Prenatal allergies prompt sexual changes in offspring

A single allergic reaction during pregnancy prompts sexual-development changes in the brains of offspring that last a lifetime, new research suggests. Female rats born to mothers exposed to an allergen during pregnancy acted more characteristically ‘male’ — mounting other female rodents, for instance — and had brains and nervous systems that looked more like those seen in typical male animals.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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How team sports change a child’s brain

Adult depression has long been associated with shrinkage of the hippocampus, a brain region that plays an important role in memory and response to stress. Now, new research has linked participation in team sports to larger hippocampal volumes in children and less depression in boys ages 9 to 11.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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How the ‘good feeling’ can influence the purchase of sustainable chocolate

More and more products carry ethical labels such as fair-trade or organic, which consumers view positively. Nevertheless, the sales figures of these products often remain low, even though they offer advantages for the environment or for society. A team of scientists have investigated what factors influence consumers’ purchasing intentions.
Consumer Behavior News — ScienceDaily

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Brain region discovered that only processes spoken, not written words

Patients in a new study were able to comprehend words that were written but not said aloud. They could write the names of things they saw but not verbalize them. For instance, if a patient in the study saw the word ‘hippopotamus’ written on a piece of paper, they could identify a hippopotamus in flashcards. But when that patient heard someone say ‘hippopotamus,’ they could not point to the picture of the animal.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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Common cause in sudden death syndromes

Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS) and Sudden Unexpected Death in Epilepsy (SUDEP) are syndromes that share many medical similarities but whose physiological causes are poorly understood. An opinion article publishing March 21 in the journal Trends in Neurosciences suggests that the inability for an individual to wake up when their CO2 blood levels rise, likely due to a faulty neural reflex, may be a shared cause for incidences of death in both disorders.
Infant and Preschool Learning News — ScienceDaily

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It’s spring already? Physics explains why time flies as we age

Researchers have a new explanation for why those endless days of childhood seemed to last so much longer than they do now — physics. According to the theory, the apparent temporal discrepancy can be blamed on the ever-slowing speed at which images are obtained and processed by the human brain as the body ages.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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Brain-inspired AI inspires insights about the brain (and vice versa)

Researchers have described the results of experiments that used artificial neural networks to predict with greater accuracy than ever before how different areas in the brain respond to specific words. The work employed a type of recurrent neural network called long short-term memory (LSTM) that includes in its calculations the relationships of each word to what came before to better preserve context.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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Families and schools may play key roles in promoting adolescent self-confidence

Self-confidence is critical for teens as they prepare for the challenges of adulthood, and both families and schools may together play a vital role in boosting adolescents’ confidence even in the face of difficulties with family, according to researchers.
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Social environment helps determine attitudes toward risk

Studies have shown women are more risk-averse than men, a trait experts say could help to explain the persistent wage gap between men and women. New research suggests those gender differences are shaped by culture and the social environment and that those differences can shift, at least in children.
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‘Virtual focus groups’ uncover clues to rural and urban HPV vaccination disparities

Researchers have harnessed the power of social media to understand differences in attitudes and behaviors about human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination among hundreds of thousands of parents living in rural and urban areas.
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Differences in brain activity in children with anhedonia

Researchers have identified changes in brain connectivity and brain activity during rest and reward anticipation in children with anhedonia, a condition where people lose interest and pleasure in activities they used to enjoy. The study sheds light on brain function associated with anhedonia and helps differentiate anhedonia from other related aspects of psychopathology.
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Taking arts classes leads to better academic performance

A new study found a link between arts elective courses in music, dance, visual art and drama, and better grades in middle school. The study followed a large and diverse sample of preschool children up until they completed sixth, seventh and eighth grade.
K-12 Education News — ScienceDaily

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Diet-induced changes favor innovation in speech sounds

Diet-induced changes in the human bite resulted in new sounds such as ‘f’ in languages all over the world, a study by an international team led by researchers has shown. The findings contradict the theory that the range of human sounds has remained fixed throughout human history.
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Poor pitch singing could be a matter of the tune in your head

