What to Expect When You’re Expecting to Retire: 6 Ways to Do It Right


Bill Poznanski didn’t want to retire.

He worked for 35 years in the used car business in Toledo, Ohio, and he liked his job.

“My job was fun, and I could handle it physically,”  Poznanski says. “I had over 4,000 customers. My job was easy.”

But then an accident left his wife in need of a new hip. Taking time off to care for her after multiple operations and for trips to the doctors drained his vacation and sick days.

So early last year, at age 70 or 71 — “I forget exactly, because old people forget,” Poznanski says with a laugh — he gave his notice.

“They said if you ever want to come back, you’re more than welcome,” Poznanski says. “That hasn’t even crossed my mind. After I was retired for just a few months, I decided I should have retired a long time ago.

“I liked my job, but I like retirement even more.”

Whether you love your job or dream of the day you can dash from the building screaming “I’m outta heeeeere,” at some point in your career, you’ll need to consider retirement.

Yeah, first you have to figure out how to retire without going broke. The Penny Hoarder can help with that part, including calculating how much you’ll need to retire, staying on track financially to retire, choosing the right retirement accounts and avoiding financial slip-ups.

But once you clear the financial hurdles, there’s still the matter of preparing mentally and physically for retirement. Because if you’re like most people, you’ve been working for a while. Like, most-of-your-life a while.

Want to retire without looking back? Here are six tips you can use now to make the transition a happy one.

Retirement Tip #1: Make Plans Before You Retire

Before his last day on the job, Poznanski says he made decisions about what was important to him. Tops on the list: fishing.

“Way before I retired, I joined a local trout club,” Poznanski says. “You could go day or night, and I thought that would be fun, and it is.”

Poznanski found a place only a few minutes away from his house, thus avoiding the stress — and increased risk — of driving for half a day to find a spot at more congested fishing holes.

By researching places before he retired, Poznanski avoided the frustration and didn’t waste his money — unlike some of his fellow retirees.

I have a lot of friends who get frustrated because they have the money, but they’ve done some things they really didn’t enjoy because they didn’t know what to do,” he says.

Creating a routine is a key to a successful retirement, according to Julia Alexis, vice president of AARP Public Policy Institute, but that requires taking some time and effort to contemplate what you really want from retirement.

“It’s something people should anticipate and plan for,” Alexis says. “What brings you joy? What are some of the things you want to do as you start this next phase of your life?

“Think about the skills you brought to the workplace. How do you bring those skills to your community?”

Retirement Tip #2: Stay Social… or Get Social

Two women chat during happy hour.
Carol Gentry (left) and Sandy Tuite (right) attend the ASPEC social at Eckerd College in St. Petersburg, Fla. Tina Russell/The Penny Hoarder

Name someone you’ve hung out with in the past month who wasn’t a coworker.

If you’re having trouble remembering the names of any people who aren’t in your work sphere, you could be setting yourself up for more than just a lonely happy hour.

Socially isolated older adults are at greater risk for poor health, including depression, compared to their well-connected counterparts, according to a study published by the AARP Public Policy Institute. It found that social isolation results in medical conditions that cost an estimated $ 6.7 billion in additional Medicare spending annually.

Reconnecting with old friends is one way to create a network, especially with people from your age group who can relate to what it’s like during the early stages of retirement.

Poznanski says he convenes with former classmates regularly.

“We still get together every month on the third Wednesday for dinner, and we have 40 or 50 people show up,” Poznanski says. He points out that, while he appreciates his alone time, “that would get boring if I didn’t have my friends.”

And if you’re not in touch with your old friends, there are opportunities to make new ones through social organizations.

Groups like the Academy of Senior Professionals at Eckerd College, or ASPEC, in St. Petersburg, Florida, offer built-in social connections, says the organization’s director, Ken Wolfe.

The group, which has approximately 300 mostly retired members, offers four ways to participate — lifelong learning groups, community outreach, social events and mentoring and teaching opportunities at the college.

Sandy Tuite, formerly a registered nurse in Rochester, New York, says she and her husband Bob joined the organization in 2012 shortly after moving to St. Petersburg. Their interaction with students and faculty at the college has become an integral part of their busy social calendar.  

