Rachel Hollis Has Sold More Than a Million Self-Help Books. But Not Everyone Is Buying Her Advice

Kara Kading wishes she weren’t crying, but there it is. The mother of three from Racine, Wisconsin, is overwhelmed. She’s working two jobs so her kids can go to a private Lutheran school. She has just sat through a day of lectures for one of them, helping to market and sell essential oils from her home. And now, after waiting in a 50-person line, she has met the conference’s keynote speaker and the woman who has helped her hold it all together, Rachel Hollis.

“I’ve been in that funk of trying so hard to keep up with everybody,” says Kading, 40, who started a book club with three friends just to read Hollis’ first self-help book, Girl, Wash Your Face. “She makes me feel like it’s O.K. to be me. That I don’t have to listen to the voice in my head that tells me I can’t do this.”

Hollis, 36, a 5-ft.-2-in. dynamo, has just spent an hour alternately laughing at herself and cajoling the several-thousands-strong audience to do what she does from the stage of the Georgia World Congress Center in Atlanta. But she still has bubbles to spare. She signs whatever each woman brings her and leans in for a selfie, tilting her head forward for the best angle before each shot. She hugs some and pauses to give specific advice to others. Despite the fact that she’s been up since before 4 a.m., her cheer and warmth never flicker.

Of course, Hollis has never sold essential oils. She has no need. She’s already found the perfect product to pitch to you, dear modern woman. She figured out just the thing you need. It will change your life.

The product is you. Hollis is 100% persuaded that you are the answer to all your problems. You just need to invest in you, to believe in you, to prioritize you.

Girl, Wash Your Face, which came out in February 2018 and expounded on this theory, was the No. 2 best-selling book of the year, right behind Michelle Obama’s Becoming, according to Amazon. About 1.5 million people have bought it so far, more than bought anything about Trump or wimpy kids or by Jordan Peterson. It was a social media phenomenon, its insights celebrated by Jen Hatmaker, Drew Barrymore, Reese Witherspoon and thousands of female readers. It was also derided as dangerous nonsense by both liberal media outlets and conservative Christian ones, a twofer few books can manage.

As of March 5, it has a sequel. Girl, Stop Apologizing is more tactical and practical, and even more insistent on women’s need for self-improvement. It makes Hollis ache, she writes, when women don’t have a dream. “I don’t think that a beautiful life happens unintentionally,” she tells me in a conference room before her speech. “I think that you have to decide what kind of life you have.” It hit No. 1 on Amazon its first week.

Peyton Fulford for TIME

There’s nothing revolutionary about Hollis’s advice. Get healthy, get up earlier, choose a goal, plan how to reach it, ignore the naysayers and work the livelong day. But her pithy, down-home, just-between-us-girls voice is both Instagram-quote-worthy and has the urgency of a siren. “I no longer spend a single second of my life worrying about what others think of me for having dreams for myself,” she writes in Stop Apologizing. “Embracing the idea that you can want things for yourself…is the most freeing and powerful feeling in the world.”

Her popularity, which came as a shock to the book industry (she had already written three fiction books and two cookbooks, all selling in the low thousands, according to NPD BookScan), is one of those barometric indicators that mark the cultural weather fronts in the U.S. To some, Hollis is their totally relatable best friend, a successful working mom of four who tells it like it is, isn’t afraid to be vulnerable and has motivated them to up their game. She talks about how she overcame being bad at sex, the time she peed her pants, her boob job, her mommy guilt and her hairy toes. She inspires women to believe in themselves. “As I read the book over the summer, tears just started flowing,” Angel Hepp, 35, a mom of one with another on the way, who works in marketing in Oregon, tells me by phone. “She gave me the courage to start my own podcast.”

I don’t think that a beautiful life happens unintentionally…I think that you have to decide what kind of life you have.The conference at which Hollis is speaking is for doTerra, a multilevel marketing organization (MLM). The mostly female attendees have been invited because they’ve persuaded a number of people to become doTerra wholesalers, to buy a preset amount of oil each month that they can then try to resell to friends. MLMs, which are often compared to pyramid schemes, have come under fire for overpromising results and trapping people with too much product. (A doTerra spokesperson says 80% of its customers buy for personal use without intending to resell.) They also offer one of the few jobs women can do in their own time, with small kids. All they need is a work ethic and ties to the local community. Hollis speaks at a lot of MLM events. It’s exactly the kind of crowd she thrives on.

To her critics, Hollis is a vapid purveyor of false hope and white privilege. She tells women their problems will be solved if they just work harder and journal more intentionally. She seems to believe women’s empowerment means telling women they have power. She ignores the structural inequities, racial disparities and economic pressures that many women face, essentially asking them to put out fires with their bare hands. For all her willingness to talk about anything, she pointedly avoids politics. “I only want to talk about things that I’m really passionate about,” says Hollis. “I don’t like politics because I don’t have faith in [politicians] at all.”

When pushed on whether it’s unfair to tell young moms to fix their own lives without addressing, say, the parlous state of America’s family leave policies, Hollis displays, for the first time, a reluctance to step up. “I start to worry that if you share too much of that stuff it’s like you’re trying to tell people to vote a certain way,” she says.

Hollis also gives her haters plenty of ammunition. Among the revelations in her new book, for example, are that she has the word “mogul” tattooed on her wrist and that one of the ten affirmations she writes for herself every day is that she only travels first class. She opens chapter six proclaiming that 850,000 people saw her fail, only to reveal her definition of failure by explaining that she told her social media followers she wanted a New York Times bestseller and Wash Your Face took 10 weeks to get there.

Some critics bother Hollis more than others. She finds the accusation that she can’t possibly know what it’s like to struggle pretty easy to shrug off. As she tells it (her parents declined to be interviewed for this story), Hollis grew up no stranger to want. Her father was a Pentecostal preacher, as was his father, which might explain her declarative style. Her family lived in rural California near Weedpatch, a community that John Steinbeck drew on when writing The Grapes of Wrath. Her parents fought often and frequently separated.

One Monday morning, when her older brother, Ryan, was supposed to take her to school, she found him in his room dead from a self-inflicted gunshot wound. She was 14 and her parents weren’t home. For years afterward, she assumed that every person she encountered who was not moving might be dead. “I am still here,” she writes, “because I will not let a nightmare have more power than my dreams.”

She attributes her drive to her childhood shame over poverty, not a lust for wealth. “Anybody who grew up poor,” she says, “and now has the ability to make a business, to be self-made — well, I heard Tyler Perry say this years ago. He said if you’ve ever been hungry, then you’ll never be full.”

Hollis finished high school early and hightailed to Los Angeles where she got an internship at Miramax. From there she started an events company (Chic Events), which became an online lifestyle blog (MyChicLife), which then began to veer into self-help (The Chic Site) and was recently rebranded The Hollis Company, specializing in “arming people with the tools to make positive and lasting change.”

Each business iteration marked a phase in Hollis’ metamorphosis from marketer to liberator of women. “For the longest time, it was sort of like, Here’s my life and my kids, and here I am with this [laundry] detergent,” she says, of the sponsored content she used to produce. “But that started to feel very soul-sucking.” Having suffered from anxiety, she began to post about her vulnerabilities. She saw the response those posts got and began to orient her content around that. Whether Hollis has described the plight of most American women with any degree of accuracy is open to debate, but clearly millions of them—and even some men—feel seen.

Backstage at the doTerra event, the lone man in the line of people seeking to have a meet and greet with Hollis, Troy Miller, 50, from Toronto, said he had never heard of her before the weekend, but he and his fellow travelers had listened to her audiobook on the car ride down. “I don’t relate to all of it,” he says. “But don’t we all compare ourselves to others and have a negative voice in our head?”

Hollis has adeptly ridden several waves in her rise to the top: the emergence of a new type of Christian, a more widespread desire for women’s empowerment, the gig economy and the dawn of the Instagram age. She writes freely about her faith, and anthropologists would put her in the tribe of so-called hipstians, hipster Christians who follow Jesus with the ardor of Ned Flanders but different sartorial choices. They tend to live in cities, have no problem with same-sex marriage or feminism, believe climate change is real and might even vote Democratic. (She voted for Hillary Clinton and President Obama.) They worship in churches with names like Foundry and Mosaic. And they’re hungry for cultural role models like Hollis, both for lifestyle tips and personal direction.

That said, not every Christian loves her. The Gospel Coalition, a Christian leadership training group, recently called her advice “exhausting and damning” because it puts self rather than God as the ultimate source of salvation.

Hollis has needed little institutional help — from church, media, or venture capitalist — in building her brand. She acquired hundreds of thousands of followers using social media even before the self-help books. But beyond that, almost her entire post-high school education has come via the web, conferences, YouTube videos and podcasts. (She is a Tony Robbins fanatic.) In the way of the internet, she aggregates liberally from other sources — Julius Caesar, Margaret Mead, Theodore Roosevelt — without worrying too much about attribution. She built her companies “through hard work and hustle and the wealth of knowledge that can be found from a Google search bar,” she writes.

A 2015 social media post in which she showed off her stretch marks on the beach is textbook Hollis. Rather than bemoan her fate, she captioned the beaming self-portrait with an upbeat ode of gratitude to her body for bearing her three sons, Jackson, 12, Sawyer, 10 and Ford, 6. “They aren’t scars ladies, they’re stripes and you’ve earned them. Flaunt that body with pride!” (She also has an adopted daughter, Noah, 2.) Practically overnight, her followers more than doubled.

Almost every day, Hollis and her husband, Dave, 44, stream a live show on Facebook where they answer questions and talk about their lives. Topics range from why she got acrylic nails to how to make a business idea a reality to what it was like to be interviewed by TIME magazine. (Despite her determination not to care about what others think of her, she replays the interview in her head, judging her answers.)

You can’t be a fan of Hollis’ without also adoring Dave. He is the cherry on the ice cream sundae of her life, the 6-ft.-4-in. trophy of a husband, whom she jokingly refers to as her “emotional support animal.” They met when she was 19. They married when she was 21. She thanks him for “covering my losses” early in her career. Their marriage — and his puppy-dog devotion to her — is a big part of her brand’s appeal.

Last year, he left his job as an executive at Disney to run the business side of his wife’s company, which they recently relocated to Austin. During our interview, he sits a few yards away from his wife, chiming in when he wants to amplify one of her answers, even though he knows it looks like classic mansplaining. “Honey, it’s O.K.,” says Hollis.

Now she and Dave have what Hollis would call “big, obnoxious dreams” for The Hollis Company. They’ve committed to a bunch of speaking engagements and business deals this year, but after that they’re not taking on more. Any content they produce will be made for The Hollis Company alone. They have a series of business and life-coaching lectures listeners can access for a monthly fee starting at $ 39. Hollis will be speaking only at their own conferences, known as Rise.

In the last year, Hollis has surpassed many of the goals she wrote in her journal. It’s clearly a bit disorienting for her. “I manifested all the things I wrote down,” she says. “But I – I don’t know how this sounds – I wrote down the wrong thing. I wrote down goals that were about myself and who I wanted to be, and maybe not as much about what I wanted to create for other people.”

Often, contemporary women are painted as these ambitious go-getters delaying marriage and family for a shot at their dream job. But Hollis seems to have found a different group, women who aren’t sure exactly what they want or who they should be. They like the mess of marriage and kids and keeping a home together and shopping at Target (which sold tens of thousands of Hollis’ books), but their lives aren’t quite how they’d pictured them. Hollis gives these women permission to pursue a dream, any dream, a way to be someone other than somebody else’s something. She might not be everyone’s idea of a revolutionary, but for many women, she’s what change looks like.