Sub-vocalization, the silent, preparatory muscle movements of the face and larynx that result when singers run a song through their heads prior to vocalizing, could be nudging them out of tune, according to researchers. Their recently published study for the first time presents evidence suggesting a relationship among sub-vocalization, auditory imagery and poor pitch singing.
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Trials testing new educational methods in schools ‘often fail to produce useful evidence’

The new study found that 40% of large-scale randomized controlled trials (RCTs) in the UK and the US failed to produce any evidence as to whether an educational intervention helped to boost academic attainment or not.
K-12 Education News — ScienceDaily

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Mental health issues increased significantly in young adults over last decade

The percentage of young Americans experiencing certain types of mental health disorders has risen significantly over the past decade, with no corresponding increase in older adults, according to new research.
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Expectant mothers can prevent fetal brain problems caused by the flu, study shows

Choline, an essential B vitamin nutrient, can prevent fetal brain developmental problems that often occur after prenatal maternal infections such as colds and influenza (flu), according to a new study.
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Infants’ advances in speech processing play role in language-cognition link

A new study provides the first evidence that infants’ increasingly precise perceptual tuning to the sounds of their native language sets constraints on the range of human languages they will link to cognition.
Infant and Preschool Learning News — ScienceDaily

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Researchers investigate the impact of the statewide opioid crisis on teachers

Researchers have evaluated the impact of the opioid crisis in classrooms across the Mountain State through a survey of 2,205 teachers in 49 counties.
K-12 Education News — ScienceDaily

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Some children can ‘recover’ from autism, but problems often remain, study finds

Research in the past several years has shown that children can outgrow a diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), once considered a lifelong condition. In a new study, researchers have found that the vast majority of such children still have difficulties that require therapeutic and educational support.
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First double-blind controlled trial of TNS shows reduced symptoms in some children with ADHD

Currently approved in Canada and Europe for adults with medication-resistant depression and seizures, trigeminal nerve stimulation (TNS) has been found to be an effective and safe means of treatment for children with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), reports a new study.
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Hollywood stars among dozens charged over university ‘scam’

Hollywood stars including Felicity Huffman and Lori Loughlin are among dozens of people charged in connection with an alleged $ 25m (£19m) university admissions cheating scam in the US, according to court documents.
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Mobile devices don’t reduce shared family time

The first study of the impact of digital mobile devices on different aspects of family time in the UK has found that children are spending more time at home with their parents rather than less — but not in shared activities such as watching TV and eating. The increase is in what is called ‘alone-together’ time, when children are at home with their parents but say they are alone.
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For infants, distinguishing between friends and strangers is a laughing matter

Infants as young as five months can differentiate laughter between friends and that between strangers, finds a new study. The results suggest that the ability to detect the nature of social relationships is instilled early in human infancy, possibly the result of a detection system that uses vocal cues.
Infant and Preschool Learning News — ScienceDaily

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Academic performance of urban children with asthma worse than peers without asthma

A new study shows urban children with poorly controlled asthma, particularly those who are ethnic minorities, also suffer academically. Kids who were kept home due to asthma symptoms weren’t able to do as well in the classroom.
K-12 Education News — ScienceDaily

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No link found between MMR vaccine and autism, even among children with other risk factors for autism

A nationwide cohort study of all children born in Denmark to Danish-born mothers between 1999 through 2010 concluded that the mumps, measles, and rubella (MMR) vaccine does not increase the risk of autism, does not trigger autism in susceptible children, and is not associated with clustering of autism cases following vaccination.
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Alzheimer’s treatment holds promise for primary progressive aphasia patients

Scientists have discovered that an existing therapy frequently used to treat Alzheimer’s disease might also work on patients with primary progressive aphasia (PPA), a type of dementia that destroys language and currently has no treatment.
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More than just memories: A new role for the hippocampus during learning

Without an intact hippocampus, forming new memories is impossible. Researchers have found an equally important role for the hippocampus: feeding information to brain areas responsible for learning. Using fMRI, the research team found it was the hippocampus that encoded associations between relevant features of the environment during learning and that the associations encoded in the hippocampus were used by brain systems responsible for learning.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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Sensory tests suggest ‘liking’ wines made with native grapes a learned response