“I have found I’m so active with ASPEC,” Sandy says. “I play golf three times a week; I’m in organizations with our association… We are just having a ball.

I am never bored,” says Sandy with a laugh, adding that she and Bob were planning their annual four-month trip back north for the summer. “I can’t wait to go and rest.”

Retirement Tip #3: Exercise Your Body

Hogan is pictured on a hiking trail
Poznanski and his dog Hogan walk an average of two miles every day. Photo courtesy of Bill Poznanski

Depending on your job, you might have sat at a desk all day or, like Poznanski, were used to walking a used car lot.

Regardless of your job, after you retire there’s a greater likelihood that your lifestyle will become more sedentary, which is associated with increases in obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease, according to a 2018 study conducted in Finland.

Poznanski says he anticipated the drop-off in activity before he retired, so he bought a special kind of “exercise equipment.” One with four legs.

I decided that I need to get some exercise, so I bought a big, big dog,” Poznanski says. “He was a puppy when I bought him, but he’s 225 pounds now, and he’s exactly what I wanted. And we go walking an average of two miles every day.”

If you need a little more organized exercise routine, and a little less fur, you can find fitness challenges designed for seniors. One to consider is AARP’s Fit and Fun Challenge, which offers cheap and easy ways to start a fitness plan that keeps you accountable, according to Alexis.   

“It’s really to get people to walk 30 minutes a day,” Alexis says. “If you can get someone to walk with you — like a buddy, a sister, a daughter, a mother — to motivate you and keep you accountable, you’re success rate is going to go up tremendously.

Retirement Tip #4: Exercise Your Brain

Three men converse while drinking wine.
 Patrick Dalsemer, Ken Wolfe and Bob Tuite (left to right) attend the ASPEC social at Eckerd College. Tina Russell/The Penny Hoarder

There’s a good chance you’ve taken on additional job responsibilities as you approach retirement. Whether you’re the vice president of your division or the veteran team member everyone goes to for advice, your brain gets a daily workout.

And although you may be looking forward to the relief from daily job stresses, using retirement as an excuse to veg out in front of the TV can have dire consequences for your health. A 2015 Italian study found that the more years a person spent in retirement, the higher the risk of cognitive decline associated with dementia.

Choosing to engage your brain can make the next part of your life as enriching as your previous work life, says Alexis.

“The first day you walk out of the office with your gold watch, it really is about the social network and also learning new things,” she says. “Make sure you’re working those muscles — your brain as much as exercising your body.

“It’s all about keeping refreshed. Learning a new language, reading different types of books, journaling or writing will really help you refresh.”

One option for stretching your neurons is to get that degree you never had time for when you were working every day. Check out where to find free college courses for senior citizens in this post.

And groups like ASPEC offer not only a social outlet but the intellectual stimulation that might be missing, according to Wolfe. Members pay dues to participate in programs that range from social hours to educational lectures to kayaking excursions.

“A lot of these people were bosses at one time or another — whether it’s an operating room or a corporation — and they’re having to adjust,” Wolfe says. “[Joining a social group] is not the total answer to retirement, but it does provide particularly that piece of intellectual stimulation that might be hard to find elsewhere.”

Retirement Tip #5: Consider a Slow Exit From Work

An older man smiles.
Gene Skluzacek attends the ASPEC social at Eckerd College. “When I retired, I did some tutoring and odd jobs like that for a couple years,” Skluzacek said. Tina Russell/The Penny Hoarder

Retirement doesn’t have to be an all-or-nothing proposition.

Cutting back to part-time or becoming a consultant can provide extra income along with connections and stimulation, says Gene Skluzacek, a retired physics professor who taught at the University of Nebraska Omaha until 1999 and at St. Petersburg College until 2004.

“When I retired, I did some tutoring and odd jobs like that for a couple years,” says Skluzacek, now ASPEC’s elected president. “When I first quit working full time, it took a while to adjust. I was surprised how important work seemed to be in my life. I took that as a negative — that my work was sort of defining me. And that’s not true anymore.”

In fact, retirement can offer the opportunity to pursue something you’re passionate about, including a money-making gig or a whole new career.

And even if you haven’t updated your resume since the Bush administration — no, the other one — that doesn’t mean you can’t market yourself for another career.