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9 self-help books that are actually worth reading

We’ve found the ones that won’t waste your time

best self help books

The best self-help books – where do you start? There are so many out there that it can make it impossible to choose one. Some claim to be the best self-help books for confidence, others promise that they’re the sacred text for career progression, and more than a few vow to turn you into a wellness angel.

So how can you separate the wheat from the chaff and find the best self-help book for you? You’ve probably heard of The Power Of Now, The Secret, and The Power Of Positive Thinking – but which newer releases can compete with the classics? Is there a book out there that can genuinely empower you, break bad habits and change your life? And is there anything out there to convert the self-help sceptics?

Read on for our complete roundup of 12 self-help books that are actually worth reading.

Best self-help books

Not sure what way to turn? We’ve broken it all down for you so that all you have to do is pick up a copy and get stuck in.

Best self-help books: one for the perfectionist

Brave Not Perfect, Reshma Saujani

Think about every time you haven’t done something because you didn’t feel good enough to. Didn’t apply for that job you wanted because you didn’t think you were qualified? Gave up writing that novel because you convinced yourself your ideas weren’t up to scratch? Or found yourself re-writing emails so that it’s worded just right (and people don’t think you’re too pushy)? Yep – you’re probably a perfectionist. But it’s time to unlearn everything you thought you knew about how to be brave with the help of Girls Who Code founder, Reshma Saujani.

The book focuses on ways in which women are primed to be perfect (and therefore feel inadequate when they don’t achieve what they set out to) before offering up tips and tricks to ensure you’re making courageous decisions in every day life, whether that’s standing up for yourself in a meeting or quitting your job completely and moving to a remote island. Reshma is like your fearless friend throughout, encouraging you to take a leap of faith – even if it means potentially landing on anything but your feet.

If you fear failure and need a bravery boost, this one’s for you.

best self help books

Best self-help books: one for the anxiety stricken

Jog On: How Running Saved My Life, Bella Mackie

Bella Mackie’s book begins at rock bottom. The journalist and writer starts her story looking back over the days following her divorce, in which she realised she had never learnt any real coping mechanisms, including how to deal with her GAD (generalised anxiety disorder) and OCD (obsessive compulsive disorder) symptoms she’d had since childhood. She takes the reader back with her over her life during her hardest moments, explaining in detail how her mental health has impacted everything from school to her first marriage. 

As the title suggests, the ongoing thread in the book is how Bella used running to self medicate and get her life back on track. So often those of us suffering with our mental health are made to feel as though there are only two lines of treatment: therapy and/or medication. And while these are of course front and centre when it comes to treating mental health, Bella’s book makes a brilliant case for also taking up exercise. Much like Ella Risbridger’s book Midnight Chicken (in which the writer explains how cooking helped ease her mental health problems), Jog On offers a practical way to take on our biggest, most pressing problems. Not only will this book encourage you to take up running – or simply to find something you have a passion for to improve your mindset – it also reminds you you are absolutely not alone. From beginning to end, Bella’s book is highly relatable (she can only manage 2 minutes on her first run), realistic (her descriptions of mental illness are bang on), and will have anyone who suffers with the terror of an anxiety disorder joyously celebrating that somebody finally knows exactly how they feel. 

best self-help books 2019

Best self-help books: one to awaken the girlboss within

Work Party: How to Create & Cultivate the Career of Your Dreams, Jaclyn Johnson

What is a ‘work party’? It’s the feeling you get when you’re absolutely killing it in your career and enjoying every minute of it. But the biggest question is – how do you get there?

Author Jaclyn Johnson recalls the highs and lows of starting her own businesses, trusting the wrong people, making the ‘wrong’ moves, following her gut and chasing her dreams in this epic, fun and totally relatable career book. Forget business jargon and the usual run-of-the-mill ‘you can do it’ pep talks. Jaclyn, founder and CEO of Create & Cultivate (a community of women looking to carve out the career of their dreams), gives sound advice to anyone who wants to up their game at work – whether that means starting your own business from scratch, or moving swiftly up the ladder in your current job.

This career bible covers everything from asking for a pay rise to personal branding, and injects fun into following your dreams.

best self-help books 2019

Best self-help books: one for a spiritual awakening

The Universe Has Your Back, Gabrielle Bernstein

Gabrielle Bernstein’s Number 1 New York Times Bestseller is a must-have for anyone feels they’re lacking control over their life and is willing to hand over the reins to a higher power. Whether you’re already totally committed to living by the laws of attraction, or you’re very sceptical about asking the universe for what you want, you need to pick up a copy of this book to find out about the powers of manifestation for yourself.

This guide if for anyone who feels their life is lacking something, is having trouble feeling ‘happy’, or is unsure of the course to take. It promises to help the reader turn fear into faith, focusing on techniques that will having you living your best life in absolutely no time at all.

best self-help books 2019

Best self-help books: one if you’re feeling stuck

Big Magic: Creative Living Beyond Fear, Elizabeth Gilbert

This book will convince you to get creative with your life. It’s not just for the poets, painters and performers – it’s for anyone who has lost themselves a little bit and wants to rediscover their passions. The book focuses on finding and appreciating joy in every day experiences, doing the things you love, and ignoring the judgement and opinions of others.

The message is clear: this book is here to remind you that you can live big without selling everything and moving to a remote village, or vowing to commit to a sport so that you can compete in the next Olympics. Whether it’s rekindling your childhood love for ice skating or booking a piano lesson after twenty years off the keys, this book will encourage you to forget what others think, focus on what you want, and follow your own interesting and totally unique path.

best self-help books

Best self-help books: one that’s ‘anti guru’

Calm The Fuck Down, Sarah Knight

If you’re familiar with Knight’s other works, The Life-Changing Magic of Not Giving a F*ckGet Your Sh*t Together and You Do You, you’ll be familiar with her writing style: punchy, energetic and a bit tongue-in-cheek. Her fourth ‘anti guru’ book offers readers and easy framework for dealing with the daily ups and downs of anxiety – from someone who knows what it’s like to deal with it – all interspersed with diagrams, a good sense of humour and relatable anecdotes. It’s a breeze to read and you’ll feel much less alone by the end of it.

best self-help books 2019

Best self-help books: one for people pleasers

The Good Girl’s Guide To Being A Dick, Alexandra Reinwarth

Struggle with being honest? Scared to be confrontational? Worried about the consequences of saying what’s really on your mind? Then you need to pick up a copy of Alexandra Reinwarth’s book because it might just change your life for the better.

After going through a BFF breakup, Alexandra decided that she was no longer going to live her life to please other people. Instead, she was going to create her own set of rules and embrace the power of saying ‘no’. She rejects the idea of women having to be ‘nice’ to get where they need to be in life – whether that’s climbing the career ladder, pleasing their peers or having the confidence to do what they really want to do – and instead focuses on ways in which we can ask for (and get) the life that we truly want.

best self-help books 2019

Best self-help books: one for the courage to speak out

Make Trouble, Cecile Richards

Planned Parenthood president Cecile Richards is ‘enjoying fighting the good fight’. Her memoir details her fight for social justice and acts as motivation for anyone who wants to flex their activism muscle.

From how her journey started to the valuable lessons she learned along the way, Cecile talks about how she fought and won some of the biggest battles of her career – and doesn’t forget about her setbacks, too. She actively encourages being a (hard-working) troublemaker to get where you need to be – even if it all ends in failure. In fact, especially if it ends in failure. Because the most important step following a setback is the ability to pick yourself back up and keep going.

A practical guide to activism, it’s the go-to book for anyone who wants a little encouragement to face their fears and fight for the changes they want to see.

best self-help books 2019

Best self-help books: one to focus on the important things

The Subtle Art Of Not Giving A Fuck, Mark Manson

This book caused waves when it was released in 2016, and it’s still one of our favourites when it comes to self-help books. Forget a wishy-washy faux-positive author – Mark Manson is here to keep things to-the-point, and isn’t scared to swear while he’s doing it.

His approach differs from the usual self-help book style – instead of encouraging the readers to focus on what they’re not and ‘should be’, he advises them to stop comparing themselves and save their energy for the things that really matter in their lives.

best self-help books 2019

The post 9 self-help books that are actually worth reading appeared first on Marie Claire.

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The Grifters Are Coming: Laura Loomer, Louise Mensch, Sheriff David Clarke All Shopping New Books

Photo Illustration by Lyne Lucien/The Daily Beast

Some of the most outspoken political grifters of the Trump era want to sell you books—if anyone is interested in buying.

The success of political commentary books like Fox News reporter-turned-Trump-booster Greg Jarrett’s The Russia Hoax and tell-alls like Omarosa’s Unhinged have inspired B-list political media celebrities to take time out of their tweetstorms and attention-starved antics to pen the next great American rant.

Multiple sources confirmed to The Daily Beast that far-right political activist Laura Loomer, for example, has been trying to shop a book, and has told associates that there may be interest from major publishers.

Read more at The Daily Beast.

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Scouted: 12 Best Selling Books Published in February You Should Read in March

We know you love books and we know it’s hard to stay up-to-date on everything coming and going.

Whether you choose to catch up using a Kindle or stack your hardcovers horizontally to make a statement, we figured we could help you with your choices. So we put together a list of Amazon’s best selling titles that were released in February and that we think you might enjoy reading in March. Below each one is Amazon’s quick summary.

Read on.

Read more at The Daily Beast.

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NYC developer: Ironically, many of protested Amazon perks are ‘on the books’ for all newcomers

The political pressure that sunk Amazon's New York City deal was borne out of a lack of understanding of the benefits, says billionaire William Rudin.
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6 Great Books to Read During Black History Month

During Black History Month, we encourage you to reflect on the contributions of our past leaders as well as current ones. We encourage you to seek knowledge from a mix of platforms. February is a powerful month, because Black folks worldwide collectively celebrate our achievements, so why not feed your soul with content. This month, we recommend 6 books that’ll pull at your heart strings or at least inform you of our accomplishments. Check out our booklist: 6 Books You Should Read During Black History Month!

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The Poet X by Elizabeth Acevedo

Bold. Beautiful. Poetic. Meet Xiomara Batista, a beautiful Afro-Latina from New York City who is deeply invested in poetry. Once she starts to grow into her bodily figure, her fierceness emerges. It is then that a Harlem star is born. Armed with a leather notebook, Xiomara jots her passions and frustrations down unapologetically. Struggling with feelings she has for a boy in her bio class as well as family issues with Mami, Xiomara puts it all on the line when she joins a slam poetry club.

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The Hate U Give by Angie Thomas

Inspired by a short story she wrote in college about the police shooting of Oscar Grant, author Angie Thomas turned a brief narrative into a debut novel, The Hate U Give. The book, which follows Starr Carter, a 16-year-old girl who joins the activism set after she witnesses the police shooting of friend. Painful, yet inspiring, The Hate U Give shows how adversity can lead to action. In 2018, The Hate U Give was adapted and it premiered at the 2018 Toronto International Film Festival.

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Marley Dias Gets It Done And So Can You by Marley Dias
Reign on Ms. Dias! Marley’s debut book is inspirational. We get to see a young and determined influencer in rare form. In Marley Dias Gets It Done And So Can You, readers get an up close look at the young phenomenon who is committed to activism, equity and inclusion, social justice and knowledge. The New Jersey native, who is the brainchild behind the dynamic campaign #1000BlackGirlBooks uses this book to promote literacy, diversity, and the importance of community support.

