Nicki Minaj and the Abusive Stan Culture Epidemic: ‘Where Do I Draw the Line?’

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We have got to do something about the stans.

At their most benign, they’re annoying. Their hyper-devotion can make them insufferable little disciples to whatever or whomever it is they fawn over, be it their favorite recording artist or a film franchise they’ve been immersed in since they were old enough to zip up their Yoda pajamas. But the worst kind of stans wield their fandom like a sword, ready to cut down anyone that crosses their fave. It doesn’t matter if an external infidel has besmirched the name of their chosen deity or if some unworthy dreg is corrupting their beloved institution from the inside—the stans will swarm and sting, and you will feel every bit of their ire.

Of course, none of this is news. Much has been written about internet harassment, stan culture and how they affirm a certain toxic socialization that’s occurred online. It’s a heinous mix of wish-fulfillment and mob mentality that has become normalized after years of watching it devolve into the kind of digital blood sport that leads to celebs or those who have transgressed against a celeb having to leave social media altogether. The ultra-devoted fanbase has been around for decades, but in the age of social media it’s mobilized into something much more aggressive and abusive than a teen idol fanclub of yesteryear. The most obvious recent example came courtesy of Nicki Minaj, her cadre of superfans (“The Barbz”) and a Toronto freelance journalist who dared express an opinion about a popular artist.

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Ability to identify genuine laughter transcends culture

People across cultures are largely able to tell the difference between a fake laugh and a real one, according to a new study. Across all societies, listeners were able to tell better than chance whether a laugh was ‘real’ or ‘fake’ with some variation. For example, Samoan listeners only got the right answer 56 percent of the time whereas Japanese listeners were correct 69 percent of the time.
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Aly Raisman, Nassar Survivors Call for USOC Culture Change at Senate Hearing

The USOC was criticized about its balance of power between the organization and its athletes in the third hearing before a Senate subcommittee. 

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AT&T Diversity Chief: “Diversity Means Creating a Culture”

A 22-year veteran at AT&T, Corey Anthony has held leadership positions in an array of vital areas, ranging from wireless and network operations to finance and global customer service. His current role at the telecom giant, which produced revenues of $ 160.5 billion and had roughly 254,000 employees on its payroll in 2017, gives Anthony the opportunity to have a “meaningful and lasting impact [and] be able to help shape the culture as we go forward in our business.” In edited excerpts from this exclusive interview, Anthony shares how the application of AT&T’s Diversity & Inclusion Best Practices advances innovative problem-solving, supplier diversity, race relations, and corporate leadership.

Define what diversity and inclusion means at AT&T and to you personally.
Trying to define diversity is almost like trying to define leadership. There are so many different definitions based on whom you happen to be talking to at the time. What diversity and inclusion really means here at AT&T is a couple things that are really, really important. One is being able to attract and embrace the best talent, period. Once we get that talent, being able to embrace that person for the uniqueness that he or she brings to the business, period. Once I have them in the business, diversity means creating a culture in which they can realize their fullest potential. If I’m creating an environment where I am facilitating opportunities so people can realize their fullest potential then we’re at our best in our business. It’s beautiful for both the company and the individual when we have that kind of environment. For me, diversity and inclusion encapsulates that.

Give me an example of how D&I plays a role in AT&T’s innovation and growth.
When we talk about diversity here at AT&T, it’s not just in the traditional sense of gender, race, and ethnicity but also cognitive style. It’s very key in driving innovation in our business. When we put a problem on the table, we want that table to be very diverse so everybody is looking at that problem not through the same lens. We all bring different backgrounds and varied experience sets to the table to try and arrive at the best solution for that problem. That drives innovation because the people who are around that table feel very valued because they have the ability to contribute to that solution, which leads to a better solution and creates this virtuous cycle.

“We embrace talent for the uniqueness they bring to our business, period.”

Too many companies check the box when it comes to diversity. AT&T, however, repeatedly demonstrates transformative D&I leadership. As such, do you share best practices with corporate peers and guide them?
We do. We spend a fair amount of time partnering with other entities, companies, and organizations in not only sharing some of our best practices as they relate to diversity and inclusion but also learning from them. I agree, we’ve been recognized externally as one of the leaders in the space, and we believe not only do we have a responsibility to perpetuate diversity and inclusion inside of the business, but we also have a responsibility to do what’s best for the communities where we work and live, and where our customers work and live.

Do you mandate suppliers to follow suit or do you encourage them?
It manifests itself in a few ways. No. 1, we model the behavior that we expect from our partners and suppliers. We want to be that example of what a successful business looks like that embraces diversity and inclusion. No. 2, we’re very clear about what our expectations are.

What are your expectations?
That you do everything that you can within your business, if you partner with us, to model the same behavior that you see from us. It’s not a mandate in the sense that we give them a miracle target or anything like that. It’s an expectation that you value diversity in your business in the same fashion that we value it in ours, and then we expect to see empirical evidence of that as well.
We take another step. We literally have a program where we help our suppliers identify minority-owned businesses as an example that they can partner with in terms of subcontracting and other relationships to meet our needs. It isn’t just a conversation we’re having. It isn’t just us modeling it. We’re also giving them tools and actually helping them to be able to achieve that in their business as well.

A member of the Billion Dollar Roundtable—corporations that spend $ 1 billion or more with minority suppliers—AT&T has also led when it comes to procurement spend among such firms. How can its approach to supplier diversity be replicated?
There are a number of reasons why we’re successful. One very important reason is our chairman and CEO Randall L. Stephenson has been very clear about his expectation of the business. I would argue that everything around diversity and inclusion has to start with leadership. For us, that means the board of directors and our chairman have been very clear about the expectation for AT&T as it relates to supplier diversity.
Two, we look at it as a partnership. We work with the supplier community to help them, in some cases, build their businesses [so they’re] able to partner with us at the scale in which they have to work with us.

You made a point that AT&T’s diversity and inclusion mandate comes from the top. Last year, the CEO went a step further in an address to the staff, stating the importance of having an honest conversation on race. That’s basically unheard of in corporate America. Tell us the impact of that statement and how you’ve created a program to foster such discussions.
Randall’s remarks at last year’s Employer Resource Group conference was one of the more interesting dynamics I’ve seen in our business. I will tell you a couple things. It wasn’t planned. His remarks were heartfelt, and they were his. What made that so interesting is that we didn’t plan for it to go external. The really beautiful part about what he did was give us all the permission to have the conversation inside of the business. He was the first one to do it. He did it in a very eloquent, very thoughtful way. He set the example for the business.
What we did was say: “OK, now that Randall has opened that door, we want to have those conversations. We want to have those effective, productive conversations in the business. How can we help facilitate that without turning it into a program that everybody has to do, and track it?” We didn’t want it to be a top-down program approach. We wanted it to happen more organically. In HR, we said: “What we will provide is not a structured program, but we will give you some tools to help have those conversations.” We did that, and we called it, “Tolerance to Understanding.” A key part of his message was cowards simply tolerate. We really need to move to full understanding, embracing. As a leader of your team, you decide, “I want to have a similar conversation with my team,” then we will give you some tools and resources, sometimes in the form of a person, that will help facilitate that conversation on your team.

It’s been extremely valuable. We’ve had thousands of people who have been impacted by these conversations. They have been springing up all over our business even to the point that it’s not domestic only. We’re having some conversations across the globe now. It’s been a key inflection point for AT&T since he made those remarks last fall.

The post AT&T Diversity Chief: “Diversity Means Creating a Culture” appeared first on Black Enterprise.

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Papa John’s now facing ‘bro’ culture scandal as nightmare continues

The John Schnatter stink will be harder to clean up at Papa John’s than first expected. The chief executive and a second high-ranking executive at the pizza chain — pals of Schnatter whom he installed in key positions — failed to curb a “bro” culture at the Louisville, Ky., business that featured open discussion of…
Business | New York Post

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What your receptionist says about your company culture

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On this episode of ‘Masters of Scale,’ entrepreneur Margaret Heffernan talks about how your company culture is reflected in the person people interact with first: your receptionist.

This editorial series is sponsored by Skillshare, the online learning community. Get 2 months of Skillshare classes for free by visiting this link → http://skillshare.com/scale Read more…

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Mental health taking center stage in pop culture

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Matthew Dowd: Comments on Sen. McCain ‘a reflection of culture’ in White House

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http://www.acrx.org -As millions of Americans strive to deal with the economic downturn,loss of jobs,foreclosures,high cost of gas,and the rising cost of prescription drug cost. Charles Myrick ,the President of American Consultants Rx, announced the re-release of the American Consultants Rx community service project which consist of millions of free discount prescription cards being donated to thousands of not for profits,hospitals,schools,churches,etc. in an effort to assist the uninsured,under insured,and seniors deal with the high cost of prescription drugs.-American Consultants Rx -Pharmacy Discount Network News

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Want to Be an Investor? Cross Culture Ventures is Looking for a Summer Associate

Cross Culture Ventures (CCV) has teamed up with Silicon Valley Bank to provide a unique opportunity. This summer, the venture firm is hiring a Summer Associate to join their investment team for two months between June and August. According to a recent post, the ideal candidate is an MBA student going into their second year with a keen interest in learning about venture capital and a passion for technology and startup companies. Previous venture capital or early-stage startup experience will also give you a boost in the application process. Additionally, due to the massive underrepresentation of women in the space, female minorities are highly encouraged to apply.

“Black and Latina women are significantly underrepresented in VC. Let’s change that,” said CCV Managing Partner Marlon Nichols.

Managing Partner, Marlon Nichols (Image: Cross Culture Ventures)

CCV Managing Partner Marlon Nichols (Image: Cross Culture Ventures)

 

So what will you gain? The post states that the Summer Associate can expect to gain hands-on experience in all areas of venture capital, including financial analysis, due diligence, deal execution, and portfolio support. Also, they didn’t fail to mention that the pay is competitive.

And what exactly will you be doing? Some of your tasks will include reviewing pitch decks and meeting with entrepreneurs; analyzing investment opportunities; researching market trends; performing company financial analysis, due diligence, and author investment memos used by partners and investment committees in investment decisions; and leading various internal market and technology research projects.

Cross Culture Ventures is an early-stage venture capital firm based in Los Angeles that invests in entrepreneurs creating next-generation technology and consumer products. Through their strategic partnership with Atom Factory, they work together to discover, invest in, and develop companies that fuel shifts in cultural trends and behaviors within an increasingly diverse global marketplace. CCV has over 20 companies in its portfolio, which includes Gimlet Media, Thrive Market, Blavity, Fair.com, and Mayvenn.
For more information on the opportunity, click here. All applications are due, Friday, April 27, at 5 p.m. PST.