Brandy Huderson, assistant professor at the University of the District of Columbia, says that even in a workplace that seems to rely heavily on technology, retirees’ soft skills and experience are needed.

“We have this technological world, but we still need a support base,” Huderson says. “We’re always going to need some of those basic skills that a lot of the retirees have and that they can bring in and integrate into the company in a new way.

If there’s something you’re passionate about, there’s always an avenue for you to do it.

Retirement Tip #6: Volunteer Your Newfound Time

Volunteering can provide many of the same benefits a job gave your brain, but perhaps in a less stressful way, according to Alexis.

Volunteering almost engages your brain the way a job does — it helps you with interaction with others; it helps you coordinate plans; it helps you think about how to complete tasks on schedule,” she says. “It’s really much akin to a job but with some benefits of having some fun.”

Peter Kent says the transition from work life to retirement could have been particularly difficult for him as a recovering workaholic who still attends Workaholics Anonymous meetings every week via phone.

At 73 years old, Kent is still president of AptaMatrix Inc., a biotechnology company, although he says he’s retired from day-to-day duties. He credits his participation in ASPEC as a major reason he’s enjoying retirement and estimates he attends at least 10 events every week.

Being a part of ASPEC has even allowed him to discover a new talent: public speaking. He volunteers to lead a couple of discussions each week.

“My wife and my son always laugh about this because I was so shy that they cannot believe I get up in front of a group and talk,” Kent says. “I wouldn’t even have joined a group like this if I’d been expected to talk 10 years ago.”

What changed?

“I don’t know what happened,” Kent says. “It’s a highly intelligent group; it’s a lot of fun of talk to and it’s a lot of fun to get a conversation going with them.”

He says the social group has given him a new outlet to pour his energies into. He spends 10 to 20 hours preparing for his group presentations.

“I’m still working a 40-hour week — probably more — like seven days a week,” Kent says, adding in his volunteer work. “It’s fun. I always thought work was fun, but it’s a much more comfortable, more relaxed life.”

What’s Next

Preparing for retirement allows those leaving the workplace to see it as less of an end and more of a “what’s next,” according to Alexis.

“Retirement means different things to different people,” she says, noting that whatever a retiree’s interests, “it’s about learning new things, it’s contributing to the community and it’s staying engaged.”

Tiffany Wendeln Connors is a staff writer at The Penny Hoarder. Her retirement plan includes plenty of cheese.

This was originally published on The Penny Hoarder, which helps millions of readers worldwide earn and save money by sharing unique job opportunities, personal stories, freebies and more. The Inc. 5000 ranked The Penny Hoarder as the fastest-growing private media company in the U.S. in 2017.

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Take 2 Minutes to See if You’re on Track to Retire (Future You Thanks You)


Are you confident you’re saving enough for retirement?

LOLOLOLOLOL

I made a funny joke there, right?

It’s common knowledge that most people aren’t giddy about their retirement savings.

According to Northwestern Mutual’s 2018 Planning and Progress Study, 1 in 5 Americans have no retirement savings at all!

Of the 2,003 adults surveyed, more than half said they expect to work past age 65. And 73% of those people said they will continue to work because they won’t have enough to live on otherwise.

Bummer, right?

But there’s no reason you need to become another statistic.

Today Is the Day to Start Investing for the Rest of Your Life

Listen, I know you have a lot of great excuses for why you’re not saving. And it’s scary, because charts like this one say you have to have your entire salary saved at 30. Meanwhile, you’re just trying to make your student loan payments.

But you have to save for retirement, because Plan B is working until you die. And you don’t need that kind of negativity in your life.

Talk to human resources and make sure you’re getting your 401(k) match at work. If you’ve done that, head online to an investment company like Vanguard, Schwab or Fidelity and open a Roth IRA.

Once you get your accounts set up, it’s much easier to figure out what you actually need to save.

How to Calculate What You Need in Retirement Savings

Basically, you need to make a budget for your future. Figure out what you want to spend annually in retirement. My goal is currently $ 40,000 per year for my husband and me. Consider that when you retire, you should have all the “stuff” you’ll ever need so you can live more frugally.

The key to saving the right amount for retirement is the Multiply by 25 rule.

