Why your number of romantic partners mirrors your mother

A new national study shows that people whose mothers had more partners — married or cohabiting — often follow the same path. Results suggest that mothers may pass on personality traits and relationship skills that make their children more or less likely to form stable relationships.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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Developing instruments to detect language problems earlier

Using the Computerized Comprehension Task, the team measured concepts by asking children to touch images on a touch-sensitive screen that represented words they were learning. The team used a measure of vocabulary that focused on stable concepts, finding that it was superior to prior measures in predicting children’s general language ability at age 3. The team also identified individual children at risk for language problems a full two years earlier than prior studies.
Infant and Preschool Learning News — ScienceDaily

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Autism and zinc deficiency in early development

Autism has been associated with zinc deficiency in infancy. While it is not yet known whether zinc deficiency in early development causes autism, scientists have now found a mechanistic link. Their study connects zinc, autism risk genes and abnormal neuronal connections associated with autism spectrum disorders.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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Wealthier people do less in the struggle against climate change

A collective-risk dilemma experiment with members of the public in Barcelona has shown that people are more or less likely to contribute money to fighting climate change depending on their how wealthy they are. And the results indicate that participants with fewer resources were prepared to contribute significantly more to the public good than wealthier people, sometimes up to twice as much.
Consumer Behavior News — ScienceDaily

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Brain learns to recognize familiar faces regardless of where they are in the visual field

A new study finds that recognition of faces varies by where they appear in the visual field and this variability is reduced by learning familiar faces through social interactions. The findings suggest that repeated social interactions may tune populations of visual neurons in the face processing network to enable consistent and rapid recognition of familiar faces.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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Mothers prefer daughters and fathers prefer sons

A research group has studied whether parents’ gender preferences and investment in offspring are affected by their status, wealth, education or childhood environment. Instead, parental preferences were best predicted by their sex. These results help to make sense of the often contradictory findings on offspring sex preferences.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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Teachers and Trump: Response to 2016 election

Teachers felt immense pressure from school leaders and families to respond in a certain way — or not at all — in their classrooms following the 2016 presidential election, according to new research.
K-12 Education News — ScienceDaily

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For adults, the terrible twos are a confusing earful

Here’s another reason you might be exhausted after that preschool birthday party: Your brain had to work to figure out who actually asked for more ice cream. ‘What we found with two-and-a-half-year-olds is that it’s amazingly hard for adults to identify who’s talking,’ said a researcher.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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Face the music: Explicit anti-piracy warnings are best deterrent

STOP! This is illegal. You may be monitored and fined. Did that get your attention? Good. Because according to a new study, this phrasing coupled with a graphic of a computer and download symbol with a prohibitive slash is the most effective way to stop music piracy.
Consumer Behavior News — ScienceDaily

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More than intelligence needed for success in life

Research has examined long-held beliefs that success in school and careers is due to more than just high intelligence. Non-cognitive skills are also important.
K-12 Education News — ScienceDaily

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Preschool children show awake responses to naptime nonsense words

Hearing has long been suspected as being ‘on’ all the time — even in our sleep. Now scientists are reporting results on what is heard and not heard during sleep and what that might mean for a developing brain. Preliminary results show preschool children seem to have memory traces for sounds heard during nap time.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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Women who give birth to boys much more likely to have postnatal depression

A new study into postnatal depression (PND) found the odds of developing this condition increased by 79 percent when mothers had baby boys compared to baby girls. Overall the researchers identified that women who give birth to males are 71-79% more likely to develop PND. Furthermore, women whose births had complications were 174% more likely to experience PND compared to those women who had no complications.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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Grandparents: Raising their children’s children, they get the job done

Millions of children are being raised solely by their grandparents, with numbers continuing to climb as the opioid crisis and other factors disrupt families. New research shows that caregivers who step up to raise their grandchildren are overcoming unique challenges to manage just as well as biological and adoptive parent caregivers.
Infant and Preschool Learning News — ScienceDaily

