4 Things We Learned at TCA: Day 4

Starz, Amazon, and AMC braved the TCA summer press tour on Saturday. Charles Donalson III of the docuseries “America to Me” held the gathered reporters in rapt attention with an impassioned speech, while Amazon Studios head Jennifer Salke touted the company’s diversity. Here are 4 things we learned from Saturday’s session. 1. Charles Donalson III, […]

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http://www.acrx.org -As millions of Americans strive to deal with the economic downturn,loss of jobs,foreclosures,high cost of gas,and the rising cost of prescription drug cost. Charles Myrick ,the President of American Consultants Rx, announced the re-release of the American Consultants Rx community service project which consist of millions of free discount prescription cards being donated to thousands of not for profits,hospitals,schools,churches,etc. in an effort to assist the uninsured,under insured,and seniors deal with the high cost of prescription drugs.-American Consultants Rx -Pharmacy Discount Network News

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Nine Innings: How Bryce Harper Is Trying to Revive His Season, What We Learned in the First Half and More

Also in Nine Innings this week, the crew discusses whether the Nationals should consider trading Harper and why requiring an All-Star from every team is a bad idea.

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10 Things We Learned From Young Buck on The Breakfast Club

Young Buck on The Breakfast Club

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Throughout his tenure in the rap game, G-Unit’s Young Buck’s had one hell of a journey over the decades. Starting out as a young independent rapper who found his way onto Juvenile’s tour but before ultimately ended up a G-Unit soldier, Young Buck’s paid his dues and reaped the rewards before falling on hard time.

Today the Ca$ hville Ten-A-Key rapper stopped by The Breakfast Club to talk about his journey that’s led up to today and spoke about why he never signed with Juvenile, where things went sour with 50 Cent, and how that fight at the Vibe Awards had long lasting consequences on his life.

Here are the 10 things we learned from Young Buck on The Breakfast Club.

 

Instagram Photo

1. Ca$ h Money

Youngbuck was never actually signed to Ca$ h Money Millionaires but was affiliated with them through Juvenile before he eventually joined G-Unit. He remembers he was given a contract to sign with UTP but he simply put it under his bed on the bus and kept on with his life.

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Three Chiefs learned locker room lessons from pro sport dads

Patrick Mahomes, Dustin Colquitt and Kahlil McKenzie grew up with dads in professional sports. Here’s a look at how those bonds impacted their careers.
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Ndamukong Suh shares the best lesson he learned from his mentor Warren Buffett

Suh and Buffett met in 2009 when Suh was playing football for the University of Nebraska.
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How I learned to breathe fire — and channel electricity

Tessa Fontaine is a snake charmer, a fire breather and the author of “The Electric Woman: A Memoir in Death-Defying Acts” (Farrar, Straus and Giroux), her debut memoir. In it, Fontaine weaves together two stories that seem, at first glance, to be mismatched: her relationship with her ailing mother, who has suffered a series of…
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Report: Arsenal Players Learned of Arsene Wenger Exit Just Before Announcement

Arsenal players were reportedly caught off guard by the timing of Arsene Wenger’s announcement that he won’t be returning to the club.

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http://www.acrx.org -As millions of Americans strive to deal with the economic downturn,loss of jobs,foreclosures,high cost of gas,and the rising cost of prescription drug cost. Charles Myrick ,the President of American Consultants Rx, announced the re-release of the American Consultants Rx community service project which consist of millions of free discount prescription cards being donated to thousands of not for profits,hospitals,schools,churches,etc. in an effort to assist the uninsured,under insured,and seniors deal with the high cost of prescription drugs.-American Consultants Rx -Pharmacy Discount Network News

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Lesson learned? Massive study finds lectures still dominate STEM ed

An analysis of more than 2,000 college classes in science, technology, engineering and math has found that 55 percent of STEM classroom interactions consisted mostly of conventional lecturing — a style that prior research has identified as among the least effective at teaching and engaging students.
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Client Success Video: How Horizon Solar Power Learned to Love Lead Generation

What is your role with Horizon Solar Power?

“My name is Ruben Ugarte, and I’m the Business Development Director for Horizon Solar Power. We’re a residential Solar installer out of Southern California, but we’re serving states nationwide.We’re one of the largest installers in the United States of rooftop and commercial Solar.My goal is to bring quality lead gen to our sales team as well as other partnership opportunities to allow us to continue to grow and install more solar”

What is your goal in working with Modernize?

“In any relationship or partnership, it has to be a win/win for both organizations. I see that as the key to what we’ve done with Modernize as a whole and the relationship we’ve had with our Account Manager.The main goal is to find homeowners who want solar, who are interested in talking about it, who would like to have a proposal presented, and ultimately decide to go solar. I think another goal is being able to work with a company who you know is doing things the right way and delivering quality leads and homeowners who actually want to talk to you about solar – which is easier said than done in the lead business. Modernize has gone from being a small vendor where we do 3-5 sales to last month where we completed over 50 projects through Modernize. It’s amazing to have a relationship with one of the biggest home improvement lead generation companies in the nation and to be able to call them and have things happen – not even in a full day – but in a few hours, is empowering and something that makes me, as a business development director, proud to say that I have these types of relationships and I can make something happen when asked by my leadership team.”

How has your relationship with Modernize evolved?

“We originally used Modernize in 2014, and had a 3-month pilot that didn’t go very well. We were quite upset. We felt that, at the time, Modernize had sent us bad leads… That was our mindset. What’s funny is, after looking back six months down the road, we noticed that our COA (cost of acquisition) was in line and was actually pretty good! So, what do I do? I made a call to Modernize and we started the relationship back up about 6-8 months later, and the relationship has been going strong ever since.We’ve gone from testing small volume – a couple thousand dollars – to, now, purchasing leads nationwide in multiple states. We haven’t limited ourselves to just web leads; We’ve also purchased other kinds of traffic. The relationship has developed to a point where we come to Modernize first for a lot of priorities and opportunities we have on our side to grow.”

What is your advice for companies looking to grow through digital marketing?

“I think number one, working only with companies who are doing the right thing.Number two, working with companies who don’t look at the relationship on an insertion order basis but looking at it more as a long-term relationship. Thinking more like ‘where can we go from here? Where can we go the year after together?’ vs. ‘Send me the money for this order, I’ll send you 100 leads, and what happens, happens!’ I think a lot of times that’s the relationship that many construction companies have with their lead gen provider, and that’s not a bridge towards prosperity or future growth together.Finally, get to know your lead gen provider, come and visit them on-site, visit their call center. Understand who they are and what they want to be, and in turn, you can figure out fairly quickly if they are aligned with who you are and what you are trying to do.”

In one word, describe your relationship with Modernize.

“Robust. We’ve faced challenges as a team and as our organizations aligned. Certainly, we will continue to have challenges on our side, and on your side, and together. But, I think as partners, we understand each other’s goals and what we are trying to do for each other. Because we have that kind of communication and transparency, we work in good faith together, and I would say that our relationship is robust. It’s something that continues to grow, and I’m excited to work hand-in-hand with you guys. It’s been an amazing experience”

The post Client Success Video: How Horizon Solar Power Learned to Love Lead Generation appeared first on Modernize.

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I wore this $279 device over my heart to track stress — here’s what I learned

The Lief Therapeutics stress tracker might be good if you need data to improve your habits, but most of us should just remember to breathe deeply.
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Language is learned in brain circuits that predate humans

It has often been claimed that humans learn language using brain components that are specifically dedicated to this purpose. Now, new evidence strongly suggests that language is in fact learned in brain systems that are also used for many other purposes and even pre-existed humans.
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http://www.acrx.org -As millions of Americans strive to deal with the economic downturn,loss of jobs,foreclosures,high cost of gas,and the rising cost of prescription drug cost. Charles Myrick ,the President of American Consultants Rx, announced the re-release of the American Consultants Rx community service project which consist of millions of free discount prescription cards being donated to thousands of not for profits,hospitals,schools,churches,etc. in an effort to assist the uninsured,under insured,and seniors deal with the high cost of prescription drugs.-American Consultants Rx -Pharmacy Discount Network News

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5 Cool Things I Learned While Playing Halo

Walking into GameStop as a 10-year-old, Halo: Combat Evolved beckoned to me. My father bought me a copy, and I raced home to pop the disc into my laptop. As I played, I experienced something I’d never felt before: escapism. Assuming the persona of the Master Chief and gazing upon the beautifully realized world of Installation 04 enabled my imagination to run wild. In short, I became hooked on the franchise. As I progressed through each Halo game, Bungie’s masterful use of storytelling and worldbuilding taught me some very valuable lessons that I will never abandon.

The Importance of Relationships



More than any other game franchise I’ve played, Halo made me feel a deep, emotional connection with the characters I encountered. Cortana became much more than a chatty, holographic companion who told me what to do. She became a trusted friend, with her own lively personality and strong moral compass. When I crash-landed on Installation 04, she yelled “Chief! Chief, can you hear me?” I was touched by this moment, as Cortana was invested in me and I valued that relationship.

Similarly, I developed a strong bond with Sergeant Johnson. He was a man who distinguished himself from my other allies with his unforgettable quotes, sarcastic attitude, and unwavering sense of duty. Playing Halo during my childhood helped me realize how important strong relationships are, as they foster friendships and make life meaningful.

Teamwork


Three is always better than one.

If you’re a Halo fan like me, it’s impossible to talk about the series without bringing up the multiplayer. Sure, the Halo franchise does an incredible job of putting you in fast-paced, action-packed battles against other players. However, it also emphasizes something many first-person shooters shy away from: teamwork. When I jumped into multiplayer, my teammates weren’t just in the game for themselves. We would communicate, coordinate different strategies to capture the enemy team’s flag, and run like hell whenever zombies approached us.