Consumer preference or aversion to wines made from native grapes — such as Concord, Niagara and Catawba, which are grown in North America — may depend on early exposure to the fruits’ sweet, ultra ‘grapey’ taste and aroma, according to researchers who conducted sensory tests with wine drinkers in Pennsylvania and California.
Consumer Behavior News — ScienceDaily

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Child’s elevated mental ill-health risk if mother treated for infection during pregnancy

Risks for autism and depression are higher if one’s mother was in hospital with an infection during pregnancy. This is shown by a major Swedish observational study of nearly 1.8 million children.
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Forgotten fathers: New dads also at risk for postpartum depression

A new study offers an in-depth view of new fathers’ experiences with postpartum depression (PPD). The study explores issues they encounter and how they can move beyond barriers they face in receiving diagnoses and treatment of the little-known phenomenon.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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People track when talkers say ‘uh’ to predict what comes next

Speakers tend to say ‘uh’ before uncommon words (‘uh… automobile’) rather than common words (‘car’). In a new eye-tracking study, researchers show that listeners use this information to predict an uncommon word upon hearing ‘uh.’ Moreover, when an ‘atypical’ speaker says ‘uh’ before common words (‘uh… car’), listeners learn to predict common words after ‘uh’ — but only with a native speaker.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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Kids with cochlear implants since infancy more likely to speak, not sign

Researchers present further evidence that deaf children who received cochlear implants (implanted electronic hearing device) before 12 months of age learn to more rapidly understand spoken language and are more likely to develop spoken language as their exclusive form of communication.
Infant and Preschool Learning News — ScienceDaily

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1 in 3 students with ADHD receive no school interventions

One in three students with ADHD received no school-based interventions and two of three received no classroom management, researchers found in the largest study of children and teens with ADHD ever conducted. At least one in five students with ADHD who experience significant academic and social impairment – those most in need of services – received no school intervention. The gap was particularly evident for adolescents and youth from non-English-speaking and/or lower income families.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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Singing for science: How the arts can help students who struggle most

Incorporating the arts — rapping, dancing, drawing — into science lessons can help low-achieving students retain more knowledge and possibly help students of all ability levels be more creative in their learning, finds a new study.
K-12 Education News — ScienceDaily

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Genetic factors influence human brain expansion

An analysis of brain scans from more than 600 children and adolescents reveals genetically-mediated associations between the size of evolutionarily novel brain regions and intelligence test scores. Genetic influences on the brain follow the patterns of evolutionary expansion of the human brain relative to nonhuman primates.
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Traumatic brain injury and kids: New treatment guidelines issued

To help promote the highest standards of care, and improve the overall rates of survival and recovery following TBI, a panel of pediatric critical care, neurosurgery and other pediatric experts today issued the third edition of the Brain Trauma Foundation Guidelines for the Management of Pediatric Severe TBI.
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Brain response to mom’s voice differs in kids with autism

For most children, the sound of their mother’s voice triggers brain activity patterns distinct from those triggered by an unfamiliar voice. But the unique brain response to mom’s voice is greatly diminished in children with autism, according to a new study.
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Intervention with at-risk infants increases children’s compliance at age 3

Children who are maltreated often develop problems complying with directions and expectations of parents and other authority figures. Lack of compliance can lead to other problems, including difficulty regulating anger and academic troubles. A new study tested a home-visiting intervention for parents of children referred to Child Protective Services (CPS). The study found that children whose parents took part in the intervention demonstrated significantly better compliance than children whose parents did not, and that parents’ sensitivity also increased.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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Infant sleep duration associated with mother’s level of education and prenatal depression

A new study analyzing data from Canadian parents has found that babies sleep less at three months of age if their mothers do not have a university degree, experienced depression during pregnancy or had an emergency cesarean-section delivery.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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Mother’s behavioral corrections tune infant’s brain to angry tone