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They Came Before Columbus by Ivan Van Sertima
The story of Christopher Columbus is a classic one and his journey is a staple in the classroom. However, many have questioned his story. What is truth? Did Columbus get here first? In They Came Before Columbus readers discover (from the authors point of view) that Africans were already present in ancient America long before Columbus. Supported by journals and oral accounts, author Ivan Van Sertima makes a powerful claim backed with real sources that Africans made a mark in the New World and shaped our current civilization.

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Little Leaders: Bold Women in Black History by Vashti Harrison
Inspirational and empowering, get to meet 40 powerful Black women who made a difference throughout U.S history. Short and sweet, Little Leaders: Bold Women in Black History provides quick biographical notes about phenomenal leaders who include filmmaker Julie Dash, Gwen Ifill, and more. If you are among little researchers, we advise this book for their collection.

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Hidden Figures: The True Story of Four Black Women And The Space Race
Based on the Academy Award-nominated movie Hidden Figures which starred stellar actresses Taraji P. Henson, Octavia Spencer, and Janelle Monae, we get the bold narrative which explores four African-American NASA mathematicians. During their tenure, they shattered glass ceilings by providing calculations that were necessary to support space missions. A great read for STEM-focused students, Hidden Figures shows that Black Magic is found everywhere.

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The 18 Best Black Books of All Time for Black History Month

Black History Month is underway, and black people are getting all the feels that come with historical blackness. The month of February signifies a celebration of all things black. Together, we collectively acknowledge the African American experience—dating back to 1619 when the first enslaved African pressed his feet onto American soil. It is only right to pay homage to our ancestors’ malleability, black excellence, and those who have impacted our history as well as the culture. It is also a good time to soak up all the unknown stories and marvels of our heritage. Plenty is surfacing online via social media. However, black books are the ultimate source to immerse ourselves in the resilience and wonderment of blackness past and present.

18 Best Black Books for Black History Month 

 

1. Incidents in the Life Of A Slave Girl

This slave narrative by Harriet Ann Jacobs was originally published in 1861 just as the American Civil War began. Jacobs fictionalized her own story on the horrors of slave life as a young girl, specifically one having to deal with the sexual harassment projected by her slaveholder and the physical violence of his jealous wife.

Best Black Books

 Incidents in the Life Of A Slave Girl, Thayer & Eldridge

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2. The Marrow of Tradition

Charles W. Chesnutt was a prolific black writer who could very well pass for white but refused to. This historical text, published at the turn of the century, depicts the Wilmington Race Riots in 1898. It focuses on racial politics, violence, and blackface during Reconstruction, and sadly, echoes events happening today.

Best Black Books

The Marrow of Tradition, Haughton, Mifflin, and Company

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3.The Autobiography of An Ex-Colored Man

James Weldon Johnson, the creator of the black national anthem, “Lift Every Voice And Sing,” shares the story of being raised by a black mother, but also believing that he was as white as his school-age peers due to his biracial heritage. His loss of innocence comes as he is discriminated against by his teacher. Throughout the text, Johnson gives firsthand accounts and observations of occupying two racial spaces, fitting into neither, yet being forced to choose one.

Best Black Books

The Autobiography of An Ex-Colored Man, Sherman, French & Co.

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4. Mules and Men

Zora Neale Hurston flexes her anthropology chops in this book that published in 1935. She gathers and documents cultural information from her native Florida, and New Orleans, and brings forth the beauty of common folk; their voice, their diction, their living, their way.

Best Black Books

Mules and Men, Harper Collins

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5. Invisible Man

This existential text told the story of a lone, nameless black man navigating a white world and, eventually, we find him so isolated from society to align and protect himself from the powers that be. It is an allegory for the entire black race, which is mistreated, objectified, commodified, and cast aside in such a way that it may as well be invisible.

Best Black Books

The Invisible Man, Random House

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6. Go Tell It On The Mountain

Christianity has close ties to the black American experience, and in many instances it is inextricable. Baldwin puts the beauty and the problematic on the page by way of a young man attempting to negotiate being black, religious, unloved, and possibly gay. Go Tell It On The Mountain is an exploration of identity and migration.

Best Black Books

Go Tell It On The Mountain, Knopf

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7. The Autobiography of Malcolm X

We are blessed to have this book in the world. Alex Haley documented X’s life-changing story for two years prior to his assassination. The book posthumously was published in 1965.

Best Black Books

The Autobiography of Malcolm X, Ballantine Books

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8. Dopefiend

Long before the crack era of the 1980s, heroine wreaked havoc on black communities. Donald Goines, a brilliant writer of street literature captures the pain of addiction perfectly.

Best Black Books

Dopefiend, Holloway House

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9. Roots

Alex Haley’s family tree is the context for Roots. It tells the story of his matriarchal forefather’s journey from Africa, through the middle passage, and through chattel slavery and is carried on by his descendants. The text was integral to African Americans wanting to know their family roots, and sparking interest in genealogy.

 

Best Black Books

Roots, Doubleday

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10. For colored girls who have considered suicide/ when the rainbow is enuf

Ntozake Shange took the Black Arts movement by storm when her collection of choreopoems hit theaters. These monologues are rooted in black feminism and speak specifically to the intersectionality of race and sexism black women experience.

Best Black Books

For colored girls who have considered suicide/ when the rainbow is enuf, Bantam Books

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11. Song of Solomon

This Nobel Prize-winning book traces the history of a black family and shows the nuance and complexity of black community rarely highlighted in mainstream literature—through Morrison’s remarkable storytelling and beautiful words.

Best Black Books

Song of Solomon, Alfred Knopf

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12. The Color Purple

If there has ever been a story told about black trauma, toxic masculinity, and survival, The Color Purple by Alice Walker will likely come up. The Pulitzer Prize-winning book made it to the big screen three years after its 1982 publishing date.

Best Black Books

The Color Purple, Harcourt Brace Jovanovich

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13. How to Succeed in Business Without Being White: Straight Talk on Making It in America 

This list would be remiss without this text from BLACK ENTERPRISE founder and publisher Earl G. Graves Sr. His shoot-from-the-hip commentary on what it takes to be a great, black entrepreneur in a white world is just the prescription the black business world needs.

Best Black Books

How to Succeed in Business Without Being White: Straight Talk on Making It in America, Harper Collins

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14. The Coldest Winter Ever

The cold, harsh reality of drug culture bleeds off these pages. It effectively captures the allure of the game while serving its consequences as well.

Best Black Books

The Coldest Winter Ever, Simon & Schuster

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15. The New Jim Crow

Mass incarceration has long plagued the black community. While representing just 13% of the nation’s population, black people make up 40% of the prison population. Michelle Alexander links this disparity to the war on drugs created to militarize police and fracture black communities, but also exposes its lasting effect as well as its ongoing nature.

Best Black Books

The New Jim Crow, The New Press

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16. The Underground Railroad

If you ever thought the Underground Railroad was an actual railroad when growing up, don’t feel ashamed. Colson Whitehead puts that perspective in play in this Pulitzer Prize-winning, historical text. It is a refreshing fictional look at slavery.

 

 

Best Black Books

The Underground Railroad, Doubleday

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17. The World According To Fannie Davis

Numbers playing is a part of the black culture that is common, yet elusive. The life of a black woman numbers runner is written alongside the historical events and the backdrop of black Detroit.

Best Black Books

The World According To Fannie Davis, St. Martin’s Press

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18. Heavy: An American Memoir

This memoir is a reckoning of the internal and external conflict within blackness. Kiese Laymon lays out parts of his life in intricate detail, taking the reader through observations of violence against black folk and violence committed by them as well. This is the story of a life filled with contradictions, tragedy, and resilience.

Best Black Books

Heavy: An American Memoir, Simon & Schuster

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Please note: Black Enterprise makes a small commission when you purchase one of these products via the embedded Amazon links. 

 

 

The post The 18 Best Black Books of All Time for Black History Month appeared first on Black Enterprise.

Lifestyle | Black Enterprise

EMPLOYMENT SEARCH UPDATE:

The story behind Henry Winkler’s 29 children’s books

Henry Winkler, who was propelled to fame as leather-wearing tough guy Fonzie on the hit 1970s show “Happy Days,” had one of the biggest surprise hits at the American Magazine Media powwow on Tuesday. After the long-running ABC hit ended, he starred in “The Waterboy” and several other movies with Adam Sandler. Last year, Winkler…
Media | New York Post

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15 New Books to Read This February

Whether you’re stuck indoors or running to somewhere warm this month, consider cozying up with a new book. From stories about complicated romances — to get you prepped for Valentine’s Day — to new releases from veteran authors like Toni Morrison and Marlon James, there are plenty of compelling reads to dive into this month. Here, 15 new books to read this February.

Notes From a Black Woman’s Diary, Kathleen Collins (2/5)

notes from a black womans diary kathleen collins

Artist, filmmaker and writer Kathleen Collins, who died in 1988, was rediscovered posthumously when her short story collection Whatever Happened to Interracial Love? was published in 2016. Three years later, her daughter has edited a collection that offers more of Collins’ short stories, as well as her diary entries, scripts and screenplays. Collins proves her literary power across mediums — exploring the complexities of marriage, motherhood and identity — even 30 years after her death.

Available on Amazon

Black Leopard, Red Wolf, Marlon James (2/5)

black leopard red wolf marlon james

In one of the most anticipated books of the year, Man Booker Prize winner Marlon James has created a mythical world inspired by African history and infused with fantasy. The novel, which is the first in a trilogy, follows a mercenary, Tracker, on a mission to find a missing boy who has not been seen in three years. As his determined search progresses and he travels from one ancient city to the next, Tracker begins to question the nature of the boy’s disappearance, leading him on a dangerous journey filled with vampires, witches and hyena-werewolves.

Available on Amazon

The Atlas of Reds and Blues, Devi S. Laskar (2/5)

the atlas of reds and blues devi laskar

A police raid on her home leaves the narrator of The Atlas of Reds and Blues, known as Mother, lying on her driveway, bleeding from a gunshot wound. As she waits for help, Mother reflects on her experiences as an American woman born to Bengali immigrants. While Devi S. Laskar’s debut novel takes place over just this single morning, Mother remembers moments from her present and past, weaving together an intense narrative about race, gender and power in America.

Available on Amazon

Where Reasons End, Yiyun Li (2/5)

where reasons end yiyun li

Novelist and memoirist Yiyun Li imagines a dialogue between a mother and her teenage son in her latest book, Where Reasons End. The conversations, which span several months after the son has taken his own life, capture both their complicated relationship and the fierceness with which the mother loves her child. Their dialogue is informed heavily by the mother’s passion for language, specifically poetry, and captures the intimate nature of the grieving process.

Available on Amazon

Digital Minimalism: Choosing a Focused Life in a Noisy World, Cal Newport (2/5)

digital minimalism cal newport

How long can you go without looking at your phone? Cal Newport urges readers to think about the relationships they have with the technology in their lives and how they can adopt the philosophies of “digital minimalists” in order to focus on what truly makes them happy. Newport discusses the value in changing your digital habits to become less accessible via social media and more equipped to interact with others outside the Internet.

Available on Amazon

Magical Negro: Poems, Morgan Parker (2/5)

magical negro morgan parker

Drawing on both personal experiences as well as pop culture and history, poet Morgan Parker expresses the everyday realities of being black in America in her latest collection Magical Negro. Her poems tackle constructions of race and identity, connected by common themes of trauma, grief and objectification.

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More Than Words, Jill Santopolo (2/5)

more than words jill santopolo

After her father dies, Nina Gregory’s life completely changes as she learns a secret about him that drives her to rethink her relationships with the men in her life, including her boyfriend and her boss. Jill Santopolo, bestselling author of The Light We Lost, leads Nina on a journey of self-discovery.