I relished every multiplayer match, whether it was Capture the Flag, Zombies, or Grifball. I knew I could depend on my teammates to win games and enjoy our collaboration. My experiences with Halo’s multiplayer taught me to put my trust in strangers when I otherwise wouldn’t have. In doing so, my team achieved its goal and had an incredible time.

The Value of a Good Story



The best part of the Halo franchise is by far its story. Joseph Staten’s writing in Halo: CE, Halo 2 and Halo 3 was epic in scope and scale. It took me on a journey through a universe with expertly-crafted lore, ferocious enemies, and characters for whom I cared.

The Covenant wasn’t your typical alien foe. It had its own social and military structure, with Prophets at the top and the unfortunate, impish Grunts at the bottom. Moreover, the Flood inspired fear whenever I saw them, with their mutated, misshapen limbs, disfigured heads, and bulbous chests. The Forerunners added an additional layer of complexity to the universe. They were the enigmatic, dominant race in the galaxy before their demise at the hands of the Halo Array. All of these races and characters contributed to the richness of Halo’s universe, and I relished being a part of such an expansive story.

The Importance of Discussing Real-World Issues



Halo is not usually known for including aspects of controversial, real-world issues in its games. However, the Halo series’ focus on religion piqued my interest in the subject. Bungie mindfully incorporated elements of religion into the Halo franchise, and its influence can be felt in nearly every corner of Halo’s universe. The name “The Covenant” is a reference to mankind’s agreement with God in the Bible. However, in the Halo universe, it’s defined as the Covenant Empire’s worship of the Forerunners and the Halo rings.

However, the Halo franchise also discusses the dangers of the Covenant’s religious fundamentalism and theocracy. It examines the ways in which such constructs and worldviews can cause immense destruction. The Covenant’s extremism is represented in the real world by groups such as al-Qaeda, the Islamic State, and the Ku Klux Klan, to name a few. In short, the way in which Halo approached the nature of religion is admirable and thought-provoking.

Perseverance



I can guarantee that any Halo player has encountered the theme of perseverance at one time or another. When I stepped inside the armor of the Master Chief, perseverance wasn’t only a theme. It became wisdom that I’ve carried with me throughout my life. As I improved at Halo, I began to push myself, trying to beat the campaign of every game on Legendary.

Sure enough, I got frustrated. Angry. Confused. “Why the hell is The Library so damn hard?” I asked myself. “Why can’t I beat Cortana without getting killed by a Combat Form every three seconds?” Fortunately, I didn’t give up. I worked hard, conquering level after level, until I had finally beaten every Halo game on Legendary. The Halo franchise taught me the simple maxim, “If at first you don’t succeed, try, try again.” I can say, without a doubt, that I’ve become a better person because of it.

Halo was a very important part of my childhood. It was more than a series of games to me. Instead, it imparted a wisdom unlike any other form of entertainment or work of art that I’d experienced. At its core, that’s what Halo is: a multifaceted piece of media from which all kinds of lessons can be learned. And that, I believe, is the sign of something indelible, something to be cherished.

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Republican senators who once criticized Trump have learned how to work with him

In fewer than two years, Sen. Lindsey Graham has turned from a political rival who called Donald Trump a “jackass” and a “political car wreck” to a semi-regular golf partner of the now-President and a close ally on some of the biggest issues facing the country.


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The Most Genius Home Hacks We Learned This Year

Improving one’s home is a never-ending cycle. That’s why people are constantly on the lookout for faster ways to wash dishes or smarter ways to fit more into their kitchen — and 2017 was no exception. These are the highlights of what we learned this year and will embrace for years to come.

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The 5 craziest things we learned about the universe in 2017

In the search for answers, the universe usually only gives us more questions. And those questions are becoming as infinite as the cosmos themselves. From Mars’ magnetic tail to inexplicable booms heard around the world to mounting evidence that a “Planet Nine” exists, these stories prove that the more we learn about the universe, the…
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Bono Reveals What He Learned From ‘Almost Dying’ – and Says ‘Music Has Gotten Very Girly’

Bono‘s latest inspiration for his most recent album Songs of Experience came from a near-death experience.

The U2 singer, 57, revealed in an interview with Rolling Stone for their January 2018 issue that he almost died but refused to divulge details about the event.

Despite refusing to speak on the incident, the star did say the 22-time Grammy-winning band’s latest album explores the theme or mortality.

“It’s just a thing that . . . people have these extinction events in their lives; it could be psychological or it could be physical. And, yes, it was physical for me, but I think I have spared myself all that soap opera,” Bono said. “Especially with this kind of celebrity obsession with the minutiae of peoples’ lives – I have got out of that. I want to speak about the issue in a way that lets people fill in the blanks of what they have been through, you know?”

He continued, “It’s one thing if you were talking about it in a place of record like Rolling Stone, but by the time it gets to your local tabloid it is just awful. It becomes the question that everyone is asking.”

His latest incident was not the first brush with illness or death for the iconic frontman. In 2000, Bono was checked for throat cancer, which turned out negative.

And in 2015, he broke his arm in a bike accident, which he told the magazine was a “comic tragedy.”

“But the thing that shook me was that I didn’t remember it. That was the amnesia; I have no idea how it happened. That left me a little uneasy, but the other stuff has just finally nailed me,” he said. “It was like, ‘Can you take a hint?’ ”

The band’s song “Jesus, What Have You Got For Me?” explores some of the themes that Bono has been contemplating since his mortality was tested.

Bono admits he had previously thought he’d “let go” of his fear of death, but reveals it was the exact opposite.

“I thought I already had, but this was the next installment in trust. You know, people of faith can be very annoying,” he said. “Like when people on the Grammys thank God for a song and you think, “God, that is a shite song. Don’t give God credit for that one – you should take it yourself!” I am sure I have done that myself. And someone’s like, “I got this directly from the mouth of God!” And you’re thinking, “Wow, God has no taste!”

As for today’s music, Bono said he gets his education from his four children.

“The band is always listening to music, and I have got my kids. Jordan is a music snob, an indie snob. Eve is hip-hop. Elijah is in a band, and he has got very strong feelings about music, but he doesn’t make any distinction between, let’s say, the Who and the Killers,” he explained. “Or, you know, Nirvana and Royal Blood. It is not generational for him. It is the sound and what he is experiencing. He believes that a rock & roll revolution is around the corner.”

Bono’s own take on today’s music can be called mixed.

“I think music has gotten very girly. And there are some good things about that, but hip-hop is the only place for young male anger at the moment – and that’s not good,” Bono said. “When I was 16, I had a lot of anger in me. You need to find a place for it and for guitars, whether it is with a drum machine – I don’t care. The moment something becomes preserved, it is f—ing over. You might as well put it in formaldehyde.”

Adding, “In the end, what is rock & roll? Rage is at the heart of it. Some great rock & roll tends to have that, which is why the Who were such a great band. Or Pearl Jam. Eddie has that rage.”

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How I Learned to Live After My Father Died of Lung Cancer

I realized that my father certainly wouldn’t want me to live a life stunted by fear of death.

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5 Life Lessons I Learned From ‘Gilmore Girls’

For the past few years, I have been watching Gilmore Girls on loop. I start at the beginning—an innocent Rory, and her plucky mother, Lorelai—and watch all the way through. Once the infamous last four words of the Netflix special have been spoken, I start all over again. Sure the Gilmore Girls are full of quotable one-liners that ooze wit and guidance: “Only prostitutes have two glasses of wine at lunch.” But if you look closely (or repeatedly like I have) deeper, truer life lessons become apparent.

When Someone Tells You Who They Are, Believe Them


Rory-jess-gilmore-girls

There are many ways people let you know who they are. But actions are my favorite. A young Rory falls for the rebellious Jess and is then dismayed when he treats her poorly, unlike the ever dependable Dean. While we occasionally see Jess being somewhat sweet, he is also unreliable and volatile. It only makes sense that since this is the type of person he is, it’s also the type of boyfriend he would be.

Believe people when they show you who they are through their actions (for better or worse) and accept them the way they are. Trying to change someone is futile and will only leave you both frustrated, like what happened when Jess tried to get physical with Rory in Kyle’s bedroom before she was ready. Knowing what behavior you can accept is important too.

Know When to Compromise


Gilmore-Girls-lorelai and chris

After Lorelai’s hasty nuptials to her baby daddy, Chris, Emily points out: “Marriage is not about always being happy, and often it’s about not being happy at all. It’s about compromise.” That statement is true of life in general. Yes, you could plant your feet and refuse to give in (like Lorelai does in many of her relationships). But sometimes it’s more important to find a resolution and move on than to be right.

Compromise is the best way forward in a conflict. That being said, knowing what your deal breakers are is just as crucial. In romance, as well as in your career, pick your battles carefully and know what behavior is non-negotiable. This means you also need to be able to walk away if and when those deal breakers come up.

Timing Is Everything


vanessa-marano-gilmore girls april nardini

Over the years, Lorelai struggles to keep her love life afloat. Her relationship with Chris suffers from chronic bad timing, as does the much-anticipated relationship with Luke. We watch as Luke pines for years. When he finally has his heart’s desire, his long-lost daughter appears throwing an otherwise intensely committed Luke for a loop. Timing is essential.

When you find that special someone it’s hard to resist going “all in” but keep the bigger picture in mind. Are you in an emotionally stable or healthy place? Are they? Weighing the answers before proceeding will save you from heartache. You might be better off waiting for the right time.

In Life, as in TV Scripts, Money Makes Everything Easier


richard gilmore gilmore girls

Wealth and its advantages are a definite theme in Gilmore Girls. However, the few times when Lorelai and Rory are up against real money constraints like paying for Chilton and Yale or saving the house from termites, grandparents Richard and Emily are there to save the day. Even though Lorelai is loath to ask for their help, they are a secure safety net.