 

The post Want to Be an Investor? Cross Culture Ventures is Looking for a Summer Associate appeared first on Black Enterprise.

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The growth of cannabis culture could be bad news for beer: Analyst

The total U.S. cannabis industry will reach $ 75 billion by 2030, said Vivien Azer of Cowen.
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Chrissy Teigen Was Once ‘Embarrassed’ By Her Ethnic Culture

Chrissy Teigen has a best-selling cookbook, an Instagram brimming with chicken-wing belfies and topless salad-making, and a palette that ranges from cake-batter popcorn to tongue-singeing hot pot. But growing up, she was a surprisingly picky eater.

Raised by a Thai mom and a Norwegian-American dad, Teigen leaned more toward her dad’s tastes, eating mainly potatoes and meat and wincing when her mom would cook Thai cuisine. “My dad is a big white guy. We ate very meat and potatoes, cabbage and meat,” Teigen tells StyleCaster at the launch of Pampers Pure, for which she is a creative consultant. “Whenever my mom cooked, she hid it because I would make fun of the smell.”

Teigen tells StyleCaster at the launch of Pampers Pure

Though Teigen eventually grew to love Thai cuisine, she recalls feeling embarrassed to invite friends over and serve them food that might be foreign to them when she was younger. “I remember being really embarrassed by it when I was young and had friends over,” Teigen says. “It was weird to pull shrimp heads off and discard the body and eat the head. There were moments when as a kid you cringe.”

Teigen credits that complex about her culture to ignorance and a desire to fit in, things she’s since overcome. Now, as a mom to 2-year-old daughter, Luna, and a not-yet-born baby boy, Teigen is aware of the importance of racial representation and diversity, especially for children. This is why instead of “blonde Barbies,” Teigen gives Luna brown-skinned dolls—which they’ve named Coco Babies—who look like Luna. She also puts on children’s TV and movies that feature racially diverse characters whom Luna can see herself in.

“Having something that represents them or looks a little like them, it changes everything,” Teigen says. “I never thought that way before. I always thought, ‘Why can’t she just play with a regular blonde Barbie?’ There is something to be said about having something that has your skin color, your hair color, your eye color, your eye shape.”

Chrissy Teigen and Luna

Chrissy Teigen and Luna

More: Why Shay Mitchell Considers Herself the New ‘Girl Next Door’

However, Teigen acknowledges that there are things Luna may face that are out of her control. Having grown up multiracial and not knowing where exactly she fit in, Teigen worries that Luna—whose father and Teigen’s husband, John Legend, is African-American—might face a similar complex. Though, with world’s fast-changing racial landscape, she hopes that things will be different for her kids as they grow up.

“I remember feeling confused when I grew up, filling out the forms on those standardized tests. I was like, ‘Am I Pacific Islander? What am I? I don’t even know!” Teigen says. “And then there was ‘Other.’ But I always said ‘Asian’ for some wild reason, even though it’s a perfect 50/50. Still, I remember the biggest question growing up was, ‘What are you? What are you? What are you?’ And you’re like, ‘Oh my God.’ I worry sometimes that Luna is going to be so much in the middle that she’s not going to know, but I think by the time she grows up, it’s such a melting pot, this whole world now.”

Though Teigen is multiracial, she now identifies strongest with her Thai side (“maybe because my mom is the stronger personality,” she says), which is why she feels an obligation to represent Asian-Americans in the media. So far, she’s done it by popularizing lesser-known Thai recipes, such as her pork-stuffed cucumber soup, in her cookbook, Cravings.

Teigen tells StyleCaster at the launch of Pampers Pure

More: Why Is It So Hard for the U.S. to See Asian-American Olympians as American?

Still, Teigen isn’t happy with the current representation of Asian-Americans in Hollywood. She recalls a recent conversation with Legend about #OscarsSoWhite and how she fought Legend’s claim that the Academy was steadily improving by referencing the lack of Asian-Americans in awards and movies.

 “I hope I can do more. So many movies come out where they’re putting people who have no Asian background at all in roles, and it’s frustrating because you know that there is so much talent out there. I think it’s really important to feature Asian-Americans. We’re so underrepresented in every single aspect of the entertainment industry, and I think our turn will come, and it’s going to be fantastic.”

Originally posted on StyleCaster.

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Sleek Culture Calendar: Our Global Guide to the Best Art and Culture Events this March

Taking in art fairs, David Bowie and a 30-hour piano recital, March is shaping up to be a busy month brimming with artsy things to see and do.

The post Sleek Culture Calendar: Our Global Guide to the Best Art and Culture Events this March appeared first on sleek mag.

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Bollywood’s Sonam Kapoor on fighting against the Middle East’s victim blaming culture

This star means business

Sonam Kapoor isn’t holding back when it comes to injustice in the entertainment industry.

With a combined Twitter and Instagram following of over 22 million, it’s safe to say Sonam Kapoor has a seriously powerful platform that goes beyond her big screen Bollywood roles.

Don’t think of this star as just a face to a cause, however. Sonam is determined to be an outspoken advocate for the causes she believes in. Whether that’s fighting the gender pay gap, speaking out against victim blaming or campaigning to end child hunger, this thirty-two year old isn’t holding back…

On self-awareness…“As actors we’re inclined towards narcissism and you tend to be very self-involved because that’s the nature of the job. Your body is your tool. Your emotions are your tool. It’s important to be aware of your surroundings instead of being so self-absorbed.”

On modesty… “I feel that you can express yourself without being on show. Being modest about the way you dress, being modest about your work, being modest about who you are… It grounds you. The more you shout, it shows your insecurity. It’s important to have a sense of self and a quiet confidence.”

On representation… “The world is getting smaller and there’s no defined colour anymore,” she says. “Different faces and colours and body types are being embraced and are aspirational for young girls to see. It’s giving people a chance to speak up and speak out.”

On #MeToo and feminism… “On our side of the world – whether it’s India or the Middle East there is a lot of victim blaming and victim shaming. It’s important to come out and say, ‘It is ok if this happens to you. It is not your fault. You are not the monster. The person doing it… He or she is the monster. It’s important for people who have a certain platform to come out and say it. And I have that platform.I understood what it meant to be a feminist at 13 years old.”

On the gender pay-gap in Bollywood… “I come from a very privileged background and if I don’t get the pay I deserve I can [refuse and therefore] set an example. I hope that sets the right tone for other girls in the industry around me.”

Sonam Kapoor spoke to The Modist

The post Bollywood’s Sonam Kapoor on fighting against the Middle East’s victim blaming culture appeared first on Marie Claire.

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Ann Curry Claims NBC Had Pervasive Culture of Verbal Sexual Harassment

Matt Lauer’s former Today show co-anchor Ann Curry, appearing on CBS News’ rival morning show Wednesday, accused Lauer and NBC management of fostering a pervasive “climate of verbal sexual harassment” against women during her 15 years at the Peacock network.

Read more at The Daily Beast.

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http://www.acrx.org -As millions of Americans strive to deal with the economic downturn,loss of jobs,foreclosures,high cost of gas,and the rising cost of prescription drug cost. Charles Myrick ,the President of American Consultants Rx, announced the re-release of the American Consultants Rx community service project which consist of millions of free discount prescription cards being donated to thousands of not for profits,hospitals,schools,churches,etc. in an effort to assist the uninsured,under insured,and seniors deal with the high cost of prescription drugs.-American Consultants Rx -Pharmacy Discount Network News

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From Silence to Culture Shift: Inside the Fight Against Sexual Harassment in Egypt

The #MeToo campaign that took the world by storm strongly resonated with women in Egypt.

OXFAM / Creative Commons

Emboldened by the global flood of women breaking their silence on sexual harassment, Egyptian women also took to social media to share their experiences. Defying social norms, Egyptian women bravely spoke up to tell their stories of sexual abuse and harassment with the hope of showing the magnitude of the problem in Egyptian society today.

“Not a single day goes by when I don’t have to worry about my physical or emotional integrity on Egyptian streets,” one woman wrote on Facebook. “It’s never safe.” She isn’t alone: According to a recent UN report, 99.3 percent of Egyptian women are victims of sexual harassment, including verbal abuse, groping and sometimes even rape. Sexual harassment is so widespread in the country that some human rights activists describe sexual harassment in Egypt as an epidemic; that epidemic reached its peak during the January 2011 uprising, when women became victims of a series of mob sexual assaults during protests at Tahrir square.

2011 was also a turning point for many women: They started speaking out. They were no longer afraid to tell their stories. They took to the streets to protest sexual violence and demanded their voices be heard. Their signs read “Silence is unacceptable; my anger will be heard,” and “Down with sexual harassment.”

Egypt’s new law criminalizing sexual harassment and assault that came into effect in July 2014 signaled a new sign of hope for many Egyptian women, as did a recent court sentencing of seven men to life imprisonment for sexual assault. But while social media platforms and campaigns like #MeToo have given Egyptian women the opportunity to raise awareness on sexual harassment and shed light on their experiences, much work remains to shift behavior and culture.

“Women are afraid of being blamed for the assault,” Aliaa Soliman, Communications Manager at HarassMap, a volunteer-based organization that works to end sexual harassment, told Ms. “Our culture creates so many excuses for the harasser. People will ask the woman ‘why are you wearing these tight jeans?’ or ‘why are you out in the first place?’… These are the kinds of comments that women hear all the time when they get sexually harassed.”

When Amira, a 26 year old who was sexually harassed on public transportation, reported her incident to the police, they told her to go home. When she insisted, they told her that they know who her father is and where he works. “They stood uncomfortably close to me the whole time and everybody in the building seemed to be undressing me with their eyes,” said Amira in her interview with Egyptian Streets, an independent news media organization in Egypt. “They catcalled me and whispered dirty comments.”

“Punishing the harasser is always a good thing of course,” Soliman said. “However, the fact that sexual harassment is culturally not recognized as a crime needs more awareness. People need to be more aware about why the law is in place, and why sexual harassment is being criminalized. If people are not convinced with the law or don’t understand why sexual harassment is wrong, then the law will not be very effective.”

