‘Doing science,’ rather than ‘being scientists,’ more encouraging to those underrepresented in the field

Over the course of a school year, elementary school children lose confidence that they can ‘be scientists,’ but remain more confident that they can ‘do science.’
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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How a new father views his relationship with his partner

A new father’s views on his changing relationship with his wife or partner may depend in part on how much support he feels from her when he is caring for their baby, a new study suggests. Researchers found that a first-time father tended to feel closer to the mother both as a co-parent and as a romantic partner when he believed he had her confidence when he was involved in child care.
Infant and Preschool Learning News — ScienceDaily

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Coherent? Voice disorders significantly affect listeners, too

Researchers conducted a study to see if there are differences in speech intelligibility (a listener’s ability to recover a speaker’s message) in healthy voices compared to those who have voice disorders like hoarseness. They also wanted to know if using listener strategies such as paying close attention to the words or using other words to try to figure out the message would increase speech intelligibility.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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Novel scale correlates children’s snacking behaviors with external food cues

Preliminary evidence from a new national study suggests that external food cue responsiveness is measurable by parental report in preschool-age children. Responsiveness was greater among children with, versus without, usual TV advertisement exposure. These results may provide a better understanding of how an obesogenic food environment shapes the development of children’s eating behaviors at a young age.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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The enduring effects of mother-child interactions as children become adults

Interactions between a mother and her child have been linked to cognitive outcomes in childhood, but little work has looked at farther-reaching effects. In a new study that examined data from the Wisconsin Longitudinal Study, more positive mother-child interactions during the first 16 years of life predicted higher education in adulthood, which predicted less decline in episodic memory, or the memory of autobiographical events.
Parenting News — ScienceDaily

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Teachers predict pupil success just as well as exam scores

New research finds that teacher assessments are equally as reliable as standardized exams at predicting educational success.
K-12 Education News — ScienceDaily

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Green energy nudges come with a hidden cost

Many US households receive energy bills comparing their use to that of similar neighbors to remind them to use less energy. Such policies aim to ‘nudge’ people toward making better choices, both for their future selves and for others. Nudges like these have become popular among policymakers, because they are virtually costless to implement. However, a new study finds these nudges have an unexplored cost: they can decrease support for policies with far greater impact.
Consumer Behavior News — ScienceDaily

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Good sleep quality and good mood lead to good working memory with age

A team of psychologists has found strong associations between working memory — a fundamental building block of a functioning mind — and three health-related factors: sleep, age, and depressed mood. The team also reports that each of these factors is associated with different aspects of working memory. Working memory is the part of short-term memory that temporarily stores and manages information required for cognitive tasks such as learning, reasoning, and comprehension.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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Origin of Sino-Tibetan language family revealed by new research

The Sino-Tibetan language family consists of more than 400 languages spoken by around 1.4 billion speakers worldwide, including major world languages like Chinese, Tibetan and Burmese. However, despite the importance of these languages for understanding the prehistory of East Asia, their relationships and origins remain controversial. A study by an international team provides new evidence for the origin of the language family, pointing to Sino-Tibetan originating with north Chinese millet farmers around 7,200 years ago.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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Maternal nut consumption during pregnancy linked to improvements in neurodevelopment in children

For the first time links have been observed between a nut-rich maternal diet during the first trimester of pregnancy and better outcomes after birth in cognitive function, attention capacity and long-term working memory.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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Scientists locate brain area where value decisions are made

Neurobiologists have pinpointed the brain area responsible for value decisions that are made based on past experiences. Data from tens of thousands of neurons revealed an area of the brain called the retrosplenial cortex, or RSC, which was not previously known for ‘value-based decision-making,’ a fundamental animal behavior that is impaired in neurological conditions ranging from schizophrenia to dementia and addiction.
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Learning language: New insights into how brain functions

When it comes to learning a language, the left side of the brain has traditionally been considered the hub of language processing. But new research shows the right brain plays a critical early role in helping learners identify the basic sounds associated with a language. That could help find new teaching methods to better improve student success in picking up a foreign language.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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New treatment could become first targeted therapy designed for ‘untreatable’ childhood brain cancer

A new type of drug that targets a genetic weakness in an untreatable childhood brain cancer could become the first ever treatment designed to target the disease. The prototype treatment could also offer hope for patients with the rare and devastating ‘stone man syndrome’ — in which muscles and ligaments turn to bone.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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‘Lentils will help you run faster:’ Communicating food benefits gets kids to eat healthier