In real life, most of us do not have extremely wealthy parents or grandparents to rely on. But that doesn’t mean we can’t take that concept and apply it. By putting money aside from each paycheck, you can be your own safety net. Savings can give you the freedom to explore a new career, move to a different city, and take risks. Savings can mean independence. I am a kayak, hear me roar!

Kindness Goes a Long Way


paris and rory hug gilmore girls

This is the big one. On multiple occasions, Lorelai and Rory navigate difficult workplace moments. The linen delivery is late, Paris needs to be ousted as editor of the Yale Daily News, Tom the contractor hasn’t been paid, the newspaper is not ready to go to press, etc. These are crises that could easily result in a freak-out, but the Gilmore Girls keep their cool and firmly but gently handle each situation with aplomb.

Instead of laying blame or yelling, they are calm, kind and nice. This is the type of attitude that builds goodwill from co-workers, employees, and fellow students. When your default reaction is kindness, you create an atmosphere where people want to help and support you. So the next time something goes horribly wrong, channel your inner Gilmore Girl and respond with kindness.

While classics like “Oy with the poodles already” and “Copper boom” have endlessly entertained, the deeper themes and lessons of Gilmore Girls are what keep me coming back. So next time you find yourself dealing with life’s challenges look no further than Stars Hollow and its favorite daughters to truly be In Omnia Paratus.

These ‘Gilmore Girls’ Quotes Are Just Too Clever

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5 Life Lessons I Learned From Doctor Who

Doctor Who, the show about the time-travelling alien with two hearts and a big, blue box captured my heart back in 1995. Since then, I’ve followed each adventure, remembered every face, and came to embrace each regeneration. Along the way, I’ve learned a lot about people and life. Here are just five of the many lessons I learned from the Doctor.

People Matter


DoctorWhoPeopleMatter

Doctor Who is all about people. Companions, friends, even enemies, they are all people with their own goals, feelings and emotions. The relationships between characters are at the centre of everything, just like in the real world.

Not everyone is the same. People can be good, bad, friends or enemies but, despite this, these relationships are important. They shape you, and they matter. Take, for instance, the relationship between the Doctor and the Master. It is one of the most complex relationships on the show. The two childhood friends are now enemies, but there is always a sense of respect between them. Friendships may end, but the memories of your past adventures together never disappear.

Never Give Up



There is one idea that remains constant in Doctor Who, no matter the subject, theme or location. That idea is hope, the light at the end of the tunnel. Even when faced with insurmountable odds, there’s always a glimmer of hope and happiness.

The Time War, an impossible situation without any correct answer, is the best examples of this. With no clear path to take and danger looming on all sides, the Doctor never loses hope that things will work out. This has translated into my own life a thousand times over. When faced with a problem, I don’t give up or give in and hope for the best. I carry on. I might not succeed in the end, but at least I tried, right? Never give up, and you will succeed or — at the very least — be proud that you tried.

Everything Ends



Life goes on, and things happen. People enter our lives and then leave, a major theme of Doctor Who that resembles real life pretty darn well. Just look at the Doctor’s companions. They join the Doctor for many adventures but, eventually, their time on the TARDIS comes to an end.

In the real world, we make friends and then that friendship ends. You have a great job, and then it becomes redundant. One minute a family member is there in front of you, the next, they’re not. Be prepared for things to happen in life that you might not always enjoy or agree with. Yes, it can be hard — possibly one of the hardest things you will ever face in your life. But you won’t enjoy the time you have now unless you come to terms with it. In the end, yes, we miss people but time does heal wounds.

Will You Help Me?



“Will you help me?” is the phrase at the heart of each episode of Doctor Who. Sure, the show is also about epic adventures and fearsome battles, but they all begin with those four words. Every single episode has a character in need of help; sometimes it’s even the Doctor him (her?) self.

Remember “Night Terrors“? That episode brought the Doctor to Earth by the sheer power of a little boy’s cry for help. Now, I wouldn’t say I never helped people before I watched the show, but it opened my eyes to just how much I could help people. Even small acts, like giving directions or donating to charities, can have a huge impact on others’ lives.

Embrace Change



“Change my dear, and not a moment too soon.” – 6th Doctor

Change is the gear that’s kept the show going for over 50 years. When it comes to Doctor Who, change is everywhere — in themes, faces, companions, and behind-the-scenes. Regeneration is the most obvious example of this. The show manages to keep the title character the same while completely changing them. It isn’t just about switching actors; each Doctor is different from the last.

Doctor Who embraces change, a natural part of our daily lives. Our jobs, homes, friends, memories and emotions can all change in a moment. Sudden or unexpected changes can be difficult to embrace. In my experience, meeting change head on and playing the hand I was dealt has been much easier after watching Doctor Who. Change can actually be a good thing.

The univer-, sorry, the Whoniverse is full of lessons you can take away and explore. From coping with the real world to understanding the next chapters of your life, it’s a fantastic show with messages that fans of all ages can understand.

Those were my five life lessons, what are yours?

The post 5 Life Lessons I Learned From Doctor Who appeared first on Fandom powered by Wikia.

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A college student talked to us about living with diabetes, and here’s what we learned

A college student talked to us about living with diabetes, and here’s what we learned


A college student talked to us about living with diabetes, and here’s what we learned

November is National Diabetes Awareness Month.

Sarah Portewig is a fireball from the moment you meet her. She is full of life, a dazzling smile always spread across her face. Sarah is a sophomore at Rutgers University-New Brunswick, where she studies Environmental Policy. An incredibly involved student, she dances with Rutgers Performing Dance Company, volunteers with Rutgers No More — a student advocacy organization, and works on campus.

Sarah was also diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at the age of 12. For National Diabetes Awareness Month, I spoke to Sarah about how she cares for her health in a college environment and what she wishes people understood about the disease.

Hello Giggles (HG): What is the culture around diabetes in a college environment?

Sarah Portewig (SP): In college a lot of people don’t necessarily care or take notice to diabetes unless they themselves have it, or if they have a loved one [who has] it. I think it is something that can easily get swept up in the busy daily schedule of college students. I mean, as a diabetic, sometimes I [even] forget about it!

HG: What are some things that people say or think about diabetes that make you uncomfortable?

SP: A lot of people think that I can’t eat or drink anything with sugar — which gets annoying because I totally can. In fact, I have a huge sweet tooth. People also expect me to be overweight, and are often confused that I have diabetes because I am a small person. That gets annoying because anyone with any body type can have diabetes. It gets uncomfortable having [a disease with] such a weird stigma.

HG: Often, people go into college with the misconception that if you have diabetes, it’s your fault. How do you address attitudes like this?

SP: I try to call people in instead of [calling out or] getting annoyed or upset with them…I know it is more about not having a proper education on this disease. I try to explain the difference between type 1 and type 2 diabetes, and [explain] how as a type 1 diabetic, my pancreas never functioned properly.  

HG: November is National Diabetes Awareness Month. What do you wish young people — like college students — knew about diabetes?

SP: I wish people knew more about how I have to manage the disease and how annoying it is. That there are constant pricks to test my blood sugar, and that with an insulin pump I constantly have a port in my stomach with a plastic needle. This stuff is really annoying and can hurt. It takes a lot out of a person physically and mentally. It is a lot more than just counting carbs; it is something I have to constantly think about.

HG: Do you think we talk about diabetes enough?

SP: We definitely do not talk about it enough. A lot of my friends have no idea about the disease and what it entails until I talk to them about it. It would be great if more people had a more general understanding of the disease.

HG: What can we as allies — as friends, romantic partners, and fellow college students — do to be better allies to diabetic people?

SP: Support is a huge thing for all allies. I know personally that I love when my friends are interested in my disease and about learning more… I love when my family asks how I am doing, and I rely a lot on my romantic partners for reminders and moral support when changing my insulin pump sites. Support is key with this disease because managing it is a full time job.

HG: Any closing thoughts?

SP: I think, as a diabetic, sometimes it is hard to forget how fortunate I am. Diabetes is so annoying, but I am so thankful with the cards that I have been dealt. There have been so many advances in devices and supplies that help make it easier and easier to manage. I am also thankful for all of my friends and family that are constantly there to remind me, love me, and support me!

Remember to approach any disease with love and a willingness to learn more about it.

You can donate to the American Diabetes Association here.

HelloGiggles

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What we learned (and didn’t) in Week 11: Players about to get paid

Remember that one-year deal Alshon Jeffery took last offseason? Expect him to do much better in free agency in 2018. He’s not alone. This week’s lessons run through guys in position to land big new contracts.
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Johnson & Johnson CEO reveals the leadership lessons he learned at West Point

Alex Gorsky, a U.S. Army veteran, spoke to West Point cadets about his top lessons in leadership.
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Thanks to my son’s 1st birthday party I learned my engagement ring was fake

by

Becky Vieira

posted in Life

I never intended to throw my son an outlandish 1st birthday party. And I didn’t.

At least I don’t think it got to the point of extravagant. But my budget did fall by the wayside somewhere between the make-your-own-gift-bag station and the caterer.

I’m not sorry. It was more than a first birthday party. We moved during my pregnancy and our baby shower had to be cancelled. I had extreme postpartum depression after my son’s birth and we lost a lot of his first year. This may have been just a birthday party in the technical sense, but the reality was so much more.

We never veered into territory we couldn’t afford, but let’s be honest…who enjoys spending money if they don’t have to? As our guest list and budget continued to grow, I had an idea to help offset the costs.

“I’m going to sell my engagement ring,” I told my husband.

woman wears engagement ring

I wasn’t talking about the ring he gave me, the one I proudly wear on my left hand and never take off. I meant the engagement ring from my ex-husband. A ring I forgot I even had until my mom stumbled across it the week prior when she was cleaning out a closet.