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The Age of Light, Whitney Scharer (2/5)

the age of light whitney scharer

Inspired by the real-life relationship between model Lee Miller and surrealist Man Ray, Whitney Scharer’s debut novel tackles art, love and sacrifice. It’s 1929 and Miller has just arrived in Paris, desperate to step away from her modeling career and become a photographer. She meets Ray, who initially wants to use Lee only for her modeling services, but convinces him to teach her everything there is to know about photography.

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On The Come Up, Angie Thomas (2/5)

on the come up angie thomas

Angie Thomas, author of the hugely popular YA novel The Hate U Give, has crafted a new story set in the same neighborhood. This time, she focuses on 16-year-old Bri, an aspiring rapper. After her song goes viral, Bri becomes the center of everyone’s attention, but not in the way she intended. As Bri’s family situation grows more tense — her mother has lost her job and the family is threatened by poverty — she has to learn to use her voice to raise herself up and follow her dreams.

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The Collected Schizophrenias: Essays, Esmé Weijun Wang (2/5)

the collected schizophrenias esme wang

Esmé Weijun Wang discusses her own diagnosis with schizoaffective disorder to propel this book of essays about the perils of mental and chronic illness. Going beyond her personal story, Wang applies her experience as a former lab researcher at Stanford to add an analytical perspective to The Collected Schizophrenias, which gives readers an inside look into the often-misunderstood intricacies of mental health.

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So Here I Am: Speeches by Great Women to Empower and Inspire, Anna Russell (Editor) (2/5)

so here i am anna russell

This collection of speeches features words spoken from some of the world’s most empowering women, from Marie Curie to Michelle Obama to Black Lives Matter co-founder Alicia Garza. The voices captured in this anthology, supplemented with histories by Russell, represent critical changes in fields that impact all parts our world — science, politics, human rights and more — and assert the importance of starting conversations to inspire others.

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Lost Children Archive, Valeria Luiselli (2/12)

lost children archive valeria luiselli

Luiselli’s road-trip novel follows an unnamed family driving across the country with two goals mind: the husband hopes to research Apacheria, and his wife has promised a friend she’ll learn what happened to two Mexican girls who were last seen at an immigration detention center. As the family travels, the couple’s son and daughter play happily in the backseat, but the radio shares grim tales of the children being detained at the U.S. and Mexico border. Lost Children Archive blends the personal and the political as cracks begin to form between the husband and wife, leaving their children anxious about their own future.

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The Source of Self-Regard: Selected Essays, Speeches, and Meditations, Toni Morrison (2/12)

the source of self-regard toni morrison

Toni Morrison’s literary expertise has been confirmed numerous times — she’s won both the Nobel and Pulitzer Prizes — and she shines once more in this nonfiction collection. Showcasing essays, speeches and meditations she’s written over the years, The Source of Self-Regard provides a space for Morrison’s musings on social and cultural issues, from racism to gender equality, as well as her own commentary on some of her most well-regarded works like The Bluest Eye and Beloved.

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The Care and Feeding of Ravenously Hungry Girls, Anissa Gray (2/19)

the care and feeding of ravenously hungry girls anissa gray

Three adult sisters are forced to dig up their messy pasts when Althea, the eldest sister, is arrested along with her husband for crimes that have completely rocked their small town community. In Anissa Gray’s debut, the bonds of sisterhood and motherhood are tested as the consequences of Althea’s actions are set in motion, leaving her sisters to take care of her twin teenage daughters.

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The Good Immigrant: 26 Writers Reflect on America, Nikesh Shukla and Chimene Suleyman (Editors) (2/19)

the good imigrant nikesh shukla

First and second-generation immigrants are featured in this collection of essays about living in a country that is consumed in debate over who can become a citizen. Chigozie Obioma, Jenny Zhang, Alexander Chee and more analyze the relationships they have with the places that matter most to them, reflecting on identity, belonging and the complexity of being an immigrant in America.

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Entertainment – TIME

ENTERTAINMENT DEAL UPDATE:

Nicole McLaughlin Talks Sustainable Design, Life on Adidas’ Farm and the Permanence of Books

MISTAKEN IDENTITY: Three years into her consultancy with Reebok as a full-time graphic designer, Nicole McLaughlin personifies the Millennial spirit that sustainability doesn’t have to be boring.
Off the clock, the New Jersey creative repurposes vintage store and eBay finds into one-of-a-kind creations. The slides she made from a magenta JanSport backpack racked up nearly 22,000 likes a few weeks ago. And more recently a pair of pants salvaged from two Columbia Sportswear ski jackets were another winner with her followers. “I have two jobs and to be honest they influence each other,” McLaughlin said Tuesday.
Edging more toward concept designer status, she sees her role in both capacities as “how to reimagine something that exists.” The end result can be mules made from Wilson tennis balls, or an umbrella repurposed with The North Face puffer jackets. Nearing the end of a London-Paris-Amsterdam trip with Reebok, McLaughlin said she steers clear of reimagining products from Reebok competitors like Nike or Under Armour.
In New York at the end of last year for a three-month rotation at “The Farm,” the creative hub in Greenpoint run by Adidas, she worked with seven to 12 apparel, footwear, color and material designers from its Herzogenaurach, Germany, and

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11 New Books to Read This January

No matter your resolution, there’s no better time than the new year to start reading more. The first month of 2019 brings with it new books that are filled with stories of adventure, survival and obsession. From intense crime thrillers to deeply affecting memoirs, there’s no shortage of interesting books to kick off the new year. Here, 11 books you should read this January.

The Truths We Hold: An American Journey, Kamala Harris (1/8)

The Truths we Hold Kamala Harris

In 2016, Kamala Harris made history when she became the country’s second black woman ever elected to the Senate and California’s first. Her memoir highlights her dedication to public service, detailing her journey as a prosecutor out of law school to becoming District Attorney of San Francisco to her rise to the U.S. Senate. Democratic Sen. Harris’ passion for helping others is on full display in The Truths We Hold, where she shares her insights on leadership, problem solving and the power of speaking your truth.

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Scrublands, Chris Hammer (1/8)

Scrublands Chris Hammer

The desolate, dying town of Riversend is left rattled when a young priest shoots and kills five men outside his church. One year later, journalist Martin Scarsden is sent to report on how the community is dealing with the tragedy. As Martin talks to more townspeople, he realizes details he’d learned about the shooting — theories his own newspaper reported in an award-winning investigation — might be incorrect. Things get even more complicated when two bodies are found in the scrublands, furthering Martin’s determination to unearth the truth.

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An Orchestra of Minorities, Chigozie Obioma (1/8)

An Orchestra of Minorities Chigozie Obioma

The Man Booker finalist’s second novel follows Chinonso, a poultry farmer whose life completely changes after he stops a woman, Ndali, from jumping off a bridge. He falls in love with Ndali, who is from a wealthy family, and sells almost everything he has to enroll in college so her family will accept him. Chinonso is guided by his chi, a guardian spirit who narrates the story and helps him through a tumultuous journey as his plans begin to crumble.

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You Know You Want This: “Cat Person” and Other Stories, Kristen Roupenian (1/15)

You Know You Want This Kristen Roupenian

Kristen Roupenian’s “Cat Person” — a short story about a college student and her relationship with an older man — rocked the Internet when it was published in 2017 amid a nation-wide conversation about consent and control. It became the New Yorker’s second most-read story of the year and landed Roupenian a seven-figure two-book deal. Her debut collection, You Know You Want This, includes “Cat Person,” as well as several other stories that tackle the complicated way we experience and perceive pain, pleasure and power.

Available on Amazon

Adèle, Leila Slimani (1/15)

Leila Slimani Adele

Despite having a seemingly perfect life — a good job, a surgeon husband and a young son — Adèle wants more. Specifically, more sex. The Parisian is obsessed with sex, in an all-consuming way, leaving her to lie to nearly everyone in her life as she rearranges her calendar for extramarital affairs. Slimani, author of the 2018 bestseller The Perfect Nanny, explores addiction and desire through Adèle, who desperately wants to feel wanted, but is spiraling out of control.

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To Keep the Sun Alive, Rabeah Ghaffari (1/15)

To Keep the Sun Alive Rabeah Ghaffari

Bibi-Khanoom and her husband, a retired judge, grow fruit on their orchard in the small city of Naishapur, Iran. It is 1979, the eve of the Iranian Revolution, and conversations at family lunches are dominated by the country’s impending crises. In her debut novel, Ghaffari addresses the political concerns of the period through an intense portrait of a family struggling against them.

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The Orphan of Salt Winds, Elizabeth Brooks (1/15)

The Orphan of Salt Winds Elizabeth Brooks

How strongly can memories haunt us? Elizabeth Brooks brings this question to the forefront in her debut novel, which centers around Virginia Wrathmell, an 86-year-old who can’t shake the memory of a plane crash that occurred near her home when she was young. As Virginia reflects on growing up in rural England on the cusp of World War II, she grapples with the decisions she’s made and the secrets she’s kept along the way.

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99 Nights in Logar, Jamil Jan Kochai (1/22)

99 Nights in Logar Jamil Jan Kochai

After spending six years in the U.S., 12-year-old Marwand returns to his family’s home province of Logar in war-torn Afghanistan, where he is overwhelmed by his new surroundings. Matters are made much worse when the family dog, Budabash, runs away on Marwand’s watch. Determined to find Budabash, Marwand and his cousins embark on a province-wide search, discovering more about each other and the culture that they share in this coming-of-age story.

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Maid: Hard Work, Low Pay, and a Mother’s Will to Survive, Stephanie Land (1/22)

Maid Stephanie Land

After becoming pregnant at 28, Stephanie Land was determined to provide for her daughter, but struggled to find work and make ends meet. In her memoir, Land reflects on the time she spent as a housecleaner working in the homes of the wealthy. She details the invisibility and shame she felt in order to create an important and moving account of wealth disparity in the U.S.

Available on Amazon

All the Lives We Ever Lived: Seeking Solace in Virginia Woolf, Katharine Smyth (1/29)

All the Lives we Ever Lived Katharine Smyth

Katharine Smyth uses Virginia Woolf’s To the Lighthouse to explore her own grief in this inventive memoir about literature and loss. Smythe’s connection to the revered novel revolves around her father, whose death was both inevitable and unexpected. Smyth’s memories of both her parents come to the surface as she learns more about Virginia Woolf and her book, showcasing the capacity fiction has to help make sense of life’s biggest questions.

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Try Common Sense: Replacing the Failed Ideologies of Right and Left, Philip K. Howard (1/29)

Try Common Sense Philip Howard

As the rhetoric between American political parties grows more tense, Philip K. Howard offers a solution based in practicality. In his book, Howard explains how the ideologies of both the Democrats and Republicans have left Americans with little choice but to demand more for themselves. He believes that a successful democracy is built on accountability and outlines his framework here, arguing that current bureaucratic processes are inhibiting the change America needs.

Available on Amazon


Entertainment – TIME

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4 Life-Lifting Books for 2019 Beyond ‘Becoming’

I don’t know a woman who doesn’t have Michelle Obama’s memoir, Becoming, and isn’t following her tour, whether up close or via Twitter. Never has a book been more heavily hyped, analyzed, and quoted — and it has paid off. Even Oprah must be thinking, ‘Daaammn!’ Like Lady Michelle, we are all always on the road to becoming our best imagined selves and great books can help us get there. Here are four life-lifting books for 2019, that I encourage you to take along for the ride.