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Model paves way for faster, more efficient translations of more languages

Researchers have developed a novel ‘unsupervised’ language translation model — meaning it runs without the need for human annotations and guidance — that could lead to faster, more efficient computer-based translations of far more languages.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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Mental health diagnoses among US children, youth continue to rise at alarming rate

The number of children and adolescents visiting the nation’s emergency departments due to mental health concerns continued to rise at an alarming rate from 2012 through 2016, with mental health diagnoses for non-Latino blacks outpacing such diagnoses among youth of other racial/ethnic groups, according to a retrospective cross-sectional study.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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Children who experience violence early in life develop faster

A study has shown that exposure to violence early in life — such as physical, emotional, or sexual abuse — is associated with faster biological aging, including pubertal development and a cellular metric of biological aging called epigenetic age.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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Potential flaw in our assumptions about unknown opinions of others

Findings from a new study suggest that people assume that those who are silent in a conversation would agree with their own opinion, even if the majority of the speakers in the group have a different opinion. This has implications for how people form opinions about products, politics, and much more.
Consumer Behavior News — ScienceDaily

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Advertising in kids’ apps more prevalent than parents may realize

Ninety-five percent of reviewed apps for children ages 5 and under include at least one form of advertising, a new study finds. Researchers found play was frequently interrupted by pop-up video ads, persuasion by commercial characters to make in-app purchases to enhance the game experience and overt banner ads that could be distracting, misleading and not always age-appropriate.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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Five out of five? Study reveals psychological influences in online reviews

A new study reveals how psychological factors affect the ratings people provide and how they describe their experiences when posting online reviews. Researchers found the length of time between product or service consumption and posting affects the review given.
Consumer Behavior News — ScienceDaily

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Brainwave activity reveals potential biomarker for autism in children

Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) affects children’s social and intellectual development. Conventional diagnostic methods for ASD rely on behavioral observation. Researchers have now identified a potential quantifiable biomarker for diagnosing ASD. Using magnetic brainwave imaging, they correlated altered gamma oscillation with the motor response of children with ASD, which is consistent with previous key hypotheses on ASD. The means of observation potentially offers a noninvasive, impartial form of early diagnosis of ASD.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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Smoke alarms using mother’s voice wake children better than high-pitch tone alarms

Researchers examined characteristics of four different smoke alarms to determine which ones worked best to wake children. The researchers found that a sleeping child was about three times more likely to be awakened by one of the three voice alarms than by the tone alarm.
Parenting News — ScienceDaily

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Why relationships — not money — are the key to improving schools

Strong relationships between teachers, parents and students at schools has more impact on improving student learning than does financial support, new research shows. The study found that social capital had a three- to five-times larger effect than financial capital on reading and math scores in Michigan schools.
K-12 Education News — ScienceDaily

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Children as young as seven suffer effects of discrimination, study shows

Children are sensitive to and suffer the impacts of discrimination as young as seven years old, new research finds. Previous studies have shown children can identify racism at that age, but the study is the first to study the impacts on children under 10 years old. The study also suggests that a strong sense of ethnic-racial identity is a significant buffer against these negative effects.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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Loss of first baby tooth a positive experience for children

Scared, ashamed, happy or proud — how do children feel when they lose their first baby tooth? Scientists have now found that children’s feelings are predominantly positive. The study also reveals that previous visits to the dentist’s as well as parental background and level of education affect how children experience the loss of their first tooth.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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Study explores infant body position and learning

A developmental psychologist has completed a study that is the first to measure how often infants spend time in different body positions over the first year of life. The study aims to understand how the physical context of infants’ everyday experiences – in particular, how much time they spend in different body positions – changes over the course of the first year and how these changes are predicted by infants’ developing motor skills.
Infant and Preschool Learning News — ScienceDaily

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Thinking outside the box: Adults with ADHD not constrained in creativity