Affirming statements like ‘eat your lentils if you want to grow bigger and run faster’ are more effective at getting kids to make healthy food choices than presenting the food repeatedly without conversation.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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Highly qualified staff at state preschools overcome private sector staffing advantage

Staff who are better qualified and trained maintain the quality of state-funded preschools, to some extent making up for the larger number of children per staff member in comparison to private and voluntary settings. A comparison of data before and after substantial UK policy change between 1999 and 2014, aimed at increasing uptake and improving the quality of early years education and care, suggests such changes could have powerful effects in improving preschool settings.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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External reference drug pricing could save medicare tens of billions

A new study found that prices for brand-name prescription drugs averaged 3.2 to 4.1 times higher in the US when compared with prices in the United Kingdom, Japan and the Canadian province of Ontario. The study also found that the longer the brand-name prescription drug was on the market, the greater the price differential.
Consumer Behavior News — ScienceDaily

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Placental function linked to brain injuries associated with autism

Allopregnanolone, a hormone made by the placenta late in pregnancy, is such a potent neurosteroid that disrupting its steady supply to the developing fetus can leave it vulnerable to brain injuries associated with autism spectrum disorder, according to new research.
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Possible link between autism and antidepressants use during pregnancy

An international team has found a potential link between autistic-like behavior in adult mice and exposure to a common antidepressant in the womb. They also identified a treatment that helped improve memory loss and social interactions, according to the new study.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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Finnish school students outperform US students on ‘fake news’ digital literacy tasks

A recent study revealed students at an international school in Finland significantly outperformed US students on tasks which measure digital literacy in social media and online news. The researchers suggest this may be due to the Finnish and International Baccalaureate curricula’s different way of facilitating students’ critical thinking skills compared to the US system and curriculum.
K-12 Education News — ScienceDaily

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Unanticipated early origins of childhood brain cancer

Brain tumors are the leading cause of non-accidental death in children in Canada, but little is known about when these tumours form or how they develop. Researchers have recently identified the cells that are thought to give rise to certain brain tumors in children and discovered that these cells first appear in the embryonic stage of a mammal’s development – far earlier than they had expected.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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Adverse events during first years of life may have greatest effect on future mental health

A new study has found evidence that children under 3 years old are most the vulnerable to the effects of adversity — experiences including poverty, family and financial instability, and abuse — on their epigenetic profiles, chemical tags that alter gene expression and may have consequences for future mental health.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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Sleep and exercise affect new moms differently than new dads

In a study looking at the daily lives of new parents, researchers found that getting more physical activity and sleep was linked with more personal well-being. However, fathers who slept more on average than other fathers reported lower overall well-being and less closeness with their partner and child. Additionally, on days when mothers exercised more than usual, there was a higher chance of an argument.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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Susceptibility to disease develops during childhood

Traumatized children and children who develop multiple allergies tend to suffer in adulthood from chronic inflammatory diseases and psychiatric disorders. Researchers have demonstrated this in a study in which they identified five classes of early immune-system programming.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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Nationwide study suggests obesity as an independent risk factor for anxiety and depression in young people

Obesity is linked with an increased risk of developing anxiety and depression in children and adolescents, independent of traditional risk factors such as parental psychiatric illness and socioeconomic status, according to new research.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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Early lipids boost brain growth for vulnerable micro-preemies

Dietary lipids, already an important source of energy for tiny preemies, also provide a much-needed brain boost by significantly increasing global brain volume as well as increasing volume in regions involved in motor activities and memory.
Infant and Preschool Learning News — ScienceDaily

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Girls and boys on autism spectrum tell stories differently, could explain ‘missed diagnosis’ in girls

A new study examined differences in the way girls and boys on the autism spectrum used certain types of words during storytelling. This study found that autistic girls used significantly more ‘cognitive process’ words such as ‘think’ and ‘know’ than autistic boys, despite comparable autism symptom severity.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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No safe amount of alcohol during pregnancy, suggest researchers

An international group of researchers has taken one of the first major steps in finding the biological changes in the brain that drive fetal alcohol spectrum disorder. New work using chaos theory to analyze brain signals shows the long-term effects. Researchers found that teenagers who were exposed to alcohol while in the womb showed altered brain connections that were consistent with impaired cognitive performance.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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Synthetic speech generated from brain recordings