 

Go back in time with Zora

Barracoon: The Story of the Last “Black Cargo” (Amistad/HarperCollins Publishers) is a first-person history of Cudjo Lewis, the last known survivor of the last slave ship to make the transatlantic journey. Painstakingly transcribed in his own dialect, it requires an attentive reader.

books for 2019

If you’re shaking your head no to another slave story, here are three reasons to at least try this one:

For starters, Cudjo’s story is recounted by the magnificent Zora Neale Hurston, who interviewed him at his home in Plateau, Alabama, over the course of three months in 1927. We often forget that Hurston was not only a great writer, she was a trained anthropologist, and to read this is to experience all parts of her intellect, interests, and cultural contributions and to see her in a new light.

Reason two: the brief, but illuminating, foreword by Alice Walker who begins with a warning: “I’m not sure there was ever a harder read than this.” But she goes on to note how universally Cudjo’s storytelling resonates, bringing to life “the nobility of a soul that has suffered to the point almost of erasure, and still it struggles to be whole, present, giving.”

Finally, there is incredible importance in this story itself. We are a people who suffer from so much lost history. Hard as it may be, we are strengthened by learning all we can, and sharing it.

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Open your brave heart

Have you heard of Cleo Wade? As a creative – through storytelling, public art, and community building largely on social media – she has been noted above all as a poet and influencer. If you haven’t heard of Wade, it’s time you do.

Peppy, motivational, inspiring and relatable, her book, Heart Talk: Poetic Wisdom For A Better Life (37 Ink/Atria Books, Simon & Schuster) is easy to read in quick bursts, each of which will leave you feeling a bit lighter, and brighter, and braver.

books for 2019

It’s dedicated to “every human being,” opens with a letter to “Dearest You,” and ends with a highly quotable poem that goes on for 17 pages. It says, in part: “I see that the clearest route to bliss is to be alive while you are here to be with yourself in a love so deep the oceans get jealous and even outer space wants to be inside.”

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Are you enough?

Self-help books almost always have catchy titles and tap into something that makes total sense. But a few pages in we may become lost, or bored, or not wanting to be preached to, worked over, or challenged. That list is already, too, long.

That could be why “The 7 Laws of Enough: Cultivating a Life of Sustainable Abundance,” drew me in.

books for 2019

Although the book covers some well-tread territory, (“You are enough. You do enough. You have enough, already,”) the idea of sustainable abundance feels like a worthwhile goal and the calm, compassionate tone of its co-writers Gina LaRoche and Jennifer Cohen will keep readers engaged. So does the book’s super-digestible 7 laws, a favorite is #5: Resting is Required.

Like any self-help tome worth its weight (this one is blessedly light), there is homework at the end of each chapter — lots of suggested journaling, reflecting, and inventory-taking designed to break unhelpful habits.

“Reading isn’t enough,” the authors note in their intro. “You must make an everyday practice of being who you wish to be, and living how you wish to live.” Practice is code for a committed vigilance to changing the habits and thinking derailing your joy.

“This is the gym of your life,” they write. “We invite you to a lifetime membership.”

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Join the Black Girl Cook Club

For an anthology of 2018 writings by black contemporary black woman authors, look no farther than Well-Read Black Girl: Finding Our Stories, Discovering Ourselves (Ballantine Books). Compiled by Glory Edam, the young visionary bookworm who founded the Well-Read Black Girl book club, the book is unique for its celebration of black women writers by 21 avid black woman readers who became gifted writers themselves. Their essays, prompted by the question, “When did you first see yourself in literature?” are thoughtful and intimate. Their responses, writes Edam, do more than pay homage to their role models, “They reveal what influences their craft, drives their curiosity, and defines their legacy.”

books for 2019

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The post 4 Life-Lifting Books for 2019 Beyond ‘Becoming’ appeared first on Black Enterprise.

Lifestyle | Black Enterprise

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Barack Obama’s Favorite Books in 2018

In a Facebook post, former President Barack Obama listed his favorite books of 2018.

As 2018 draws to a close, I’m continuing a favorite tradition of mine and sharing my year-end lists. It gives me a moment to pause and reflect on the year through the books, movies, and music that I found most thought-provoking, inspiring, or just plain loved. It also gives me a chance to highlight talented authors, artists, and storytellers – some who are household names and others who you may not have heard of before. Here’s my best of 2018 list – I hope you enjoy reading, watching, and listening.

Mr. Obama, unsurprisingly, lists the former first lady Michelle Obama’s book, “Becoming” at the top of his list. Mrs. Obama’s book is currently number one on the The New York Times bestselling non-fiction book list.

Here are Barack Obama’s Favorite Books in 2018

Becoming – Michelle Obama 

Barack Obama's Favorite Books in 2018

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An American Marriage – Tayari Jones

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Americanah – Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

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The Broken Ladder: How Inequality Affects the Way We Think, Live, and Die – Keith Payne

Barack Obama's Favorite Books in 2018

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Educated – Tara Westover

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Factfulness – Hans Rosling

Barack Obama's Favorite Books in 2018

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Futureface: A Family Mystery, an Epic Quest, and the Secret to Belonging- Alex Wagner

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A Grain of Wheat – Ngugi wa Thiong’o

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A House for Mr Biswas – V.S. Naipaul

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How Democracies Die – Steven Levitsky and Daniel Ziblatt

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In the Shadow of Statues: A White Southerner Confronts History – Mitch Landrieu

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Long Walk to Freedom – Nelson Mandela

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The New Geography of Jobs – Enrico Moretti

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The Return – Hisham Matar

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Things Fall Apart – Chinua Achebe

barack obama's favorite books in 2018

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Warlight – Michael Ondaatje

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Why Liberalism Failed – Patrick Deneen

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The World As It Is – Ben Rhodes

barack obama's favorite books in 2018

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American Prison – Shane Bauer 

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Arthur Ashe: A Life – Raymond Arsenault

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Asymmetry – Lisa Halliday 

barack obama's favorite books in 2018

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Feel Free – Zadie Smith 

barack obama's favorite books in 2018

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Florida – Lauren Groff 

barack obama's favorite books in 2018

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Frederick Douglass: Prophet of Freedom – David W. Blight

barack obama's favorite books in 2018

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Immigrant, Montana – Amitava Kumar

barack obama's favorite books in 2018

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The Largesse of the Sea Maiden – Denis Johnson

barack obama's favorite books in 2018

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Life 3.0: Being Human in the Age of Artificial Intelligence – Max Tegmark 

barack obama's favorite books in 2018

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There There – Tommy Orange 

barack obama's favorite books in 2018

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Washington Black – Esi Edugyan

barack obama's favorite books in 2018

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The post Barack Obama’s Favorite Books in 2018 appeared first on Black Enterprise.

Lifestyle | Black Enterprise

FASHION DEALS UPDATE:

12 ‘Must Read’ Books By Black Authors For 2019

With 2018 coming to a swift close, it is a good time to reflect on some of the praiseworthy reads brought to our bookshelves this year by authors of color. The following books by black authors (in alphabetical order by title) were published in 2018 and fall under a wide range of genres. These books are must-reads to add to your 2019 list of books to dive into if you have not yet had the pleasure of reading them.

1.  Becoming (Michelle Obama)

books by black authors

This book and author need very little introduction, but for the sake of formalities, let’s do this: Becoming is former first lady Michelle Obama’s blockbuster memoir that launched in November 2018—and is taking the world by storm. Mrs. 44, a powerhouse in her own right, shot up the charts at record speed, becoming an instant New York Times No. 1 best-seller. Becoming calls on all the feels; it is thought-provoking, inspiring, has refreshing humor, and in some parts, is outright heart-wrenching. Prepare to be moved at a soul level and have tissues nearby.

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2.  Freshwater (Akwaeke Emezi)

books by black authors

Author Akwaeke Emezi is a talented millennial Nigerian fiction writer and artist with a graduate degree from New York University. Her debut novel, Fresh Water, released in February of this year has been described as, “A mesmerizing and poetic novel that cracks open notions of self-control, mental illness, and love.” It tells the story of a troubled Nigerian girl named Ada who over time develops multiple versions of herself as a result of being born “with one foot on the other side.”

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3.  How Not to Get Shot: And Other Advice From White People (D.L. Hughley)

books by black authors

D.L. Hughley is a famed American stand-up comedian, actor, political commentator, and radio host. In his hilarious yet soul-shaking truth-telling book, Hughley touches on politics, race, and life as a black American as only he can.

From the book:

White people are always giving out ‘helpful’ advice, such as: ‘Comply with the police and you won’t get shot.’ They’ve been doling out advice to black people ever since ‘I suggest you pick the cotton if you don’t like getting whipped.’ Not getting shot by the police has long been a problem for black people. Even when we had a black president! Now that we have a new set of overlords, with President Trump at the head, wouldn’t it be nice to get a little advice on how not to get shot?

Hughley uses wit and all-too-real jokes to bring the elephant of injustice to the forefront of the room, while also sharing some advice including: ‘If You Do Get Shot, Don’t Rush to Judgement,’ ‘How to Dress Less Threatening,’ ‘What To Name Your Kids,’ and ‘Don’t Drive Like a Suspect.’

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4.  I Can’t Date Jesus: Love, Sex, Family, Race and Other Reasons I’ve Put My Faith in Beyoncé (Michael Arceneaux)

books by black authors

Houston born and raised Howard University grad Michael Arceneaux’s debut memoir is a stimulating laugh out loud take on his life as a millennial, gay, black man in a world programmed to misunderstand him. His clever play on words, obsession with Beyoncé, and pop culture references make this book impossible to put down.

While you’re guaranteed to get multiple chuckles from reading I Can’t Date Jesus, you’re also likely to gain a new appreciation for the struggles of the LGBTQ community.

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5. Not That Bad: Dispatches from Rape Culture (Roxane Gay)

books by black authors

Roxane Gay is an award-winning American writer, professor, and commentator. Her book Not That Bad is an informative anthology filled with transparent original pieces and some that have been previously published, highlighting the undeniable rape culture that has been formed and addressing the major issue of women often being second-guessed and discredited when they speak out about their experiences. Some contributors to Not That Bad include, Gabrielle Union, Amy Jo Burns, and Ally Sheedy.

Gay challenges the world to stop forcing women to measure the level of sexual harassment endured, and makes the case that “Not that bad” can no longer be good enough.

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6.  Poet X (Elizabeth Acevedo)

books by black authors

Afro-Dominican award-winning slam poet Elizabeth Acevedo’s YA novel-in-verse debuted in March of 2018 and is still a No.1 best-seller on Amazon. A collection of hard-hitting poems creates the story of Xiomara Batista. A teen girl who wishes for her voice to be heard, but all that is seen in the streets of her Harlem neighborhood are the curves she can no longer hide. She has a lot to say and scribbles her passionate frustrations down in her black leather notebook as she doesn’t want to disappoint her church-going mother.

The New York Times Book Review’s take on Acevedo’s narrative poetry book sums it up perfectly, “The force and intensity behind her words practically pushes them off the page, resulting in a verse novel that is felt as much as it is heard. This is a book from the heart, and for the heart.”

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7. Rise and Grind (Daymond John)

books by black authors

Daymond John, best known for being a shark on ABC’s Shark Tank and co-founding the FUBU clothing line, brought us a gem earlier this year. In January, John released his nonfiction New York Times best-selling business book, Rise and Grind. In John’s much-anticipated follow-up to Power of Broke, Rise and Grind shares that there is no shortcut to success, encouraging readers to out-think and out-work those around them. He also shares helpful routines and success strategies to get ahead.