My first marriage wasn’t good for either of us. I don’t have much left from that period of my life; I donated my wedding dress years ago. The ring remained because I never knew what to do with it, then I honestly forgot about it. I’d stashed it at my parents’ house and moved on.

My ex-husband never wanted it back and there wasn’t much use for it. Selling it, taking this last piece of my old life to move forward with my new existence, felt cathartic. And symbolic.

The manner in which my ex-husband once spoke about the ring led me to believe we’d be able to sell it. We didn’t think we’d get rich from it, or even pay for the party in its entirety. But thought it may help. We decided to donate the bulk and keep a little to cover the excess of our party budget.

Since it was already at my parents’ house my mom offered to take the ring to an appraiser. It seemed easy enough, and off I went to investigate mobile petting zoos.

A few days later she called me, frazzled and making no sense. I had completely forgotten about the ring, and suffer from extreme anxiety. I, of course, just assumed someone died. After she calmed me down I realized her hysterics were due to shock, not sadness.

“Are you sitting down for this? You better sit down,” she counseled me. “The ring is fake.”

I was speechless. My mind flashed back to the day my ex-husband got down on one knee in front of me, presenting me a ring that had a fairly sizable diamond. I’m not talking Liz Taylor-big, but much bigger than I ever wanted or expected.

Or the day his mom suddenly pulled a jeweler’s magnifying glass out of her kitchen cabinet (why she had that I’ll never know, and I learned it’s called an “eye loupe” — in case you were wondering) and peered at my ring. “It’s a very good stone, just one small flaw,” she said with an authority she didn’t really have. Okay, great, I thought. It didn’t matter to me, I was just happy to be engaged to the man I loved.

How I discovered I was given a fake engagement ring

Back in present time I was stunned. I wasn’t angry. I wasn’t upset with him for buying a fake diamond, I wanted to know why he didn’t tell me. The truth is that I’d have been happy with a cigar band.

I knew it wasn’t a financial reason. Did that then mean he’d never loved me? Was he planning to tell me one day? Maybe he wanted to wait and see if the marriage lasted a few years, then swap it out one night while I was sleeping.

My worst fear was that he never had any faith in me or the marriage from the start. The questions and assumptions raced through my mind.

It wasn’t the ring, it wasn’t the stone. It was the deceit. The big charade. He asked me to be his partner in everything, for the rest of our lives, while starting that life off with deception. What did that say about the rest of our marriage?

I suppose that’s another reason why it ended.

I resumed party planning. We paid for it all ourselves and still made that donation. I did have a few days where I felt like I’d been the butt of some big joke, one everyone was in on but me. And then I looked at my son.

I knew that I was where I was supposed to me, with the man I was meant to end up with. A man who has also promised me to be forthcoming if he ever gifts me with fake diamonds in the future.

For more of my mom shenanigans follow me on Instagram at Witty Otter.

Would you be surprised to learn your engagement ring was fake? Would you be angry or just sad?

BabyCenter Blog

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What We Learned on the Set of Thor: Ragnarok: From Jack Kirby to Planet Hulk

What We Learned on the Set of Thor: Ragnarok: From Jack Kirby to Planet Hulk

It was just about one year ago exactly that Fandango jetted out to Brisbane, Australia to tour the magnificent sets of Thor: Ragnarok, the third and possibly wildest standalone movie for the God of Thunder yet. You can read our guide to all the characters old and new here, but below is where we’ll answer some of the most pressing questions about the movie, its plot and production.

We last saw Thor (Chris Hemsworth) soaring off into the cosmos to investigate certain disturbances in the…

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Whitney Houston Doc ‘Can I Be Me’: 8 Things We Learned

Director Nick Broomfield wanted to change the conversation around Whitney Houston with his new documentary, Whitney: Can I Be Me. "We're always looking for a reason to not give people a second chance, and I think she was so harshly judged for her drug addiction," he 

This article originally appeared on www.rollingstone.com: Whitney Houston Doc ‘Can I Be Me’: 8 Things We Learned

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The trick I learned in Silent Book Club to feel like myself again

by

Maggie Downs

posted in Life

In the first couple years of motherhood, I thought I lost myself.

It wasn’t that I didn’t love being a mom. I did. I loved the yogurty smell of my son as an infant and his tiny sweet breaths as he dozed on my shoulder. I loved how each day was like slowly tugging open a curtain, revealing a little more of my son’s personality. I even loved how his colicky screaming fits made his laughter even more extraordinary.

What I didn’t love was how motherhood made me feel less like me.

I used to travel, budget-style, with a backpack and a lots of long, open roads. I ate meals when they were still hot. I had hobbies that went well beyond washing cloth diapers and going to Target. And maybe most important of all, I used to read.

I read the New York Times in print on Sunday mornings, and I had stacks of library books next to my bed. Even my e-reader overfloweth.

Woman reading

And then after I gave birth, I just didn’t. I bought books, and they just sat there looking at me like, “Who are you kidding?” I still listened to audiobooks, and those were usually pretty great, but I often missed chunks of the story (see: colicky infant, above) and I genuinely missed holding something in print.

So take that feeling of being a hollowed-out shell, combine it with the immobilizing loneliness of new motherhood when it felt like all of my old friends disappeared, and you have the worst recipe ever. It’s no wonder I was sad all the time.

It’s better now that my son is older. He has a decent attention span and will play with a train set for about 7 minutes before trying to set the house on fire, and I can squeeze in a whole paperback page before everything goes to hell. (But I usually don’t do that, because what if something tragic happens? All the horrible Facebook comments on the news story will be like, “Some mom. That’s what you get for READING.”)

And now that he’s older, I’m not so tired at night anymore that I fall asleep in the shower and wake up cold and shivering and 100 percent responsible for California’s drought. I’m usually able to read a chapter before I hand over my one-way ticket to Snoretown. So that has helped.

A woman is completely immersed in a book at a bookstore

 

But the biggest change occurred after I discovered Silent Book Club, which I wrote about recently for Lit Hub. You can read about my experience here. In short, it’s a group that gathers monthly to read individually. Unlike a traditional book club, where everyone reads the some book selection and has a conversation about it, there are no reading requirements for Silent Book Club and no obligation to participate in a conversation. You just bring a book to a public space and read alongside other people.

I interviewed Guinevere de la Mare, author of the forthcoming book I’d Rather Be Reading: A Library of Art for Book Lovers and the founder of Silent Book Club, who said the idea for the club came about when her son was 2 and she desperately needed reading time and a social outlet.

“With an infant or a toddler, to be able to sit in your house and read a book, it’s a luxury and a privilege you just don’t get,” she said. “I needed to grant myself time on the calendar to give myself permission to do nothing but read.”

Solidarity, sister!

What really made Silent Book Club work for me was the fact that I made a date with myself and reclaimed that time. Turns out that when I put something in the calendar it comes true. I’m not sure if it’s some kind of wizardry, or maybe just a self-fulfilling prophesy, but it works. And I wish someone had told me that YEARS ago.

I’ve since used the trick to find room in my schedule for other meaningful things – an exercise class, a quick coffee with a friend – to get me out of the house and with some semblance of agency. Doing so makes me a better mom and a better human.

Best of all, even if I lose myself again, I know exactly where to find me.

How did you feel like yourself again, post-baby?

The post The trick I learned in Silent Book Club to feel like myself again appeared first on BabyCenter Blog.

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4 Things We Learned From the New Documentary About Whitney Houston

As one of the most successful pop artists of all time, Whitney Houston was — and continues to be — one of the world’s most beloved voices. But her musical legacy has also been clouded by her personal struggles and tragic death at the age of 48 in 2012, chapters of her story that are explored in the new documentary Whitney: Can I Be Me.

Helmed by Rudi Dolezal and BAFTA winner Nick Broomfield — who delved into the untimely death of another iconic musician, Kurt Cobain, in the 1998 film Kurt & Courtney — the documentary is an in-depth look at the private life of a cultural icon. It crafts a heartbreaking narrative through found footage, including never-before-seen interviews, performances and clips that address everything from her intimate relationship with best friend Robyn Crawford to her tumultuous marriage to Bobby Brown.

As it opens in theaters on Aug. 18, and ahead of its Showtime debut on Aug. 25, here are the aspects of Houston’s story onto which Can I Be Me shines a light.

Houston’s commercial success came at a personal price.

The documentary’s title speaks to the struggle Houston fought her whole life between her public persona and her true self. She was groomed from an early age to be marketable to white mainstream consumers, an endeavor spearheaded by her mother Cissy Houston and the producer Clive Davis, who discovered Houston as a teenager and helped catapult her to meteoric pop stardom. But the musical choices and respectability politics that catapulted her to mainstream success also backfired by making her less palatable to black audiences. In the late 1980s, for exmple, she was booed during the Soul Train Awards, with some audience members calling her “Whitey” instead of Whitney.

The film also focuses on how Houston’s success supported the livelihoods of many of her friends and family, with the singer choosing to work even to the detriment to her own health and well-being, especially as she became heavily addicted to drugs and alcohol. Her longtime bodyguard David Roberts, who was somewhat of an inspiration for her film The Bodyguard, insinuates in the film that the personal interests of the friends and family that she employed sometimes took precedent over her own welfare and sobriety.

She had an incredibly intimate relationship with her friend Robyn Crawford — of which some of her inner circle disapproved.

Whitney’s childhood friend Robyn Crawford was one of the star’s closest confidantes. The film addresses longtime speculation about a romantic relationship between Crawford and Houston, with the latter’s stylist Ellin Lavar noting that she thought that the singer might have been bisexual. “Robyn provided a safe place for her. Robyn loved her,” Lavar says in the film. “In that, Whitney found safety and solace.” The two remained close friends until Houston started a relationship with her eventual husband Bobby Brown. Brown and Crawford did not like each other and often fought, sometimes leading to blows.