The same brain network that adults use when they hear angry vocalizations is at work in infants as young as six months old, an effect that is strongest in infants whose mothers spend the most time controlling their behavior, according to a new study.
Infant and Preschool Learning News — ScienceDaily

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Steep rise in self-poisonings in children and adolescents

Self-harm from self-poisoning in children and adolescents is not only increasing but starting at a younger age, finds new research. The study found there were more than 33,500 self-poisonings in young people in Australia from 2006 – 2016, with a 98 per cent increase over this time.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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As genetic data expand, researchers urge caution in how predictors of education outcomes are used

Authors of a new review article warn that as the predictive power of genes tied to learning and educational outcomes increases and access to genetic data expands, researchers, educators, and policymakers must be cautious in how they use such data, interpret related findings, and, in the not-too-distant future, apply genetics-informed student interventions.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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Teens need to text, talk with parents often to maintain youth resiliency after a divorce

Texting, FaceTime and other popular communication methods among teens may help build supportive parent-youth relationships after a divorce, according to a family studies researcher.
Infant and Preschool Learning News — ScienceDaily

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Study affirms self-reported sleep duration as a useful health measure in children

While sleep questionnaires are commonly completed by children and their parents, there has been a lack of data comparing the validity of these self-reported sleep parameters. A new study indicates that these sleep characteristics are relatively accurate compared to one another, and they vary only slightly from objective sleep measures.
Parenting News — ScienceDaily

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Did you get it? I can see it in your eyes

Small involuntary eye movements, independent of any response, can be used to determine whether one has successfully learned. This finding opens new possibilities in understanding the process of learning in populations that are less responsive to external events, such young children, or individuals with certain mental or physical conditions.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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New model mimics persistent interneuron loss seen in prematurity

Research-clinicians created a novel preclinical model that mimics the persistent interneuron loss seen in preterm human infants, identifying interneuron subtypes that could become future therapeutic targets to prevent or lessen neurodevelopmental risks.
Infant and Preschool Learning News — ScienceDaily

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Keep calm and don’t carry on when parenting teens

In a new study, psychologists find that mothers and fathers who are less capable of dampening down their anger are more likely to resort to harsh discipline aimed at their teens, and that fathers in particular were not as good at considering alternative explanations for their teens’ behavior.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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Children with autism, co-occurring ADHD symptoms lag in key measures of independence

A pair of new studies has provided new insight into the challenges faced by children on the autism spectrum who exhibit symptoms of attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). According to the findings, these children have difficulty with adaptive behavior, a key measure of independence.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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Word order predicts a native speakers’ working memory

Memory plays a crucial role in our lives, and several studies have already investigated how we store and retrieve information under different conditions. Typically, stimuli presented at the beginning and at the end of a list are recalled better than stimuli from the middle. But are these findings universal and generalizable across languages and cultures?
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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Positive findings with dasotraline for ADHD in children ages 6-12

A new study in children aged 6 to 12 years of dasotraline, a promising new treatment for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), showed significant improvement in efficacy in the treatment of ADHD compared to placebo beginning at week 1 and continuing throughout the study.
Parenting News — ScienceDaily

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Immersive virtual reality therapy shows lasting effect in treatment of phobias in children with autism

New research shows that an immersive virtual reality environment treats 45 percent of children with autism, freeing them from their fears and phobias — and that the treatment lasts.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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Effective self-control strategies involve much more than willpower

It’s mid-February, around the time that most people waver in their commitment to the resolutions they’ve made for the new year. Many of these resolutions require us to forego a behavior we want to engage in for the one we think we should engage in. In a new report, leading researchers in behavioral science propose a new framework that outlines different types of self-control strategies and emphasizes that self-control entails more than sheer willpower to be effective.
Consumer Behavior News — ScienceDaily

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Brain clock ticks differently in autism

The neural ‘time windows’ in certain small brain areas contribute to the complex cognitive symptoms of autism, new research suggests. In a brain imaging study of adults, the severity of autistic symptoms was linked to how long these brain areas stored information. The differences in neural timescales may underlie features of autism like hypersensitivity and could be useful as a future diagnostic tool.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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Children who eat lunch score 18 percent higher in reading tests

The powerful connection between nutrition and education has been revealed by new research from ESMT Berlin. Primary school children who attended a public free lunch program over an extended period were shown to have significantly better learning outcomes.
K-12 Education News — ScienceDaily

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Surrounded by low achievers:High on positive emotions?