You multiply your desired annual income by 25, and that’s how much you’ll need to retire. Why 25? It produces the number you need to generate a 4% return accounting for inflation.

You can safely withdraw 4% from your retirement savings if you want it to last well beyond 30 years.

If we want pull out $ 40,000 our first year of retirement, we’ll need to have $ 40,000 x 25, which is $ 1 million. This will allow us to withdraw 2% more every year to keep up with inflation.

That doesn’t mean we’re putting $ 1 million of our own dollars into retirement. This includes all the compound interest that will build over time.

That means the earlier you start saving for retirement, the less money you’ll have to put in, and the less work you’ll be doing in your golden years.

Jen Smith is a junior writer at The Penny Hoarder who gives tips for saving money and paying off debt on Instagram at @savingwithspunk.

This was originally published on The Penny Hoarder, which helps millions of readers worldwide earn and save money by sharing unique job opportunities, personal stories, freebies and more. The Inc. 5000 ranked The Penny Hoarder as the fastest-growing private media company in the U.S. in 2017.

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Top U.S. lawmaker Ryan to retire in latest Washington upheaval

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – U.S. House of Representatives Speaker Paul Ryan will not seek re-election and will leave his post at the start of 2019, further unsettling a Republican Party rocked by Donald Trump’s tumultuous presidency ahead of November’s pivotal congressional elections.


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http://www.acrx.org -As millions of Americans strive to deal with the economic downturn,loss of jobs,foreclosures,high cost of gas,and the rising cost of prescription drug cost. Charles Myrick ,the President of American Consultants Rx, announced the re-release of the American Consultants Rx community service project which consist of millions of free discount prescription cards being donated to thousands of not for profits,hospitals,schools,churches,etc. in an effort to assist the uninsured,under insured,and seniors deal with the high cost of prescription drugs.-American Consultants Rx -Pharmacy Discount Network News

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David Levin to Retire as DXL Chief as Losses Grow

David Levin, the longtime president and chief executive officer of Destination XL Group Inc., will retire by the end of this year.
Heidrick & Struggles has been retained to search for a successor to helm the country’s largest big and tall men’s retailer. Candidates from within and outside the company will be considered. Levin, 66, has said he will be available to provide support during the transition period.
The company made the announcement at the same time it reported a fourth-quarter net loss of $ 3.3 million, compared to net income of $ 1.8 million in the same period last year, despite a sales increase of 9.5 percent to $ 135.5 million. On a non-GAAP basis, adjusted earnings before income, taxes, depreciation and amortization fell to $ 5 million from $ 10.8 million.
For the fiscal year, the company’s net loss grew to $ 18.8 million from a loss of $ 2.3 million a year ago, on a sales increase of 3.7 percent to $ 468 million. Adjusted EBITDA for the year fell to $ 17.1 million from $ 31.6 million.
Comparable-store sales increased 4.3 percent in the quarter and only 0.9 percent for the year.
The company’s stock fell 19.5 percent in morning trading to $ 1.85, the second-lowest rate in its history.
Levin attributed the earnings

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http://www.acrx.org -As millions of Americans strive to deal with the economic downturn,loss of jobs,foreclosures,high cost of gas,and the rising cost of prescription drug cost. Charles Myrick ,the President of American Consultants Rx, announced the re-release of the American Consultants Rx community service project which consist of millions of free discount prescription cards being donated to thousands of not for profits,hospitals,schools,churches,etc. in an effort to assist the uninsured,under insured,and seniors deal with the high cost of prescription drugs.-American Consultants Rx -Pharmacy Discount Network News

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Is it time to retire the Halloween candy-eating prank?

by

Laura Falin

posted in Life

It’s the question that has divided most parents I know for the last few Halloweens. Is Jimmy Kimmel’s annual prank, where parents tell their children they ate all the kids’ Halloween candy, funny or mean?

I’ve always found it unsettling. I swear I have a sense of humor. I like joking with my kids. I really like Jimmy Kimmel and I think he’s hilarious, too. There were a few years when I wondered if I was being too uptight. But this particular prank never sat well with me.