Many women in Egypt still choose to remain silent. And until new earth is broken in the fight against assault and harassment, many still will. “All of society must be engaged in stopping sexual harassment,” Soliman said. “Bystanders must act if they see harassment happening in front of their own eyes. Harassers must also know that there will be consequences for their actions. We have all to create a culture that simply doesn’t accept sexual harassment anymore.”

May El Habachi specializes in writing about development, health and expat life. Her writing has been featured in leading international publications including Newsweek Middle East, Global Living, Expat Go Malaysia, Kuwait Bazaar and Fair Observer, among others.

The post From Silence to Culture Shift: Inside the Fight Against Sexual Harassment in Egypt appeared first on Ms. Magazine Blog.

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The Top 10 Feminist Pop Culture Shake-Ups of 2017

In a year that dramatically began with the Women’s March in Washington, D.C.–the largest protest in U.S. history in the wake of President Trump’s Inauguration–and ended with “Silence Breakers” as Time’s Person of the Year, in response to the #MeToo movement protesting sexual harassment and assault, 2017 certainly qualifies as the year of feminist resistance, so much so that Oxford Dictionary selected “Feminist” as the word of the year.

Popular culture punctuated this political year with feminist moments of its own. Here are 10 of the most memorable, quirkiest and provocative examples.

#10: Rihanna Broadened Beauty

Diversity sells. At least that was the lesson the cosmetics industry hopefully learned upon the massive success of pop star Rihanna’s debut line of Fenty Beauty cosmetics. While makeup in and of itself is not particularly “feminist,” what is groundbreaking is the way Rihanna grounded women of color–especially darker-skinned women–at the center of an advertising campaign that recognized a diversity of complexions in its forty shades of foundation. From albino to midnight skin, few other cosmetics companies have ever recognized this variety in skin color. Given the existence of skin bleachers and the marketing of lighter skin as the “most beautiful,” Fenty Beauty has changed the game by encompassing women across the color spectrum and altering the commercial expectations for the color of beauty.

#9: Female Music Artists Made Noise

2017 was a banner year for women music artists appearing in unexpected spaces and places: from newcomer Cardi B becoming the first rapper since Lauryn Hill in 1998 to top the Billboard Charts (without the aid of a featured artist) to Solange Knowles reconfiguring her album A Seat at the Table into a live, performance-art installation at the Guggenheim Museum in New York, to Ariana Grande headlining a benefit concert after her Dangerous Woman tour in Manchester, England was tragically targeted by ISIS, to Taylor Swift’s sexual harassment lawsuit in which she powerfully defended the right to her own body. And then there was Pink describing her attempts to raise her daughter on gender-neutral terms at MTV’s VMA Show. All these entertainers–some who identify as feminist–have reclaimed their bodies and their artistry and, in the process, are demonstrating what it means to resist a culture that attempts to restrict their freedoms.

#8: Beyoncé’ Cultivated Reverence for Black Motherhood

Speaking of women music artists pushing boundaries, pop star Beyoncé, who announced in a series of artistic photographs that she was expecting twins (birthed during the summer), upped the ante at the 59th Grammy Awards show and bore her pregnant belly in a digitally-enhanced live stage show that was part kitschy and part reverential. Playing ironically with the deified pedestal on which multiple fans have foisted her, Beyoncé invoked multiracial goddesses–from the Yoruba orisha Oshun to Hindi goddess Kali to the Catholic Black Madonna–and heralded the divine beauty and aura of black motherhood. Some thought the performance was over-the-top and too embodied in essentialist meanings of motherhood, but in a political climate that has clamped down on reproductive rights and within an environment that has experienced an uptick in maternal mortality rates–especially among African American women–this performative spectacle of divine black motherhood, in a culture that values Judeo-Christian patriarchal gods, featured Beyoncé at her most subversive and transgressive in her feminist views.

#7: Janet Jackson Got Personal and Political

The year began for the pop star with the birth of a son at 50, the announcement of a divorce, and the return to full form in her “State of the World” world tour. With her eyes and ears wide open to the pressing concerns of our tumultuous society–replete with denouncements of the rise in hate crimes–Jackson also managed to include a rather personal song-and-dance reenactment of a domestic violence scene in her rendition of “What About” during the world tour. “This is Me!” she confessed at the end of each tour performance of “What About,” reminding us that #MeToo–in its insistence on breaking the silence–takes on multiple forms and layers in creating public dialogue on violence against women.

#6: Kesha Spoke Up About Surviving

Before the #MeToo movement, pop artist Kesha unsuccessfully sued to be released from SONY’s record label, which forced her to work with producer Dr. Luke, whom she accused of sexually assaulting her. In an act of defiance, Kesha wrote “Praying,” a song that openly speaks about surviving an abuser – even though that very same person produced it. That takes courage and steels of nerve, and in a year when “silence breakers” were the breakout story, Kesha’s own silence-breaking must not be ignored.

#5: Miss Peru Contestants Made a Pageant Into a Protest

The collective silence-breaking that occurred at this year’s Miss Peru contest was an extraordinary event. Rather than give their usual physical “measurements,” the beauty pageant contestants flipped the script and gave a different kind of measurement: the appalling statistical numbers pertaining to violence against women in Peru. These women boldly resisted the sexual objectification of the beauty pageant and transformed it instead into an arena for feminist protest.

#4: Tiffany Haddish Took Us on a Girls Trip

The breakout star this year is Tiffany Haddish, the African American comedian who stole the show in the summer box office hit Girls Trip–a raunchy yet feminist tale of black girlfriends choosing friendship and bonding at the black-girl-magic event that is Essence Fest in New Orleans. Haddish’s outrageous characterization was an ode to sex-positivity and solidarity, but her biggest show of solidarity in 2017 was as host of Saturday Night Live–becoming the first African American woman to host the popular series while simultaneously calling out all the sexual harassers and abusers on their bad behavior in allusion to the #MeToo movement. “You wrong!,” she bellowed as she advised potential harassers to keep their clothes on if a woman has not invited them to remove them. Combining both sardonic wit, outrageous truth-telling, and comedic charm, here’s hoping for the continued meteoric rise of Haddish.

#3: Wonder Woman Stole the Show

Feminist storytelling was a major theme at the movies this year: from the NASA-driven biopic of African American path-pavers in Hidden Figures to black-girl-magical comedy in Girls Trip; to the feminist-led resistance depicted in Star Wars: The Last Jedi and critically-acclaimed women-directed fare such as Dee Reese’s Mudbound, Greta Gerwig’s Lady Bird, and Angela Robinson’s Professor Marston and the Wonder Women. But the biggest feminist film story this year is Wonder Woman, the superhero demigod daughter of Amazons, starring Gal Gadot and directed by Patty Jenkins. Grossing $ 800 million worldwide, Wonder Woman became the highest grossing live action film directed by a woman, thus shattering all the presumptions that exist suggesting women-led films (with feminist themes) don’t do well as blockbuster fare. Wonder Woman worked its wonders–both on the screen and off–to dispel myths and break multiple records.

#2: And Feminists Stole the Small Screen, Too

Smaller screens seem to be miles ahead of big-screen fare when it comes to women-led stories. Shows as diverse as Hulu’s The Handmaid’s Tale, OWN’s Queen Sugar (whose all-female lineup of directors is a standout in the entertainment industry), HBO’s Insecure and Big Little Lies and ABC’s Scandal–which has given us a fictitious madam president since we couldn’t get one for real–have all placed women at the center. Given the big wins at the Emmys for Big Little Lies and Handmaid’s Tale, with the wondrous view of author Margaret Atwood on stage among A-list celebrities, it seems safe to say that 2017 is the year that brought us feminist TV.

#1: The #MeToo Moment

When a few feminists and progressives questioned the validity of big-name celebrities publicly embracing the F word back in 2014–from Beyoncé to Emma Watson to Taylor Swift–few would have predicted the ways in which celebrity feminists would push beyond simply playing identity politics. First, the word “feminist” became acceptable in the commercial world of entertainment. Then, the political push for gender equity began–from calling out pay-inequality to breaking the silence on the rampant sexual assault and harassment that exists in the industry.

After myriad women alleged that studio mogul Harvey Weinstein had sexually harassed and abused them–among them Rose McGowan, Ashley Judd. Angelina Jolie, Gwyneth Paltrow, Mira Sorvino, Reese Witherspoon, Jennifer Lawrence, Lupita Nyong’o and Salma Hayek–actor Alyssa Milano revived Tarana Burke’s “Me Too” movement by starting a #MeToo hashtag on Twitter, in which countless women from all walks of life shared their experiences of sexual harassment and assault.

Now that the dam of silence has been broken, the question remains: will there be a sea change for women in the entertainment industry, who are still woefully underrepresented in movie storylines and behind the scenes as producers, directors and screenwriters? With a new commission addressing sexual harassment–to be led by Anita Hill, who famously came forward with her own story against Supreme Court Justice Clarence Thomas in 1991–one cannot help but maintain hope that the #MeToo movement is just the beginning of a new wave in feminist resistance. This may eventually demonstrate that what was once dismissed as a fad or as a superficial brand, “celebrity feminism” has indeed become a major force for social movement.

Janell Hobson is associate professor of women’s, gender and sexuality studies at the University at Albany, State University of New York. She is the author of Body as Evidence: Mediating Race, Globalizing Gender.

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The post The Top 10 Feminist Pop Culture Shake-Ups of 2017 appeared first on Ms. Magazine Blog.

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27 reasons 2018 might not totally suck (pop culture edition)

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At the end of 2016, we naively hoped 2017 would be better. Instead, 2017 turned out to be so bad that we’re basically dreading 2018. Because if there’s one thing we learned this year, it’s that no matter how awful things get, they can still get worse. 

And yet. 

The other big lesson we got this year was that even at the worst of times, there’s always gonna be stuff to love, and still more stuff to look forward to loving. 

So, sure, 2018 is probably gonna suck. But it won’t be all bad, and we know that because there are at least 27 things we expect to be freakin’ awesome over the next 12 months. Read more…

More about Avengers, Rihanna, Doctor Who, Lin Manuel Miranda, and Henry Cavill


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Hill staffer who won first sex harassment case sees ‘serious’ culture shift

WASHINGTON – It’s taken nearly 30 years, but Dorena Bertussi may finally get Congress to overhaul its sexual harassment policies. Bertussi, 65, was the first congressional staffer to win a sexual harassment case against a member of Congress back in 1989. The process before the House Ethics Committee was a “joke” back then, Bertussi said,…
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Jemele Hill Calls Out Stacey Dash For Starring In A Black Movie After Distancing Herself From Black Culture

 

 

 

 


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OVERKILL & PUMA Pay Tribute to Berlin Culture with “Pfeffiboys” Pack

Earlier this year, Berlin brand OVERKILL linked up with adidas for a new EQT Support pack, taking inspiration from the Kreuzberg. For this latest season, the German label teams up with PUMA for its latest pack.

