Say What Now? Australian Senator Gets Egged by Teen, Punches Back [Video]

An Australian teenager egged the senator who made disgusting comments about immigration following the New Zealand mosque shooting.

via Complex:

Captured on video, Senator Fraser Anning was speaking with reporters when a teen who was recording him slapped an egg on the back of the senator’s head. The senator immediately turned around and hit the boy. A few men then held the boy on the ground for what seemed like an unnecessarily long amount of time as film crews surrounded him.

According to Australian reporter Kristy Mayr, the teenager was released from custody.

On Friday, the senator shared a statement where he blamed the shooting on Muslim immigration. “As always, leftwing politicians and the media will rush to claim that the causes of today’s shootings lie with gun laws or those who hold nationalist views, but this is all cliched nonsense,” he said. “The real cause of bloodshed on New Zealand streets today is the immigration program which allowed Muslim fanatics to migrate to New Zealand in the first place.”

The senator’s remarks were widely denounced. U.K. home secretary Sajid David accused the senator of further fueling extremism. “Australians will be utterly ashamed of this racist man,” he tweeted. “In no way does he represent our Australian friends.”

Australia’s prime minister Scott Morrison also condemned the senator’s comments: “The remarks by Senator Fraser Anning blaming the murderous attacks by a violent, rightwing, extremist terrorist in New Zealand on immigration are disgusting. Those views have no place in Australia, let alone the Australian parliament.”

After the shooting, New Zealand Attorney-General David Parker appeared to reveal that the government would ban semi-automatic weapons. However, on Saturday, he made it clear that the government hadn’t yet committed to that promise. New Zealand prime minister Jacinda Ardern vowed to change gun laws and shared that the government would consider regulations on semi-automatics as “one of the issues,” RNZreports.

On Thursday, at least 49 people were reported dead following mass shootings at two mosques in Christchurch, New Zealand. One man was arrested and charged with murder for the attacks.

One thing’s for sure — Senator Anning was ready with that two-piece. Watch below.

The post Say What Now? Australian Senator Gets Egged by Teen, Punches Back [Video] appeared first on lovebscott – celebrity news.

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Meet Trump, the Australian Shepherd Who Just Won Big at the Westminster Dog Show

The President of the United States was in Texas on Tuesday, but someone else named Trump made waves in New York.

At the 2019 Westminster Dog Show, one Australian Shepherd named Trump won best of his breed, leaving some fans of the Westminster Kennel Club’s program to interpret the name as a political message of some kind. But Trump’s co-owner and co-breeder, Pat Zapf, tells TIME that the show dog’s name has absolutely nothing to do with the President of the United States. Actually, it has everything to do with a card game.

When the dog was born in 2012, naming him after the ‘trump card’ in bridge — a wild card which changes from hand to hand — seemed innocuous to Zapf, whose grandparents always played the game throughout her childhood. “But at the time, I obviously didn’t know where our political standings would go,” she says.

Upon learning his name, when people react both positively and negatively, Zapf isn’t bothered. “The dog doesn’t know that his name is a controversial topic,” she says over the phone, driving home through the snow to Pennsylvania after Trump’s successes in New York. “He doesn’t care at all. He wants his pets and cookies.” But sometimes, he’ll even have his absolute favorite treat, marshmallows—Trump “has a sweet tooth,” she explains.

The 6-year-old Trump is a star at more than just snacking, though. He won awards of merit in the 2016 and 2018 Westminster competitions and was the No. 1 male Australian Shepherd in 2015. “He’s an old hat at showing,” Zapf says. “He certainly knows what he’s doing out there and he loves his job.”

This will be Trump’s last year competing in shows, but that’s okay—Zapf says the dog will be just as happy laying on the couch and eating potato chips. “He’s had a pretty illustrious career as an Australian Shepherd show dog,” she says, “but more than anything, he’s our pet.”

Sports – TIME

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Chinese businessman denies reported justification for Australian visa cancelation

A prominent Chinese businessman and political donor, linked in the past to a row about the promotion of Chinese interests, said on Friday Australia’s decision to rescind his visa was based on nothing more than speculation.