People often believe those with Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder face challenges that could hinder future employment, but a new study found that adults with ADHD feel empowered doing creative tasks that could help them on the job.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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Celebrity culture likely contributed to destigmatizing out-of-wedlock childbirth

In 1992, former Vice President Dan Quayle criticized the sitcom character Murphy Brown’s decision to have a child out of wedlock. That ignited discussions that continue today about whether celebrities might be contributing to the demise of the nuclear family, yet 40 years of data from one reputable celebrity news source suggests that celebrities in fact have fewer out-of-wedlock childbirths compared to the rest of the U.S. population.
Parenting News — ScienceDaily

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Cumulative sub-concussive impacts in a single season of youth football

In an investigation of head impact burden and change in neurocognitive function during a season of youth football, researchers find that sub-concussive impacts are not correlated with worsening performance in neurocognitive function.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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For preterm infants, skin-to-skin contact affects hormone levels — and may promote parental engagement

For premature infants in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU), skin-to-skin contact with parents influences levels of hormones related to mother-infant attachment (oxytocin) and stress (cortisol) — and may increase parents’ level of engagement with their infants.
Infant and Preschool Learning News — ScienceDaily

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Brain cells called astrocytes have unexpected role in brain ‘plasticity’

Researchers have shown that astrocytes — long-overlooked supportive cells in the brain — help to enable the brain’s plasticity, a new role for astrocytes that was not previously known. The findings could point to ways to restore connections that have been lost due to aging or trauma.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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Children with autism, developmental delays nearly 50 percent more likely to be overweight, obese

A new study reveals that children with developmental delays, including autism spectrum disorder (ASD), are up to 50 percent more likely to be overweight or obese compared with the general population.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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Kids’ sleep may suffer from moms’ tight work schedules

After studying the sleep habits of children from ages five to nine, researchers found that when mothers reported less flexibility in their work schedules, their children got less sleep. When they gained flexibility in their work schedules, their children slept more.
Parenting News — ScienceDaily

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Attending the ‘best’ high school may yield benefits and risks for students

Parents often go to great lengths to ensure that their children attend top schools, surrounded by high-achieving peers who often come from advantaged backgrounds. But data collected from individuals over a span of 50 years suggests that these aspects of selective schools aren’t uniformly beneficial to students’ educational and professional outcomes in the following decades.
K-12 Education News — ScienceDaily

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Youth violence lower in countries with complete ban on corporal punishment

A study shows that in countries where there is a complete ban on all corporal punishment of children there is less fighting among young people. There was 31 percent less physical fighting in young men and 42 percent less physical fighting in young women in countries where corporal punishment was banned in all settings, compared with those where corporal punishment was permitted both at school and at home. In countries where there was a partial ban on corporal punishment (such as in Canada, the US and the UK where corporal punishment not banned at home), the level of violence in young men was similar to that in countries with no bans, though the level of violence in women was lower (at 56 percent).
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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Father’s nicotine use can cause cognitive problems in children and grandchildren

A father’s exposure to nicotine may cause cognitive deficits in his children and even grandchildren, according to a new study. The effect, which was not caused by direct secondhand exposure, may be due to epigenetic changes in key genes in the father’s sperm.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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Linguistic red flags from Facebook posts can predict future depression diagnoses

Research finds that the language people use in their Facebook posts can predict a future diagnosis of depression as accurately as the tools clinicians use in medical settings to screen for the disease.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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Freeloaders beware: Incentives to foster cooperation are just around the corner

In our society, there are always a certain percentage of people who adopt a freeloader attitude. They let other members of society do all the work and do not do their part. In a new study researchers show that it is possible to incentivize members of society to cooperate by providing them fixed bonuses and, thus, prevent freeloader behavior from becoming prevalent.
Consumer Behavior News — ScienceDaily

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Gene variants raise risk of migraines in African-American children