A state-of-the-art brain-machine interface created by neuroscientists can generate natural-sounding synthetic speech by using brain activity to control a virtual vocal tract — an anatomically detailed computer simulation including the lips, jaw, tongue, and larynx. The study was conducted in research participants with intact speech, but the technology could one day restore the voices of people who have lost the ability to speak due to paralysis or neurological damage.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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Gestures and visual animations reveal cognitive origins of linguistic meaning

Gestures and visual animations can help reveal the cognitive origins of meaning, indicating that our minds can assign a linguistic structure to new informational content ‘on the fly’ — even if it is not linguistic in nature.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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Growing up in poverty increases diagnoses of psychosis-spectrum mental illnesses

Growing up in impoverished urban neighborhoods more than doubles your chances over the average person of developing a psychosis-spectrum disorder by the time you reach middle adulthood, according to a new study of nearly 4,000 families who were monitored over 30 years.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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Short period of parental sexual contact prior to pregnancy increases offspring risk of schizophrenia

Children may be at a slightly increased risk of schizophrenia when their parents were in sexual contact for less than three years before conceiving them, according to new research.
Parenting News — ScienceDaily

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How humans reduce uncertainty in social situations

A new perspective paper establishes a framework to apply rigorous mathematical models of uncertainty originally developed for non-social situations, such as whether or not to purchase a lottery ticket, to social scenarios such as determining an interviewer’s opinion of an interviewee.
Consumer Behavior News — ScienceDaily

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Climate change could undermine children’s education and development in the tropics

A new study concludes that exposure to extreme heat and precipitation in prenatal and early childhood years in countries of the global tropics could make it harder for children to attain secondary school education, even for better-off households.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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Young children judge others based on facial features as much as adults do

Just like adults, children by the age of 5 make rapid and consistent character judgements of others based on facial features, such as the tilt of the mouth or the distance between the eyes. Those facial features also shape how children behave toward others.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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Growing a cerebral tract in a microscale brain model

An international research team modeled the growth of cerebral tracts. Using neurons derived from stem cells, they grew cortical-like spheroids. In a microdevice, the spheroids extended bundles of axons toward each other, forming a physical and electrical connection. Fascicles grew less efficiently when one spheroid was absent, and when a gene relevant to cerebral tract formation was knocked-down. The study further illuminates brain growth and developmental disorders.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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Behavioral disorders in kids with autism linked to reduced brain connectivity

More than a quarter of children with autism spectrum disorder are also diagnosed with disruptive behavior disorders. Now researchers have identified a possible biological cause: a key mechanism that regulates emotion functions differently in the brains of the children who exhibit disruptive behavior.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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Brain wiring differences identified in children with conduct disorder

Behavioral problems in young people with severe antisocial behavior — known as conduct disorder — could be caused by differences in the brain’s wiring that link the brain’s emotional centers together, according to new research.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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Major study finds one in five children have mental health problems

One in five Ontario children and youth suffer from a mental disorder, but less than one-third have had contact with a mental health care provider. A new study included 10,802 children and youth aged four to 17 in 6,537 families. It replicated and expanded on the landmark 1983 Ontario Child Health Study of 3,290 children in 1,869 families.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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How college students can end up in vicious cycle of substance abuse, poor academics, stress

One negative behavior such as substance abuse or heavy alcohol drinking can lead college students toward a vicious cycle of poor lifestyle choices, lack of sleep, mental distress and low grades, according to new research.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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Elucidation of functional mechanism of ‘love hormone,’ oxytocin, at molecular level

Oxytocin is essential in activities of the social brain such as trust and love and in maternal bonding behaviors. It is produced in the brain and secreted into the circulation. Here, by analyzing maternal behaviors of RAGE gene-manipulated mice, oxytocin was found to be transported back to the brain, crossing the blood-brain barrier (BBB), an extremely effective barrier, by binding to the receptor for advanced glycation end-products (RAGE) on capillary endothelial cells of the BBB.
Parenting News — ScienceDaily

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‘Mindreading’ neurons simulate decisions of social partners

Scientists have identified special types of brain cells that may allow us to simulate the decision-making processes of others, thereby reconstructing their state of mind and predicting their intentions. Dysfunction in these ‘simulation neurons’ may help explain difficulties with social interactions in conditions such as autism and social anxiety.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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Simple way to inoculate teens against junk food marketing