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Australian Open Champ Naomi Osaka Becomes Asia’s First No. 1 in Tennis

(MELBOURNE, Australia) — Australian Open champion Naomi Osaka is the youngest woman to make her debut at No. 1 in nine years and the first man or woman from Asia to lead the tennis rankings.

Simona Halep’s 48-week stay atop the WTA ended Monday. She slid to No. 3 after a fourth-round loss to Serena Williams.

Williams missed the tournament last year after having a baby; her run to the quarterfinals this time pushed her up five places to No. 11.

The 21-year-old Osaka’s second consecutive major title helped her rise three spots.

Runner-up Petra Kvitova went from No. 6 to No. 2.

Men’s champion Novak Djokovic remained No. 1 in the ATP rankings. Runner-up Rafael Nadal stayed at No. 2, but Roger Federer’s fourth-round exit dropped him from No. 3 to No. 6.

Sports – TIME

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Naomi Osaka Wins Australian Open and Second Grand Slam Title After Beating Petra Kvitová

(MELBOURNE, Australia) — So close to victory, Naomi Osaka suddenly was letting the Australian Open final slip away. Three championship points? Gone. A sizable lead? Soon all gone, too.

She was playing poorly. She yelled at herself. Slammed a ball. Tugged at her visor’s pink brim. Trudged to the locker room between sets with a towel draped over her head.

And then, after returning to the court, Osaka turned it all around just as quickly as she had dropped 23 of 27 points. Refocusing and reasserting herself, Osaka edged Petra Kvitova 7-6 (2), 5-7, 6-4 on Saturday night to win the Australian Open for a second consecutive Grand Slam title.

“I felt like I didn’t want to have any regrets,” Osaka said. “I think if I didn’t regroup after the second set, then I would have looked back on this match and probably cried or something.”

On top of that, Osaka will rise to No. 1 in the rankings.

“Amazing achievement,” two-time Wimbledon champion Kvitova said. “Definitely she is a great one. We’ll see what the future will bring.”

Osaka added the Australian Open trophy to the one she collected in a U.S. Open final last September that forever will be remembered for the way runner-up Serena Williams was docked a game after arguing with the chair umpire.

Unlike that day, there was no jeering from the confused crowd. No controversy. No chaos. No sharing the spotlight.

Clearly marking herself as tennis’ bright new star, Osaka is the first woman to win two major championships in a row since Williams picked up four straight in 2014-15.

Almost didn’t happen.

Osaka held three match points in the second set at 5-3, love-40 as Kvitova served. But Osaka couldn’t close it out. Instead, she completely lost her way.

That allowed Kvitova to come back and make a match of it, reeling off five games in a row to take the second set and go up 1-0 in the third.

At that point, Kvitova would say later, she figured it was going to keep going her way.

“In the end,” she said, “it wasn’t.”

After Kvitova double-faulted to offer up a break point at 1-all, Osaka converted it with a cross-court backhand winner. There was still more work to be done, of course, and some additional drama when it began raining at the changeover right before Osaka tried to serve for the match at 5-4 in the third set.

This time, Osaka would not falter. She would not let this lead disappear.

“I knew that Petra couldn’t keep it up for that long if Naomi could just manage those emotions,” said Osaka’s coach, Sascha Bajin, “and she did that beautifully.”

Osaka was born in Japan — her mother is Japanese, her father is Haitian — and she moved to New York at age 3. Now she’s based in Florida and has dual citizenship. Osaka already was the first player representing Japan — female or male — to win a Grand Slam singles title. Now she also is the first to top the WTA or ATP rankings.

At 21, Osaka is the youngest No. 1 in nearly a decade; Caroline Wozniacki was 20 when she first ascended to that spot in 2010.

And to think, a year ago, Osaka was ranked 72nd.

What a climb. What a quick climb.

Kvitova was playing in her first Grand Slam final since winning Wimbledon in 2014 — and the first since she was stabbed in the hand by an intruder at her home in the Czech Republic a little more than two years ago.

Kvitova needed surgery, missed the first 4½ months of the 2017 season, including the Australian Open, and couldn’t be sure she’d ever get back to the top of tennis.

