Melanoma Diagnoses Continue to Rise, Says American Cancer Society Annual Statistics Report for 2019

The American Cancer Society has released its annual statistics report for 2019, giving us even more reason to step up our sun-care routine. This year’s report found that skin cancer is still the most commonly diagnosed form of cancer in the U.S., and melanoma skin cancer diagnoses continue to rise. In 2019, new cases of melanoma are expected to increase by more than five percent
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Immune System Therapy Shows Wider Promise Against Cancer

(Anna Carlstrand via AP)

ATLANTA (AP) — A treatment that helps the immune system fight deadly blood cancers is showing early signs of promise against some solid tumors, giving hope that this approach might be extended to more common cancers in the future.

The treatment, called CAR-T therapy, involves genetically modifying some of a patient’s own cells to help them recognize and attack cancer. Richard Carlstrand of Long Key, Florida, had it more than a year ago for mesothelioma, an aggressive cancer of the lining of the lungs.

“We were going into unknown territories” to try this, he said, but now he shows no sign of cancer and “I couldn’t be happier.”

Results on his and other cases were discussed Sunday at an American Association for Cancer Research conference in Atlanta.

The first CAR-T therapies were approved in 2017 for some leukemias and lymphomas. After being altered in the lab, the modified immune system cells are returned to the patient through an IV, which puts them right where the cancer is — in the blood.

But that approach doesn’t work well if the cells have to travel far through the bloodstream to get to tumors in the lung, breast, colon, or other places.

“Solid tumors are notorious for not letting the immune cells enter,” and not enough may make it in to have an effect, said Dr. Prasad Adusumilli of Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York.

A bigger worry is that the proteins on solid tumor cells that these therapies target also are found on normal cells at lower levels, so the therapy might harm them, too.

Adusumilli helped design a new CAR-T to try to avoid these problems and tested it on 19 patients with mesothelioma and two others with lung and breast cancer, respectively, that had spread to the chest lining. About 150,000 patients in the U.S. each year face this situation.

The modified cells were injected directly into the chest where the tumors were. A genetic safety switch was added so a medicine could be given to destroy the cells if they caused harm.

After the therapy, one patient was able to have surgery and radiation, and is doing well 20 months later with no further treatment. Fifteen others were well enough to start on a drug that boosts the immune system in a different way.

Eleven of the 15 have been studied long enough to report results. Two had signs of cancer disappear for about a year, although one later relapsed. Six saw their tumors shrink. Three saw their cancer worsen.

There were no severe side effects although some patients had temporarily low blood counts and fatigue.

Grants from the federal government and foundations paid for the work and a larger study is planned. Sloan Kettering has licensed the treatment to Atara Biotherapeutics and may get payments from it, as may Adusumilli.

A second study tested a different CAR-T therapy in 10 children and adults with advanced sarcomas — cancers that originate in various soft tissues or bones. Unlike other CAR-Ts that are usually given just once, this one was given multiple times, up to 15 in one patient’s case, if there were signs it was helping.

“From a single blood draw we make a large amount of the CAR-T cells and then we freeze them” and give them through an IV as needed, said Dr. Shoba Navai of Baylor College of Medicine in Houston.

Two of the 10 patients had all signs of cancer disappear, one for 17 months and the other for nearly three years, so far. Three others had their disease stabilized. Five worsened despite treatment.

Side effects were similar to the other study. The therapy seems safe “and we have early signs that this treatment approach may help,” Navai said.

Several foundations and charities paid for the work.

“These studies are showing there may be a path forward in solid tumors” with CAR-T therapies, said Dr. Louis Weiner, director of the Georgetown Lombardi Comprehensive Cancer Center and one of the conference leaders. It may hold promise for some cancers of the stomach, breast, colon, lung and other areas, he said.

Cost is a big issue — current CAR-T therapies are around $ 400,000 but can be made for far less than that in research centers. Doctors say they hope the cost will come down as more come on the market and find their way to wider use.