Researchers demonstrate negative impacts of high-achieving environment on school students’ individual emotional well-being.
K-12 Education News — ScienceDaily

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Studies lend support to ‘grandmother hypothesis,’ but there are limits

Humans are unusual in that women go through menopause and stop reproducing long before reaching the end of their life expectancy. One theory holds that this aspect of human life history may be explained by the evolutionary benefits associated with the role of grandmothers in helping their grandchildren. Now, two studies add to evidence for this so-called ‘grandmother hypothesis.’ However, they also show that there are limits.
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Human enhancement: Is it good for society?

Human enhancement technologies are opening up tremendous new possibilities. But they’re also raising important questions about what it means to be human. These technologies are currently geared towards upgrading or restoring physical and psychological abilities for medical purposes. An application is surfacing, however, that is designed with another goal in mind: embellishing performance. An international team of researchers has been examining the ethical issues arising from these experiments.
Consumer Behavior News — ScienceDaily

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Why children struggle with the ‘cocktail party effect’

Researchers have clarified the development of the ability to attend to a speaker in a noisy environment — a phenomenon known as the ‘cocktail party effect.’ Published in JNeurosci, the study could have implications for helping children navigate the often-noisy surroundings in which they grow and learn.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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From Peep Show to Hollywood royalty: Why we love Olivia Colman

Robert Webb and David Mitchell knew it. As Webb affectionately put it on Twitter following her Golden Globe win: “Colman. She’s so bloody *nice*… She’s a consummate professional with seemingly unlimited talent. WHAT a shocking a*******.”
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See-through fish aid scientists in autism-related breakthrough

Researchers have discovered a clue in the humble zebrafish’s digestive tract that, one day, could help people on the autism spectrum alleviate one of the most common yet least studied symptoms of their disorder: gastrointestinal distress.
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Touch biographies reveal transgenerational nature of touch

The way we feel about being touched — and the way we touch others — are shaped by our personal and generational affective history. Touch inequalities, too, are often transmitted through generations, a new study shows. For the study, the researchers analyzed a unique set of data, namely touch biographies.
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Dengue virus infection may cause severe outcomes following Zika virus infection during pregnancy

Prior Dengue virus infection may cause severe outcomes following Zika virus infection during pregnancy, a new study shows. The research points to a possible mechanism for the enhancement of Zika virus progression during pregnancy in an animal model.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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Climate change poses greater risk of mental health challenges for children born to depressed mothers

Climate change poses an exponentially greater risk for mental health problems in children born to mothers with prenatal depression who also experience natural disaster-related stress. That is the message of a new study of infants born to New York City mothers shortly after Superstorm Sandy.
Infant and Preschool Learning News — ScienceDaily

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Hearing and deaf infants process information differently

Deaf children face unique communication challenges, but a new study shows that the effects of hearing impairment extend far beyond language skills to basic cognitive functions, and the differences in development begin surprisingly early in life. Researchers have studied how deaf infants process visual stimuli compared to hearing infants and found they took significantly longer to become familiar with new objects.
Infant and Preschool Learning News — ScienceDaily

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Maternal depression and natural disaster-related stress may affect infants’ temperament

A new study demonstrates that prenatal maternal depression has important consequences for infant temperament. Furthermore, the negative impact of prenatal maternal depression appeared to be magnified when pregnant women lived through Superstorm Sandy.
Infant and Preschool Learning News — ScienceDaily

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Advocating for social issues at work more likely to succeed linking morality and mission, study says

When convincing management to consider advocating for a particular social issue, employees may think it is wise to focus on the benefits to the bottom line but making a moral argument may be a better strategy, as long as it aligns with the company’s values, according to research.
Consumer Behavior News — ScienceDaily

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Laughter may be best medicine — for brain surgery