“You’ve been through so much,” Osaka told Kvitova during the trophy ceremony. “I’m really honored to have played you in the final of a Grand Slam.”

On a somewhat cloudy, rather comfortable evening, with only a slight breeze and the temperature around 75 degrees (25 Celsius), both women hit the ball as hard as can be. Exchanges were mostly at the baseline and filled with flat, powerful groundstrokes that barely cleared the net and made retrieving and replying as much about reflexes as anything.

Here’s one measure of how even it was: Each finished with 33 winners.

Points were swift and blunt; of 86 in the first set, only four lasted nine strokes or more. There was plenty of strong serving, clean hitting and good movement.

It was Osaka who was the first to get ahead, tearing through the tiebreaker by grabbing five points in a row — four via winners — to go up 5-1. When Kvitova sailed a backhand wide moments later, ceding a set for the first time all tournament, Osaka pumped her fist and screamed, “Come on!”

How pivotal was that moment? Kvitova had won her last 22 Grand Slam matches after winning the first set. Osaka, meanwhile, entered the day having won 59 matches anywhere after going up by a set.

When Osaka broke to lead 3-2 in the second set, and then got to 5-3, the outcome seemed to be a foregone conclusion. Turned out, that wasn’t the case. Not at all.

All that really matters, of course, is that Osaka righted herself in time to win.

“It didn’t really take that long,” she said. “I didn’t have a choice.”

Sports – TIME

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How to Watch Naomi Osaka vs. Petra Kvitova: Australian Open Final Live Stream, TV Channel, Time

How to watch Naomi Osaka vs. Petra Kvitova in the 2019 Australian Open Final on Saturday, Jan. 26.

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Serena Williams Knocked Out of Australian Open by Karolina Pliskova

(MELBOURNE) — Serena Williams was one point — just one — from quite a comeback victory in the Australian Open quarterfinals when she turned her left ankle.

Everything unraveled from there.

In a startling reversal and result, Williams wasted four match points along the way to dropping the last six games of a 6-4, 4-6, 7-5 loss to No. 7 seed Karolina Pliskova of the Czech Republic at Melbourne Park on Wednesday.

“I was almost in the locker room,” Pliskova told the Rod Laver Arena crowd, “but now I’m standing here as the winner.”

So instead of Williams moving closer to an eighth championship at the Australian Open and record-tying 24th Grand Slam title overall, it is Pliskova who will continue her pursuit of her first major trophy.

In the semifinals, Pliskova will face No. 4-seeded Naomi Osaka, who advanced by beating No. 6 Elina Svitolina 6-4, 6-1 earlier Wednesday. The other women’s semifinal will be two-time Wimbledon champion Petra Kvitova against unseeded American Danielle Collins.

In the men’s quarterfinals Wednesday, 2016 Wimbledon runner-up Milos Raonic met No. 28 Lucas Pouille, before 14-time major champion Novak Djokovic was scheduled to face 2014 U.S. Open finalist Kei Nishikori.

Williams’ surprising departure scuttled what would have been a much-anticipated rematch against Osaka, who beat her in the chaotic U.S. Open final last September.

This defeat is the earliest in Australia for Williams since a fourth-round loss to Ana Ivanovic in 2014. Since then, she had won the tournament in 2015, lost in the final in 2016, and won again in 2017 while pregnant, before missing last year’s edition a few months after the birth of her daughter.

The 37-year-old American’s match against Pliskova was played under a stifling sun, with the temperature around 80 degrees (25 Celsius), and Williams — coming off an intense three-set victory over No. 1 Simona Halep in the fourth round — often stepped into the patches of shade behind each baseline.

She did not start well, not well at all. Her mistakes were mounting and deficit was growing.

In the first set alone, Williams made more than twice as many unforced errors as her opponent, 11-5, a pattern that would continue throughout. By the end, the margin was 37-15.

Looking increasingly frustrated, Williams would yell at herself after mistakes or gesture as if to say, “That’s NOT how I should be hitting the ball!” Add it all up, and Pliskova led by a set and a break at 3-2 in the second.