According to the singer’s former security guard Kevin Ammons, Brown was jealous of the intimate relationship Crawford and Houston shared. “[Robyn and Whitney] had a bond and Bobby Brown could never remove Robyn,” he says. “He wanted to be the man in the relationship.” While Crawford eventually parted ways with Houston after heightened tensions with Brown, Brown himself admitted that Houston had no close friends after Crawford left and that she “would probably still be alive” if Crawford had still been in her life. Brown wasn’t the only one who didn’t like Crawford; Houston’s mother Cissy disliked her as well and often advocated for her to be fired. Cissy told Oprah, in a 2013 interview, that she would have disapproved of her daughter being in a lesbian relationship.

Brown and Houston had an intense (and at times toxic) relationship.

In one of the most poignant scenes in the documentary, Brown and Houston are seen playacting scenes from What’s Love Got to Do With It in their hotel room. Although the pair are having fun impersonating Ike and Tina Turner, it’s an eerie parallel to the tumultuous nature of their own relationship. Houston’s fame and success made Brown jealous. The film paints him as emotionally abusive, trying to reduce her self-worth in order to make himself feel better.

The documentary also reveals that while Houston relied on drugs before she met Brown, Brown turned to alcohol. Once the pair got together, they began using both substances together. The film also emphasizes how much Houston tried to make their relationship work, despite their emotional duress and Brown’s womanizing, suggesting that her religious upbringing was a driving force in her wanting to make the marriage work.

Houston’s bodyguard was fired when he tried to intervene with her drug addiction.

Roberts reveals in the documentary that after the singer’s 1999 My Love Is Your Love tour, during which he witnessed the star overdose, he filed an extensive report on Houston’s drug abuse to her management — largely her family and friends— and was fired immediately. “There’s no doubt in my mind, had that report been taken seriously, Whitney and Bobbi Kristina would still be here,” he says in the movie. Roberts contends that Houston’s daughter Bobbi Kristina’s untimely death at the age of 22 in 2016 was a direct result of this approach to Houston’s drug abuse. “She never had a chance,” he says. “She came along when things were only getting worse.”


Entertainment – TIME

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10 Things We Learned From Amanda Seales On The Breakfast Club

Amada’s Seales’ road to success has been as interesting as it’s been long. The former MTV2 VJ has gone from being “famous and broke” to being finally being simply famous.

Today (Aug. 9), the actress stopped by The Breakfast Club and had a grand old time spilling all kinds of tea relating to her old beef with Marsha Ambrosius, getting fired from a few jobs thanks to Jay-Z, and why she dropped “Diva” from her name.

Here are the 10 things we learned from Amanda Seales on The Breakfast Club.

Photo: Power 105

The post 10 Things We Learned From Amanda Seales On The Breakfast Club appeared first on Hip-Hop Wired.

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Twitter chat: 3 years after Ferguson, what have we learned about race and police shootings?

Alton Sterling. Eric Garner. Philando Castile. Tamir Rice. Freddie Gray. Michael Brown.

The police shooting deaths of these six African-American men have sparked intense debate across the country about police use of force and racial bias in fatal police shootings.

According to an analysis by The Washington Post, 963 people were fatally shot by police in 2016. So far this year, 606 people have been shot and killed by police.

About 40 percent of the unarmed people fatally shot by police were black, according to the Post’s analysis. Another look at the data earlier this year by Mother Jones found that black men between the ages of 18 and 44 were three times as likely as white men the same age to be killed by the police.

Today, three years since Brown was shot in Ferguson, Missouri, what have we learned about race and police shootings? What’s changed — and what hasn’t?

At 1 p.m. ET Wednesday, the PBS NewsHour (@newshour) will host a Twitter chat with Paul Butler (@LawProfButler), a former federal prosecutor and leading criminal law scholar of race and the policing of black men, and Steve Rich (@dataeditor), the data editor at the Washington Post, who has helped compile the newspaper’s database on police shootings. We’ll discuss the latest data and answer your questions about police shootings.

Have questions? Tweet them using #NewsHourChats

The post Twitter chat: 3 years after Ferguson, what have we learned about race and police shootings? appeared first on PBS NewsHour.


PBS NewsHour

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What I Learned about Business from the CEO of the World’s Largest Black-Owned Company

My dad, Reginald F. Lewis, was an impressive man. He taught me how to ride a bike, and despite his more-than-full-time job, made it a habit to be back to our New York City home in time to have dinner with my mom, my sister, and me.

He was also an iconic figure in the history of black business and one of the greatest entrepreneurs of all time. When he died in 1993, my dad was the owner and CEO of TLC Beatrice International, the largest black-owned business in the U.S. and, according to Fortune, one of the 400 wealthiest people in America.

(Reginald Lewis. Image: The Reginald F. Lewis Foundation)

 

Born in 1942 in segregated Baltimore to a 17-year-old mother who never graduated from high school, he went on to earn a football scholarship (and, later, an academic scholarship) to Virginia State University and attend Harvard Law School. After graduation, he spent years working as a corporate lawyer on Wall Street before engineering the $ 1 billion leveraged-buyout of Beatrice International Food Co. and securing his spot as one of the most successful businessmen of the 1980s and early 1990s.

Shortly before my father died, he wrote a letter expressing his intention to devote the rest of his life to pursuing social justice. He also appointed me to the board of our family foundation, which has a history of funding education grants aimed at black and Hispanic students. I channeled his legacy to start All Star Code, a New York-based nonprofit that seeks to give the next generation of diverse leaders the tools they need to succeed in the technology industry.

(Christina Lewis Halpern. Image: All Star Code)

 

As an entrepreneur, I constantly look to my father’s work and spirit for inspiration. While it wasn’t easy to narrow down what he taught me to this list, I believe the five lessons below are among the greatest gifts he gave me.

 

Entrepreneurship can take many forms

 

People think “entrepreneur,” and they imagine someone who started a business from the ground up. But really, an entrepreneur is someone who organizes and operates a business, taking on greater-than-normal financial risks in order to do so. My father recognized that too many minority-founded businesses failed to reach a sustainable level and focused his energy on acquiring the necessary intellectual, social, and financial capital to purchase an existing business. This made him a successful entrepreneur. Sure, I started my company from scratch, but just like my father, I’ve forged a winding path to entrepreneurship.

Be careful where you invest

 

Just like my dad knew he didn’t need to start a business to be an entrepreneur, he knew that there was no point wasting money to fix something that wasn’t broken. That’s bred one of my mantras for All Star Code: Don’t reinvent the wheel. Whenever we are considering adding a new service or process, we ask, “Is there anyone who is already doing this better than we could?” If so, we consider asking that person or company to do it. Only when we feel we are best equipped to fill a market gap or need do we dive in.

Reach out to people of all races and statures

 

In the 1960s, there were very few black students at top law schools, including Harvard. But do you think my father let being the minority stop him? No way. He actively participated in class. He made a point to reach out to and make friends with people of all races and ethnicities. He wasn’t afraid to join the school’s existing clubs, even if none of their members looked like he did. It wasn’t always easy for him to put himself out there. It took confidence, hard work, and a hustler mentality. The payoff was learning how to build strong relationships and how to go after—and get—what he truly wanted, two skills that proved critical to helping my dad make it to the top.

Now, I’m doing the same at All Star Code, where our full-time staff is majority black and Latino and 75% people of color overall. In my personal life, I also very consciously live in a lot of worlds. I speak French, Spanish, and English, so I can easily communicate with a wide swath of people. My husband is Jewish. My extended family lives in the Philippines and in Baltimore. I thrive off of spending time with people from all walks of life.

Don’t let discrimination hurt your pride

 

Between growing up in segregated Baltimore, playing in segregated Little League, and being a waiter and valet at an all-white country club, my dad knew what it was like to be discriminated against. Even so, his mindset was always, Race is an issue, but you can’t let it bother you. Because my dad often found himself in the minority, he did not always receive the respect he knew he deserved. Instead of being thought of as a great entrepreneur, businessman, and philanthropist, he was considered a great black entrepreneur, black businessman, and black philanthropist. As much as he disliked being defined by his race, he was always proud to be African American. He raised me to be the same.

While I’ve never experienced anything like the racism my father did, I do experience racism. Growing up, for example, people often assumed that I was a financial aid student for no reason other than the color of my skin. As an adult, I appear on many panels and do a lot of public speaking. Often, I’m the only woman or black person participating, and some people think that I am only there due to affirmative action. In these situations, I remind myself that I can compete and carry, and I assert myself as someone who belongs. I also employ some dark arts to reassert a positive narrative and subtly sell myself. Name-dropping may be awkward, but when I say, “AT&T gave us a quarter of a million dollars last year, and Facebook, Cisco, MLB Advanced Media, Goldman Sachs, and J.P. Morgan gave us $ 350,000 in funding,” it helps forestall stereotypes.

Pushing through the uncomfortable moments is what separates the best from the rest

 

Just like my dad rose to the occasion in uncomfortable situations, I too strive to persist in moments of discomfort. When I was writing my memoir, Lonely At the Top, there were many nights when I’d go home and tell my husband, who is a magazine writer, that I couldn’t do it. Putting my personal and professional life out there was extremely uncomfortable. But when the going got tough, I channeled my dad. He overcame so much, and he still had so much that he wanted to do when he passed away. At the end of the day, I’m my father’s daughter, and I want to make him proud. Because of him, I’ll never stop pushing forward.

 

Christina Lewis Halpern is the founder and executive director of All Star Code, a unique, fast-growing non-profit education organization that attracts, prepares and places more young men of color in the technology sector.