Known as the “Pfeffiboys” pack, OVERKILL and PUMA’s new collaborative effort is made up of a black and mint green Blaze Cage and white and mint green Disc Blaze. Both of the aforementioned items represent the “Pfeffiboys” collective that inspired their production, with the Blaze Cage each featuring the Berlin group’s logo on the top of its tongue. Adding to the list of inspirations, OVERKILL also states that the new drop is inspired by Berliner Luft, a popular regional drink that’s defined as “liquid gold” by the label. Along with the sneakers, the collaboration also yields a branded baseball bat, pin set and flask.

You can take a look at the new OVERKILL and PUMA “Pfeffiboys” pack above, and expect the shoes to hit the e-shelves of OVERKILL’s website on November 18.

PUMA has also collaborated with The Weeknd for another new XO Parallel.

Click here to view full gallery at Hypebeast.com


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The best pop culture Halloween costumes of 2017

This Halloween, make a news-splash! 2017 was a yuuuge year, with headlines coming faster and in greater numbers than Kardashian spawn. Why not take advantage of the non-stop insanity and let it inspire your costume on Oct. 31? Here, The Post teaches you to dress like lazy mayors, casual princesses, Instagrammable beverages and more.
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The Culture of Offense is Why Black Workers Are Punished for Speaking Out

The national controversy surrounding NFL protests took a dramatic turn on Monday when Dallas Cowboys owner Jerry Jones issued a statement indicating that he will bench any player who refuses to stand during the national anthem. “If there’s anything that is disrespectful to the flag, then we will not play,” Jones said. “Understand? We will not… If we are disrespecting the flag, then we will not play. Period.”

(Image: iStock/tacojim)

 

ESPN journalist Jemele Hill, a black woman, responded by tweeting about how disgruntled fans can effectively boycott Jones. “This play always works,” Hill tweeted. “Change happens when advertisers are impacted. If you feel strongly about JJ’s statement, boycott his advertisers,” she concluded.  

Hill was subsequently suspended for two weeks on Oct. 9, 2017. ESPN cited “a second violation of our social media guidelines” as a rationalization for the suspension. “In the aftermath, all employees were reminded of how individual tweets may reflect negatively on ESPN and that such actions would have consequences,” the network said in a statement.   

 

The Culture of Offense

 

Dallas Cowboys owner Jerry Jones’s recent threat to bench non-compliant team members, coupled with ESPN’s suspension of Jemele Hill, illustrates why I oppose what I call the “culture of offense.”

The culture of offense normalizes and encourages employer-based punishment for offensive but non-violent comments or political gestures. 

Since what may be considered offensive varies on one’s perception and offense is perceived differently by individuals across the socio-political and ideological spectrum, punishing these football players creates a slippery slope that threatens the rest of us to freely express ourselves without the looming threat of consequence.

 

The First Amendment and the Workplace  

 

The right to free speech is not entirely protected at the workplace. “An employee may have a constitutional right to talk politics, but he has no constitutional right to be employed,” said Oliver Wendell Holmes. In other words: to keep your job, you often can’t say or do what you like.  

This is in part due to an absence of protections at the state and federal levels regarding speech-related terminations. “At the protective end of the spectrum, five states (California, Colorado, Montana, New York, and North Dakota) prohibit employers from punishing employees for legal off-duty activities that do not conflict with the employer’s business-related interests,” according to the American Bar Association.

“These limited protections for off-duty political speech are not available to approximately half of the U.S. population… Accordingly, the majority of Americans only have legal protections for their speech only when it relates to a narrow category of topics protected by federal, state or local law.”

And yet, increased state or federal protections are unlikely to reduce the threat of workplace suspension or termination as it relates to politically motivated speech or actions, precisely because said speech or actions impact “business-related interests.”

This is particularly true during this deeply divided period in American political history. As such, employers are increasingly at risk of losing profit when their employees make on-the-job political statements or issue remarks that offend a target customer. This would explain the rationale that Jones used to explain his no-kneeling policy. “Too many of the fans of the Dallas Cowboys perceive this as disrespect for the flag,” he noted. “And so I don’t want our team doing it.”

 

The Solution: A Shift in American Values  

 

The solution to the challenge I have presented is not a shift in policy or an increase in regulatory protections. The solution is a cultural shift from offense to toleration.

Far too often, people are quick to take offense when presented with ideas that do not align with theirs. In many instances, the offense becomes a rallying call for punitive action. This has become increasingly apparent as a result of the NFL protests, during which 47% of Republicans agreed that NFL players should be fired or suspended when caught kneeling during the national anthem.

As the Republican response to the NFL protests demonstrates, the culture of offense has normalized and encouraged employer-based punishment for non-violent comments and political gestures. NFL owners, broadly, and Jerry Jones, specifically,  have cited “business-related interests,” which translates to nothing more than offended consumers, as the key motivator driving the decision to reprimand players who kneel during the anthem.

The onus is on us—ordinary citizens and consumers—to renounce the culture of offense and to promote toleration, civil debate, and the free exchange of ideas. Although it is OK to respectfully disagree with others, encouraging employers to retaliate whenever one is offended puts us all, regardless of race, ideological orientation, or political affiliation, at risk of being punished by our employers for making comments or political gestures that others might disagree with.

 

 

 

Lifestyle – Black Enterprise

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Hollywood’s Heinous ‘Casting Couch’ Culture That Enabled Harvey Weinstein

Harvey Weinstein’s alleged assault and harassment of the countless women who’ve now spoken out against him—not to mention the many others likely still preparing to come forward—was evil in a very specific, individual way. As co-founder of Miramax and The Weinstein Company, his apparent intimidation, coercion, and rape of actresses and employees were heinous offenses, and should be judged—by which I mean condemned—in their own right. He was, by all media accounts, a monster who used his power and influence to terrorize, all in order to satisfy his perverse sexual desires. His fall from grace is justly deserved.

Read more at The Daily Beast.

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Fashionista’s Pop Culture Style Icons: Maura Will Never, Ever Be Over Sloane Peterson’s White Jacket

This week at Fashionista, we’re celebrating all things at the intersection of fashion and pop culture — including the nostalgic sartorial moments that were formative to our style growth. In our series, Fashionista’s Pop Culture Style Icons, we obsess over the characters who have influenced our …

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LeBron James Producing Comedy Series About Sneaker Culture For HBO

Sorry Cleveland, but it seems more and more likely that LeBron James is LA bound come next summer. The latest clue comes out of tinseltown where LeBron is going to be producing his new HBO project which centers around two friends who own an up and coming sneaker store in Los Angeles.

The half-hour single-camera comedy about the insanity that surrounds the sneaker culture phenomenon that’s taken over the world seems to be filling a part of the culture that’s yet to be explored by a television series. If done right, it should be a smash. And with LeBron’s Nike connect who knows what kind of original sneakers and designs will make their debut in this series. Don’t expect Big Baller Brand or Kyrie’s to get any shine though.

Though the project has yet to be named according to Highsnobiety the series is going to be written by Shawn Wines (High Maintenance) and Lemon Andersen (She’s Gotta Have It).

No word on when a pilot might air but best believe sneakerheads around the world will be glued to their tubes and tablets when it does indeed debut.

Photo: WENN.com

The post LeBron James Producing Comedy Series About Sneaker Culture For HBO appeared first on Hip-Hop Wired.

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The Curious History of Men in HeelsGoogle’s Art & Culture…

The Curious History of Men in Heels

Google’s Art & Culture section (yes, they have an Arts & Culture section) has an interesting slideshow today outlining the curious history of men in heels. It’s a fascinating look at how masculinity has meant different things at different times, and how clothes intersect with ideas about gender. High heels have symbolized everything from class privilege to rugged sportiness to rock ‘n roll rebellion. 

The distinction between what men and women ought to wear in terms of heel height really came about with the rise of democracy and European Enlightenment (about the 18th century). Men were thought to be the more rational of the two genders, and thus worthy of political enfranchisement. Women, on the other hand, were “naturally deficient in reason and unfit for education, citizenship, and control of property.” Fashion was redefined as frivolous and feminine, and thus most men abandoned the artifice of high heels. 

There are some great photos of pre-18th century shoes in the story, including those jade green slip-ons you see above. Those are Persian riding shoes, which would later influence the design of Western European riding footwear. The higher heel and square waist on English riding shoes, for example, helps riders stay in their stirrups. And high heels haven’t completely gone away for men – John Lennon’s Chelsea boots, pictured at the very top of this post, were made with an especially high heel (the design is now known as a Beatle boot). Designers today also use them, such as Margiela and Saint Laurent. I wear these side-zips from Margiela, which sit kind of high. (They’re my Costanza boots). 

You can read the whole story here.

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Trans Military Ban: Why Doubling Down on the Culture Wars Won’t Save Trump

With the administration quickly taking on the feel of a bad circus, earlier this week President Trump signaled his intent to turn to an old strategy intended to solidify support among the Republican base. He is following the formula correctly, but it is

This article originally appeared on www.rollingstone.com: Trans Military Ban: Why Doubling Down on the Culture Wars Won’t Save Trump

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Have We Become An Angry Dating Culture?

I’m seeing a really disturbing trend out there.

I want you to take this time right now to read every single word that I’m writing.

I don’t want you to glance through this article, because if you’re single, this is by far the most important thing you've ever read in your life.

I’m going to start off with this:

How frustrated are you now in your dating life?

If you can write that down right now, write the one word that describes how you feel in your dating life right now.

Over the last couple of years, I’ve noticed a really disturbing trend when it comes down to dating.

The word that we used to have a long time ago, before the flood of Internet dating sites and dating apps and social media validation.

And all these ridiculous ways to get lost in cyber world.

The word that people used to use in dating was a magical word, it was called hope.

People got excited about finding a new mate.

People got excited about finding a new partner.

People went out and actually talked to one another.

If you’re a woman reading this article right now, I want you to think, when was the last time a man came over and approached you and flirted with you?

If you’re a man reading this, I want you to think, when was the last time you actually walked over and actually took a dare and flirted with a woman?

I want you to also ask yourself this question: when you're out in public, how often do you look at your cell phone?