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8.  Secrets We Kept: Three Women of Trinidad (Krystal Sital)

books by black authors

Author Krystal Sital, a Hunter College grad, was born and raised in Trinidad and moved with her family to the U.S. in the ’90s. Sital is a mix of the Africans brought to Trinidad as slaves and the Indians brought as indentured servants, and in her debut memoir, she shares a story of racism, abuse, and cruelty women endured in paradise.

The author grew up idolizing her wealthy Hindu grandfather until he became hospitalized and the women in her family finally found the courage to share their painful memories of his violent past. Amazon sums this must-read up with, “Violence, a rigid ethnic and racial caste system, and a tolerance of domestic abuse―the harsh legacies of plantation slavery―permeate the history of Trinidad. On the island’s plantations, in its growing cities, and in the family’s new home in America, Secrets We Kept tells a story of ambition and cruelty, endurance and love, and most of all, the bonds among women and between generations that help them find peace with the past.”

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9.  Shook One (Charlamagne Tha God)

books by black authors

Celebrity radio personality of The Breakfast Club, Charlamagne released his second book Shook One in October 2018. Shook One shares Charlamagne’s secrets for overcoming fear and anxiety in everyday life.

The author gets transparent about his own battles with anxiety since childhood, along with the fears that still creep up for him today, all while providing a blueprint for readers to manage their own fears and anxiety to succeed.

With mental health finally starting to get the attention it deserves, and the increase of anxiety in the world today, this book could not have come at a better time.

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10.  The Wedding Date (Jasmine Guillory)

books by black authors

Author Jasmine Guillory is a Bay Area native and Standford Law School grad who, outside of penning novels, has written for the likes of Shondaland, Cosmopolitan, and The Toast.

In this fictional story, Alexa Monroe agrees to accompany Drew Nichols (a random man with whom she gets stuck on an elevator with) to a wedding. If you’re looking for a fun, charming, stress-free easy read, this rom-com novel is it. The Wedding Date was released in January 2018. Guillory has released another (unrelated) rom-com novel The Proposal in October of this year and her next novel, The Wedding Party, is set to be released in 2019.

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11.  This Mournable Body (Tsitsi Dangarembga)

books by black authors

Tsitsi Dangarembga is an author and filmmaker from Zimbabwe. She studied medicine at Cambridge, leaving to return home after experiencing racism and isolation. In her fiction story This Mournable Body, she shares a tale of a young girl from Zimbabwe whose hopes become bitter over time due to the combination of betrayal, colonialism, and capitalism.

Vanity Fair described the book noting, “The novel explores how race, gender, class, and age are at play in Zimbabwe, and the overwhelming strength of these forces in the face of even the most optimistic and ambitious women.”

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12.  When They Call You a Terrorist: A Black Lives Matter Memoir (Patrisse Khan-Cullors and Asha Bandele)

books by black authors

Co-author Patrisse Khan-Cullors co-founded the Black Lives Matter movement following George Zimmerman’s acquittal after his shooting of Trayvon Martin. Having grown up in L.A. in an impoverished neighborhood and raised by a single mother, she witnessed the prejudice blacks suffered at the hands of law enforcement first-hand. When They Call You a Terrorist is the powerful memoir of the author’s life and how the entire Black Lives Matter movement began, triggering frustration, sorrow, and a fire to get involved.

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Upcoming Bonus Book – Confessions of Frannie Langton (Sara Collins)

books by black authors

This book will not be released until April 4, 2019, but the description alone makes it worthy of a mention as a book to look out for. The story is of a Jamaican slave given as a gift to England’s “finest mind” as a maid for his Mayfair mansion. Frannie has an affair and falls in love with her new master’s wife—who ends up dead, and fingers get pointed at her.

Historical novelist Sara Collins was born in Jamaica, raised in Grand Cayman, and studied law at London School of Economics.

Collins has shared that initially, she was reluctant to write a story about a black slave as a black woman. In an interview with Penguin publishing house Collins shares, “Slavery is one of those topics people expect to be written about in a certain way. Historically, slave narratives were written with an agenda: to inform white readers about the terrible suffering endured by slaves, and thereby persuade them to the abolitionist cause. It’s the kind of writing that tells you what happened to a person, but not much about who they were. One of history’s many failings is that those early black chroniclers were required to spend all their energy addressing the emergencies that had been made of their lives, instead of leaving behind a proper record of themselves.”

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The post 12 ‘Must Read’ Books By Black Authors For 2019 appeared first on Black Enterprise.

Lifestyle | Black Enterprise

EMPLOYMENT SEARCH UPDATE:

Places to travel that are inspired by famous books

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We’re going to be honest; we’re complete bookworms! Because of, this, many of the books often inspire us to travel far and wide in search of these magical fictional places – and there are so many places we’d go. We’d start off at Hogwarts to hang out with Dumbledore in the castle; we’d then take a trip to the Shire to have a second breakfast with Pippin and Merry, and then pop on through the wardrobe to don our fur coats and explore Narnia. Of course, these places aren’t real (sob), but some are! Here are five places you can actually travel to that are inspired by famous books.

Snæfellsjökull Volcano, Iceland – Journey to the Center of the Earth

Okay, so visiting a volcano isn’t exactly the most common travel destination in the world – but it is so worth it. This volcano is Iceland was the inspiration for Jules Verne’s famous Journey to the Center of the Earth, which was published in 1864. The Snæfellsjökull Volcano is a whopping 700,000 years old – and even has a glacier on the top of it! According to Verne and his awesome novel, the entrance to the center of the Earth is through the volcano. Although, we don’t suggest you try this out for yourself. An average tourist isn’t allowed to climb to the top of the volcano, but you can take a tour around the Snæfellsjökull National Park which will give you amazing views of this novel inspiration.

Whitby, United Kingdom – Dracula

Even if you haven’t read the incredible book that is Bram Stoker’s Dracula, you’ll probably still know the story of the evil vampire, Count Dracula, who moves from Transylvania to England and resides in his castle. Well, that castle still exists today. In the book, Count Dracula moves to Whitby, in the UK, and the castle was based on Whitby Abbey – a 16th-century monastery which is still standing (although it is missing a roof). In fact, Bram Stoker first got the idea for Dracula while he was walking around the Abbey, and he first read about his muse, Vlad Dracul, in the local library in Whitby. So why not take a trip to Whitby, walk in Bram Stoker’s shoes and try to write your own vampire story?

Big Sur, United States of America – Big Sur

We don’t need to give you two guesses on which book was based on Big Sur. Of course, it’s Jack Kerouac’s 1962 masterpiece, Big Sur! This novel follows the life of Kerouac and Lawrence Ferlinghetti as they settle down for three months in a cabin, located in the Bixby Canyon in Big Sur, California. Although the novel isn’t exactly happy-go-lucky with flowers and marshmallows, the description of the location is beyond belief, and you just have to see it for yourself! You could even stay in a cabin, just like Kerouac.

Hathersage, United Kingdom – Jane Eyre

Charlotte Bronte’s Jane Eyre is one of the most iconic books of all time – and it’s believed that Bronte got most of her inspiration from the village of Hathersage, in Derbyshire, UK. This little village is steeped in rolling hills and green forests, with tiny little cottages and manor houses. Bronte visited Hathersage in 1985, drawing on the location and North Lees Hall to create her own story and Thornfield Hall. So grab your copy of Jane Eyre, take a stroll through the grounds of North Lees Hall and the Peak District National Park and have a read within the midst of the inspiration.

Prince Edward Island, Canada – Anne of the Green Gables

Hopefully, you’ve all read Anne of the Green Gables – if not, you need to get on that ASAP! Lucy Maud Montgomery published her first book in 1908 which was based on the Green Gables Farm she often visited as a child. Nowadays, the area is called the Green Gables National Park and is located on Prince Edward Island in Canada. If you visit, you can check out the surrounding woods and buildings that inspired her ‘Lover’s Lane,’ ‘Haunted Woods’ and ‘Balsam Hollow.’ What could be better?

Are you looking for your next travel destination? Are you a book lover? We think you’ve found your answer. Books are great at conjuring up beautiful scenes, epic castles and intricate village life in our heads, but how great would it be to go see your favorite locations in real life?

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The post Places to travel that are inspired by famous books appeared first on Worldation.

Worldation

BEST DEAL UPDATE:

Ultimate 2018 Holiday Gift Guide From Black-Owned Businesses: Books

Ultimate 2018 Holiday Gift Guide From Black-Owned Businesses: Books



For Kids:

I’M A BRILLIANT LITTLE BLACK BOY!

Ultimate 2018 Holiday Gift Guide From Black-Owned Businesses

I’m a Brilliant Little Black Boy is targeted to African American children ages 6-11 years old.

 




I Am Unique 

Ultimate 2018 Holiday Gift Guide From Black-Owned Businesses

I Am Unique is a book and global empowerment brand reaching children in the United States, Africa, United Kingdom, Philippines, and Australia.


Sasha Savvy Loves to Code

Ultimate 2018 Holiday Gift Guide From Black-Owned Businesses

This book written by a teen author is to further the culture of science, technology, engineering, and math, while teaching some programming basics as well.




Harlem’s Little Blackbird 

Ultimate 2018 Holiday Gift Guide From Black-Owned Businesses

This book tells the story of Florence Mills, a singer with a voice like a bird.


Fly High! The Story of Bessie Coleman

Ultimate 2018 Holiday Gift Guide From Black-Owned Businesses

Bessie Coleman was the first African American to have a pilot’s license – she traveled all the way to France to earn her license after every American school refused to teach her.




Little Melba and Her Big Trombone

Ultimate 2018 Holiday Gift Guide From Black-Owned Businesses

This book highlights Melba Liston; a child prodigy trombonist who played with everyone from Count Basie to Billie Holiday.




For Adults: 

Becoming Michelle Obama

Throughout the book, Obama shares insights of a life of pomp and circumstance as a first lady, yet one also filled with the everyday worries, anxieties, and self-doubts so many women who hold it down as mothers and working professionals face.




Standing Our Ground

Ultimate 2018 Holiday Gift Guide From Black-Owned Businesses

 

Part memoir, part history lesson, this is the story by newly-elected congresswoman Lucia McBath who became an activist after the murder of her son Jordan Davis.




An Extraordinary Life

Ultimate 2018 Holiday Gift Guide From Black-Owned Businesses

Author Wendy Jones can’t exactly prove that her mother, Josephine Jones, was the first black woman manager at a Fortune 500 company, but she certainly makes a strong case for it in her book.


Getting to the Other Side of Victory

Ultimate 2018 Holiday Gift Guide From Black-Owned Businesses

This autobiography is a story of hope and action to teach people how to hit the reset button, tap into their hidden strengths, and rebuild their lives after crisis and loss.




Rise and Grind 

Ultimate 2018 Holiday Gift Guide From Black-Owned Businesses

 

In this collaboration, Daymond John looks at everyday routines of individuals including, Gary Vaynerchuk, Wendy Williams, Carlos Santana, and Catherine Zeta-Jones, who people consider to be winning and at the top of their fields.


Black Fortunes 

Ultimate 2018 Holiday Gift Guide From Black-Owned Businesses

This book is an ode to the nation’s first-known, post-slavery titans, a few of whom reside in his own family tree, concentrates on six African Americans who escaped slavery and became millionaires.


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The post Ultimate 2018 Holiday Gift Guide From Black-Owned Businesses: Books appeared first on Black Enterprise.

Lifestyle | Black Enterprise

EMPLOYMENT SEARCH UPDATE:

My Top 10 Men’s Style Books

If you are a follower of the Gentleman’s Gazette, you may very well know my fascination for all things classic menswear.