Only then did Williams seem to get going. From there, she immediately earned her first break point of the match and converted it to get to 3-all, beginning a run in which she claimed nine of 11 games.

“I was a little bit too passive,” Pliskova said about that section of the match. “Obviously mentally down.”

And then it all changed. Serving for the victory at 5-1, 40-30, Williams was called for a foot fault — reminiscent of an infamous such ruling at the U.S. Open a decade ago. During the ensuing point Wednesday, Williams twisted her left ankle and dumped a forehand into the net.

She grabbed at her foot afterward, and would go on to cede that game.

Not a big deal, right? She still had a sizable lead.

Except three more match points would follow, and Pliskova staved off each one.

Williams would again serve for the match at 5-3 — and again get broken. The owner of the most feared and respected serve in women’s tennis was broken for a third time in a row at 5-all, and Pliskova was on her way.

“She got a little bit shaky in the end,” Pliskova said. “So I took my chances. And I won.”

Osaka will carry a 12-match Grand Slam winning streak into the semifinals.

The 21-year-old from Japan moved closer to a second consecutive major championship by parlaying her aggressive and powerful style into a 31-11 edge in winners against Svitolina.

“For me, right now, I just try to keep looking forward. So I’m not really satisfied. Like, I am happy that I’m here, but at the same time, I want to keep going,” said Osaka, who never had been past the fourth round at the Australian Open. “There is more matches to win.”

Sports – TIME

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Roger Federer Defeated By 20-Year-Old Stefanos Tsitsipas in Australian Open

(MELBOURNE, Australia) — Even as his uninterrupted dominance of yore dissipated, even as he took the occasional break, Roger Federer always mattered more often than not in the closing days of Grand Slam tournaments.

Until lately, that is.

Until, at age 37, he was outplayed in the Australian Open’s fourth round by a much younger man, 20-year-old Stefanos Tsitsipas, during a 6-7 (11), 7-6 (3), 7-5, 7-6 (5) surprise that ended Federer’s bid for a third consecutive championship at Melbourne Park.

“I have massive regrets,” said Federer, who failed to convert any of the 12 break points he earned against Tsitsipas, the first player from Greece to reach a major quarterfinal.

This loss makes it a fourth straight Slam without Federer in the semifinals: He skipped the 2018 French Open, was beaten at Wimbledon in the quarterfinals and exited the U.S. Open in the fourth round.

That is his longest such drought since he claimed the first of his men’s record 20 major titles, all the way back in 2003 at Wimbledon.

“Roger is a legend of our sport. So much respect for him. He showed such good tennis over the years. I’ve been idolizing him since the age of 6,” said Tsitsipas, who has worked with Serena Williams’ coach, Patrick Mouratoglou.

“It was a dream come true for me … just facing him,” Tsitsipas said about Federer. “Winning at the end? I cannot describe it, you know.”

Federer was the oldest man left in the field and would have been the oldest quarterfinalist in Australia since Ken Rosewall at 43 in 1977.

Tsitsipas, a lanky guy who kept his scraggly hair in place with a pink headband, was the youngest to make the fourth round this year. He lost his opening match in Melbourne a year ago, when Federer picked up his sixth Australian Open championship.

“For sure, it’s a good win against Roger. I mean, we all know who Roger Federer is, what he has done in tennis. But I still have to keep my focus, keep my concentration on further goals that I want to achieve. That’s a very good beginning. I need to stay humble,” said Tsitsipas, who next faces another player making his quarterfinal debut at a major, No. 22 Roberto Bautista Agut of Spain. “This win is a good milestone, let’s say good first step, as I said, to something bigger.”

At least Federer was able to crack a joke when asked whether Tsitsipas reminds him of a younger version of himself, replying: “He has a one-handed backhand. And I used to have long hair, too.”

And before anyone writes off Federer just yet, remember that folks have kept trying to do that for quite some time, and he has repeatedly returned to title-winning form. After this setback, Federer announced that he would return to playing the clay-court circuit this season, including the French Open after missing it the past three years.