Everybody is angry right now because everybody is escaping.

We’ve become a dating culture – especially in the western world – of people who are swiping and hoping that they’ll stumble across the right photo, the right picture, the perfect person.

Dating has become a paradoxic choice. It’s almost like shopping on Amazon.com for stereo equipment.

You take a look, you read the reviews and you see if – after reading reviews from random strangers – this is the perfect thing for you. And don’t even get me started on how dating is only a review away. Pretty soon there’s going to be a review site, a major one, a major breakthrough where people will post about their exes, and then you’re going to find out the truth about everybody and the next thing you know, it’s going to feed this dating anger even more.

Let’s even get more honest with today. When was the last time you went out on a date with somebody and didn’t Google them ahead of time so you can have a preconceived story about what you think they are due to somebody else’s opinion of them on Google?

Or maybe an article they wrote because well, in today’s neurotic world, we can go deeper and deeper into the void.

It used to be this magical moment: boy meets girl.

Boy asks girl out, actually calls her on a thing called the telephone, not a texting device. Your iPhone is a phone, people, not an iText.

There would be this anticipation. There would be nerves.

At the end of the date, you’d wonder if you liked each other, you’d do a post-date re-cap with your friends and you’d give that person another chance.

Now, there’s no post-date re-cap anymore. It’s either a yes or a no immediately. You don’t think about it because when you do. You go back into the illusional, delusional world of swipe dating.

Because we always know there’s going to be something better, because that’s the way we’ve been programmed.

And this is why people are so frustrated. People are frustrated and angry. Women are angrier than ever before.

I know this factually. I’ve been coaching women for a long time and as the years go by, women get more and more angry.

They feel like they are running out of time.

I'm in my 30's, when am I going to have my children, when am I going to meet that guy?

I'm in my 40's, I haven't met him yet. When am I going to find the man that I'm supposed to marry and live happily ever after.

I'm in my 50's and I'm running out of time. I'm not going to be pretty for a long time and all men want is younger women.

It just goes on and on and on. Women have this accelerator down they feel like they have no time left in the world, that they are just aging at 100 miles per hour and they get angry and pissed off that nobody is seeing their beauty, so they are forced to date the men they don’t want to date.

People are angry out there.

If you ask people how they feel about dating, most people will say they hate it.

To me, I’d ask why do you hate dating? It’s an opportunity to meet someone you’ve never met before. It’s so amazing because it gives you an opportunity to have the relationship you’ve never had.

If you’re not open, how do you expect to even meet somebody? And yet, we do all of these ridiculous things, pretending we’re open.

Swiping. Social media posting. We have this illusion of a social life. No wonder people hate dating, because we’re not getting anywhere!

We’re like bald snow tires in a snow storm. We just spin and spin and spin and get nowhere, and then when we finally do find somebody…

We try to hit the accelerator button down and try to get to a relationship as quickly as possible so we can avoid the thing that we truly hate: dating.

Folks, you’ve got to lose the anger to find love. Period. End of story. End of rant.

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

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If The Comey Memos Involved Other Pop Culture Villains

The Comey hearing took our world by storm on Thursday, wherein the Senate Intelligence Committee further examined the details of former FBI Director James Comey’s memos regarding his encounters with President Trump.

We wondered what those memos would look like in the fictional worlds of pop culture, written about some of our very favorite villains.

Darth Vader Memo

“My Lord Vader asked me to dinner in his private chambers earlier that day. My instincts told me that the one-on-one setting, and the pretense that this was our first discussion about my position, meant the dinner was, at least in part, an effort to have me ask for my job and create some sort of patronage relationship. Lord Vader was known throughout the galaxy for telling people he was their father.”

 

Voldemort Memo

“During the dinner, He Who Must Not Be Named returned to the salacious material I had briefed him about on January 6, and, as he had done previously, expressed his disgust for the allegations and strongly denied that his Death Eaters had used unforgivable curses on Cedric Diggory or Neville Longbottom’s parents. He said he was considering ordering me to investigate the alleged incident to prove it didn’t happen. He said he would think about it and asked me to think about it and then asked his snake Nagini to think about it.

“As was my practice for conversations with He Who Must Not Be Named, I wrote a detailed memo about the dinner immediately afterward and shared it with the senior leadership team in the Order of the Phoenix.”

 

Jigsaw Memo

“Jigsaw signaled the end of the briefing by thanking the group and telling them all that he wanted to speak to me alone. I stayed in my chair.

“When the door by the grandfather clock closed, and we were alone, Jigsaw began by saying, ‘The grandfather clock in this room contains former National Security Advisor Mike Flynn. In 10 minutes, a naked and unconscious Mike Flynn will be released from the grandfather clock. Compromising photos of the two of you will be taken and circulated to the press, unless you can first escape from this room. The only exit is through those glass windows, which are covered in a thin gel. Your clothing is covered in a second substance, which will ignite if mixed with the gel on the windows. You must take off all your clothing and crash through the window naked onto the White House lawn, or take photos with a naked, unconscious Mike Flynn.’

“Jigsaw went to the door and before exiting, said, ‘The grandfather clock is ticking, James. Make your choice.’”

 

Emperor Palpatine Memo

“The Emperor asked his guards to ‘leave us,’ which they did promptly. He then made a long series of comments about the problem with leaks of classified information about his Death Stars — a concern I shared and still share. After he had spoken for a few minutes about stolen data tapes, Reince Priebus appeared via the HoloNet communication system and I could see a group of people waiting behind him. The Emperor waved at him, saying he would be done shortly. The hologram disappeared.

“He then said, ‘I hope you can see your way clear to letting this go, to letting Vader go. He’s not a good guy. There is no good left in him, I assure you. I hope you can let this go.’”

 

Sauron Memo

“On the morning of April 11, Sauron called me and asked what I had done about his request that I ‘get out’ that he is not personally under attack. He replied that ‘the halflings’ were getting in the way of his ability to do his job. He said that perhaps he would have his people reach out to Saruman or the steward of Gondor. I said that was the way his request should be handled. I said the Witch-king of Angmar should contact the leadership of DOJ to make the request, which was the traditional channel. He said he would do that and added, ‘Because I have been very loyal to you, very loyal; we had that ring, you know.’ I did not reply or ask him what he meant by ‘that ring.’ I said only that the way to handle it was to have the Nazgûl call the Acting Deputy Attorney General. He said that was what he would do and the call ended.”

 

Hannibal Lecter Memo

“Dr. Lecter and I had dinner on Friday, January 27 at 6:30 p.m. He had called me at lunchtime that day and invited me to dinner that night, saying he was going to serve my whole family, but decided he would have just me this time, making a lip-smacking sound. But adding that he would have my whole family ‘soon enough,’ at which point he chuckled. I assumed there would be others. It turned out to be just the two of us, seated at a small oval table in the center of a plexiglass room. Two Navy stewards waited on us, only entering the room to serve us very rare meats, fava beans and a nice chianti.”

 

Mr. Burns Memo

“On the morning of March 30, Mr. Burns called me at the FBI. ‘Ahoy-hoy,’ he said, and then described ‘the cloud’ that had formed around his nuclear power plant. He asked what we could do to get the pesky EPA off his back without having to release the hounds, which he assured me he was very much in favor of doing. 

“He finished by stressing ‘the cloud’ was interfering with his ability to take over Springfield and that he hoped I could find a way to get out that he wasn’t as evil as everyone made him sound. I told him I would see what we could do, and that it might be helpful if he didn’t laughed manically at the poor or disabled. He then pressed a button at his desk which opened a trapdoor in the floor, which I fell though.” 

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

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Farrah Abraham Wears Bindi at MTV Movie & TV Awards, Says the Bollywood Look Brings ‘Culture to the Red Carpet’

Farrah Abraham skipped the quirky cut-outs and miniskirts that marked the 2017 MTV Movie & TV Awards red carpet in favor of a more global look.

The Teen Mom OG star posed in an elaborate gold, bedazzled crop top with a matching pink skirt inspired by Bollywood, Abraham told TooFab.

Along with an embellished scarf, Abraham layered on the accessories, including a heavy gold chain and pendant, a henna ink choker and a gold headpiece. She finished the beauty look with a bindi between her eyebrows.

Speaking to TooFab, the 25-year-old said she “wanted to bring culture to the red carpet.”

She insisted she had no fears of backlash over the ensemble, saying, “I think this will inspire others to embrace new cultures and have good experiences.”

RELATED VIDEO: Farrah Abraham on Refusing to Attend Amber Portwood’s Wedding

Abraham said the pink-and-gold ensemble was “freaking amazing, Bollywood and sexy.”

The look is a departure from Abraham’s last turn at the annual awards ceremony: In  2016, she wore a black-and-gold dress with her hair in old Hollywood-esque curls.


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William Cobbett and Rural Popular Culture

William Cobbett and Rural Popular Culture


This is the first rural and cultural study of the great English countryman William Cobbett (1763-1835). It binds Cobbett’s radical career to his rural heritage and to the experiences and politics of agricultural workers during the early nineteenth century. As a radical, Cobbett’s first quest was to represent the hardships of the labouring poor, and he adopted the labourers’ cultural experiences and class consciousness as the basis of his political platform. He revolutionized press history by joining the ‘pedlar’s pack’, from where he dispensed his two-penny broadsheets along with other varieties of popular literature. The rural labourers understood Cobbett because he articulated their beliefs and values as expressed in their own folksongs and broadside ballads. They embraced Cobbett as a radical leader and as an educator, heeding his moral instruction, his treatises on cottage economy, and his prescriptions on the recovery of Old England. Cobbett lived and moved among the labourers, and knew their political or economic grievances; thus long before the ‘Captain Swing’ rising he forecast the date and patterns of the revolt. His predictions came to pass and he became the single most important leader of the insurrection. His position of authority in the villages carried him forward in the cause of the Great Reform Bill and the Old Poor Law, so that by the end of his eventful career he was the sole public exponent of the cottage charter. This is a major and original work on Cobbett, and represents a breakthrough in the study of rural popular culture and in Cobbett scholarship. It will appeal strongly to a wide range of social and political historians, and have much value for all those interested in the language of class, the evolution of the English language, and the history of journalism.
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Gym Culture Meets Planet Earth in This Pretty-Accurate Parody Video

Like antelopes at the watering hole.