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This new bra promises comfort for women fighting breast cancer

Breast cancer survivors frequently complain about the comfort of their lingerie after having had surgery. Now a New York startup medical wear company for people with disabilities promises to change that with a new, specialized bra for women who have undergone mastectomies and reconstructive breast surgeries. The $ 65 Care + Wear Recovery Bra’s key feature…
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Pat Cleveland’s Friends Help Raise Funds for Her Colon Cancer Treatment

STRENGTH IN NUMBERS: Friends and relatives of the irrepressible model Pat Cleveland are rallying around her to help finance her treatment for colon cancer.
In less than 24 hours, 121 people had contributed nearly $ 44,000 toward the $ 150,000 GoFundMe initiative as of early this afternoon. Cleveland’s husband, Paul van Ravenstein, said Monday, “The community is so supportive. It is just amazing to see everybody reach out.”
After having some strange digestive issues over the last few months, Cleveland sought medical advice in New York. Cleveland helped to break racial barriers on the runways in the Sixties and Seventies. Unlike many of her peers, Cleveland continued to model through the years. Once fashion week got underway in February, she was busy in New York, and then off to Europe for the Laura Biagiotti and Missoni shows in Milan, followed by Tommy Hilfiger’s Zendaya show in Paris, her husband said. Earlier this month Cleveland made an appearance at the Montreal Museum of Fine Arts’ opening for its Thierry Mugler exhibition.
About 10 days ago in Paris for her daughter Anna’s birthday and a hair show for L’Orèal, Cleveland sought medical attention due to increased discomfort, her husband said. When the consulting physician checked back with

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Beating Cancer — Together

Miguel and Paula Rodriguez have been married more than 53 years. “I still love her like I did when we first met,” said Miguel.

Their strong partnership was more important than ever when Paula learned she had colon cancer, just 2 years after Miguel received the same diagnosis.

“When you hear the word ‘cancer,’ you feel like death is upon you,” Miguel said. “Fortunately, at Kaiser Permanente, we have always gotten the help we need.”

That help included gentle but firm reminders to stay up to date with preventive screenings from their doctor, Margarita Sánchez-Padilla, reinforced by the medical assistants and receptionists they saw at each visit.

Once their cancers were detected, both Rodriguezes received expert care from teams of specialists who worked together closely to ensure the best prognosis for them.

“We caught the cancer early in both cases, removed it, and they are cured,” said surgeon Bryan Loh.

Learn how Kaiser Permanente saves lives with its team-based approach to cancer care.

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A Stage 3 Colon Cancer Survivor Story

March is National Colorectal Cancer Awareness Month. In the United States, colorectal cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths in men and women, and the second most common cause of cancer deaths when men and women are combined. Approximately 140,000 people are diagnosed with colon cancer in the U.S. and more than 50,000 people die from it annually.

Colon cancer deaths are highly preventable with proper annual screening and understanding how your family history could play a part in your health – just ask Melinda Teixeira of Santa Clarita, California.

It all started with a doctor’s appointment to discuss some digestive discomfort she was experiencing. Melinda met with her doctor, Cindy Uypitching, MD, at Kaiser Permanente Canyon Country Medical Offices, who asked a routine series of questions that Melinda says saved her life.

“She began asking me about my family history,” Melinda, 43, recalled. “She was so easy to talk to, and very personable. She listened and took her time with me. In that conversation, I mentioned my mother was diagnosed with stage 2 colon cancer at age 50.”

Dr. Uypitching immediately knew this family history revelation was critically important.

“I listened to her carefully and based upon some of the symptoms she was experiencing, I concluded there could be a much more serious health issue based on her family history,” she said. “This led me to refer her to see a gastroenterologist. I’m glad I did, because it turned out that she had colon cancer that required immediate attention.”