Small Business – Black Enterprise

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What I Learned about Business from the CEO of the World’s Largest Black-Owned Company

My dad, Reginald F. Lewis, was an impressive man. He taught me how to ride a bike, and despite his more-than-full-time job, made it a habit to be back to our New York City home in time to have dinner with my mom, my sister, and me.

He was also an iconic figure in the history of black business and one of the greatest entrepreneurs of all time. When he died in 1993, my dad was the owner and CEO of TLC Beatrice International, the largest black-owned business in the U.S. and, according to Fortune, one of the 400 wealthiest people in America.

(Reginald Lewis. Image: The Reginald F. Lewis Foundation)

 

Born in 1942 in segregated Baltimore to a 17-year-old mother who never graduated from high school, he went on to earn a football scholarship (and, later, an academic scholarship) to Virginia State University and attend Harvard Law School. After graduation, he spent years working as a corporate lawyer on Wall Street before engineering the $ 1 billion leveraged-buyout of Beatrice International Food Co. and securing his spot as one of the most successful businessmen of the 1980s and early 1990s.

Shortly before my father died, he wrote a letter expressing his intention to devote the rest of his life to pursuing social justice. He also appointed me to the board of our family foundation, which has a history of funding education grants aimed at black and Hispanic students. I channeled his legacy to start All Star Code, a New York-based nonprofit that seeks to give the next generation of diverse leaders the tools they need to succeed in the technology industry.

(Christina Lewis Halpern. Image: All Star Code)

 

As an entrepreneur, I constantly look to my father’s work and spirit for inspiration. While it wasn’t easy to narrow down what he taught me to this list, I believe the five lessons below are among the greatest gifts he gave me.

 

Entrepreneurship can take many forms

 

People think “entrepreneur,” and they imagine someone who started a business from the ground up. But really, an entrepreneur is someone who organizes and operates a business, taking on greater-than-normal financial risks in order to do so. My father recognized that too many minority-founded businesses failed to reach a sustainable level and focused his energy on acquiring the necessary intellectual, social, and financial capital to purchase an existing business. This made him a successful entrepreneur. Sure, I started my company from scratch, but just like my father, I’ve forged a winding path to entrepreneurship.

Be careful where you invest

 

Just like my dad knew he didn’t need to start a business to be an entrepreneur, he knew that there was no point wasting money to fix something that wasn’t broken. That’s bred one of my mantras for All Star Code: Don’t reinvent the wheel. Whenever we are considering adding a new service or process, we ask, “Is there anyone who is already doing this better than we could?” If so, we consider asking that person or company to do it. Only when we feel we are best equipped to fill a market gap or need do we dive in.

Reach out to people of all races and statures

 

In the 1960s, there were very few black students at top law schools, including Harvard. But do you think my father let being the minority stop him? No way. He actively participated in class. He made a point to reach out to and make friends with people of all races and ethnicities. He wasn’t afraid to join the school’s existing clubs, even if none of their members looked like he did. It wasn’t always easy for him to put himself out there. It took confidence, hard work, and a hustler mentality. The payoff was learning how to build strong relationships and how to go after—and get—what he truly wanted, two skills that proved critical to helping my dad make it to the top.

Now, I’m doing the same at All Star Code, where our full-time staff is majority black and Latino and 75% people of color overall. In my personal life, I also very consciously live in a lot of worlds. I speak French, Spanish, and English, so I can easily communicate with a wide swath of people. My husband is Jewish. My extended family lives in the Philippines and in Baltimore. I thrive off of spending time with people from all walks of life.

Don’t let discrimination hurt your pride

 

Between growing up in segregated Baltimore, playing in segregated Little League, and being a waiter and valet at an all-white country club, my dad knew what it was like to be discriminated against. Even so, his mindset was always, Race is an issue, but you can’t let it bother you. Because my dad often found himself in the minority, he did not always receive the respect he knew he deserved. Instead of being thought of as a great entrepreneur, businessman, and philanthropist, he was considered a great black entrepreneur, black businessman, and black philanthropist. As much as he disliked being defined by his race, he was always proud to be African American. He raised me to be the same.

While I’ve never experienced anything like the racism my father did, I do experience racism. Growing up, for example, people often assumed that I was a financial aid student for no reason other than the color of my skin. As an adult, I appear on many panels and do a lot of public speaking. Often, I’m the only woman or black person participating, and some people think that I am only there due to affirmative action. In these situations, I remind myself that I can compete and carry, and I assert myself as someone who belongs. I also employ some dark arts to reassert a positive narrative and subtly sell myself. Name-dropping may be awkward, but when I say, “AT&T gave us a quarter of a million dollars last year, and Facebook, Cisco, MLB Advanced Media, Goldman Sachs, and J.P. Morgan gave us $ 350,000 in funding,” it helps forestall stereotypes.

Pushing through the uncomfortable moments is what separates the best from the rest

 

Just like my dad rose to the occasion in uncomfortable situations, I too strive to persist in moments of discomfort. When I was writing my memoir, Lonely At the Top, there were many nights when I’d go home and tell my husband, who is a magazine writer, that I couldn’t do it. Putting my personal and professional life out there was extremely uncomfortable. But when the going got tough, I channeled my dad. He overcame so much, and he still had so much that he wanted to do when he passed away. At the end of the day, I’m my father’s daughter, and I want to make him proud. Because of him, I’ll never stop pushing forward.

 

Christina Lewis Halpern is the founder and executive director of All Star Code, a unique, fast-growing non-profit education organization that attracts, prepares and places more young men of color in the technology sector.

Small Business – Black Enterprise

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7 Things We Learned From Joseline Hernandez On The Breakfast Club

Ever since making her debut on Love & Hip Hop: Atlanta six years ago, Joseline Hernandez has become a rising star in the reality TV world due to her brazenness and over the top sexuality.

Unfortunately for her fans, she recently quit the hit VH1 series and today checked into The Breakfast Club to explain why she came to said decision.

Speaking with the morning trio, the Puerto Rican Princess talks about why she left the show, the rumors that have dogged her personal life, and why she doesn’t regret calling her baby daddy’s daughter out her name.

Here are the 7 things we learned from Joseline Hernandez on The Breakfast Club.

Photo: Power 105

The post 7 Things We Learned From Joseline Hernandez On The Breakfast Club appeared first on Hip-Hop Wired.

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Scotty McCreery Cited for Accidentally Carrying Loaded Gun Through Airport: ‘I Have Learned a Lesson I Won’t Forget’

Scotty McCreery has been cited for trying to carry a loaded gun through a security checkpoint at Raleigh-Durham International Airport in North Carolina, PEOPLE confirms.

The incident occurred on July 13 when the country singer, 23, arrived at the airport after a day at the firing range and forgot to remove the loaded weapon – a black, 9 mm Smith & Wesson handgun – from his backpack, The News & Observer reports. The X-ray screen also caught McCreery’s two boxes of ammo that contained 63 bullets.

While the season 10 American Idol winner does have a permit to carry a concealed handgun, he was cited for a misdemeanor violation for trying to carry the firearm through an airport checkpoint and board a plane with it, according to authorities.

“I have been a concealed carry permit holder for awhile now after being robbed at gunpoint in 2014, and I take gun safety very seriously. While in-between tour dates last week, I went to go target shooting with a friend a few days before an early flight out of my hometown Raleigh-Durham airport,” McCreery tells PEOPLE in a statement.

“Unfortunately, I did not realize that I left my pistol in my backpack until the TSA found it during the security X-ray screening and rightly confiscated it. I had my concealed carry permit on me so once they had checked everything out, they then released me to catch the next available flight. Great to know our airport security force is on the job. I have learned a lesson that I won’t forget.”

Nearly one year ago, McCreery witnessed the sentencing of Mikkail Jamal Shaw to 17 years in prison for the 2014 home invasion. McCreery and three of his friends were robbed at gunpoint with a pistol and assault rifle inside of a Raleigh home.

Still, McCreery does not let the frightening experience keep him from putting himself in the public eye to do what he loves.

Last month, the country crooner released the music video for his single “Five More Minutes,” which features the singer’s family home movies from over the years. The video is dedicated to both of McCreery’s grandfathers, and directed and produced by Jeff Ray.

“The whole song is talking about time, and time gone by, and time you still wish you had, and those home videos are precious moments,” McCreery told PEOPLE at the time. “Everybody’s got those kind of videos that makes you look back on your life.”

Reporting by SARAH MICHAUD


PEOPLE.com

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It’s High Time You Learned to Play the Piano

What else are you doing this weekend?

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What John Legend And Chrissy Teigen Learned In One Year Of Parenting

It’s a big day for John Legend and Chrissy Teigen. Their daughter, Luna Simone Stephens, turns 1 today!

What a year it’s been for the couple, who have opened up about parenting experiences like sleep deprivation, postpartum depression and shaming― on and off social media.

Happy birthday, Luna Simone!

A post shared by John Legend (@johnlegend) on

In honor of Luna’s birthday, we’ve rounded up some of her famous parents’ standout quotes about raising kids. Keep scrolling for some reflective, hilarious and always real thoughts on parenting from John Legend and Chrissy Teigen. 