Neuroscientists have discovered a focal pathway in the brain that when electrically stimulated causes immediate laughter, followed by a sense of calm and happiness, even during awake brain surgery. The effects of stimulation were observed in an epilepsy patient undergoing diagnostic monitoring for seizure diagnosis. These effects were then harnessed to help her complete a separate awake brain surgery two days later, and then confirmed in two other patients.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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Childhood lead exposure linked to poor adult mental health

Lead exposure in childhood appears to have long-lasting negative effects on mental health and personality in adulthood, according to a study of people who grew up in the era of leaded gasoline. The findings reveal that the higher a person’s blood lead levels at age 11, the more likely they are to show signs of mental illness and difficult personality traits by age 38.
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Persistent low body weight in young kids increases risk for anorexia nervosa later, study finds

A new study has found that a persistent low body mass index (BMI) in children, starting as young as age 2 for boys and 4 for girls, may be a risk factor for the development of anorexia nervosa in adolescence.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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Learning new vocabulary during deep sleep

Researchers showed that we can acquire the vocabulary of a new language during distinct phases of slow-wave sleep and that the sleep-learned vocabulary could be retrieved unconsciously following waking. Memory formation appeared to be mediated by the same brain structures that also mediate wake vocabulary learning.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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Babies who hear two languages at home develop advantages in attention

In the study, infants who are exposed to more than one language show better attentional control than infants who are exposed to only one language. This means that exposure to bilingual environments should be considered a significant factor in the early development of attention in infancy, the researchers say, and could set the stage for lifelong cognitive benefits.
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Poor sleep at night, more pain the next day

After one night of inadequate sleep, brain activity ramps up in pain-sensing regions while activity is scaled back in areas responsible for modulating how we perceive painful stimuli. This finding provides the first brain-based explanation for the well-established relationship between sleep and pain.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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Children looking at screens in darkness before bedtime are at risk of poor sleep

Preteens who use a mobile phone or watch TV in the dark an hour before bed are at risk of not getting enough sleep compared to those who use these devices in a lit room or do not use them at all before bedtime.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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Collective nostalgia makes people prefer domestic products

Nostalgia for events experienced by members of your own group can make you prefer domestic products over foreign ones, concludes the first systematic investigation into the effects of collective nostalgia on consumer decisions. The results could help countries bolster domestic industries without resorting to hard interventions, such as tariffs or international trade re-negotiations.
Consumer Behavior News — ScienceDaily

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Giving high school students the tools to question classic literature

Generations of students have read Shakespeare and Hemingway for high school literature class. Assigning these texts without questioning issues of race or gender may exclude students and make them feel their voices are not valued, says a researcher.
K-12 Education News — ScienceDaily

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A ‘compelling call’ for pediatricians to discuss firearm safety

The Children’s commentators point to the ‘extremely dangerous’ combination of ‘the small curious hands of a young child’ and ‘the easily accessible and operable, loaded handgun’ and suggest that pediatricians who counsel families about safely storing weapons tailor messaging to the weapon type and the family’s reason for owning a firearm.
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Teens’ same-gender friendships key to later satisfaction in romantic relationships

A new longitudinal study sought to identify the factors in adolescence that best predicted who would and would not have a satisfying romantic life in their late 20s. The study found that the skills teens learn in friendships with peers of the same gender were the strongest predictors of later romantic satisfaction.
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Interferon regulatory factor 6 mutations implicated in neural tube defects, including spina bifida

Mutations in a gene known as interferon regulatory factor 6 that cause cleft lip and palate also are implicated in neural tube defects such as spina bifida, suggests new research.
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Natural disaster affects children’s schooling years later

A new study looked at changes in children’s academic performance after major bushfires in Australia. The study concluded that children in regions affected significantly by bushfires demonstrated poorer academic outcomes in some subjects than children in regions that were less severely affected by the fires.
K-12 Education News — ScienceDaily

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Giving children the skills they need to tackle life’s toughest challenges

Mental health is not just an adult issue. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, suicide rates have tripled over the last 15 years among girls 10 to 14 years of age in the United States. More detailed analyses of the data only paint a bleaker picture for some minority populations.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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White math teachers treat students differently in predominantly black schools