This match was a thriller from beginning to end, both in terms of the high quality and entertaining style of play from both men — something long expected of Federer. The world is still learning what the 14th-seeded Tsitsipas can do.

His soft hands serve him well on volleys, and he is that rare man who will press forward as often as Federer and have nearly as much success. On this cool evening, Tsitsipas won the point on 48 of 68 trips to the net, while Federer went 50 for 66.

The kid served well, too, compiling a 20-12 edge in aces and, more significantly, staving off all of those break chances that Federer earned: two in the first set, eight in the second, two in the third.

In the opening game of the match, Tsitsipas twice was called for a time violation after allowing the 25-second serve clock — new in Melbourne’s main draw this year — to expire. The second such warning resulted in the loss of a serve, and Tsitsipas proceeded to double-fault, offering up a break point to Federer.

Tsisipas erased that chance with a 123 mph (198 kph) serve initially called out, then reversed on a challenge. Federer insisted to chair umpire James Keothavong that they should replay the point, a request that was denied, drawing the Swiss star’s ire.

That would signal a pattern. At each key juncture, either Federer blinked or Tsitsipas delivered something special.

“Hung in there, gave himself chances at some points, stayed calm. It’s not always easy, especially for younger guys,” said Federer, who was trying to reach his 54th Grand Slam quarterfinal. “Credit to him for taking care of that.”

Tsitsipas never even collected a break point of his own until the third set, and the match was nearly 3 hours old when he finally cashed one in, the only one he would need, when Federer pushed a forehand into the net.

The crowd, sensing something special, broke into a chorus of “Tsi-tsi-pas! Tsi-tsi-pas!”

As is often the case when a youngster outdoes an old master, there was buzz about whether this might signal something more meaningful than one result. Each member of the sport’s long-ruling Big Three — Federer, Rafael Nadal and Novak Djokovic — already had dismissed challenges from the next generation at this tournament.

This, though, was different.

Tsitsipas is different.

“I see him being high up in the game,” Federer said, “for a long time.”

Sports – TIME

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Even Roger Federer Needed His Security Pass at the Australian Open

(MELBOURNE, Australia) — Maybe Roger Federer isn’t as famous as we thought.

Turns out that even he must carry his tournament ID to get where he’s try to go at the Australian Open.

Rules are rules, after all.

So what if Federer is a six-time champion at Melbourne Park … the owner of 20 Grand Slam titles in all … a man who’s spent more weeks ranked No. 1 than any other … and one of the most recognizable athletes on the planet?

A video showing Federer stopped by a security guard in a hallway outside a locker room at the Grand Slam tournament made the rounds on Twitter on Saturday, drawing a mix of amazement and amusement.

In the clip, the guard is seen indicating to Federer that he was missing his Australian Open accreditation pass. Players, coaches, officials, members of the media and others are given lanyards with badges that have a name, a photo, tournament role and a bar code that can be scanned at security checkpoints.

Federer didn’t argue. He stood patiently, waiting until he was joined by members of his entourage. That’s when he was allowed to proceed and go through the door.

Saturday was a practice day for Federer at Melbourne Park.

He is scheduled to face Stefanos Tsitsipas in the fourth round on Sunday.

Sports – TIME

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Aryna Sabalenka’s sweaty headband causes Australian Open fan fight

Two stubborn fans at the Australian Open snarled their way to 15 seconds of fame with one of the pettiest squabbles Melbourne Park has seen. A video showing two women arguing and tussling over an item of clothing near the front row of seats on Melbourne Arena on Wednesday is spreading across the Internet. The…
Sports | New York Post

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Serena Williams Returns to Australian Open With Clinical Win

(MELBOURNE, Australia) — Serena Williams jumped straight back in where she left off at the Australian Open, returning for the first time since winning the title in 2017 when she was pregnant with her first child.

Williams conceded only five points in the first set and was completely clinical in a 6-0, 6-2 win over Tatjana Maria, another mom who lives close to Williams in Florida and visits for play dates with their daughters.

It was overwhelming for Maria, who got just two of her first serves into play in the first set and didn’t have game points until she held in the fourth game of the second set. She was in tears as the pair hugged at the net following the match, and Williams joined the crowd in giving the German player a clap as she left the arena.