On birth:

“No one told me I would be coming home in diapers too.” ― Chrissy

On the pressure to “bounce back”:

“Anyone in the public eye, we have all the help we could ever need to be able to shed everything. So I think people get this jaded sensation that everybody’s losing [pregnancy weight] so quickly, but we just happen to be the ones who are out there. We have nutritionists, we have dietitians, we have trainers, we have our own schedules, we have nannies. We have people who make it possible for us to get back into shape. But nobody should feel like that’s normal, or like that’s realistic.” ― Chrissy

A post shared by John Legend (@johnlegend) on

On being a new parent:

“It just takes over your life when you have a child … I spent a lot of time at home with her for the first three months and with my wife, you know, it just humbles you. I think everyone struggles with being a new parent, everyone’s trying to figure it out and I think it’s a humbling process.” ― John

On shaming:

“Funny there’s no dad-shaming. When both of us go out to dinner, shame both of us so Chrissy doesn’t have to take it all. We’ll split it.” ― John

“I know that when I post something, if she’s in a car seat, I’ve got to be ready for the million people telling me she’s in the car seat wrong, even though she’s in there correctly. At this point, I know what they’re going to say before they say it. If I’m holding her while I’m cooking, or if I’m holding her within 10 feet of a stove top, I’ve kind of just come to expect it.” ― Chrissy

“Photos are literally split-second moments in time that evolve. I despise mommy shamers. I am a proud shamer of mommy shamers.” ― Chrissy

A post shared by chrissy teigen (@chrissyteigen) on

On equal parenting:

“[There are] a lot of people that still think it’s a woman’s job to do the child rearing. I think it’s something we should share.” ― John

On breastfeeding:

“I just think it’s so funny. Sometimes I’m Googling how to do it better. I’m like, ‘Is it working? Is it taking? I don’t think I’m feeling enough pain!’ You just get so confused about how it’s supposed to feel, and as hard as anyone said it was, I feel like it somehow managed to be harder.” ― Chrissy

“They just use you for your milk and you just feel like you are just a cow all day.” ― Chrissy

“Just spray tanned around my breast pump outline. The logistical challenges of a healthy beach glow while boobing are incredible.” ― Chrissy 

have you ever seen a more "why me?" face

A photo posted by chrissy teigen (@chrissyteigen) on

On postpartum depression:

“Getting out of bed to get to set on time was painful. My lower back throbbed; my ­shoulders — even my wrists — hurt. I didn’t have an appetite. I would go two days without a bite of food, and you know how big of a deal food is for me … I couldn’t figure out why I was so unhappy. I blamed it on being tired and possibly growing out of the role: ‘Maybe I’m just not a goofy person anymore. Maybe I’m just supposed to be a mom.’” ― Chrissy

“You don’t see it coming. You’re not emotionally prepared for someone that’s going through a dark time as you’re welcoming this new life. When you don’t understand what’s happening, it’s a bit challenging to figure it out and you don’t know if it’s something you’ve done or some other ­reason why she’s not feeling well. Once you understand what the reasons are then it makes perfect sense and you can adjust accordingly.” ― John

“You should read about it and understand what it is and really just be there to help. You need to be present and you need to be compassionate. And we’re all learning and trying to figure it out as we go. At least do that and try to figure it out together.” ― John

Back on set for #lipsyncbattle season 3B!

A post shared by chrissy teigen (@chrissyteigen) on

On watching your baby grow up:

“I love seeing Luna grow and develop. I love all the new things that happen every week, every day even. And I LOVE when she smiles!” ― John

“I want to work less now, you know? I want to be home more, and be able to just help my wife with whatever she needs. Also, just be there to experience [Luna] growing up. I want to take them on tour. I want to be around.” ― John

On “doing it all”:

“My mom lives with us. I have hair and makeup people. I’m not getting up and doing all this by myself. If I’m not being done for something, I’m not going anywhere. A lot of hands go into it. We have help. It’s important for people to know that.” ― Chrissy

6 months old!

A post shared by John Legend (@johnlegend) on

On sleep:

“My biggest parenting conundrum: why it is so hard to put someone who is already sleepy to sleep?” ― Chrissy

“When Luna is awake I want her to sleep and when she is asleep I want her awake. This is my parenting life.” ― Chrissy

On date night:

“I’m not kidding, I go there not to watch a movie, I go there to sleep. I order food, lay on my side and shovel it into my mouth. I get the blanket and lay there and he watches the movie and I am passed out.” ― Chrissy

On hopes for the future:

“Just having the product of our love right in front of us, it’s a really powerful thing. I feel the responsibility that comes with that. We want to raise her into a great human being and hopefully, we can do that. It makes you kind of reprioritize what matters the most to you, and think about the kind of world you want to raise your daughter in.” ― John

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Style – The Huffington Post
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I Learned The Hard Way That You Can’t Take A Vacation From Grief

There are just some things you can’t take a vacation from: Grief is one of them.

In utter defiance of the advice proffered by friends and grief counselors, I have been determined to move myself and my two teenagers beyond the January death of my husband ― their dad. I’ve been especially eager to put emotional distance between us and the last year from Hell we spent as his caregivers. Because of my husband’s illness and mounting medical bills, we had not been on a vacation since forever. Which is how my son and I wound up in Washington, D.C., over spring break, trying to pretend we were unaffected by our recent loss.

The thing about grief is that it follows you. It goes where you go, even when you try to shake it off your tail. It causes you to be unfocused, forget things, not really be present in the moment. In our case, it led us to miss a flight, lose a credit card, blow up at strangers, have panic attacks in crowded places, forget valuables in the hotel, and the coup d’grace ― have no clue which airport parking lot we had left our car in. In other tell-tale signs that we packed our grief in our suitcase: We suffered claustrophobia in museums and had to leave, grew unmanageably impatient waiting in lines, overslept and missed events, had little energy to meet up with friends and pretty much never got our bearings. Was our vacation fun? No, not really. But in hindsight, it was funny. And yes, there was good that came of our trip: We recognized the toll that grief is taking on us despite our ― my ― best efforts to keep it at bay.

My greatest symptom of grieving has been an inability to focus. My days are not consumed with thoughts of my late husband. My days are not consumed with thoughts of anything. I just am, in a limbo-land where I can’t muster enough concentration to read a book, or apparently not even enough to read an airport sign or hear my name being called over the public address system announcing that the plane was about to take off.

We missed our outgoing flight because, as a good friend observed, I simply forgot why I was at the airport.

We had arrived to the gate on time. My son fell asleep in the chair next to me while I fooled around on my phone. I began texting with a friend in Philadelphia about the must-see sights of D.C. and I just never looked up from my screen. At one point, the line of people stepping around us became so annoying that we switched our seats so that the people ― in line to board the flight we were supposed to board too ― wouldn’t keep bumping me. And just like that, the plane left without us. We were there. On time. At the right gate. And grieving.

Nine hours later, we boarded the next available flight. We both had cramped center seats, but standby passengers can’t be choosy. Had I not been wedged in so tightly, I might have attempted a leap out on to the wing. The long delay plus the physical discomfort of a center seat put me squarely in the bull’s eye for a meltdown, and sure as Sherlock, I began to cry. Not ugly cry, but soft cry. The passengers on either side of me did an admirable job of giving me pretend privacy as I wept, although I think one of them assumed I had a fear of flying ― not in the Erica Jong sense ― because he put his hand over mine and assured me that we were just experiencing some temporary turbulence. I nodded in agreement, because what else is grief if not denial?

Arriving to a hotel with no one staffing the front desk at 1:15 a.m. did nothing to improve our moods. Nor did finding the night desk attendant rocking out with his headphones on in the storage area off the lobby 25 minutes later. We had called to say we’d be arriving late. Yet when I complained to the manager the next day, did I really have to go straight to nasty? I clung to righteous indignation and demanded financial recourse. I tossed around words like “incompetence,” “dangerous situation” and “customer service like this will be reported on Yelp.” I have never suffered fools graciously, but grief has armed me with a bazooka to shoot at mosquitos. Grief has cost me my understanding ― and in doing so, made me coarser.

Grief has also made me a space cadet. In my many years of marriage, I would ask my husband as we exited a restaurant whether he “got the credit card back?” The answer was always yes. The same wasn’t always true with his Tilley hat, but unlike credit cards, a Tilley can be replaced with minimal fuss.

For the first time in my life, I left my credit card at a restaurant on this trip. No alcohol was involved. I was well-rested. I just wasn’t present. My lack of focus cost me two Uber rides in traffic ― back and forth from the hotel to fetch the card. Yes, I consider myself lucky that the restaurant still had it. I profusely thanked the waiter, the manager and the bus boy who found the card where I had dropped it. But for reasons I don’t fully understand, I felt the need to blurt out to all three that I was recently widowed ― as if this was something they needed to know about me. I succeeded only in making them about as uncomfortable as a person can get when a stranger overshares. 

“You take care of yourself, ma’am,” the manager said to me, holding the door and ushering me out with his hand gently on my back. I think I hated his pity more than the fact that I left my card there. That’s grief for you.

Sadly, the vacation didn’t improve much from there. Lines were long as D.C. filled up with spring breakers, school trips and families who traveled great distances to see cherry blossoms. The crowds got to us. We couldn’t fully experience the solemnity of the U.S. Holocaust Museum with so many kids screaming, so we left. We stood in the rain for an hour to enter the Smithsonian Air and Space Museum, only to be overwhelmed by the crowds inside, and so we left that too. We sniped at each other when we couldn’t agree which direction to walk to get to the White House and wound up at the Capitol instead. We carried cameras but took few photos and the ones we did take show us grimacing, not smiling.

Three days later, we were at Dulles airport for our journey home when my son realized he had left his eyeglasses back at the hotel, an hour’s drive away. I arranged to have them sent overnight so he’d have them for his much-anticipated behind-the-wheel driver’s license test (he passed!) and just swallowed hard when I heard the shipping cost. I simply ran out of the energy to be mad ― and I had lost any moral high ground by factor of the credit card left behind.

But then something wonderful happened. We both burst out laughing ― the kind of laughter that is so loud and maniacal that strangers stare. We just couldn’t stop. We listed everything that had gone awry and just cracked up. 

“Like what else bad could happen?” my son asked, gulping his words in between laugh spasms. He pointed at the TV in the airport waiting room, wanting me to read the news scroll at the bottom ― all the while laughing so hard that tears were running down his cheeks.

