Meet the First Black Woman to Own a Male Professional Sports League in the U.S.

Evelyn Magley has made history as the first African American woman to ever own a male professional sports league in the United States. Magley and her husband, retired NBA player David Magley, are the founders of The Basketball League (TBL), a newly formed minor professional basketball league which acquired the North American Premier Basketball (NAPB) league and is scheduled to debut next year.

“I am thrilled to start a league that treats our players with the greatest level of respect thereby impacting our community in a manner that is consistent with our faith, by serving those who need it the most,” said Magley in a statement. She was named as the CEO of the league while her husband operates as president.

The league has targeted 40 markets in the U.S. and Canada and expects to start with 12 to 16 teams in January 2019. Some of the teams include the Kansas City Tornados, Ohio Bootleggers, Nevada Desert Dogs, Vancouver Knights, Raleigh Firebirds, Tampa Bay Titans, and San Diego Waves. Each team will play 32 games that will be available via livestream.

TBL offers athletes who don’t make it in the NBA or G-League another option to play ball professionally and earn anywhere from $ 1,500 to $ 7,500 a month. TBL is also dedicated to providing families with affordable and quality entertainment as well as community support through the launch of an upcoming philantropic arm, youth camps, clinics, and nonprofit organizations. Plus, the league gives individuals and groups an opportunity to own a professional sports business with a relatively low cost barrier to entry.

David Magley, who most recently served as the Commissioner of the National Basketball League of Canada, said Mrs. Magley brings a “unique vision” to the new league as the wife of a pro athlete and the mother of four children who played sports collegiately. “Her passion for people allows us to build on a vision of impacting community through giving young men opportunities that do not exist today, then leveraging our platforms to engage each local market to benefit the youth and non-profit initiatives she is so very passionate about,” said the former Cleveland Cavaliers small forward in a statement. He was drafted in 1982.

According to her bio, Magley is the former Director of Community Engagement for the Brampton A’s of the NBL Canada, where she scaled the forward-facing programming of the NBL team and nonprofit organizations within the community at large. She graduated from the University of Kansas and worked as a professional music educator and music therapist. She also co-founded an inner-city ministry focused on mentoring children through the gospel, academic services, food, and music called Children with Purpose.

The post Meet the First Black Woman to Own a Male Professional Sports League in the U.S. appeared first on Black Enterprise.

Lifestyle | Black Enterprise

BEAUTY DEAL UPDATE:

Female Sports Reporters Are Blowing the Whistle on Sexist Behavior at the World Cup

From late goals to major upsets, the World Cup in Russia this year has had more than its usual share of excitement. While more women have had high-profile sports commentary roles this year than ever before, a series of sexist incidents have provoked outcry.

During the tournament, several women working for international media outlets have been harassed and assaulted while doing their jobs. Male fans have coached women to chant sexually graphic phrases in languages they don’t understand. Even away from the crowds outside the stadium, women working from the relative calm of a studio have received online abuse just for daring to work in the male-dominated world of soccer.

The soccer world is no stranger to sexism. As is typical of many sports, the men’s version is thought of first—British pundit Gary Lineker was called out on Twitter for crediting Lionel Messi with a world soccer first, despite American soccer player Mia Hamm and China’s Sun Wen achieving the same in 2003. In Britain, thought of as the home of the sport, the women’s game was banned for 50 years until 1971, and was only officially brought under the British soccer governing body in 1993. It’s only in recent years that women have taken roles in FIFA, the sport’s global governing body, with the first board members being elected in 2013, and the first ever secretary general in 2016. Progress has been slow across the board, with top European leagues only getting their first ever female referee last September (in Germany); there are no female refereeing staff at this World Cup. Sports journalists in several countries marked milestones in Moscow, becoming the first to commentate live men’s matches on television. (In the U.S. Fox Sports and Telemundo both had the country’s first ever live commentary from women, while in the U.K., where women have commentated live soccer on the radio, the BBC’s Vicki Sparks made history as the first woman to commentate a live televised men’s match.)