Melinda met with Gina Lin, MD, a gastroenterologist at Kaiser Permanente Santa Clarita Medical Offices, where a colonoscopy was scheduled right away. Following the procedure, Melinda received the news no one wants to hear – a mass was found in her colon.

“I was told I had stage 3 colon cancer, and that I needed surgery,” Melinda said. “I was shocked! I wasn’t sure what to think; this was devastating news.”

Melinda underwent surgery at Kaiser Permanente Panorama City Medical Center to remove the tumor. She was informed she had stage 3 colon cancer with 3 of 12 lymph nodes involved. Immediately following surgery, Melinda underwent chemotherapy, which has resulted in a positive outcome. But, she faced some challenges.

“I experienced a lot of the normal side-effects during my chemo treatment,” she recalled. “All of these got better once chemo stopped. I’m in a good position right now. If I’m clear in 2 years, I can consider it to be a true remission of this disease.”

Melinda, a mother of 2, keeps a positive outlook on life with the goal of being 100 percent cancer-free. Today, Melinda eats more vegetables and exercises regularly, something that she rarely did before being diagnosed with colon cancer. And, she has some important advice for others.

“I would have definitely gotten screened sooner for colon cancer if I understood the importance of how my family history could play a role in my health,” she said. “My advice is: Don’t take your health for granted; be your own health advocate and don’t procrastinate! Preventive care is key to fighting diseases like colon cancer, and it starts with screening. So much depends on early detection and understanding family history.”

Melinda credits her positive outlook for the future on Kaiser Permanente’s integrated health care system and its emphasis on preventive care through early screening. She was impressed by Kaiser Permanente’s focus on patient safety and medical excellence exemplified by the ongoing high-quality care she received. She acknowledges her team of doctors starting from her primary care physician, Dr. Uypitching, to her oncologist, Andy Yung Su, MD, as important factors in her road to recovery.

“I’m finding a sense of acceptance of my condition,” she said. “Finding a sense of normalcy is important after something as life-altering as colon cancer, and being able to help the next person allows me to find a reason and a purpose. The facts are clear: colon cancer is curable, but it starts with screening because it saves lives, and it saved mine!”

Learn more about Kaiser Permanente Southern California’s expert cancer care and choices that are right for you.

Get more information on the importance of colon cancer screenings.

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Monsanto’s Roundup was likely the cause of a second man’s cancer, jury says

In the first federal case of what could become thousands of lawsuits, a jury found the world’s most widely used herbicide was likely responsible for a California man’s cancer, according to the San Francisco Chronicle.


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Doctors Need To Talk Through Treatment Options Better For Black Men With Prostate Cancer

African-American men have the highest risk of being diagnosed with prostate cancer as well as dying from it compared to any other ethnic group in the U.S. This trend has remained unchanged for over four decades.

Although research has focused on identifying the biological differences that may lead to this difference, there’s growing evidence that distinct racial and ethnic disparities in prostate cancer treatment, and the quality of medical care in African-American men, contribute to this disparity.

African-American men are less likely to receive more aggressive treatments than their counterparts. And, if and when they do receive those treatments, they receive them later than their counterparts. For example, access to early effective survivorship treatments such as androgen deprivation therapies remains a challenge in African-American patients.

Our multidisciplinary research program in cancer population science at the University of Virginia has been examining reasons for poor prostate cancer outcomes, especially in African-American patients. Recent, as yet unpublished research from our group highlights several issues related to medication challenges in elderly prostate cancer survivors. We found there is a clear link between improved use of these treatments and reduced mortality. In addition, both access and use of these life-saving treatments remains low among African-American survivors.

A history of gaps

African-American prostate cancer patients face unique challenges in the treatment decision-making process. These include lower rates of understanding of treatment options, less time and interaction with medical care professionals and, often, poorer quality of medical care. Those challenges particularly affect both their access and compliance to medications, and, in turn, outcomes in these patients.