In today’s article, I will share with you my top 10 men’s style books, I explain why I chose them over others, I tell you which ones didn’t make the list and why they didn’t make it, and I mention other books that may make your top 10 list.

Book Title Author
Dressing The Man Alan Flusser
Gentleman Bernhard Roetzel
Bespoke Menswear Tailoring For Gentlemen Bernhard Roetzel
Esquire Encyclopedia Of 20th-Century Men’s Fashion Oscar E. Schoeffler
Reclams Mode – Und Kostümlexicon Ingrid Loschek
The Elegant Man Riccardo Villarosa & Guiliano Angeli
Alles über Herrenschuhe Helge Sternke
History Of Men’s Fashion Farid Chenoune
Sharp Suits Eric Musgrave
Mercury Dictionary Of Textile Terms

1. Dressing The Man – Alan Flusser

It was written in 2002 and contains everything you want to know about classic men’s style. It has beautiful photographs, illustration, very good text, it has hands-on graphics that allow you to pick the right patterns, it explains what to do and what not to do and overall, Alan Flusser probably sold more books on classic men’s style than any other author in the world.

Flusser also penned a bunch of other books including Clothes and the man and Style and the man. I believe dressing the man is the best one of all of them because the photography is superior, the layout is nice and it’s also one of the most comprehensive books he wrote. Dressing the man was the second book I had in my menswear library and I cherish it to this day. Even though it was written in 2002, it’s not outdated at this point which is probably one of the reasons it hasn’t been republished.

Der Gentleman - Bernhard Roetzel

Der Gentleman – Bernhard Roetzel

2. Gentleman – Bernhard Roetzel

It is a German book and it was the first book I ever had that started it all for me. At the time it was written, it was the first and only book of its kind and probably because of that, it was really popular. The author, although German, is an Anglophile and because of that, you can see the British style in that book as well. If you look at the table of contents, it covers a wide array of classic men’s things including suits, shoes, shirts and so forth.

This book has been translated into 19 languages, has been published many times and is updated regularly. That latest edition, for example, is from 2016. The great thing is neither Dressing the man nor the Gentleman are breaking the bank and you can find new or used copies for not very much money. If I just had to buy two books those would be the two.

3.  Bespoke Menswear Tailoring For Gentlemen – Bernard Roetzel

It’s likewise written by Bernhard Roetzel and it walks you through the entire process of choosing a fabric, cutting the pattern, having your fitting and getting your final garment. It also highlights a bunch of different tailors from across Europe so you get a better understanding of the different styles and what works for you. Last but not least, it also talks about other bespoke things such as bespoke shirts or bespoke ties and overall, if you’re considering to get a made to measure garment or a bespoke custom garment, I think this is money well spent because you learn a lot about the process, the pitfalls, and the mistakes you can make, and even if you’re not in the market for a custom garment yet, you just learn a lot about how garments are made traditionally and because of that, it’s my number 3 pick.

4.  Esquire Encyclopedia Of 20th-Century Men’s Fashion – O. E. Schoeffler

That’s quite a mouthful and even though it’s so old, it’s such a good book because it’s very comprehensive and it’s over 600 pages. Just look at the table of contents, it doesn’t just talk about formal evening wear but also formal day wear and there is a chapter on waistcoats, cummerbunds, and other clothing. It’s a fantastic book that has lots of illustrations as well as a glossary and a dictionary that really help you to find things quickly if you don’t know what certain terminology means.

That aside, it’s usually something you leave in your coffee table and read on a cold day in front of the fire. Sadly, this book is out of print and you can sometimes find it at libraries but more often than not, they sold it years ago. Because it’s out of print, it often goes north of $ 1,000 per copy sometimes you’re lucky and you may end up getting it for 100 or $ 200 so be patient and when the opportunity arises, definitely get a copy.

5. Reclams Mode – Und Kostümlexicon – Ingrid Loschek

It was originally written by Ingrid Loschek who sadly died because of cancer but it’s now continued by Gundula Wolter. The focus of this encyclopedia is not just men but also women and fashion and fashion history, in general. I found it extremely valuable and if you speak German, it’s a no-brainer, get this book! If you don’t speak German, you have two alternatives.

One is Fairchild encyclopedia of menswear which, as the name implies, just focuses on menswear but I don’t find it nearly as good. Another good book is the fashion dictionary by Guido Vergani which is more fashion-forward nevertheless, you find lots of useful information. Not a book you would read in front of the fireplace but something to look up terminologies and things when you need them. Obviously, if you are in the classic menswear business, you produce a lot of content and because of that, encyclopedias and in-depth research literature is very important for us. For you as a style enthusiast, it may not be something you must have in your library.

6. The Elegant Man – Riccardo Villarosa & Guiliano Angeli

I put it on the list because it has a really comprehensive section about fabrics. You don’t just learn about worsteds and flannels but also about things like the weaves and everything you need to know as a style enthusiast. On top of that, it covers all the basics of a classic man’s wardrobe even though the style sections are a little dated because it was published in the 90s, it is overall a very solid performer with good basic knowledge and it’s a book that should not be missing from your library.

7. Alles über Herrenschuhe – Helge Sternke

Another German one, Alles Uber Herrenschuhe by Helge Sternke. This monumental book title has everything about men’s shoes, isn’t perfect but it’s definitely the most comprehensive attempt about anything there is to men’s shoes. Learn about construction, different models, their history and if you speak German and like shoes, it should not miss from your bookshelf. It’s also not cheap and retails for around 200 euros. Now if you speak English, I suggest you check out a book from Daszlo Vass about Goodyear welted shoes for men which is very educational about how shoes are made and it’s something you can read and understand.

8. History Of Men’s Fashion – Farid Chenoune

Even though the author’s French and he wrote it in French, there’s also an English version of it. It has about 300 pages and talks about men’s fashion history which is very interesting for someone like me who always likes to dig deeper and understand why certain elements in classic menswear evolved, why they remain and how did they come to be.

9. Sharp Suits – Eric Musgrave

I met Eric once at his club in London and he has been into men’s clothing for the most part of his life. He is very knowledgeable and he put together a book just about the suit, its history, the different silhouettes, the patterns, and since the suit is so central to classic elegance and style, I put it on my list.

Mercury Dictionary Of Textile Terms

Mercury Dictionary Of Textile Terms

10. Mercury Dictionary Of Textile Terms

Now the 10th book on my list may surprise you, it’s the Mercury dictionary of textile terms and it was published in the 1950s. So it’s quite old but I love it because it’s more than 500 pages of detailed information about anything related to cloth, fabric, textiles, yarns, they talk about the weaving patterns, the history, and anything else you wanted to know. That’s particularly important for me as a menswear designer and creator because I want to understand how patterns and certain fabrics and styles came to be and what makes them different from others. For you, as a consumer, it’s really not as useful.

Other Books That Might Interest YOU…

1. Cuff Links – Susan Jonas & Marilyn Nissenson

You guessed it! most of them evolved around cufflinks such as this one. It’s from Susan Jonas and Marilyn Nissenson and I can wholeheartedly recommend it.

2. Jewelry For Gentlemen – James Sherwood

Another great recent book edition from James Sherwood, it covers rings, cufflinks, brooches, chains, necklaces, lapel pins and brooches and anything else you could imagine a gentleman to wear.

3. Gentleman Of The Golden Age eBook – Sven Raphael Schneider

If you like 1930 style and the way we are inspired by it today, please check out my ebook, Gentlemen of the Golden AgeLearn from the men who wore classic fashion best. Clark Gable, Fred Astaire, Cary Grant — they all looked their best in the 1930’s. Now you can use their source of sartorial inspiration, too.

4. Bruce Boyer Books (True Style / Elegance)

First, let me say I’m a great admirer of Bruce and of all the authors I mentioned here, I think he has the best writing style. On top of that, he has a wonderful personal style. So why didn’t it make my list?

One, his books have no photographs. Personally, I believe that classic men’s style and clothing is best consumed in a visual way. I’ve discussed this with Bruce Boyer personally in the past and he believes that nothing dates a book as quickly as having photos in it and while I agree with him on that front, I still think photos help the consumer to better understand what he’s writing.

Two, a lot of what you can read in Bruce’s books are individual articles that were written for magazines or different outlets. In his books, they’re all combined and so sometimes I personally miss that coherence that you get when you write one book from start to finish. That being said, I have all of his books in my possession, I really enjoy them and I think you should invest in them too, they’re just not my personal top 10.

5. Hugo Jacomet Books

You may know him as the Parisian Gentleman. In recent years, he has published a book Parisian Gentleman as well as the Italian Gentleman. Both books are beautiful, they are large oversized coffee table books with beautiful photographs, and I think overall, it’s something you should invest in. At the same time, those books are more focused on craftsman and different houses as well as their history.  Personally, I don’t care as much about the history of the people but more about the products they create. Because of that, Parisian Gentleman was not in my top ten list.  

6. Simon Crompton Books

I think Simon Crompton has a great wealth of knowledge, very detailed, very in-depth, he really understands bespoke and has visited many craftsmen. At the same time, his books either focus on brands which again, I’m not so interested in, because I know all of those brands already I know their benefits and their shortcomings and so there’s not much value there for me. Simon also speaks about things that are not primarily about brands but about clothing, style, and tailoring. The problem with those is they’re not as comprehensive as the information that you can find on his website. I know that’s often the fault of the publisher not of Simon Crompton but at the end of the day, if I invest money in a book, I want more information than what I can get free online.

Of course, if you like his writings on the website, buying his book is a great way to support him. That being said, if you want to learn from real-world outfits and get information you can not find on his website, I suggest to buy his book, The Style Guide because it shows you men from this day and age that wear things and he explains why it works for them in a particular situation and so you can draw conclusions from that for your own outfits.

7. Gentleman’s Lookbook – Bernhard Roetzel

Another book that goes in the same vein is called the Gentleman’s Lookbook by Bernhard Roetzel.  

8. I Am Dandy And We Are Dandy – Rose Callahan & Nathaniel Adams

Also, I really like the books I am dandy and We are dandy by Rose Callahan and Nathaniel Adams that highlight unique personal style paired with a story of the people and how they created it.

 

Book Title Author
Dressing The Man Alan Flusser
Gentleman Bernhard Roetzel
Bespoke Menswear Tailoring For Gentlemen Bernhard Roetzel
Esquire Encyclopedia Of 20th-Century Men’s Fashion Oscar E. Schoeffler
Reclams Mode – Und Kostümlexicon Ingrid Loschek
The Elegant Man Riccardo Villarosa & Guiliano Angeli
Alles über Herrenschuhe Helge Sternke
History Of Men’s Fashion Farid Chenoune
Sharp Suits Eric Musgrave
Mercury Dictionary Of Textile Terms

 

 

What are your favorite fashion books? Share with us in the comments below!


Gentleman’s Gazette

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‘The Walking Dead’ Time Jump: Show Versus Comic Books

SPOILER WARNING: The following article contains SPOILERS for The Walking Dead Season 9 Episode 6, called “Who Are You Now?”. Proceed at your own risk.

We’re living in a Rick-less world now in The Walking Dead, and this week’s episode went a long way toward filling the gaping void left by Grimes Sr’s departure. It introduced five new survivors – Magna, Luke, Connie, Kelly, and Yumiko – and showed us how Alexandria and The Kingdom have fared after a staggering six-year time jump. Interestingly, at around this point in the comics, there was a significant leap forward in the timeline as well.