Lifestyle – Esquire

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When Do Kids Learn ‘Fairness’? Culture May Matter, Study Finds

Experiment sheds light on how children in different countries react to being given more than their peers
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Reading Beyond the Book: The Social Practices of Contemporary Literary Culture

Reading Beyond the Book: The Social Practices of Contemporary Literary Culture


Literary culture has become a form of popular culture over the last fifteen years thanks to the success of televised book clubs, film adaptations, big-box book stores, online bookselling, and face-to-face and online book groups. This volume offers the first critical analysis of mass reading events and the contemporary meanings of reading in the UK, USA, and Canada based on original interviews and surveys with readers and event organizers.

The resurgence of book groups has inspired new cultural formations of what the authors call “shared reading.” They interrogate the enduring attraction of an old technology for readers, community organizers, and government agencies, exploring the social practices inspired by the sharing of books in public spaces and revealing the complex ideological investments made by readers, cultural workers, institutions, and the mass media in the meanings of reading.


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Consumption, Media And Culture In South Africa: Perspectives On Freedom And The Public

Consumption, Media And Culture In South Africa: Perspectives On Freedom And The Public


This book is the first of its kind to bring together a collection of critical scholarly work on consumer culture in South Africa, exploring the cultural, political, economic, and social aspects of consumption in post-Apartheid society.From sushi and Japanese diplomacy to Queen Sophie''s writhing gown, from middle class Sowetan golfers to an indebted working class citizenry, from wedding websites to wedding nostalgia, from the liberation of consuming to the low wage labour of selling, the chapters in this book demonstrate a variety of themes, showing that to start with consumption, rather than ending with it, allows for new insights into long-standing areas of social research. By mapping, exploring and theorizing the diverse aspects of consumption and consumer culture, the volume collectively works towards a fresh set of empirically rooted conceptual commentaries on the politics, economics, and social dynamics of modern South Africa. This effort, in turn, can serve as a foundation for thinking less parochially about neoliberal power and consumer culture.On a global scale, studying consumption in South Africa matters because in some ways the country serves as a microcosm for global patterns of income inequality, race-based economic oppression, and hopes for the material betterment of life. By exploring what consumption means on the ''local'' scale in South Africa, the possibility arises to trace new global links and dissonances. This book was originally published as a special issue ofCritical Arts.
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William Cobbett and Rural Popular Culture: WILLIAM COBBETT & RURAL POPULA

William Cobbett and Rural Popular Culture: WILLIAM COBBETT & RURAL POPULA


This is the first rural and cultural study of the great English countryman William Cobbett (1763-1835). It binds Cobbett''s radical career to his rural heritage and to the experiences and politics of agricultural workers during the early nineteenth century. As a radical, Cobbett''s first quest was to represent the hardships of the labouring poor, and he adopted the labourers'' cultural experiences and class consciousness as the basis of his political platform. He revolutionized press history by joining the ''pedlar''s pack'', from where he dispensed his two-penny broadsheets along with other varieties of popular literature. The rural labourers understood Cobbett because he articulated their beliefs and values as expressed in their own folksongs and broadside ballads. They embraced Cobbett as a radical leader and as an educator, heeding his moral instruction, his treatises on cottage economy, and his prescriptions on the recovery of Old England. Cobbett lived and moved among the labourers, and knew their political or economic grievances; thus long before the ''Captain Swing'' rising he forecast the date and patterns of the revolt. His predictions came to pass and he became the single most important leader of the insurrection. His position of authority in the villages carried him forward in the cause of the Great Reform Bill and the Old Poor Law, so that by the end of his eventful career he was the sole public exponent of the cottage charter. This is a major and original work on Cobbett, and represents a breakthrough in the study of rural popular culture and in Cobbett scholarship. It will appeal strongly to a wide range of social and political historians, and have much value for all those interested in the language of class, the evolution of the English language, and the history of journalism.
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Selling God: American Religion in the Marketplace of Culture

Selling God: American Religion in the Marketplace of Culture


Religion in America is up for sale. The products range from a plethora of merchandise in questionable taste–such as Bible-based diet books (More of Jesus. Less of Me), Rapture T-shirts (one features a basketball game with half its players disappearing in the Rapture–the caption is "Fast Break"), and bumper stickers and Frisbees with inspirational messages–to the unabashed consumerism of Jim Bakker’s Heritage USA, a grandiose Christian theme park with giant water slide, shopping mall, and office complex. We tend to think of these phenomena–which also include a long line of multimillionaire televangelists and the almost manic promotion of Christmas giving–as a fairly recent development. But as R. Laurence Moore points out in Selling God, religion has been deeply involved in our commercial culture since the beginning of the nineteenth century. In a sweeping, colorful history that spans over two centuries of American culture, Moore examines the role of religion in the marketplace, revealing how religious leaders have borrowed (and invented) commercial practices to promote religion–and how business leaders have borrowed (and invented) religion to promote commerce. It is a book peopled by a fascinating roster of American originals, including showman P.T. Barnum and circuit rider Lorenzo Dow, painter Frederick Church and dime novelist Ned Buntline, Sylvester Graham (inventor of the Graham cracker) and the "Poughkeepsie Seer" Andrew Jackson Davis, film directors D.W. Griffith and Cecil B. DeMille, Norman Vincent Peale and Bishop Fulton J. Sheen. Moore paints insightful portraits of figures such as Mason Locke Weems (Weems’s marriage of aggressive marketing and a moral mission–in such bloody, violent tales as The Drunkard’s Looking Glass or God’s Revenge Against Adultery–was an important starting point of America’s culture industry), religious orator George Whitefield (who transformed church services into mass entertainment, using his acting talents to enthrall vast throngs of people), and Dwight Moody, a former salesman for a boot-and-shoe operation who founded a religious empire centered on the Moody Bible Institute in Chicago (and who advertised his meetings in the entertainment pages of the newspaper). Moore also shows how the Mormons pioneered leisure activities (Brigham Young built the famed Salt Lake Theater, seating 1,500 people, months before work on the Tabernacle started), how Henry Ward Beecher helped the ardent Protestant became the consummate consumer (explicitly justifying the building of expensive mansions, and the collecting of art and antique furniture, as the proper tendencies of pious men), and how the First Amendment, in denying religious groups the status and financial solvency of a state church, forced them to compete in the marketplace for the attention of Americans: religious leaders could either give in to the sway of the market or watch their churches die. Ranging from the rise of gymnasiums and
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Selling God: American Religion in the Marketplace of Culture

Selling God: American Religion in the Marketplace of Culture


Religion in America is up for sale. The products range from a plethora of merchandise in questionable taste–such as Bible-based diet books (More of Jesus. Less of Me), Rapture T-shirts (one features a basketball game with half its players disappearing in the Rapture–the caption is "Fast Break"), and bumper stickers and frisbees with inspirational messages–to the unabashed consumerism of Jim Bakker’s Heritage USA, a grandiose Christian theme park with giant water slide, shopping mall, and office complex. We tend to think of these phenomena–which also include a long line of multimillionaire televangelists and the almost manic promotion of Christmas giving–as a fairly recent development. But as R. Laurence Moore points out in Selling God, religion has been deeply involved in our commercial culture since the beginning of the nineteenth century. In a sweeping, colorful history that spans over two centuries of American culture, Moore examines the role of religion in the marketplace, revealing how religious leaders have borrowed (and invented) commercial practices to promote religion–and how business leaders have borrowed (and invented) religion to promote commerce. It is a book peopled by a fascinating roster of American originals, including showman P.T. Barnum and circuit rider Lorenzo Dow, painter Frederick Church and dime novelist Ned Buntline, Sylvester Graham (inventor of the Graham cracker) and the "Poughkeepsie Seer" Andrew Jackson Davis, film directors D.W. Griffith and Cecil B. DeMille, Norman Vincent Peale and Bishop Fulton J. Sheen. Moore paints insightful portraits of figures such as Mason Locke Weems (Weems’s marriage of aggressive marketing and a moral mission–in such bloodly, violent tales as The Drunkard’s Looking Glass or God’s Revenge Against Adultery–was an important starting point of America’s culture industry), religious orator George Whitefield (who transformed church services into mass entertainment, using his acting talents to enthrall vast throngs of people), and Dwight Moody, a former salesman for a boot-and-shoe operation who founded a religious empire centered on the Moody Bible Institute in Chicago (and who advertised his meetings in the entertainment pages of the newspaper). Moore also shows how the Mormons pioneered leisure activities (Brigham Young built the famed Salt Lake Theater, seating 1,500 people, months before work on the Tabernacle started), how Henry Ward Beecher helped the ardent Protestant became the consummate consumer (explicitly justifying the building of expensive mansions, and the collecting of art and antique furniture, as the proper tendencies of pious men), and how the First Amendment, in denying religious groups the status and financial solvency of a state church, forced them to compete in the marketplace for the attention of Americans: religious leaders could either give in to the sway of the market or watch their churches die. Ranging from the rise of gymnasiums an
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Selling God: American Religion in the Marketplace of Culture

Selling God: American Religion in the Marketplace of Culture


Religion in America is up for sale. The products range from a plethora of merchandise in questionable taste–such as Bible-based diet books (More of Jesus. Less of Me), Rapture T-shirts (one features a basketball game with half its players disappearing in the Rapture–the caption is Fast
Break), and bumper stickers and Frisbees with inspirational messages–to the unabashed consumerism of Jim Bakker''s Heritage USA, a grandiose Christian theme park with giant water slide, shopping mall, and office complex. We tend to think of these phenomena–which also include a long line of
multimillionaire televangelists and the almost manic promotion of Christmas giving–as a fairly recent development. But as R. Laurence Moore points out in Selling God, religion has been deeply involved in our commercial culture since the beginning of the nineteenth century.
In a sweeping, colorful history that spans over two centuries of American culture, Moore examines the role of religion in the marketplace, revealing how religious leaders have borrowed (and invented) commercial practices to promote religion–and how business leaders have borrowed (and invented)
religion to promote commerce. It is a book peopled by a fascinating roster of American originals, including showman P.T. Barnum and circuit rider Lorenzo Dow, painter Frederick Church and dime novelist Ned Buntline, Sylvester Graham (inventor of the Graham cracker) and the Poughkeepsie Seer Andrew
Jackson Davis, film directors D.W. Griffith and Cecil B. DeMille, Norman Vincent Peale and Bishop Fulton J. Sheen. Moore paints insightful portraits of figures such as Mason Locke Weems (Weems''s marriage of aggressive marketing and a moral mission–in such bloody, violent tales as The Drunkard''s
Looking Glass or God''s Revenge Against Adultery–was an important starting point of America''s culture industry), religious orator George Whitefield (who transformed church services into mass entertainment, using his acting talents to enthrall vast throngs of people), and Dwight Moody, a former
salesman for a boot-and-shoe operation who founded a religious empire centered on the Moody Bible Institute in Chicago (and who advertised his meetings in the entertainment pages of the newspaper). Moore also shows how the Mormons pioneered leisure activities (Brigham Young built the famed Salt Lake
Theater, seating 1,500 people, months before work on the Tabernacle started), how Henry Ward Beecher helped the ardent Protestant became the consummate consumer (explicitly justifying the building of expensive mansions, and the collecting of art and antique furniture, as the proper tendencies of
pious men), and how the First Amendment, in denying religious groups the status and financial solvency of a state church, forced them to compete in the marketplace for the attention of Americans: religious leaders could either give in to the sway of the market or watch their churches die.
Ranging from the rise of gymnasiums and muscular Christianity, to the creation of the Chautauqua movement (blending devotional services with concerts, fireworks, bonfires, and humorous lectures), to Oral Robert''s Blessing Pacts and L. Ron Hubbard''s Church of Scientology, Selling God provides
both fascinating social history and an insightful look at religion in America.
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Zimbabwe Women in Culture, Business & Travel