“Yeah, I think the last time I was here, I was pregnant and playing at the same time — which is insane,” Williams said. “It’s kind of weird walking back on, by myself this time.”

Williams considers the 2017 victory here among the best of her 23 Grand Slam singles titles, giving everything that was going on. Since returning to the tour following the birth of Alexis Olympia, Williams hasn’t added to her list of majors, having lost the finals at Wimbledon and the U.S. Open.

“Literally the best win of my career,” she recalled Tuesday in a post-match TV interview. “Just exciting to be back.”

At Melbourne Park, she’s now on an eight-match winning streak. She’s only lost one of her last 22 matches at the season-opening major, which she has won seven times.

The 37-year-old Williams said she loves to test herself early in the year after practicing “hard for that first hit.”

“I like to jump into the deep end and swim,” she said.

The 16th-seeded Williams will face either Eugenie Bouchard or wild-card entry Peng Shuai in the second round.

Madison Keys opened her season with a 6-2, 6-2 win over 18-year-old wild-card entry Destanee Aiava in the first match on Rod Laver Arena on Day 2.

“I expected it to be tough — obviously playing an Aussie on Rod Laver,” Keys told the crowd. “Thanks for the love, anyway.”

She broke Aiava’s serve four times and fended off the only break-point chance she faced. Aaiva, who was the first player born in this century to play in the main draw of a major when she got a wild card here in 2017, didn’t help herself with six double-faults.

The No. 17-seeded Keys has reached the semifinals or better at three of the last five Grand Slam tournaments, and her focus is on the bigger prizes for now.

“I was having issues with my knee at the end of the year (and) ran out of time to be ready for Brisbane — wanted to be 100 percent for here,” she said of her recent lack of competitive matches. “It’s my first match of the year, so mostly just happy I did everything pretty well.”

Seventh-seeded Karolina Pliskova won the Brisbane International title in the first week of the season and continued her streak by beating fellow Czech Karolina Muchova 6-3, 6-2 to progress to the second round. No. 12 Elise Mertens and No. 21 Qiang Wang also advanced.

Kei Nishikori is feeling a little bit liberated after having to come back from two sets down to beat Kamil Majchrzak in a difficult opener.

The eighth-seeded Nishikori won 10 consecutive games after losing the second set in a tiebreaker and took 15 of the last 17 games before Majchrzak retired with an injury with the score at 3-6, 6-7 (6), 6-0, 6-2, 3-0 at Margaret Court Arena.

“He was playing amazing tennis,” Nishikori said. “I have to be happy going to the next round — I almost lost in the first round, so I have to be positive and get better.”

Among the other men advancing were Ryan Harrison, who beat Jiri Vesely 6-0, 7-5, 6-3, No. 12 Fabio Fognini and No. 15 Daniil Medvedev.

Pierre-Hugues Herbert beat Sam Querrey 5-7, 7-6 (6), 6-3, 6-1.

The temperature was already 30 degrees Celsius (86 Fahrenheit) when play began on all courts shortly after 11 a.m. local time and it rose to 33 C (91 F) by the early afternoon.

Sports – TIME

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‘The Pain Is Too Much.’ Andy Murray Says Australian Open Could Be His Last Tournament

(MELBOURNE, Australia) — A tearful Andy Murray says the Australian Open could be his last tournament because of a hip injury that has hampered him for almost two years.

The three-time Grand Slam champion says he plans to start his opening match against No. 22-ranked Roberto Bautista Agut at the Australian Open, where he has reached the final five times but never won the title.

“I’m going to play (in Australia) — I can still play to the level,” Murray said. “Not a level I’m happy playing at — but also, it’s not just that. The pain is too much really.”

Murray had right hip surgery in January 2018 and, after two brief attempts to return to the tour, played only 12 matches in the year.

He returned at the Brisbane International last week, where he won his opening match but lost in the second round to Daniil Medvedev, showing visible signs of limping between points.

The 31-year-old Murray, who ended long Grand Slam droughts for British men and also won the Olympic gold medal, had hoped to play the first half of 2019 and make a run at Wimbledon.

