Girl — voters championed the idea and daughter and mother took home $ 16,400 to put towards a larger print run for the comic. The book will come out in June, Nixon announced on Instagram.

Now Natalie has much stronger self-esteem — and so does Nixon. She advises other parents to always feed their children positive affirmations and model the self-respect they want their kids to have.

“How can I tell my daughter her hair is beautiful in its natural state, if I alter mine?” she said. “I have to embrace my natural beauty before I am truly able to tell her to embrace hers.”

“We have to work on ourselves as parents first. We have to model the behavior that we want to see in our children,” Nixon said.

moxie girl

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

Style – The Huffington Post
FASHION NEWS UPDATE-Visit Shoe Deals Online today for the hottest deals online for shoes!

Our Valued Customers Conversations from the Comic Book Store: 9780399537523

Our Valued Customers Conversations from the Comic Book Store: 9780399537523


Our Valued Customers Book: While working for several years in a comic book store, MRTIM started drawing the more memorable customers and the things that they said. Based on the blog of the same name, and featuring popular entries as well as brand-new cartoons, Our Valued Customers chronicles the liv
List Price: $ 2.99
Price: $ 2.54

What REALLY Happens at Comic Con

San Diego’s Comic Con is the premier event for fans of all things comics and action-packed entertainment. Seeing as how there are quite a few fans of “entertaining” things, the crowds that descend on Comic Con are mammoth, creating interminable lines.

How bad are the Comic Con lines? So bad that the seasoned comic veterans DweebCast found themselves with enough time to record a surprisingly good (and hilarious) music video about “What REALLY Happens at Comic Con.”

Watch the video from DweebCast above.

Comedy – The Huffington Post
ENTERTAINMENT NEWS-Visit Mobile Playboy today for the hottest adult entertainment online!

Our Valued Customers Conversations from the Comic Book Store: 9780399537523

Our Valued Customers Conversations from the Comic Book Store: 9780399537523


Our Valued Customers Book: While working for several years in a comic book store, MRTIM started drawing the more memorable customers and the things that they said. Based on the blog of the same name, and featuring popular entries as well as brand-new cartoons, Our Valued Customers chronicles the liv
List Price: $ 2.99
Price: $ 2.54

“Boy Comics“ Comic Book Cover #1 – 1954

“Boy Comics“ Comic Book Cover #1 – 1954


Reproduction of the comic book cover for Boy Comics No. 98, Feb 1954. The Senate Judiciary Subcommittee to Investigate Juvenile Delinquency held televised hearings on the effects of comic books, as well as radio, television, and movies, on juvenile delinquency, April 21-June 4, 1954. There was a four-level rating system for evaluating comic books: ???no objection, some objection, objectionable, and very objectionable.??? From the records of the U.S. Senate, U.S. National Archives. Created in 1934, the National Archives is one of the world???s largest repositories, serving as our nation???s memory and documenting the American experience. All prints include a Certificate of Authenticity from the National Archives. Unframed prints ship in 3 – 5 business days. Framing adds 2 additional production days. Unframed prints 16??? x 20??? and larger ship rolled in a tube.
List Price:
Price:

Our Valued Customers Conversations from the Comic Book Store: 9780399537523

Our Valued Customers Conversations from the Comic Book Store: 9780399537523


Our Valued Customers Book: While working for several years in a comic book store, MRTIM started drawing the more memorable customers and the things that they said. Based on the blog of the same name, and featuring popular entries as well as brand-new cartoons, Our Valued Customers chronicles the liv
List Price: $ 2.99
Price: $ 2.54

Our Valued Customers Conversations from the Comic Book Store: 9780399537523

Our Valued Customers Conversations from the Comic Book Store: 9780399537523


Our Valued Customers Book: While working for several years in a comic book store, MRTIM started drawing the more memorable customers and the things that they said. Based on the blog of the same name, and featuring popular entries as well as brand-new cartoons, Our Valued Customers chronicles the liv
List Price: $ 2.99
Price: $ 2.99

A Girl Comic and Her Heckler

“Sooo, you’re a comic?” he says, looking me up and down from head to toe. He appears to not believe the answer as he presses his pint of beer against his mouth, smiling into it instead of drinking it. He pauses there for a three seconds. Let’s call him “Craig.”