Portugal v Morocco: Group B - 2018 FIFA World Cup Russia
Maddie Meyer—Getty ImagesVicki Sparks commentates for BBC during the 2018 FIFA World Cup Russia group B match between Portugal and Morocco at Luzhniki Stadium on June 20, 2018 in Moscow, Russia.

What’s different about this year’s World Cup is the rise of call out culture. As Anna Kessel, sports journalist and chair of British campaign group Women in Football says, “For the first time, we’re having a global awakening about what women in the sport face.” In the wake of the #MeToo movement across other industries, more women in soccer are talking about their experiences—and the world is listening.

For those working in front of the camera, the grabs, gropes and kisses have taken place in full view of the world. On June 15, Colombian-born journalist Julieth Gonzalez Theran was delivering her lines for Deutsche Welle to camera when a soccer fan grabbed her chest and forcibly kissed her. Three days later, Malin Wahlberg was presenting, talking to a crowd of Swedish fans for the country’s Aftonbladet newspaper, when a rowdy fan draped an arm around her shoulder, another another vigorously ruffled her hair and a third grabbed her round the neck and went in for a kiss she tried to dodge. Mexican journalist Mariana Zacarias has told Paris Match about being groped, kissed and grabbed in the first two weeks of the tournament. On June 24, Julia Guimaraes, presenting for Brazil’s TV Globo and sporTV, dodged a man who tried to kiss her on the cheek, berating him afterward with a wave of her mic.

https://twitter.com/dw_espanol/status/1007240122138492928

It’s not just women on the job who have had to deal with sexist crowds. Fare Network, part of a global network of organizations tackling discrimination in soccer, has reported several instances of fans persuading women from different countries to chant crude and sexual phrases in a language they don’t understand. “There’s the very visible issue of TV reporters who are being assaulted on the streets while they’re working, and there’s another aggressive, sexualized misogyny that’s new. I’ve never seen that before,” says Fare’s executive director Piara Powar, describing the videos.

In one video Fare highlights, two Paraguayan journalists taught a woman an obscene phrase, telling her it meant “I like Paraguay,” and in another Colombian fans taught Japanese women to say obscene phrases. Paraguay—which is not playing at the World Cup—condemned the journalists through its Russian embassy, and Colombia’s government said the behavior was “degrading to women and insults our country” on Twitter. “All these things are highlighting old, sexist attitudes, and that most of the people who travel are men,” says Powar. “It’s something the culture of [soccer] hasn’t tried to address.”

Several female pundits have also been trolled online—and action is being taken. German pundit Claudia Neumann, the first woman to commentate men’s matches on German public television, has been subject to online abuse, with her employer ZDF now pursuing criminal charges against two users who expressed “extremely derogatory comments,” according the German newspaper Allgemeine Zeitung. ZDF director Thomas Bellut said he hoped it would have a deterrent effect, and expressed surprise that “apparently some viewers still have a problem with a woman commentating.”

Elsewhere, others have been displeased that the playing field is becoming more equal. Jason Cundy, who played for British top-level soccer club Chelsea, came under fire last week for his assertion on breakfast TV that female commentators were a “tough listen,” saying “a high-pitched tone isn’t what I want to hear.”

URUGUAY-FBL-WC-2018-URU-RUS-SAN JAVIER
Pable Porciunicula Brune—AFP/Getty ImagesA woman (C) reacts she watches the World Cup match between Uruguay and Russia at a square in the Russian-founded town of San Javier in Rio Negro Department, Uruguay, on June 25, 2018.

Powar of Fare Network says that the media—and soccer as a whole—has its own role to play in helping change sexist attitudes, by making the presence of women a regular feature across the board, rather than a one off at big tournaments. Female pundits Eni Aluko and Alex Scott, who work for the U.K.’s two major networks, have drawn praise for their insightful commentary—as well as what some have called patronizing applause from a fellow male pundit. “They clearly understood they had to prove themselves, they had to work harder than the men,” says Powar. “They’ve done their homework.”