“That’s where I’d like to stop playing … but I’m also not certain I’m able to do that,” Murray said. “I don’t want to continue playing that way. I’ve tried everything I could to get it right and that hasn’t worked.”

Murray held a news conference Friday at Melbourne Park, and had to leave the room for a while soon after it started to compose himself as he fronted the media.

He said he’s considering another hip operation, more to improve his quality of life than as a way to return to the top level in tennis.

The Australian Open starts Monday.

Sports – TIME

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Funniest dialect differences between British, Australian, and American English

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Ever since the British empire ruled over almost a quarter of the world so many years ago, the English language was always changing dialects all over the globe. Though very similar, there are some big differences between the three different types of English – Australian, British, and American. In addition to all that, accents can get confusing to every native English speaker for now and then. Many of our words remain the same and have the same meanings. Others have slightly altered spellings. Some, however, are used very differently.

Flannel

Americans and Australians use the word flannel to describe a shirt with a checked or plaid design, while Britons see a flannel as a small washcloth. These shirts are often described as checked or occasionally plaid in Britain. So, we’d advise not asking to borrow a British guy’s flannel, even if you just want a shirt.

Elevator

In Britain, an elevator is known as lift. While ‘lift’ to an American makes you think of weights or picking something up, in Britain, a lift takes you between levels of a building. Although to confuse matters further, Britons also use lift in the same way as Americans, in terms of moving things. Australians have the best of both worlds and use the two interchangeably.

Cactus

In both Britain and America, a cactus is a small prickly plant from the desert. In Australia, however, cactus means something completely different. To Australians, saying something is cactus means it is broken or not working. For example, a leaking washing machine would be cactus – very dissimilar to our meaning of the word.

Blue

In Australia, a blue most commonly means a fight and often, is a nickname for a redhead. This is because redheads had a reputation for being aggressive in the early 1900s, so redheads became known as ‘blueys,’ thanks to the local slang of blue meaning fight. In Britain, feeling blue usually means sad or miserable. In all three forms of English, however, blue is, of course, a color.

Hamper

Americans refer to a basket full of dirty laundry as a hamper, whereas Britain and Australia simply call it a laundry basket. A hamper in these two countries is more commonly a small wicker basket, usually used to carry cutlery and food for picnics.

Pants

In America, pants are the bottom half of our outfits, but in Britain, pants are called trousers. Pants are referring to a very different thing – undergarments. So, you’d get a very funny look if you asked your friend what pants they were wearing on a night out! Meanwhile, once again, Australians use the two terms interchangeably.

Whether you travel across America, Australia, or Britain, you’re bound to notice some pretty significant differences between the languages; from strange words and slang, to accent variations which make the language hard to understand. Thankfully, you’ll get the most part of the conversation, however, no matter where you travel of the three main English-speaking countries, due to the similarities and general familiarity of the languages.

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Australian Cult Brand Spell & The Gypsy Collective Lands in U.S.

Australian fashion labels, many of which are in the spotlight as Meghan Markle, Duchess of Sussex, tours the antipodes, have long been popular in Southern California, where the climate and beach culture mirror the land of Oz.
Spell & The Gypsy Collective, the 10-year-old contemporary brand started by sisters Isabella Pennefather and Elizabeth Abegg, opened its first stand-alone retail space in the U.S., a pop-up at 1108 Abbot Kinney Boulevard in Venice, Calif. Open through Nov. 25, the shop has attracted cult lovers of the brand, some of whom traveled from as far away as Florida and Canada just to shop.

The Spell & The Gypsy Collective pop-up shop on Abbot Kinney Boulevard in Venice, Calif. 
Rich Polk

“Because we’re slow fashion, we don’t make too many pieces so they tend to sell out very quickly,” said Pennefather, who started out in 2008 making jewelry that she sold at the open-air market in Byron Bay, Australia. When her sister, Lizzy, came on board a few years later, they expanded into clothing and e-commerce, and the business grew from there.
“I remember when we had a clunky web site and early bloggers such as Oracle Fox [whose given name is Amanda Shadforth] bought our things at the

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