A simple and brief intervention can provide lasting protection for adolescents against the harmful effects of food marketing. Researchers find that reframing how students view food-marketing campaigns can spur adolescents, particularly boys, to make healthier daily dietary choices for an extended period of time. The method works in part by tapping into teens’ natural desire to rebel against authority.
Consumer Behavior News — ScienceDaily

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Cognitive functioning does not predict weight-loss outcome for adolescents

Young people with cognitive impairments and developmental disabilities, including Down syndrome, have similar weight-loss trajectories to those with typical cognitive function after bariatric surgery, according to a new study.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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Autism rate rises 43 percent in New Jersey, study finds

A new report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, which uses research by Rutgers University, shows a significant increase in the percentage of 4-year-old children with autism spectrum disorder in New Jersey. The study found the rate increased 43 percent from 2010 to 2014 in the state.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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Anesthesia sends neurons down the wrong path in unborn rat babies

A study provides new insight into why — and when — anesthesia during pregnancy harms unborn brains. Most research into prenatal exposure to anesthesia has focused killing brain cells, this rat study showed how anesthesia disrupts the ‘precisely choreographed’ migration neurons make in utero, and how not ‘arriving at their proper and predetermined’ locations can have profound impact on brain development.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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Childhood trauma has lasting effect on brain connectivity in patients with depression

A study found that childhood trauma is linked to abnormal connectivity in the brain in adults with major depressive disorder (MDD). The paper shows symptom-specific, system-level changes in brain network connectivity in MDD.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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Too hungry to learn: New research provides food for thought

Food insecurity — that is, limited access to sufficient safe and nutritious food at home — negatively impacts on the learning ability of adolescents in India, new research shows.
K-12 Education News — ScienceDaily

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Later school start times significantly reduce teen driving accidents

A new study shows a significant decrease in teen driving accidents when school start is delayed. Researchers studied the impact of a 50-minute delay in high school start times in one of the largest school districts in the US.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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What most attracts us to a tourist destination? Attractions, culture and gastronomy

Tourists’ expectations when visiting a particular place are related to several features of the chosen destination: culture, architecture, gastronomy, infrastructure, landscape, events, shopping, etc. These features attract people to the destination and contribute to the overall experience of the trip. As a whole, they are crucial aspects of the destinations and have a profound influence on their success. Therefore, the study of the market segment of urban destinations is particularly important due to the impact on the economic development of cities.
Consumer Behavior News — ScienceDaily

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Associating colors with vowels? Almost all of us do!

Does [a:] as in ‘baa’ sound more green or more red? And is [i:] as in ‘beet’ light or dark in color? Even though we perceive speech and color are perceived with different sensory organs, nearly everyone has an idea about what colors and vowels fit with each other. And a large number of us have a particular system for doing so.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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Countries that help working class students get into university have happier citizens

A study has shown that ‘inclusive’ educational policies that help working class students access higher education, such as delaying streaming children according to their ability until they are older, lowering the cost of private education, and increasing the intake of universities so that more students can attend all act to reduce the ‘happiness gap’ between the rich and poor.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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Parental behavior affects the involvement of children in cyberbullying

Experts have recently published a study of the perception that adolescents have of the upbringing they have had and their relationship to cyberbullying. In this way, the data obtained highlights that the involvement of families and their training in prevention programs is a fundamental as it has been shown that parental behavior has an influence on the involvement of children in cyberbullying.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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A ‘million word gap’ for children who aren’t read to at home

Young children whose parents read them five books a day enter kindergarten having heard about 1.4 million more words than kids who were never read to, a new study found. This ‘million word gap’ could be one key in explaining differences in vocabulary and reading development.
Infant and Preschool Learning News — ScienceDaily

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Interparental aggression often co-occurs with aggression toward kids

Parents in the midst of a psychologically or physically aggressive argument tend to also be aggressive with their children, according to researchers. The team found that this ‘spillover’ of aggression toward children causes kids to exhibit greater fear during future incidents of interparental aggression, regardless of the severity of those future incidents, than children who do not experience this spillover effect.
Parenting News — ScienceDaily

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Impact of poverty on children’s brain activity