Delta had just canceled 3,000 flights. Thousands of travelers were having a worse vacation than ours.

“Mom, we aren’t on Delta, right?” my son asked, still laughing. 

Nope, we were not. At least on the scoreboard, we had denied grief a total shut-out. Can full recovery be far behind?

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

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Mandy Moore Learned About Her This Is Us Golden Globe Nod From Milo Ventimiglia & It’s the Cutest Thing Ever

This Is Us, Mandy Moore, Milo VentimigliaAs if we weren’t obsessed enough with the on-screen pairing of Milo Ventimiglia and Mandy Moore as This Is Us’ Jack and Rebecca Pearson, along comes this little story from Moore about who…

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Notes of a Retired Wedding Videographer: From Proposal to Reception; Lessons Learned from Brides and Grooms

Notes of a Retired Wedding Videographer: From Proposal to Reception; Lessons Learned from Brides and Grooms


Initially this book originated by way of a response to a reprehensible and professionally insulting article I stumbled across in a popular wedding magazine. I telephoned the editor and reviewed the article sentence by sentence with him regarding the inconsistencies and inaccuracies of a real-life wedding focusing specifically on the videography facet. By the end of our conversation, he asked me to commit these thoughts to paper for consideration and I did. The article with my amendments was first published in the Summer 2005 issue of Premier Bride Magazine. Inspired by this, I continued to expand and record my experiences and observations with the sole intent of offering an experienced, unique insight for all would-be newlyweds to consider. "Notes of a Retired Wedding Videographer" is intended to provide an entertaining and informative guide to help brides and grooms understand all that the camera captures throughout the wedding day as well as some frequently overlooked tips on how to ensure that the festivities recorded on video best capture the festivities occurring in live action at the time. Enjoy the most memorable insights based on actual first-hand experiences through the course of nearly 1000 completed wedding assignments during the last 11 years. Topics include observations and opinions regarding bridal logistics, wedding themes and color schemes, music/photographer/videographer selection, wedding within budget,7 tips for men in kilts, how to avoid becoming a victim of Murphy’s Law, and much more- all illustrated by real-life personal experiences from behind the camera.
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Natalie Portman Explains What She Learned Going Through ‘Dark Moments’ At Harvard

Attending Harvard University, said actress Natalie Portman, “changed the very questions I was asking.”

Portman, a 2003 graduate of Harvard, was the keynote speaker at Harvard College’s Class Day on Wednesday. Portman joked up front that she had wanted some comedy writers for her speech because at her Class Day, Will Ferrell was their hilarious speaker. She didn’t get anyone to help her craft jokes, she said, and so Portman’s speech largely focused on her explaining how she confronted her own doubts when she went to Harvard.

In high school, she was voted most likely to be a contestant on “Jeopardy,” which Portman said was “code for nerdy.” But when Portman came to Harvard, after the 1999 release of “Star Wars: Episode I” that she starred in, she was worried she’d be viewed as unworthy and only gotten in because of her fame.

“I got in only because I was famous — this is how others viewed me and how I viewed myself,” Portman admitted. Portman said she would have some “pretty dark moments” as a Harvard student.

“There were several occasions I started crying in meetings with professors, overwhelmed with what I was supposed to pull off when I could barely get out of bed in the morning,” she recounted.

class day

Bouncing between researching about underground groups for her role in “V for Vendetta” and making the stoner comedy “Your Highness,” among other films, Portman said she learned to find her own meaning and not have her success determined by box office receipts.

Portman learned as she studied for her role in “Black Swan” that “the only thing that separates you from others is your quirks, or even flaws.”

“There was a reason I was an actor,” Portman said, “because I love what I do and I saw from my peers and my mentors that was not only an acceptable reason, that was the best reason.”

— This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website.

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Kim Jong Un Learned To Drive At 3, According To A North Korean Teacher’s Guide

Kim Jong Un is an extraordinary human being if a teacher’s guide being sent to North Korean schools is any indication.

The guide, Kim Jong Un’s Revolutionary Activities, includes a lot of facts about the North Korean dictator that are — spoiler alert — hard to believe.

For instance, the guide suggests that teachers tell their impressionable students that Kim was able to drive a car at 3, and beat the chief executive of a foreign yacht company in a boating race when he was 9, UPI.com reports.

Similarly dubious claims were made about Kim’s father, Kim Jong-il, who reportedly shot 11 holes in one the first time he played golf and then never played again, the Mirror reports.

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What Jessie Star Debby Ryan Learned From Taylor Swift: Compliment Everyone!

When meeting Taylor Swift, it’s hard to avoid going full-on fan-girl—even for one of her peers, Debby Ryan. The star of the Disney Channel show Jessie and loyal Swiftie recently stopped by InStyle’s offices to discuss her role as the face of Mary Kay’s “Don’t Look Away” campaign to prevent dating abuse, and she told us about meeting […]
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8 Lessons I Have Learned Since Giving Up Television

The day my cable was turned off for good, I was lying on my bed in the midst of the afternoon watching a reality show about people with odd sexual compulsions. As the cable guy cut my connection, a guy describing his fetish for smelly feet was interrupted mid-sentence.

“God took my cable away,” I texted my daughter.

I was joking, but, honestly, my obsession with TV had gotten out of hand, and while I’m sure there are some quality programs on television, I wasn’t watching any of them. In 2011, I had watched the entire Casey Anthony trial on CNN, and even though we lived hundred of miles from the nearest ocean, it was not unusual for me to spend a whole evening staring at maps of potential hurricane paths on The Weather Channel. And as if that weren’t enough, lately, I had become fascinated with reality shows like Honey Boo-Boo, 19 Kids And Counting, Hoarders, Breaking Amish and Sister Wives. These shows had made me feel better about myself — more clever, more classy, more together.

I might be moving from a gray Cape Cod in the country to a rustic cabin in the woods with no cable access, but at least I did not have a family of dead cats lying underneath the pile of open food cans in the midst of my living room. I did not eat laundry detergent. I had not yet been the subject of an intervention, drug related or otherwise. I did not eat spaghetti noodles doused in ketchup and butter. I had not been shunned. I did not have to drag nineteen children with me everywhere I went. And I certainly did not have to pretend to be pleased when my husband expressed his undying affection for another woman.

Though learning to live without television was a challenge at first, just last month, we passed the second anniversary of our new life here at the cabin, and at the risk of sounding overly hippyish, I thought this might be a good time to pause and reflect on some things I have learned and to offer a few nuggets of wisdom to those considering cutting their own cable connections:

1. I have figured out that one does not need to watch The Weather Channel regularly to know what the weather is going to be like. I have figured out that generally one can just walk outside and look at the sky and get a good idea of what’s ahead for the day.

2. I no longer mindlessly peruse quasi news channels thinking that I am getting actual news, and I no longer watch the disturbing stories of celebrities unfold before me ad nauseum because I find these stories to be, well, disturbing. I do not know what celebrity has just been arrested for shoplifting, whose spouse just slept around, who is in rehab or who is eerily thin. I have just so much emotional energy to give, and now I can expend that energy on people I actually know who have legal troubles or marital problems or addiction issues or eating disorders.

3. It has been two years since anyone has even tried to talk to me about The Bachelor or The Bachelorette. Same with American Idol or any of those shows imitating American Idol. In fact, people actually stop discussing those things when I walk in a room. Enough said.

4. I’ve got to admit that the Olympics were hard. As was the World Cup and every other major sporting event. Everyone is always talking about sports, especially at bars where sports are always on big screen TV’s and sometimes on multiple screens, but my advice for those televsionless folks trying to maintain some sort of social connectivity during major sporting events is to simply drink more beer. That way, you will be at a bar when the television is on and can quickly catch up to speed. Another option is to take up a sport of your own so that while everyone else is sitting around drinking beer and watching sports, you can actually be out longboarding or free climbing or what have you.

5. I no longer begin sentences with the words, “I was up late last night watching…” If I happened to be up late last night, I was (1) reading, (2) writing, (3) cuddling my Dachshund who is afraid of thunderstorms or (4) cuddling my husband who is not afraid of thunderstorms. In any case, there is not nearly enough of that sort of thing happening in the world today, and now that I no longer mindlessly watch television, I have more time for all of those things.

6. Like major sporting events, the Oscars and the Emmys are a problem. Everyone is watching, and everyone is tweeting about them, and, sure, it’s a little like being back in high school, and everyone you know is talking about some party that you weren’t invited to. For advice on coping, please see #4.

7. Back when I had television, I used to spend a lot of time worrying about the what ifs. What if we have a major earthquake here in North Carolina? What if one of my friends gets a nose job that collapses? What if one of my young adult children suddenly joins a cult? What if my husband has a whole other family in another state and one day fakes his own death in order to be with them? Now, I take long walks with my Lab. I feed Vanilla Wafers to my goats. I pick wild blueberries and roses. I sit outside at a local brewery and drink Dale’s Pale Ale while I watch other people’s kids play corn hole. And somehow being outside and doing simple things makes me feel more in touch with the here and now and less concerned with the hypothetical.

8. I have taken up some new hobbies. I ride my bike — a lot. I hike. I make my own goat cheese and cream cheese, ferment my own yogurt. I grow my own kale and bake my own whey pies. I am learning about jazz and blues, and I have signed up for a poetry class and for contra dance lessons. The point is, when you are not watching television and thinking about inane things like how on earth someone could give birth nineteen times and still be walking around or how a human being could not notice she had a cat carcass rotting on her living room floor, your world opens up a bit, and suddenly you realize that even if you don’t want to make your own yogurt or pen your own chapbook, maybe, just maybe, there is something else out there for you to discover.
GPS for the Soul – The Huffington Post
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