For example, a 69-year-old African American man whom we interviewed for our research, Mr. Tyler (name changed), along with his wife, Mrs. Tyler, sat in an exam room while his doctor told him he had stage 4 prostate cancer. Stage 4 cancer is cancer that has spread from its original site to distant organs and, in prostate cancer, even the bone.

Mr. Tyler was shocked. He had not noticed any health issues besides getting up in the middle of the night to urinate and some hip pain. He thought that was normal as men age. When he went to the clinic, he thought he had arthritis in his hip and would be prescribed pain medications for that. He could not imagine hearing that he had cancer.

He had not been to see a health care provider in about 12 years. He was always so busy at work and did not really feel comfortable going to a health care provider, having heard stories from family members and friends that other African-Americans are not treated well at the hospital.

The doctor gave Mr. Tyler a few options such as surgery, radiation and androgen deprivation therapy, considering his age, ethnicity, comorbidities and other related factors. But Mr. Tyler and his wife did not know what treatment options to seriously consider.

The health care provider gave a recommendation, but his wife was unsure. They were confused and anxious about making such a big and complex decision. The couple relied on information they received from speaking to friends, church members and relatives and ultimately made a decision, but it was not easy. And, it was not free from some regrets. Ultimately they chose to receive the radiation treatment and start the androgen deprivation treatment, which Mr. Tyler stopped because of discomfort. Mr. Tyler unfortunately died shortly after he discontinued treatment.

Treatment decision process improvements may be paramount

This scenario of confusion and anxiety is not so uncommon. Cancer is a terrifying diagnosis, and making decisions about treatment can be overwhelming.

Studies have suggested that patients with cancer feel more comfortable expressing their concerns with their health care provider when there is a trusting and supportive relationship developed along with adequate time for treatment discussion. This in turn leads to more comfortable treatment decisions, which often works to improve patient outcomes.

Prostate cancer treatment in particular often brings harsh side effects that severely affect a man’s quality of life. These side effects include erectile dysfunction, hot flashes, muscle loss, hair loss and urinary issues such as incontinence. These may be short term, but they can last for years.

The matter is complicated because many of these harsh side effects stem from androgen deprivation therapies, which can improve survival. Because of the complicated nature of assessing the risk of side effects with the potential benefit of survival, the use of androgen deprivation therapies should carefully be considered by the patient and his doctor.

Research has shown that these treatment-related decisions are very different in African-American prostate cancer patients compared to white patients and those residing in urban and rural communities. Therefore, there is a need to study treatment decision-making in both settings to formulate effective educational interventions.

Aids that can help

In one of our recent studies, we found that decision aids may help. Decision aids are electronic or paper tools involving a set of questions and information related to treatments. They are used to assist patients and caregivers in making informed decisions about the types of treatments and procedures, or both, that are more suitable for their particular case.

Decision aids are effective in a shared decision-making process, in which the doctor or nurse navigator sits down with a patient and walks through the process. There is active participation between the patient, caregiver and health care provider.

Decision aids can help patients apply specific health information while actively participating in health-related decision-making. Primarily, decision aids that have been applied to prostate cancer have been focused on knowledge or treatment options only, which patients often complete themselves. These types of decision aids are quite limited and do not allow patients the time and true engagement with health care providers to really understand their disease and the options that are available, and ultimately become satisfied with that decision.

Decision aids are most effective when they are tailored to the individual patient, rather than being generic. For example, researchers have developed an individualized decision support system BreastHealthDecisions.org, which represents a new approach to breast cancer prevention care.

In our study that developed an interactive decision aid for treatment decisions among advanced prostate cancer patients, we found that not only did the decision aid enhance patients’ and their caregivers’ understanding of the options that they had for treatment, but it also built more trust and engagementbetween the patient and the health care provider, which is valuable. The study also revealed that by using the decision aid, patients were more concerned with the quality of their life after treatment than extending the number of years of life.