The commercial argument for change is strong: Women’s soccer is among the fastest growing sports in the world—and in the U.S., women’s soccer has for years been more popular than men’s. Kessel points to two campaigns this World Cup that were disbanded after an outcry over sexism—Burger King’s offer to give prizes to any woman impregnated by a player, and Getty’s gallery of “hottest fans” featuring only young women. “It’s been standard for galleries and TV feeds to feature this narrow idea of women at the football. This is first time there’s been such a big platform for change,” Kessel says. Women are a significant audience at World Cups: FIFA’s own viewing figures show women were around 40% of the audience for the 2014 tournament. And where there are viewers, there are advertising dollars.

But for women on the ground right now, sharing their experiences and immediately condemning sexism has been essential to effecting change more quickly. As Julieth Gonzalez-Theran said in a post on her Instagram after she was groped, the women reporting are doing their jobs and they deserve respect: “Respect! We don’t deserve this. We are equally valuable and professional. I share the joy of soccer but we must identify the line between affection and harassment.”

Sports – TIME

ENTERTAINMENT DEAL UPDATE:

Disney’s Fox deal OK’d, must sell regional sports networks

Disney will sell the 22 regional sports networks it will acquire from Twenty-First Century Fox as part of a settlement that won it regulatory approval of its $ 71 billion purchase of most of Fox’s assets, the Mouse House said on Wednesday. The agreement to sell the RSNs was disclosed as part of a consent decree…
Business | New York Post

SPECIAL SHOE DISCOUNT UPDATE:

College sports doctors under new scrutiny amid scandals

Allegations of sexual abuse carried out over decades by team physicians at Michigan State and Ohio State are sending ripples through university athletics departments, with some schools exploring whether more oversight is needed for figures in such powerful positions.

FOX Sports Digital

BEST DEAL UPDATE:

Leading Sports Physio & Medicine Supplies

Grossman: Barstool Sports bros are huge jerks for getting a kick out of Corey Lewandowski’s shameful ‘womp, womp’

Nobody went lower this week than former Trump campaign manager Corey Lewandowski, who, on Fox News, mocked the separation of a 10-year-old girl with Down Syndrome from her mother with a “womp, womp” sound effect.

Somehow, his disgusting lack of empathy trickled like a sewer leak into the world…

Sports – New York Daily News

GOLF SPECIAL DEAL UPDATE:

Tom Brady on Kneeling in the NFL: Empathy Is Essential to Sports | SuperSoul Sunday | OWN

OWN

SPECIAL NEWS BULLETIN:

http://www.acrx.org -As millions of Americans strive to deal with the economic downturn,loss of jobs,foreclosures,high cost of gas,and the rising cost of prescription drug cost. Charles Myrick ,the President of American Consultants Rx, announced the re-release of the American Consultants Rx community service project which consist of millions of free discount prescription cards being donated to thousands of not for profits,hospitals,schools,churches,etc. in an effort to assist the uninsured,under insured,and seniors deal with the high cost of prescription drugs.-American Consultants Rx -Pharmacy Discount Network News

CHARITY UPDATE :

Click today to request your free ACRX discount prescription card and save up to 80% off of your medicine!

SPECIAL DONATION REQUEST UPDATE:

Please help American Consultants Rx achieve it’s biggest goal yet of donating over 30 million discount prescription cards to over 50k organizations in an effort to assist millions of Americans in need. Please click here to donate today!

New Jersey legalizes sports betting

Newsy

SPECIAL NEWS BULLETIN:

http://www.acrx.org -As millions of Americans strive to deal with the economic downturn,loss of jobs,foreclosures,high cost of gas,and the rising cost of prescription drug cost. Charles Myrick ,the President of American Consultants Rx, announced the re-release of the American Consultants Rx community service project which consist of millions of free discount prescription cards being donated to thousands of not for profits,hospitals,schools,churches,etc. in an effort to assist the uninsured,under insured,and seniors deal with the high cost of prescription drugs.-American Consultants Rx -Pharmacy Discount Network News

CHARITY UPDATE:

Click today to request your free ACRX discount prescription card and save up to 80% off of your medicine!

