Paralyzed High School Student Walks Across Stage at Graduation: ‘Couldn’t Do Anything But Smile’ [Video]

We always hear about the crazy stories coming out of Florida, but here’s one that’s sure to warm your heart.

A high school student who was left paralyzed from the waist down last year was determined to walk across the stage during graduation — and he did!

via People:

Kolton Smith, 18, told ABC affiliate WFTS that he was injured in a car crash that happened in June. According to the news outlet, he was ejected from his truck because he wasn’t wearing his seat belt.

“The next thing I know, I was on my back looking at the sky,” he told WFTS. “I thank God every day for letting me stay on this earth.”

Smith, who used to play football at Durant High School and aspired to join the military, now plans on enrolling at Southeastern University and will study business.

“If you have an injury, you can overcome anything you want,” said Smith, who said he didn’t realize that he received a standing ovation when he managed to walk at graduation.

“I was just focused on walking. I looked at my feet. I didn’t even know everyone was standing,” Smith told WFTS.

He added: “When I was on stage and I heard everyone scream when I stood up, I was like, ‘Whoa!’ I just smiled. I couldn’t do anything but smile.”

On Thursday, the Hillsborough County Public Schools posted on Facebook that seeing Smith walk was “an inspirational and emotional moment.”

“Kolton was paralyzed from the waist down after a horrible car accident last summer,” they added. “He was determined to rise from his wheelchair and walk across the stage to receive his diploma. We are in awe of your perseverance, Kolton. Congratulations!”

Watch the emotional moment below.

The post Paralyzed High School Student Walks Across Stage at Graduation: ‘Couldn’t Do Anything But Smile’ [Video] appeared first on lovebscott – celebrity news.

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Is Anything Truly Classic in Fashion?

stock photo of audrey hepburn in a black top and black pants

Readers, here’s a question to ponder for today: is anything truly classic in fashion? And if so, what is it? I’ve written before about how when skinny jeans started to come back into style I clung to my bootcuts, insisting that they were a classic look (and one that flattered me). As I write this I’m still not sure I would disagree with the idea of bootcuts as classic, particularly since they’re coming back in fashion now, but what I found was that the things you wear with denim — boots, tops, jackets — all changed to accommodate the look of a skinny jean silhouette, so eventually I felt outdated to wear bootcut jeans. Mark my words, it will happen again as we swing back to denim with more volume on the bottom — it’s the fashion industry’s way of making everyone toe the line and completely replace your wardrobe every ten years. (I’ve said before that I feel like denim trends do influence workwear in significant ways, so keep an eye over the next few years — I wouldn’t be surprised if slim leg ankle pants, the roundest of ballet flats, and untucked/voluminous blouses all start to be scarce…) Readers were recently discussing long necklaces and whether they were in –and I know this question has come up with regards to brooches — so let’s discuss. What does “classic” mean in the fashion context? And what looks or items would you include in the list? Is it a specific base item you adhere to (e.g., bootcut jeans) or is it something more akin to style? 

{related: how to cultivate style}

Things I might argue are classic (but I suspect readers will fight me on at least half of them):

  • a crisp white blouse
  • pointy-toed kitten heels 
  • pointy-toed flats
  • stilettos
  • pencil skirts
  • a sleeveless sheath dress
  • a red lip 
  • classic fitted trench coat

There’s also a list of items that are NEVER “fashionable” but would qualify, I’d argue, as classic, at least in certain parts of the country: pearls, twinsets, Ferragamo pumps, Chanel flats… 

What say you, readers? Is anything truly classic in fashion? Are you making purchasing decisions based on it (i.e., investing a bit more in the workwear pieces you think are classic?)?