Zimbabwe Women in Culture, Business & Travel


Women often occupy different roles in a foreign culture. Avoid offensive assumptions and behavior by understanding the position of women in Zimbabwean society: their legal rights; access to education and health care; workforce participation; and their dating, marriage, and family life.
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Western Europe – Culture Smart!: The Essential Guide To Customs & Culture

Western Europe – Culture Smart!: The Essential Guide To Customs & Culture


The historic countries of Western Europe – Austria, Belgium, Britain, France, Germany, Ireland, Italy, Portugal, Netherlands, Spain, and Switzerland – are the jewels in the crown of European civilization. Their importance and attraction for the rest of the world are so great that the region is the prime travel destination for businesspeople, tourists, and students. Western Europe is a relatively compact geographical area, containing an enormous diversity of landscapes, peoples, and cultures. The historically competitive Western Europeans are unlike each other in many ways, yet share an underlying system of values, and the restless Western European spirit of enquiry, enterprise, and adventure has had a decisive impact on world history. In the past, their empires spread their languages, religions, arts, and ideologies around the globe, and today the world beats a pathway to their doors. For foreign visitors, first encounters in Western Europe can be overwhelming. The richness and complexity of the different national cultures are difficult to take in, and people’s behavior and reactions can be surprisingly unpredictable.For example, attitudes to time vary. In Germany it’s rude to be late; in France it’s rude to be on time. In business there is a range of negotiating styles. And because there is more to communication than speech, it is easy to misread the signals in other people’s societies. Even smiling can sometimes be wrong – in France it’s distinctly uncool to smile at strangers. Western Europe is ideal for student travelers, businesspeople, or academics who will be visiting several countries on their trip and who don’t wish to be burdened with eleven books on different destinations. In this it is unique. No other book captures the essence of eleven national cultures in a single volume. Drawing on the wealth of information in the individual Culture Smart! country guides, it focuses on those situations in each country where visitors are likely to come into contact with local people. Beyond listing the dos and don’ts, it explains the cultural context of different or unexpected behavior. It tells you about beliefs and attitudes, and alerts you to local manners and sensitive issues. Full of fascinating insights and practical advice, it will help you navigate your way through uncharted seas, avoid gaffes and misunderstandings, and establish a rapport with people wherever you are.
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Òrìsà Devotion As World Religion: The Globalization Of Yorùbá Religious Culture

Òrìsà Devotion As World Religion: The Globalization Of Yorùbá Religious Culture


As the twenty-first century begins, tens of millions of people participate in devotions to the spirits called Òrìsà. This book explores the emergence of Òrìsà devotion as a world religion, one of the most remarkable and compelling developments in the history of the human religious quest. Originating among the Yorùbá people of West Africa, the varied traditions that comprise Òrìsà devotion are today found in Africa, the Americas, Asia, Europe, and Australia.    The African spirit proved remarkably resilient in the face of the transatlantic slave trade, inspiring the perseverance of African religion wherever its adherents settled in the New World. Among the most significant manifestations of this spirit, Yorùbá religious culture persisted, adapted, and even flourished in the Americas, especially in Brazil and Cuba, where it thrives as Candomblé and Lukumi/Santería, respectively. After the end of slavery in the Americas, the free migrations of Latin American and African practitioners has further spread the religion to places like New York City and Miami. Thousands of African Americans have turned to the religion of their ancestors, as have many other spiritual seekers who are not themselves of African descent.     Ifá divination in Nigeria, Candomblé funerary chants in Brazil, the role of music in Yorùbá revivalism in the United States, gender and representational authority in Yorùbá religious culture—these are among the many subjects discussed here by experts from around the world. Approaching Òrìsà devotion from diverse vantage points, their collective effort makes this one of the most authoritative texts on Yorùbá religion and a groundbreaking book that heralds this rich, complex, and variegated tradition as one of the world’s great religions.   
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The Oxford History of Popular Print Culture: Volume Six: US Popular Print Culture 1860-1920

The Oxford History of Popular Print Culture: Volume Six: US Popular Print Culture 1860-1920


What did most people read? Where did they get it? Where did it come from? What were its uses in its readers'' lives? How was it produced and distributed? What were its relations to the wider world of print culture? How did it develop over time? These questions are central toThe Oxford History
of Popular Print Culture, an ambitious nine-volume series devoted to the exploration of popular print culture in English from the beginning of the sixteenth century to the present.

Volume six explores a cornucopia of US popular print materials from 1860 to 1920, the period when mass culture exploded into the everyday lives of large swathes of the population. Thirty specially written essays by scholars from a wide range of disciplines – history of the book; literary, cultural,
media, and film studies; social history, journalism, and American Studies – probe the material conditions, proliferating genres, and cultural work of newly affordable and accessible forms. A dozen short entries address additional topics, genres, and approaches. A chronology of the relevant legal,
technological, and organizational developments of the period and a list of online and physical archives provide further support for study in this burgeoning field. Cumulatively, the volume revisions the power of ''the popular'' in its many meanings – widely circulated, commercialised, vernacular,
working-class, cheap, accessible; it recovers and analyses neglected cultural webs and networks, as well as individual authors, famous and forgotten; and it interrogates conventional cultural hierarchies and high/low binaries.

The volume pursues some key issues in rich archival and analytical detail. How did new technologies of production and distribution shape a plethora of print forms, including advertising leaflets, postcards, tracts, pamphlets, dime novels, story papers, newspapers, magazines, and cheap books? How did
upheavals in the publishing industry and new regulatory mechanisms affect circulation and consumption? How did various genres mediate social and political transformations of the period? How did popular print forms consolidate transnational and borderlands networks? How were particular cultural
communities, including Native American, African American, Asian American, and Mexican / America alternately served and oppressed by popular print? How was it seized in support of labour and woman suffrage, and how was it wielded by governmental and educational institutions? How did print interact
with other media?
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The Making of the Cold War Enemy: Culture and Politics in the Military-Intellectual Complex

The Making of the Cold War Enemy: Culture and Politics in the Military-Intellectual Complex


At the height of the Cold War, the U.S. government enlisted the aid of a select group of psychologists, sociologists, and political scientists to blueprint enemy behavior. Not only did these academics bring sophisticated concepts to what became a project of demonizing communist societies, but they influenced decision-making in the map rooms, prison camps, and battlefields of the Korean War and in Vietnam. With verve and insight, Ron Robin tells the intriguing story of the rise of behavioral scientists in government and how their potentially dangerous, “American” assumptions about human behavior would shape U.S. views of domestic disturbances and insurgencies in Third World countries for decades to come. Based at government-funded think tanks, the experts devised provocative solutions for key Cold War dilemmas, including psychological warfare projects, negotiation strategies during the Korean armistice, and morale studies in the Vietnam era. Robin examines factors that shaped the scientists’ thinking and explores their psycho-cultural and rational choice explanations for enemy behavior. He reveals how the academics’ intolerance for complexity ultimately reduced the nation’s adversaries to borderline psychotics, ignored revolutionary social shifts in post-World War II Asia, and promoted the notion of a maniacal threat facing the United States. Putting the issue of scientific validity aside, Robin presents the first extensive analysis of the intellectual underpinnings of Cold War behavioral sciences in a book that will be indispensable reading for anyone interested in the era and its legacy.

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A Guide to Irish Culture: History, Rural Traditions, Arts, Events, Famous Architectural Sites, Cuisines, and More

A Guide to Irish Culture: History, Rural Traditions, Arts, Events, Famous Architectural Sites, Cuisines, and More


New – Please note that the content of this book primarily consists of articles available from Wikipedia or other free sources online. The Irish culture has taken thousands of years to develop. The Irish love traditions which is why the country is full of them. Two of the most enduring and internationally famed traditions are Irish music and dance. Traditional music can be heard all over the country from city centre pubs to rural festivals. With ancient myths and legends to uncover, amazing lands

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Discover Ethnic Neighborhoods Food & Culture of Los Angeles

Discover Ethnic Neighborhoods Food & Culture of Los Angeles

Uncover the astounding mix of nationalities that make up the City of Angels on this Los Angeles food tour that reveals hole-in-the-wall eateries markets snack shops and the fine art of riding the metro. Who said you need a car in LA?
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Afrofuturism: The World of Black Sci-Fi and Fantasy Culture

Afrofuturism: The World of Black Sci-Fi and Fantasy Culture


In this hip, accessible primer to the music, literature, and art of Afrofuturism, author Ytasha Womack introduces readers to the burgeoning community of artists creating Afrofuturist works, the innovators from the past, and the wide range of subjects they explore. From the sci-fi literature of Samuel Delany, Octavia Butler, and N. K. Jemisin to the musical cosmos of Sun Ra, George Clinton, and the Black Eyed Peas’ will.i.am, to the visual and multimedia artists inspired by African Dogon myths and Egyptian deities, the book’s topics range from the “alien” experience of blacks in America to the “wake up” cry that peppers sci-fi literature, sermons, and activism. With a twofold aim to entertain and enlighten, Afrofuturists strive to break down racial, ethnic, and social limitations to empower and free individuals to be themselves.