White math teachers in predominantly black middle schools are more likely to respond negatively to students’ behavioral or academic issues – and this may have long-term negative consequences for student performance, according to a new study that highlights the need to recruit more black teachers. The study, published recently in Harvard Educational Review, observed video data collected from 2009-2011 of 25 mathematics classrooms in middle schools that were either predominantly white or black.
K-12 Education News — ScienceDaily

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Rocking motion improves sleep and memory, studies in mice and people show

Two new studies, one conducted in young adults and the other in mice, add to evidence for the broad benefits of a rocking motion during sleep. In fact, the studies in people show that rocking not only leads to better sleep, but it also boosts memory consolidation during sleep.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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Genetic risk for ADHD manifest in brain structure in childhood

There is only scant scientific evidence on whether the genetic risk for developing specific psychiatric disorders or cognitive traits is manifest in brain structure from childhood and, to date, studies have focused primarily on adult populations. The question remains unanswered.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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Nudging does not necessarily improve decisions

Nudging, the concept of influencing people’s behavior without imposing rules, bans or coercion, is an idea that government officials and marketing specialists alike are keen to harness, and it is often viewed as a one-size-fits-all solution. Now, a new study puts things into perspective: Whether a nudge really does improve decisions depends on a person’s underlying decision-making process.
Consumer Behavior News — ScienceDaily

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Scientists find genes with large effects on head and brain size

The size of children’s heads is not only related to the growth of their skull, but also their brain. A genome-wide analysis now reports the largest known genetic effects on head circumference and the related measure of intracranial volume.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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Youthful cognitive ability strongly predicts mental capacity later in life

Early adult general cognitive ability is a stronger predictor of cognitive function and reserve later in life than other factors, such as higher education, occupational complexity or engaging in late-life intellectual activities.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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Early child deprivation and neglect impair memory and executive functioning at age 16

Young children experiencing deprivation and neglect in institutional settings have impaired memory and executive functioning at ages 8 and 16 compared with peers placed early in quality foster homes, report investigators.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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Bioethicists call for oversight of consumer ‘neurotechnologies’ with unproven benefits

The marketing of consumer ‘neurotechnologies’ can be enticing: apps that diagnose a mental state, and brain devices that improve cognition or ‘read’ one’s emotional state. However, many of these increasingly popular products aren’t fully supported by science and have little to no regulatory oversight, which poses potential health risks to the public. Two bioethicists suggest the creation of a working group that would further study, monitor, and provide guidance for this growing industry — which is expected to top $ 3 billion by 2020.
Consumer Behavior News — ScienceDaily

PARENTAL UPDATE:

Fighting perinatal mood and anxiety disorders on multiple levels

Over the past several decades, it’s become increasingly recognized that perinatal mood and anxiety disorders (PMADs), including postpartum depression, are more than just “baby blues.” They’re the most common complication of childbirth in the U.S., affecting about 14 percent of women in their lifetimes and up to 50 percent in some specific populations. PMADs can lead to a variety of adverse outcomes for both mothers and their babies, including poor breastfeeding rates, poor maternal-infant bonding, lower infant immunization rates and maternal suicides that account for up to 20 percent of postpartum deaths.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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Managerialism in UK schools erodes teachers’ mental health and well-being

Performance targets, increased workload, curriculum changes and other bureaucratic changes are eroding teachers’ professional identity and harming their mental health, a new study finds.
K-12 Education News — ScienceDaily

PARENT UPDATE:

Our one-of-a-kind bestselling personalized alphabet book makes learning the ABCs fun, especially when your child sees their face and hears their name throughout their very own book!

How bad will my postpartum depression be in 12 months?

A new study was able to successfully predict — with 72.8 percent accuracy — if a new mother would experience worsening depressive symptoms over the first year after giving birth. The scientists predicted this depression trajectory using four maternal characteristics that put the mother at risk. Identifying these factors early in the postpartum period will allow mothers to seek treatment earlier and improve their chance of a full recovery.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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