New research reveals the impact of poverty on children’s brain activity. Researchers studied the brain function of children aged between four months and four years in rural India, and compared their results with children from families in Midwest America. They found that children in India from lower-income backgrounds, where mothers also had a low level of education, had weaker brain activity and were more likely to be distracted.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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Inflammation inhibitor blocks neurodevelopmental disorders in mouse model

New work shows that an enzyme inhibitor reduced inflammation in the brains of mice born to mothers with maternal immune activation. Inflammation triggered by the enzyme, soluble epoxide hydrolase, is linked to neurodevelopmental disorders in these mice.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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Childhood methylphenidate treatment predicts antidepressant use during adolescence

A new, 12-year longitudinal study, which monitored 6,830 children from early childhood into adolescence, has shown that consistent treatment with MPH-based medications during childhood increases the risk of antidepressant use during adolescence. The study is the first of its kind to examine the connection between children diagnosed with ADHD and prescribed MPH between the ages of six and eight, and future dispensed prescriptions of antidepressants.
Parenting News — ScienceDaily

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Gastrointestinal complaints in children could signal future mental health problem

Researchers have linked disruption of a child’s gastrointestinal microbiome triggered by early-life adversity — such as parental separation — with activity in the regions of the brain associated with emotional health.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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Maternal diet during pregnancy may modulate the risk of ADHD symptoms in children

A study suggest that the risk of a child developing symptoms of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) may be modulated by the mother’s diet during pregnancy. The research analyzed samples of umbilical cord plasma to quantify the levels of omega-6 and omega-3 that reach the fetus. The analysis showed a higher omega-6:omega-3 ratio to be associated with a higher risk of ADHD symptoms at seven years of age.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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Children with autism are in ‘in tune’ with mom’s feelings like other children

New research addresses limitations of prior autism spectrum disorder (ASD) studies on facial emotion recognition by using five distinct facial emotions in unfamiliar and familiar (mom) faces to test the influence of familiarity in children with and without ASD. Findings show no differences in the two groups of children and reveal that children with ASD are perceptive to their mother’s emotions, which may indicate greater potential to learn and socialize with people they know rather than with strangers.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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Mind melding: Understanding the connected, social brain

Parents may often feel like they are not ‘on the same wavelength’ as their kids. But it turns out that, at least for babies, their brainwaves literally sync with their moms when they are learning from them. In a new study, researchers found that how well babies’ neural activity syncs with their moms’ predicts how well they learn social cues about new toys.
Infant and Preschool Learning News — ScienceDaily

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New type of mobile tracking link shoppers’ physical movements, buying choices

A new study used a targeting strategy that tracks where, when, and for how long consumers are in a shopping mall to determine how shoppers’ physical movements affect their economic choices. The study found that targeting potential customers in this way can significantly improve advertising via mobile phones.
Consumer Behavior News — ScienceDaily

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Prenatal allergies prompt sexual changes in offspring

A single allergic reaction during pregnancy prompts sexual-development changes in the brains of offspring that last a lifetime, new research suggests. Female rats born to mothers exposed to an allergen during pregnancy acted more characteristically ‘male’ — mounting other female rodents, for instance — and had brains and nervous systems that looked more like those seen in typical male animals.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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How team sports change a child’s brain

Adult depression has long been associated with shrinkage of the hippocampus, a brain region that plays an important role in memory and response to stress. Now, new research has linked participation in team sports to larger hippocampal volumes in children and less depression in boys ages 9 to 11.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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How the ‘good feeling’ can influence the purchase of sustainable chocolate

More and more products carry ethical labels such as fair-trade or organic, which consumers view positively. Nevertheless, the sales figures of these products often remain low, even though they offer advantages for the environment or for society. A team of scientists have investigated what factors influence consumers’ purchasing intentions.
Consumer Behavior News — ScienceDaily

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Brain region discovered that only processes spoken, not written words

Patients in a new study were able to comprehend words that were written but not said aloud. They could write the names of things they saw but not verbalize them. For instance, if a patient in the study saw the word ‘hippopotamus’ written on a piece of paper, they could identify a hippopotamus in flashcards. But when that patient heard someone say ‘hippopotamus,’ they could not point to the picture of the animal.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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Common cause in sudden death syndromes

Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) and Sudden Unexpected Death in Epilepsy (SUDEP) are syndromes that share many medical similarities but whose physiological causes are poorly understood. An opinion article publishing March 21 in the journal Trends in Neurosciences suggests that the inability for an individual to wake up when their CO2 blood levels rise, likely due to a faulty neural reflex, may be a shared cause for incidences of death in both disorders.
Infant and Preschool Learning News — ScienceDaily

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It’s spring already? Physics explains why time flies as we age

Researchers have a new explanation for why those endless days of childhood seemed to last so much longer than they do now — physics. According to the theory, the apparent temporal discrepancy can be blamed on the ever-slowing speed at which images are obtained and processed by the human brain as the body ages.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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Brain-inspired AI inspires insights about the brain (and vice versa)

Researchers have described the results of experiments that used artificial neural networks to predict with greater accuracy than ever before how different areas in the brain respond to specific words. The work employed a type of recurrent neural network called long short-term memory (LSTM) that includes in its calculations the relationships of each word to what came before to better preserve context.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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Families and schools may play key roles in promoting adolescent self-confidence

Self-confidence is critical for teens as they prepare for the challenges of adulthood, and both families and schools may together play a vital role in boosting adolescents’ confidence even in the face of difficulties with family, according to researchers.
Parenting News — ScienceDaily

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Social environment helps determine attitudes toward risk

Studies have shown women are more risk-averse than men, a trait experts say could help to explain the persistent wage gap between men and women. New research suggests those gender differences are shaped by culture and the social environment and that those differences can shift, at least in children.
Consumer Behavior News — ScienceDaily

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‘Virtual focus groups’ uncover clues to rural and urban HPV vaccination disparities

Researchers have harnessed the power of social media to understand differences in attitudes and behaviors about human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination among hundreds of thousands of parents living in rural and urban areas.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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Differences in brain activity in children with anhedonia

Researchers have identified changes in brain connectivity and brain activity during rest and reward anticipation in children with anhedonia, a condition where people lose interest and pleasure in activities they used to enjoy. The study sheds light on brain function associated with anhedonia and helps differentiate anhedonia from other related aspects of psychopathology.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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Taking arts classes leads to better academic performance

A new study found a link between arts elective courses in music, dance, visual art and drama, and better grades in middle school. The study followed a large and diverse sample of preschool children up until they completed sixth, seventh and eighth grade.
K-12 Education News — ScienceDaily

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Diet-induced changes favor innovation in speech sounds

Diet-induced changes in the human bite resulted in new sounds such as ‘f’ in languages all over the world, a study by an international team led by researchers has shown. The findings contradict the theory that the range of human sounds has remained fixed throughout human history.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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Poor pitch singing could be a matter of the tune in your head

Sub-vocalization, the silent, preparatory muscle movements of the face and larynx that result when singers run a song through their heads prior to vocalizing, could be nudging them out of tune, according to researchers. Their recently published study for the first time presents evidence suggesting a relationship among sub-vocalization, auditory imagery and poor pitch singing.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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Trials testing new educational methods in schools ‘often fail to produce useful evidence’

The new study found that 40% of large-scale randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in the UK and the US failed to produce any evidence as to whether an educational intervention helped to boost academic attainment or not.
K-12 Education News — ScienceDaily

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Mental health issues increased significantly in young adults over last decade

The percentage of young Americans experiencing certain types of mental health disorders has risen significantly over the past decade, with no corresponding increase in older adults, according to new research.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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Expectant mothers can prevent fetal brain problems caused by the flu, study shows

Choline, an essential B vitamin nutrient, can prevent fetal brain developmental problems that often occur after prenatal maternal infections such as colds and influenza (flu), according to a new study.
Infant and Preschool Learning News — ScienceDaily

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Infants’ advances in speech processing play role in language-cognition link

A new study provides the first evidence that infants’ increasingly precise perceptual tuning to the sounds of their native language sets constraints on the range of human languages they will link to cognition.
Infant and Preschool Learning News — ScienceDaily

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Researchers investigate the impact of the statewide opioid crisis on teachers

Researchers have evaluated the impact of the opioid crisis in classrooms across the Mountain State through a survey of 2,205 teachers in 49 counties.
K-12 Education News — ScienceDaily

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Some children can ‘recover’ from autism, but problems often remain, study finds

Research in the past several years has shown that children can outgrow a diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), once considered a lifelong condition. In a new study, researchers have found that the vast majority of such children still have difficulties that require therapeutic and educational support.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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