The comic’s “new beginning” was significantly less dramatic, however. A less impactful two-year time jump, it meant Judith was still young; she’s now old enough and resourceful enough to go on fighting the fight in her dad’s absence. In the comic books at this point, Rick and Carl were still around. In fact, a lot of the early storylines following the skip forward in time revolved around Carl getting older and wanting to strike out on his own. The show and the comic books have separated themselves time and time again, and here it’s no different. These are the major differences between the series and the comic books after the time jump following the war with Negan.

Henry Is The New Carl


Henry.

When Carl was killed, a lot of fans were asking how some of the upcoming stories would be handled. They were arguably moments that made Carl more interesting than he had been in years. Well, it looks like Carol and Ezekiel’s adopted son Henry will become a stand-in for Carl in some of Grimes Jr’s comic-book storylines. This week’s episode saw Henry and Carol set out to deliver goods for the upcoming festival. This mirrors a similar Rick-less trip Carl took to the Hilltop where he soon moved to so he could train to be a blacksmith.

It’ll be interesting to see how far Henry’s story will follow Carl’s. One of the most memorable parts of the jump in the comic books was seeing Carl go through puberty and navigate interactions with girls while living in the apocalypse.

The Saviors Are Gone

We saw this tension play out through the first five episodes of the season, but in the comic books Alexandria, Hilltop, and the Saviors were in a slightly better place. Rick was in charge of Alexandria, Maggie was at Hilltop, and Dwight was in charge of the remaining Saviors. Things were still tense between everyone, but for the most part, the communities were all thriving.

In the show, it’s just Alexandria and Hilltop – and even that relationship seems rocky at best. Not only are the Saviors not in the picture community-wise, it seems like Carol pretty much wipes what was left of them out after they hurt Henry and steal her wedding ring.

Ezekiel’s Love Life


Ezekiel and Carol
Ezekiel and Carol.

Developments in Ezekiel’s love life take a big leap forward in this week’s episode. It transpires that he and Carol tied the knot at some point between when we first saw Ezekiel bring it up outside D.C. early this season and now.

In the comic books, the time jump reveals that Ezekiel was actually in a relationship with Michonne – who had become a pseudo-pirate in the two years since the war. Of course, in the comic books, Michonne never had a romantic relationship with Rick. Michonne’s role was filled by Andrea in the comic books, who lasted significantly longer than the Andrea of the TV series.

Connie

Connie is a member of Magna’s group that Judith saves and brings to Alexandria. The difference between her character in the show and the comic books is that in the show, she’s deaf and uses American Sign Language to communicate with her group. Her TV version is the first deaf character to be featured in both The Walking Dead and spin-off Fear the Walking Dead.

Gabriel and Rosita?!



Eugene’s had a very obvious thing for Rosita since we met him. And Rosita has always had a soft spot for Eugene. That’s been the case in both the comic books and the show. Some thought that, eventually, things might develop further for Eugene and Rosita. Well, in the comic books, after the time jump, they do. The oddly matched pair wind up together, despite some rockiness in their relationship.

TV Eugene just can’t catch a break, however — because Rosita is now with Gabriel. This pairing might not make a ton of sense, but a lot can happen in six years. It’s clear Eugene still harbors feelings for his longtime traveling companion, so who knows how things might pan out as the series progresses?

Hilltop Under New Management

One of the least publicized parts of last week’s episode was that it wasn’t just Rick’s last episode of the season, but also Maggie’s. Not only is that a fairly abrupt departure – though she’s much more likely to pop up in the show again than Rick – particularly since Lauren Cohan, who plays Maggie, appears to have been given a leave of absence to shoot her new show Whiskey Cavalier — but it really changes up the dynamic of Hilltop.

Where Maggie was still in charge of the community in the comic books, someone else has the reins in the show now. Jesus seems like the obvious choice, but is that too easy? Also, Hilltop and Alexandria seem to be in a rocky place themselves. It’ll be interesting to see where all that started, and how many months or years Maggie hung around before she took off. Expect some answers going forward.

Negan and Judith

Judith alone is probably the biggest left-turn the series has made in a while. And although Henry seems to be filling in for Carl’s comic storylines in some places, it seems Judith is taking over in others.

The comics revealed Negan was still alive and in prison after the war because Carl spent a lot of his time talking with the man in his cell. The two had a weird bond during the war and that continued in the years after it. Apparently, that bond was passed to Carl’s sister.

The show revealed Judith hanging out by Negan’s cell, having her dad’s former enemy help her with math homework. The two have a clear rapport, and although it’s pretty creepy, it’s also kinda cute.

Michonne and Rick’s Kid



There’s nothing to compare this to in the comic books. Rick doesn’t have another kid after Judith – at least not yet. A lot of fans thought Michonne could be pregnant before Rick died and their guess was right on the money. Their offspring seems to be in line to take the place of a young Judith, as a child that the group rallies to protect.

How the Walkers Have Evolved in ‘The Walking Dead’, Season By Season

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Books coming out this week: Nine Perfect Strangers, The Woo-Woo, and more

Books coming out this week: Nine Perfect Strangers, The Woo-Woo, and more


Books coming out this week: <em>Nine Perfect Strangers</em>, <em>The Woo-Woo</em>, and more

I know this is a space where we talk about books, but I would be remiss not to talk about the election, too. When I say “the election,” you might get a sinking feeling in your gut thinking about November 8th, 2016. But I’m hopeful that soon, we’ll start associating the term with the midterm elections taking place tomorrow, Tuesday, November 6th. It will be one of the most important elections of our generation and has the potential to “flip the house”—a.k.a. vote in enough Democrats to hold the majority in the House of Representatives.

If you’re not registered to vote, you may still be able to do so. Over 15 states—including California, Illinois, and Minnesota—have same-day voter registration for last-minute voters. After you cast your ballot and take your “I voted” selfie (with your “I voted” sticker), dive into a new read from this list of books coming out this week. You earned it.

Here are six books coming out this week that you don’t want to miss:

1. The Woo-Woo: How I Survived Ice Hockey, Drug Raids, Demons, and My Crazy Chinese Family by Lindsay Wong, out November 6th

Arsenal Pulp Press
available at Amazon | $ 12.16

When Lindsay Wong was a young girl, her grandmother was terrified of Chinese ghosts called “the woo-woo.” After her aunt and mother started behaving strangely and blaming the woo-woo too, Lindsay herself began feeling the effects of the ghosts and wondered if she could escape. Don’t miss this darkly hilarious memoir about mental illness, survival, and growing up in a dysfunctional Asian family.

2. How to Be Alone: If You Want To, and Even If You Don’t by Lane Moore, out November 6th

Picture of How to Be Alone Books
Atria Books
available at Amazon | $ 11

Lane Moore’s collection of essays holds nothing back. With stories about growing up with toxic parents, never feeling love, and turning pain into art, it isn’t always easy to read. But you won’t be able to put it down. How to Be Alone will make you feel less alone. It deserves an extra special place on your bookshelf.

3. Nine Perfect Strangers by Liane Moriarty, out November 6th

Flatiron Books
available at Amazon | $ 18.61

This is it. It’s the moment we’ve all been waiting for. Liane Moriarty, author of Big Little Lies (ever heard of it?) is back with a new novel. This one’s about nine strangers at a health resort seeking 10 days of mindfulness, meditation, pampering, and some tough self-love. And it’s Moriarty’s most page-turning book yet.

4. An Unexplained Death: The True Story of a Body at the Belvedere by Mikita Brottman, out November 6th

Henry Holt and Co.
available at Amazon | $ 18.30

Calling all true crime junkies: If you binged Season 2 of Making a Murderer and never miss an episode of the My Favorite Murder podcast, you’re going to be downright obsessed with An Unexplained Death. It investigates the mysterious death of a man named Rey Rivera. The police ruled his death a suicide—but is that what really happened? Here, Mikita Brottman seeks the truth.

5. The New Order by Karen E. Bender, out November 6th

Counterpoint Press
available at Amazon | $ 17.10

I’ve come to love short stories in 2018, and The New Order is one of the best collections of the year. My favorite story? “Mrs. America,” a timely read about a candidate for local office and all the things threatening to upend her campaign.

6. Those Who Knew by Idra Novey, out November 6th

Viking
available at Amazon | $ 17.10

Speaking of timely reads, it’s extremely fitting that Those Who Knew hits shelves on Election Day. Set 10 years in the future after the collapse of the U.S. government, it’s a powerful novel about a male politician, his bad behavior, and the people who bring him down.

Happy reading!

The post Books coming out this week: <em>Nine Perfect Strangers</em>, <em>The Woo-Woo</em>, and more appeared first on HelloGiggles.

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Kobe Bryant Sets Ambitious Plan For Books In 2019-2020

(AP Photo) 

NEW YORK (AP) — Kobe Bryant, Oscar winner and former NBA great, has big plans for books in the next few years.

Bryant’s Granity Studios plans to release five middle grade and young adult novels in 2019 and 2020. According to a press release issued Thursday, each novel was “conceptualized” by Bryant and written with a “notable” fiction author.

Projects for next year include The Wizenard Series: Training Camp featuring a “diverse cast” of young males and Legacy and the Queen, about a young black woman and her tennis match against a superstar known as “The Queen.”

Earlier this year, the Granity film Dear Basketball, Bryant’s ode to the sport that made him famous, won the Academy Award for best animated short.

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Sotheby’s Paris Preps Fourth Auction of Books From Pierre Bergé’s Personal Library

BERGE’S BOOKENDS: If reading is the key to enlightenment, Pierre Bergé sure had a lot of books to spark his intelligence.
Sotheby’s Paris will hold the fourth auction for a selection of books from Bergé’s personal collection on Dec. 14. Several choice lots are on view at Sotheby’s New York office through Saturday, and they illustrated the myriad interests of the late French business titan: botany, gardens, philosophy, activism and more. The upcoming auction is expected to drum up between 5 million euros and 6 million euros, according to a Sotheby’s spokeswoman.
Literature, the 19th century and music were among the areas of interest covered in prior sales, with the first auction having been held nearly three years ago.
The December sale includes such highlights as Bartholomeus Anglicus’ “Le Propriétaire des choses,” circa 1486. This complete copy of a major medieval encyclopedia is illustrated with 19 large woodcuts, all hand-colored at that time. Bidders will also find Gustave Flaubert’s “Salammbô” from 1863, a first edition that was inscribed by Flaubert to the composer Hector Berlioz.
Another reading relic is Leonhart Fuchs’ “De historia stirpium commentarii insignes” from 1542 that is considered to be the founding treatise of modern botany. The auction house will also

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5 Books That Will Actually Make You Productive

Over the last decade, I’ve read my way through the entire Barnes & Noble productivity section. Has it made me the most productive person in the world? Debatable. The Rock, or, perhaps, Elon Musk might lay claim to that title, but this little word binge did make me remarkably more focused. Whether you want to get more work done, stop procrastinating, pick up a new skill, or need a swift kick in your Aeron chair, there’s a book out there for you.

If You’re a Productivity Newbie

Great news, friends! You don’t have to master complicated filing systems, or download habit-tracking apps, or start going to bed at 8 p.m. every night to get more meaningful work done. Nope. What you have to do is focus on one thing at a time. Go small, says Gary Keller, author of The One Thing, by ignoring all the things you could do, and focus on what you should do. Pick a task, complete it, move on to the next. It’s shockingly counterintuitive, practically transgressive. He’s definitely not advocating multitasking, and getting this mantra drilled into your head for a couple hundred pages actually makes it stick. This book is so simple—and effective—it actually makes me angry I hadn’t thought of it first.

Read more at The Daily Beast.

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