Developing decision support systems for prostate cancer is paramount as we move towards an era of precision medicine treatments, such as proton therapies, which are used only after decision support system plans are in place for the prostate cancer survivor.

Often, the conversations between health care providers and the patient are focused around the quantity of life. The patients in our study said they felt empowered enough through the use of the decision aid to discuss quality of life, and how that was a critical aspect within their conversations.

There is much work to do to provide optimal health care to patients with cancer, including African-Americans with cancer. Tailored decision aids that focus on the priorities of the patient and their caregivers and that promote trusting relationships with health care providers is key to helping patients feel satisfied with their health care decisions and have less regret.

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WATCH: World News 03/06/19: Alex Trebek Announces He Has Stage 4 Pancreatic Cancer

R. Kelly in custody after failing to pay $ 161,000 in child support; Sen. Martha McSally: I am ‘a military sexual assault survivor’
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Do I Really Need a Colorectal Cancer Screening?

Kaiser Permanente - eading the Nation in Colorectal Cancer Screening Rates. Commercial Health Plans: Kaiser Permenante - 88%, National Average 72%. Medicare Health Palnas: Kaiser Permanante - 79%, National Average 61%. Source: 2018 HEDIS® (Healthcare Effectiveness Data and Information Set), used by more than 90 percent of America’s health plans to measure performance.

Download a .pdf of this infographic.

Keeping up with screenings is one of the best ways to stop colon cancer, the second-leading cause of cancer death in the U.S.

When colon cancer is caught early, the disease can be cured in 9 out of 10 cases. Screening can also prevent cancer by helping doctors find and remove polyps before they become cancerous.

Kaiser Permanente is proud to lead the nation in colorectal cancer screening rates. To make it easy and convenient, we use a non-invasive test called FIT whenever possible, completed in the privacy of your own home. Talk with your care team to determine what type of screening is best for you based on your age and risk.

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2.22.19 Prostate cancer awareness; Clark Stinks

Clark was diagnosed with prostate cancer over 10 years ago. And he is working with the Prostate Cancer Foundation to raise awareness. Christa reads listener posts about how Clark has missed the mark in his advice this week. If you have a “Clark Stinks” to share you can leave it here.

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The post 2.22.19 Prostate cancer awareness; Clark Stinks appeared first on Clark Howard.

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New recommendations say not all women need genetic testing for cancer. Critics say it could cost lives

Primary care providers should screen women for personal, family and/or ethnic history of breast, ovarian, tubal or peritoneal cancer to decide who should undergo genetic counseling for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations, the US Preventive Services Task Force recommended Tuesday. The mutations increase a woman’s cancer risk.


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Company claims to have ‘complete cure for cancer’ within a year

AEBi, a biopharmaceutical company, claims it will have a cure for cancer within a year. Those claims are probably too good to be true.
ABC News: Health

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http://www.acrx.org -As millions of Americans strive to deal with the economic downturn,loss of jobs,foreclosures,high cost of gas,and the rising cost of prescription drug cost. Charles Myrick ,the President of American Consultants Rx, announced the re-release of the American Consultants Rx community service project which consist of millions of free discount prescription cards being donated to thousands of not for profits,hospitals,schools,churches,etc. in an effort to assist the uninsured,under insured,and seniors deal with the high cost of prescription drugs.-American Consultants Rx -Pharmacy Discount Network News

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FDA Alerts More Doctors Of Rare Cancer With Breast Implants

(AP Photo)

WASHINGTON (AP) — U.S. health officials say doctors should be on the lookout for a rare cancer linked to breast implants after receiving more reports of the disease.

The Food and Drug Administration sent a letter late Wednesday to family doctors, nurses and other health professionals warning about the form of lymphoma in breast implant patients. In suspected cases, the FDA recommends laboratory testing to confirm or rule out of the disease. It’s the first time regulators have issued such a warning to doctors other than plastic surgeons.

The disease is not breast cancer, but usually forms in the scar tissue that forms around implants.

