Milk expression within 8 hours associated with lactation success for VLBW infants in NICU

A study has shown that first milk expression within eight hours of giving birth is associated with the highest probability of mothers of very low-birth-weight infants being able to provide milk throughout hospitalization in the neonatal intensive care unit.
Breastfeeding News — ScienceDaily

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Speech recognition technology is not a solution for poor readers

Could artificial intelligence be a solution for people who cannot read well (functional illiterates) or those who cannot read at all (complete illiterates)? According to psycholinguists, speech technology should never replace learning how to read. Researchers argue that literacy leads to a better understanding of speech because good readers are good at predicting words.
Literacy News — ScienceDaily

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April Fools hoax stories could offer clues to help identify ‘fake news’

Academic experts in natural language processing who are interested in deception have compared the language used within written April Fools hoaxes and fake news stories. They have discovered that there are similarities in the written structure of humorous April Fools hoaxes — the spoof articles published by media outlets every April 1 — and malicious fake news stories.
Literacy News — ScienceDaily

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Good news for women with MS: Disease may not worsen after pregnancy after all

There’s good news for women with multiple sclerosis (MS) — researchers now say the disease may not flare up again right after pregnancy as they had long believed, according to a preliminary study. Most people with MS have the relapsing-remitting form of the disease, where symptoms flare up, then go into periods of remission.
Breastfeeding News — ScienceDaily

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Effect of breastfeeding versus pumping on human milk microbiome

A large-scale analysis in humans suggests that the milk microbiota is affected by bacteria both from the infant’s mouth and from environmental sources such as breast pumps, although future research will be needed to assess the effects that these changes may have on the infant gut microbiome and infant health.
Breastfeeding News — ScienceDaily

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Unfamiliar words, not blue text, slows reading of hyperlinks

Hyperlinks slow down reading speed only when the linked word is unfamiliar, an effect that is independent of link color, according to new research. The effect is likely due to the reader’s perception that the unfamiliar word may carry special importance in the sentence when formatted as a hyperlink.
Literacy News — ScienceDaily

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Delaying newborn baths increases rates of breastfeeding

While it has been standard practice for decades to whisk newborns off to a bath within the first few hours of their birth, a new study has found that waiting to bathe a healthy newborn 12 or more hours after birth increased the rate of breastfeeding exclusivity during the newborn hospital stay.
Breastfeeding News — ScienceDaily

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Diving deeper into developmental dyslexia

Men with dyslexia have altered structural connections between the thalamus and auditory cortex on the left side of the brain, new research reveals. The study extends similar observations of the dyslexic visual system and highlights the importance of early sensory processing for reading proficiency.
Literacy News — ScienceDaily

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Link between job titles and gender equality

Researchers have revealed a link between role-nouns (e.g. job titles) in gendered languages and gender equality. The study, which examined whether the masculine form in the plural in German is understood as gender-neutral or as specific to males, confirms earlier findings in behavioral research: people tend to interpret the grammatically masculine form as male-specific, despite it being used regularly to refer to both males and females.
Literacy News — ScienceDaily

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Flipped classroom enhances learning outcomes in medical certificate education

The quality of medical certificates written by students of medicine was better when they were taught by using the flipped classroom approach instead of traditional lecturing. A randomly selected student from the flipped classroom group had an 85 percent probability to receive a better total score than a student from the traditional teaching group, according to a new study.
Literacy News — ScienceDaily

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Breastfeeding protects infants from antibiotic-resistant bacteria

A new study shows that infants that are breastfed for at least six months have less antibiotic-resistant bacteria in their gut compared with babies breastfed for a shorter time. On the other hand, antibiotic use by mothers increases the number of antibiotic-resistant bacteria in infants.
Breastfeeding News — ScienceDaily

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