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Victorian Bathing and Bathing Suits: The Culture of the Two-Piece Bathing Dress from 1837 – 1901

Victorian Bathing and Bathing Suits: The Culture of the Two-Piece Bathing Dress from 1837 – 1901


When I decided to create a new bathing suit pattern, I searched for a modern book documenting Victorian bathing suits. To my surprise, I couldn’t find one. Yet I had quite a few period magazines with engravings of bathing dresses in my collection. While I was doing more research, I fell in love with the traditions and ethics surrounding American, English, and French bathing.This book focuses on the culture of swimming and sea bathing across the decades, and on women’s bathing suits, noting their styles, variations, and evolution, all quoted from the original writers of that time. For your enjoyment, I’ve included descriptions and engravings of men’s and children’s suits when I could find them, but their clothing was not as well documented as the ladies’ dresses.The culture and proper dress of bathing changed radically during Queen Victoria’s reign, led, of course, by the French. The accepted ladies’ one-piece bathing gown gave way to the two-piece bathing suit, and bathing went from a medical treatment to a social event.Even the French bathing dress was not admired in its early days. It was plain, usually black, and, at best, boring. But once fashion got hold of the bathing suit, the dress evolved rapidly. By 1870, many bathing suits were downright gorgeous. Fashion magazines began to include descriptions and engravings on a regular basis, vying to provide the most up-to-date styles. Bathing went from a quick, unpleasant dip in the ocean to true enjoyment, and even swimming became popular.Victorian Bathing and Bathing Suits has over 125 period illustrations. It is intended for costume historians, bathing enthusiasts, Victorian re-enactors, historical writers and history buffs.

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Reading Beyond the Book: The Social Practices of Contemporary Literary Culture

Reading Beyond the Book: The Social Practices of Contemporary Literary Culture


Literary culture has become a form of popular culture over the last fifteen years thanks to the success of televised book clubs, film adaptations, big-box book stores, online bookselling, and face-to-face and online book groups. This volume offers the first critical analysis of mass reading events and the contemporary meanings of reading in the UK, USA, and Canada based on original interviews and surveys with readers and event organizers. The resurgence of book groups has inspired new cultural formations of what the authors call “shared reading.” They interrogate the enduring attraction of an old technology for readers, community organizers, and government agencies, exploring the social practices inspired by the sharing of books in public spaces and revealing the complex ideological investments made by readers, cultural workers, institutions, and the mass media in the meanings of reading.
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Hot Stuff: Disco and the Remaking of American Culture

Hot Stuff: Disco and the Remaking of American Culture


Disco thumps back to life in this pulsating look at the culture and politics that gave rise to the music. In the 1970s, as the disco tsunami engulfed America, the question, “Do you wanna dance?” became divisive, even explosive. What was it about this music that made it such hot stuff? In this incisive history, Alice Echols reveals the ways in which disco, assumed to be shallow and disposable, permanently transformed popular music, propelling it into new sonic territory and influencing rap, techno, and trance. This account probes the complex relationship between disco and the era’s major movements: gay liberation, feminism, and African American rights. But it never loses sight of the era’s defining soundtrack, spotlighting the work of precursors James Brown and Isaac Hayes, its dazzling divas Donna Summer and the women of Labelle, and some of its lesser-known but no less illustrious performers like Sylvester. You’ll never say “disco sucks” again after reading this fascinating account of the music you thought you hated but can’t stop dancing to.

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Magazine Movements: Women’s Culture, Feminisms and Media Form

Magazine Movements: Women’s Culture, Feminisms and Media Form


All women’s magazines are not the same: content, outlook, and format combine to shape publications quite distinctively. While magazines in general have long been understood as a significant force in women’s lives, many critiques have limited themselves to discussions of mainstream printed publications that engage with narrowly stereotypical representations of femininity. Looking at a range of women’s magazines (“Cooperative Correspondence Club “and “Housewife) “and magazine programmes (“Woman’s Hour” and “Houseparty”), “Magazine Movements” not only extends our definition of a magazine, but most importantly, unearths the connections between women’s cultures, specific magazines and the implied reader. The author first outlines the existing field of magazine studies, and analyzes the methodologies employed in accessing and assessing the cultural competence of magazines. Each chapter then provides a case study of a different kind of magazine: different in media form or style of presentation or audience connection, or all three. Forster not only extends our definition of a magazine, but most importantly, unearths the connections between women’s cultures, specific magazines and the implied reader. In this way, fresh insights are provided into the long-standing importance of the magazine to the variety of feminisms on offer in Britain, from the mid twentieth century to the present day.

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Food History Almanac: Over 1,300 Years of World Culinary History, Culture, and Social Influence

Food History Almanac: Over 1,300 Years of World Culinary History, Culture, and Social Influence


The Food History Almanac covers 365 days of the year, with information and anecdotes relating to food history from around the world from medieval times to the present. The daily entries include such topics as celebrations; significant food-related moments in history from the fields of science and technology, exploration and discovery, travel, literature, hotel and restaurant history, and military history; menus from famous and infamous meals across a wide spectrum, from extravagant royal banquets to war rations and prison fare; birthdays of important people in the food field; and publication dates for important cookbooks and food texts and first known recipes. Food historian Janet Clarkson has drawn from her vast compendium of historical cookbooks, food texts, scholarly articles, journals, diaries, ships logs, letters, official reports, and newspaper and magazine articles to bring food history alive. History buffs, foodies, students doing reports, and curious readers will find it a constant delight. An introduction, list of recipes, selected bibliography, and set index, plus a number of period illustrations are added value.

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7 Hilarious Vine Videos Teach Us About Pidgin, The Humuhumunukunukuāpuaʻa, And Local Hawaiian Culture

For many visitors to Hawaii, it can be difficult to get a glimpse of the local color and culture. After all, if you stay in Waikiki for your whole vacation, you’ll never hear pidgin phrases like “da kine” — which can mean anything you want it to — or understand the local practice of only using the words mauka (mountain-side) and makai (ocean-side) when giving directions.

Thankfully, Hawaii Vines — a Facebook page that hopes to spread aloha with Hawaii humor — offers 7-second windows into the vibrant, fun-loving and diverse culture on the islands. Below, 7 of our favorites:

1. Hawaii’s Fabulous State Fish: The Humuhumunukunukuāpuaʻa

2. The Difference Between How Hawaii Surfers and California Surfers Measure Waves

3. Getting In Trouble With Da Parents

4. When A Haole (White Person) Gives Directions Vs. When A Local Does

5. The Best Indicator That You’re In A Tourist Trap

6. The Haka, Because Everyone Here Knows It

7. Trying To Take Da Bus As A Child

Comedy – The Huffington Post
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X vs. y: A Culture War, a Love Story

X vs. y: A Culture War, a Love Story


Seen through the eyes of siblings 14 years apart in age, “X vs. Y” is a smart, funny, stylish, and visually driven anthology that com-piles and compares their two generational cul-tures. It’s a story told through lists, infographics, essays, anecdotes, and images, with chapters devoted to fashion, TV, music, technology, dating, books, and movies. Through musings on topics such as leg warmers, “Clueless,” “Sassy” magazine, and MTV, along with mixtapes and TV characters, “X vs. Y” paints a portrait of two intricately entwined generations.

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Travelling Languages: Culture, Communication and Translation in a Mobile World

Travelling Languages: Culture, Communication and Translation in a Mobile World


Based on the commonly held assumption that we now live in a world that is on the move, with growing opportunities for both real and virtual travel and the blurring of boundaries between previously defined places, societies and cultures, the theme of this book is firmly grounded in the interdisciplinary field of Mobilities . Mobilities deals with the movement of people, objects, capital, information, ideas and cultures on varying scales, and across a variety of borders, from the local to the national to the global. It includes all forms of travel from forced migration for economic or political reasons, to leisure travel and tourism, to virtual travel via the myriad of electronic channels now available to much of the world s population. Underpinning the choice of theme is a desire to consider the important role of languages and intercultural communication in travel and border crossings; an area which has tended to remain in the background of Mobilities research. The chapters included in this volume represent unique interdisciplinary understandings of the dual concepts of mobile language and border crossings, from crossings in virtual life and real life, to crossings in literature and translation, and finally to crossings in the semioscape of tourist guides and tourism signs. This book was originally published as a special issue of “Language and Intercultural Communication.”

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Creating Mexican Consumer Culture in the Age of Porfirio Díaz

Creating Mexican Consumer Culture in the Age of Porfirio Díaz


In Gabriel García Márquez’s novel One Hundred Years of Solitude, a character articulates the fascination goods, technology, and modernity held for many Latin Americans in the early twentieth century when he declares that “incredible things are happening in this world.” The modernity he marvels over is the new availability of cheap and useful goods. Steven Bunker’s study shows how goods and consumption embodied modernity in the time of Porfirio Díaz, how they provided proof to Mexicans that “incredible things are happening in this world.”In urban areas, and especially Mexico City, being a consumer increasingly defined what it meant to be Mexican. In an effort to reconstruct everyday life in Porfirian Mexico, Bunker surveys the institutions and discourses of consumption and explores how individuals and groups used the goods, practices, and spaces of urban consumer culture to construct meaning and identities in the rapidly evolving social and physical landscape of the capital city and beyond. Through case studies of tobacco marketing, department stores, advertising, shoplifting, and a famous jewelry robbery and homicide, he provides a colorful walking tour of daily life in Porfirian Mexico City. Emphasizing the widespread participation in this consumer culture, Bunker’s work overturns conventional wisdom that only the middle and upper classes participated in this culture.

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Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture

Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture


Roman Dress and the Fabrics of Roman Culture investigates the social symbolism and cultural poetics of dress in the ancient Roman world in the period from 200 BCE-400 CE. Editors Jonathan Edmondson and Alison Keith and the contributors to this volume explore the diffusion of Roman dress protocols at Rome and in the Roman imperial context by looking at Rome’s North African provinces in particular, a focus that previous studies have overlooked or dealt with only in passing. Another unique aspect of this collection is that it goes beyond the male elite to address a wider spectrum of Roman society. Chapters deal with such topics as masculine attire, strategies for self-expression for Roman women within a dress code prescribed by a patriarchal culture, and the complex dynamics of dress in imperial Roman culture, both literary and artistic. This volume further investigates the literary, legal, and iconographic evidence to provide anthropologically-informed readings of Roman clothing.This collection of original essays employs a range of methodological approaches – historical, literary critical, philological, art historical, sociological and anthropological – to offer a thorough discussion of one of the most central issues in Roman culture.

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