SPECIAL DONATION REQUEST UPDATE:

Please help American Consultants Rx achieve it’s biggest goal yet of donating over 30 million discount prescription cards to over 50k organizations in an effort to assist millions of Americans in need. Please click here to donate today!

New Jersey governor signs sports betting bill into law

Sports betting is on the books in New Jersey, and parlors could begin taking best as early as Thursday. Gov. Phil Murphy signed a law Monday to let casinos and racetracks take bets on some professional and college sporting events — following a Supreme Court decision last month that a federal ban on sports betting…
Sports | New York Post

EMPLOYMENT SEARCH UPDATE:

The Weekend Reset: Sports betting, the return of an old favorite, and the makings of a perfect party.

It’s Friday. Looking for something to switch your weekend up, or to give you an excuse to relax a little? That’s what the Weekend Reset is for. Each week contributor Tim Johnstone pulls together five things to get your weekend started. Could be something to read or watch, something to eat or listen to, or even something to do. Enjoy the weekend fellas.

 

READ: The Supreme Court and sports betting – some perspective.

The SCOTUS upended a 25 year old law that outlawed sports betting outside of Las Vegas. This, obviously, is huge news and the impact it will have moving forward is still being figured out. This will get you some idea of what’s at stake. (photo credit)

 

PLAY: Go climb a tree and swing on some ropes.

Chances are there is at least one ropes course in your area. They have become increasingly popular over the last decade as people search out new avenues of recreation. They are common with corporate team building events. And they do a great deal for your self-esteem. Even if you are not a fan of heights, in order to play on one of these you need to be secured at all times. Safety is the first thing you learn before you even climb up. If you can remind yourself that you are secure, you should be able to do a great deal more than you ever thought possible. Once you are up on the course you have a really terrific selection of methods of crossing from one platform or another. They are challenging for many, but confidence comes quickly and the experience is quite rewarding. So. Much. Fun. (photo credit)

 

BINGE: Karate Kid version 2.0

Picking up the Karate Kid story 30 years on, Cobra Kai is a YouTube Red offering that has people losing their shit. This, of course, is a good thing and we thank Dappered reader Brandon D for the hook-up.

 

EAT: Party Prep 101 – How to arrange a charcuterie and cheese board.

With all due respect to my vegan friends, nobody doesn’t like a good charcuterie board at a gathering. Along with crudite, they pair well with cocktails, beer and wine.  Heck, even if you loathe olives, there is plenty else to appreciate and enjoy. Use this as a basic formula and substitute meats (Basque chorizo, Prosciutto, dry cured Salami for example), cheeses (Manchego is mandatory at my house, Stilton, Burrata), and assorted fruits and other items. Soon enough you will be a pro.

 

LISTEN: Indispensable party favor.

The reason you can’t buy one of the most beloved hip hop albums of all time is that it is stuck in legal limbo. This is not what you generally hear from the genre these days. De La Soul blurred the boundaries between hip hop and funk, jazz and pop, with kitschy pop culture samples and a sense of joy. If you are looking for a sure fire way to provide the perfect soundtrack for a Spring or Summer event, this is it.

Tim Johnstone is Dappered’s music correspondent as well as our resident gatherer of all things interwebs related. He’s pretty sure he should lay off the horror movies but he’s afraid to. 


Dappered Style Mail

FASHION DEAL UPDATE:

Mailbag: Petra Kvitova Is the Best Story in Tennis Right Now, and Maybe in All of Sports

A year ago, Petra Kvitova suffered a serious hand injury from a harrowing home invasion. Now, she’s the hottest player in women’s tennis. 

Latest News

BEST DEAL UPDATE:

Shop The Official FILA® Store for the latest Performance apparel and footwear for men, women, and kids at FILA.com