Researchers have discovered common gene variants associated with migraines in African-American children. The research adds to knowledge of genetic influences on childhood migraine and may lead to future precision medicine treatments for African-American children with these intense headaches.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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Disruption makes startup investors balance caution against fear of missing out

A new study finds that fear of missing out motivates investors to give money early to startups with a disruptive vision. However, those backers are reluctant to invest too much in unproven ideas that might not take off. In other words, disruptive startups are more likely to raise money, but they receive smaller amounts than less-threatening ventures.
Consumer Behavior News — ScienceDaily

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Brain circuits for successful emotional development established during infancy

Researchers tracking the development of the brain’s emotion circuitry in infancy found that adult-like functional brain connections for emotional regulation emerge during the first year of life. And the growth of these brain circuits during the second year of life predicted the IQ and emotional control of the children at 4 years old, suggesting new avenues for early detection and intervention for children who are at risk for emotional problems.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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Pregnant women recognize baby expressions differently depending on mental health history

A pilot study has found that pregnant women who have suffered from depression or bipolar disorder (i.e. both mania and depression) recognize babies’ faces and how babies laugh or cry, differently to healthy controls. This happens even if they are not currently experiencing depressive or manic symptoms and may represent an early risk-factor for children of these women, although the authors stress that research would be needed to confirm any long-term effects.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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Compound improves social interaction in autism mouse model

Children with autism often find social interactions awkward, leaving them isolated. Now scientists report that they have discovered a first-of-its-kind compound that promotes social interaction among laboratory mice that display autistic traits. The finding could lead to the development of drugs capable of improving social behaviors in those who have autism.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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Checked off ‘the talk’ with your teen? Not so fast: Once isn’t enough

New research shows that one vague conversation with your teen about sex is not enough. Researchers found that ongoing communication between parents and their adolescent children benefits the parent-child relationship and leads to safer sexual activity at age 21.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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Latin may help students bridge their native language with English

Researchers found that in teaching English learners — students who aren’t fluent in English and often come from homes where a language other than English is spoken — the Latin roots of words helped them problem solve the meaning of unfamiliar words.
Infant and Preschool Learning News — ScienceDaily

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Fathers’ postnatal hormone levels predict later caregiving

Dads whose cortisol levels were elevated while they held their newborns on the day of their birth — either skin-to-skin or clothed — were more likely to be involved with indirect care and play with their infants in the first months of their lives.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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Reading is a team-lift as different brain parts work together to predict proficiency

The extent to which sensory-specific parts of the brain are able to connect as a network, not necessarily anatomically, but functionally, during a child’s development predicts their reading proficiency, according to a new neuroimaging study.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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Nurseries may trump informal or childminder care for kids’ psychological development

Attendance at a nursery/crèche staffed by professionals may be linked to better psychological development than being looked after by family/friends or a childminder in early childhood, suggests new research.
Parenting News — ScienceDaily

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Unlocking the secret of how the brain encodes speech

People like the late Stephen Hawking are unable to speak because their muscles are paralyzed. Scientists want to help these individuals communicate by developing a brain machine interface to decode the commands the brain is sending to the tongue, palate, lips and larynx. New research has moved science closer by unlocking new information about how the brain encodes speech. They discovered the brain controls speech in a similar way to how it controls arm movements.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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When neglected children become adolescents

Many migrant children separated from their parents at the U.S. border, some of them very young, have landed in shelters where they often experience stress, neglect and minimal social and cognitive stimulation. The latest findings tell a cautionary tale about the psychiatric and social risks of long-term deprivation and family separation as children transition to adolescence.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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Scientists use AI to develop better predictions of why children struggle at school

Scientists using machine learning — a type of artificial intelligence — with data from hundreds of children who struggle at school, identified clusters of learning difficulties which did not match the previous diagnosis the children had been given. The researchers from the Medical Research Council Cognition and Brain Sciences Unit at the University of Cambridge say this reinforces the need for children to receive detailed assessments of their cognitive skills to identify the best type of support.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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