Photo of Audrey Hepburn courtesy of Photos for Class. But see

pin with text "Is Anything Truly Classic" on top of image of Audrey Hepburn in a black top and black pants

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Penny Marshall Played an Underachiever on TV. In Real Life She Was Anything But

In the olden days of TV, long before Netflix or binge-watching and certainly before DVRs, people used to tune in on certain days and times to watch the shows they liked: If you were a kid in the mid-1970s—maybe, particularly, a girl—one of those shows was likely to be Laverne & Shirley, the Happy Days spinoff that became a huge hit by itself. Its stars, Penny Marshall and Cindy Williams, played young single women, roommates and best friends, in late 1950s Milwaukee. They worked at a brewery (and horsed around) by day. They went on dates (and horsed around) at night. The cheerful theme song that opened the show included the lyric “We’re gonna make our dreams come true,” but these girls—we thought of them as girls at the time, because they were sort of like us, and we were girls—weren’t exactly go-getters. During that opening song, we saw Laverne Defazio and Shirley Feeney hustle into their plain wool coats and race out the door to get to work on time. On the job, they’d daydream as a forever’s worth of beer bottles drifted by on the conveyor belt. At the end of the day, they couldn’t get out of there soon enough. Today, young women characters are mostly required to be role models, following big dreams instead of merely living out little ones. But Laverne and Shirley, who would dance and laugh and play practical jokes on one another, were the kind of almost-grownups you dreamed of being. They were still having fun, even if that meant getting through drudgery first. They made underachieving look awesome.

Laverne and Shirley - 1976-1983
Paramount Television—Kobal/REX/ShutterstockPenny Marshall on ‘Laverne and Shirley,’ 1976-1983

Penny Marshall, who died on Dec. 17 at age 75, may have played a charming underachiever on TV. But in real life, she was anything but: Even though Marshall had been playing small parts on TV for years, that role on Laverne & Shirley (the show ran for eight seasons) ignited a career that included not just acting but directing and producing as well—all at a time when women had to work much harder to carve out their own success.

Marshall was born in the Bronx in 1943; her brother was producer and director Garry Marshall, who, as the creator of Happy Days, tapped her for the spinoff. She directed four episodes of the show, eventually going on to to produce and direct feature films, beginning with 1986’s Jumpin’ Jack Flash, starring Whoopi Goldberg. Other directing projects included the 1990 Oliver Sacks adaptation Awakenings, starring Robert De Niro and Robin Williams, and, in 1992, A League of Their Own, a fictionalized story based on the real-life members of the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League, starring Geena Davis and Tom Hanks and featuring Madonna and Rosie O’Donnell. But Marshall’s finest film may be the 1988 comedy Big, in which Hanks plays a kid who wishes he were a grown-up: His wish comes true, but he ends up being a thirteen-year-old boy trapped in a grown man’s body, which wasn’t exactly what he was expecting. The picture is filled with broad jokes and small ones, and Marshall navigated both deftly. You get the sense that her own sense of humor, self-deprecating and mildly raucous, was her truest guide.

Marshall’s final film as a director was an as yet unreleased documentary about NBA Hall of Famer Dennis Rodman, and her resume over the last 35 years or so is dotted with acting roles of various sizes. But her most enduring character is Laverne, an outgoing girl with a glorious honk of a voice and a saucy, flirtatious smile. The characters Laverne and Shirley first appeared on an episode of Happy Days, as a type of “fast” girl—a characterization in keeping with the show’s retro appeal. And it’s true that their gameness was part of their charm. They were up for anything, as long as it was fun, and as long as it didn’t involve an endless row of bottles on a conveyor belt. Parents used to tell kids that watching TV all the time would rot their brains, but they didn’t know that so much of what we watched would stick with us—and that our brains weren’t rotting, they were actually working. TV, and people like Penny Marshall, made us who we are: Schlemiels or schlimazels some of the time, but at least able to laugh our way through it all.


Entertainment – TIME

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CHARITY UPDATE :

Click today to request your free ACRX discount prescription card and save up to 80% off of your medicine!

SPECIAL DONATION REQUEST UPDATE:

Please help American Consultants Rx achieve it’s biggest goal yet of donating over 30 million discount prescription cards to over 50k organizations in an effort to assist millions of Americans in need. Please click here to donate today!