Jimmy Kimmel son surgery monologue

Then today, I stumbled across this Washington Post article that perfectly articulated all the reasons it made me uneasy. This sums it up here:

“I have a different view. In my opinion as a longtime child psychiatrist, the children in the clips — most of whom appear to be between 3 and 7 years old — are reacting not so much to the temporary loss of candy but to a sense of betrayal that will linger long after their parents own up to the joke.”

Aside from the fact that we have plenty of crying around here already, and I do not need to introduce reasons for more of it, there’s that sense of betrayal. The writer, a child psychiatrist, states that kids see things as strictly right or wrong. We don’t understand nuance, or shades of gray, or pranking, until we get older. So either you’re a good guy, or a bad guy. When parents deliberately lie to their kids, and steal on top of that, it confuses them.

The author also points out that this is the first time a lot of kids get some independence. They get to pick out a costume. They get to knock on doors, and ask for candy, and keep that candy in a special container just for them. And then we consider this:

“But they are still very young. Their bonds with their parents are built on trust — trust that Mom and Dad would never do anything to hurt them. And it can feel like a violation of that trust to hear that Mom and Dad have stolen and eaten all of their hard-won spoils, the stuff they went to bed dreaming about.”

I’m probably going to let my kids down more times than I can count before they’re grown. I hope those times will all be unintentional, and I hope my kids will forgive me. Why would I add deliberate disappointments to that?

I second the writer when she says she hopes this is the year the prank is retired for good. Let the kids have their candy without any pranking. And if we’re going to take a piece or two (and I will…I definitely will…), let’s be honest with our kids about it from the start.

What do you think? Is the candy-eating prank funny or not?

Images by iStock and YouTube/Jimmy Kimmel Live

The post Is it time to retire the Halloween candy-eating prank? appeared first on BabyCenter Blog.

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Robert Redford To Retire From Acting

Robert Redford says he is planning on retiring from acting soon to focus on directing and on his first love – art.

The 80-year old star of “Out of Africa” and “The Sting” told his grandson Dylan in an online interview that he was getting tired of acting.

“I’m an impatient person, so it’s hard for me to sit around and do take after take after take,” Redford said in the interview published on Thursday for the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis. “Going back to sketching — that’s sort of where my head is right now.”

Redford, who has never won an Oscar for acting despite a storied 50-year career, will not be departing from the big screen any time soon.

He said he has two more acting projects in the works. One is a love story for older people with Jane Fonda, his co-star in the 1967 romantic comedy “Barefoot in the Park,” and the other is a lighter movie with Casey Affleck and Sissy Spacek. According to movie website IMDB.com, both movies are expected to be released in 2017.

“Once they’re done then I’m going to say, ‘Okay, that’s goodbye to all that,’ and then just focus on directing,” he said.

Redford recalled that his first love was art and that he spent time in Europe as a teenager “exploring story-telling through painting.”

Movies like “All The President’s Men,” “Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid” and “The Way We Were” made Redford into one of the world’s biggest movie stars of the 1970s and 1980s.

He later turned to directing, winning an Oscar for the 1980 film “Ordinary People.”

In 1978, Redford helped found what became the Sundance Film Festival in Utah to promote independent movies, and which has grown to be the most influential independent film gathering in the world.

(Reporting by Jill Serjeant; Editing by Marguerita Choy)

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When Professional Women Retire…: Food for Thought and Palate

When Professional Women Retire…: Food for Thought and Palate


When Professional Women Retire: Food for Thought and Palate celebrates women''s ways of knowing how to retire into the good life. Our approach is predicated on the belief that we may transform the outward loss of professional careers and identity to inward gain. Urging a thoughtful assessment of ourselves as retired professional women, we advocate finding a passion leading to tasks that will engage our minds and demand our commitment. We propose ways of living examined lives yet realize that minding our bellies is vital to leading a good life. Our favorite recipes, therefore, bring attention to food as a means of individual well-being and social bonding. The Tool Book offers practical, hands-on information with specific text references and recommended readings, directories of agencies considered especially helpful in posing, answering, or directing inquiries into part-time jobs, volunteer opportunities, continuing education, physical exercise options, and travel destinations. It furthermore shows how the book may be used as a starter text for group explorations, such as seminars, workshops, chautauquas, and focus groups, inviting women to come together to discuss issues, means of mutual support, and community outreach.
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