“Yeah!” I shrug. And glance past him towards the barkeep. Small talk is fun! Where’s the barkeep? Just need a drink.

Craig holds his eyes on mine and he gulps down his IPA. I can hear the stickiness in his mouth as he swallows and lets out a refreshing, “tssaaaahh.” His beer tastes good you guys but it’s not going to distract him from processing that I’m a girl and a comic because he can do two things at once, right? Bro!

“A girl… comic,” he slowly says out-loud like he’s sounding out a word in a foreign language. A girl comic! Out of nowhere my breasts suddenly rejoice. They’re getting the limelight they’ve always desired in my comedy. My breasts are attention seekers that way. They actually perk up at his identification. They even have their own choreography to Alan Thicke’s, “Blurred Lines” after I told them not to, trust me they are so dumb.

I respond again cordially after silencing my percolating and unruly comedy breasts, “Yeah! So I’m a comic.”

“Are you funny,” he says his question more as a statement without understanding that thinking oneself is funny is far from a standard for good comedy. See, funny means so much more than I could ever be alone. Funny is an energy, a potential to deeply connect, a person that has that spark that creates the space where the result is laughter. I answer, “Ya know, I’m grateful that people laugh.”

I glance past Craig at the barkeep, “G&T!” I yell “PLEASE!” I yell. “A double!” I yell. “Like my breasts!” I don’t yell that last part I’m just kidding.

I look over to see Craig still standing near. He leans back, “So, tell me a joke.”

“Come to a set,” I reply inviting him with a time and date of my next show.

See, comics understand this. And I think most people understand this too that comedy isn’t just telling a joke. It’s timing, it’s place, it’s syntax, set up, it’s replacing one syllable words with three syllable words because it sounds different, it’s honesty and authenticity and working and reworking a set. It’s also your mom. Asking a comic that you meet on the street to “tell you a joke” is another way of saying I’d really like you to minimize the maximum potential of comedy in thirty seconds or less so that I may approve your worth in being a part of it. Don’t be that guy.

But today it sounds more like grunting. “Commeee Onnnnn,” Craig grunts.

“Seriously, come to a show.”

“Hey guys! There’s a girl comic here who won’t tell a joke!” he sneers. “OK then, I am going to come to your show and heckle the shit out of you. Just to see if you can handle it.” He continues, high fiving his buddies. “Your fault,” he says assuring me. It is then I realize that I have inadvertently landed myself in a real life circle jerk and I have been caught with only this little girly dildo in this very amazing dick fight oh no what will I do.

I grin. No teeth. “Yeah dude, yeah.” I dig deep. See, this isn’t just comic vs. asshole heckler, this is every day not asshole comic vs. asshole future heckler.

As the night progressed, and each time I’d walk past their group I’d hear him taunt. And each time I’d hide my growing annoyance with a “See ya there!” Comics loathe hecklers for a variety of reasons but we don’t fear them. And for whatever reason it felt important for this guy to make sure I was afraid.

So at the end of the night when it was time to go, I stopped at the coat check and as I’m putting back on the sexiest pant-suit blazer you have ever mother-effin’ seen, I walk over to Craig, looked him square in the eyes and said, “Do you mind if I do something right now?”

And I reached and held him close and gave him the biggest and longest hug and I waited long after it got awkward and I waited until he melted in my arms like a little boy who is seeing his mother for the first time after he was kidnapped for 16 years when he was four. What a shame just old enough to have memories to keep him warm but not old enough to know if he was making them up; and I waited for his chest to slowly rise with relief and fall with trust right into my little lesbian arms and only after he let his guard down and whispered vulnerably with his head against mine, “Wow thanks, I really needed that.” Do I hold him tighter and deadpan into his soul, “Fucking come to my show and heckle me and see what happens.”

He laughed.

“Okay so you are a comic.” he paused, “I have an idea for a joke you could use.”

“Trust me, you’ve given me plenty,” I smiled into the last sip of my rocks glass with a gulp and walked out the door, thankful for my comedy and the tits that go with it.
Comedy – The Huffington Post
ENTERTAINMENT NEWS-Visit Mobile Playboy today for the hottest adult entertainment online!