Regulators said they have identified 450 likely cases of the cancer since 2010. That’s a tiny number considering 400,000 U.S. women receive implants annually.

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FDA reports additional cases of cancer linked to breast implants

A rare and deadly cancer linked to breast implants has been diagnosed in additional women in the United States, federal health officials said.


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Acupressure Can Relieve Breast Cancer Symptoms

Acupressure Can Relieve Breast Cancer Symptoms

Acupressure Relieves Breast Cancer Treatment Symptoms, Study Finds

New American research has found that at-home acupressure could help women relieve some of the side effects of breast cancer treatment.

Carried out by researchers from the University of Michigan Rogel Cancer Center, the new study looked at the effect of acupressure on symptoms experienced by breast cancer survivors after treatment had ended, including chronic pain, anxiety, depression and poor…

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‘Regionalized’ Approach to Cancer Surgery Leads to Better Outcomes

Lung-cancer surgery patients who received care at regional centers where specialty care is concentrated have shorter hospital stays and fewer complications, according to Kaiser Permanente research presented this week at the 55th annual meeting of the Society of Thoracic Surgeons.

“Shifting lung cancer surgery to designated centers within our integrated health system reduced the number of days patients spent in the hospital, decreased intensive care use, and reduced post-operative complications,” said Jeffrey B. Velotta, MD, a thoracic surgeon at Kaiser Permanente Oakland medical center.

Kaiser Permanente regionalized thoracic surgery care in 2014 by shifting cases in Northern California from 16 hospitals to five designated specialty-care centers.

Researchers looked for effects of regionalization by comparing two groups of patients: 782 patients who underwent lung-cancer surgery between 2011 and 2013 (before regionalization) and 845 patients who had surgery between 2015 and 2017 (after regionalization).

The researchers found that regionalization resulted in increased use of minimally invasive, video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery – from 57 percent to 86 percent.

In addition, the average operating time for these types of surgeries decreased by more than 50 minutes after regionalization, possibly due to the surgical team’s efficiency with repetition of these cases.

“In our study, we found that regionalization of lung surgery was indeed feasible within an integrated health system,” said Velotta. “In the post-regionalization era, lung surgeries are performed by more experienced, thoracic-specialized surgeons at higher volume centers.”

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EastEnders spoilers: Jean Slater to be diagnosed with ovarian cancer in heartbreaking storyline

JEAN Slater is going to develop ovarian cancer in a new hard-hitting EastEnders storyline.

The cleaner – who is played by actress Gillian Wright in the BBC soap – will have her health tested by the disease as she battles it as well as her mental health issues.

Jean is going to face an upsetting cancer battle

In a statement Gillian said: “I’m aware of the impact such stories can have. It’s important that we treat the issue of cancer diagnosis and treatment with huge sensitivity, dignity and respect.

“I hope the story helps awareness of the disease and is supportive to those affected.”

EastEnders boss Kate Oates added in a statement published by the Daily Mirror: “I know an actor of Gillian’s calibre will approach the story with great truth and depth.

“The Slaters are an amazing ensemble family and this story is a completely fresh subject for them to tackle. I know they will do it justice and raise awareness of such an important issue that affects so many people.”

Fans think Sean is returning for Jean’s illness
EastEnders
Sean fought with everyone in the Square
BBC

Kate previously teased a health battle for Jean, hinting that the story would actually be the best thing ever to happen to Jean because it brings her son Sean back to Walford.

She said: “We’ve got a big story coming up for Jean.

“She’s going to have a challenge coming her way where we look at her mental health through the lens of her physical health. So I’m excited about that one too.”

However, Kate also said how it would potentially have some happiness within the harrowing plot, and fans are convinced this means this is why Sean returns to see his mum.


Kate added: “Jean’s going to have a bit of a new challenge coming her way that she might find it’s the best thing that’s ever happened to her.

“So there’s some fun stuff to challenge her there, along with Lacey [Turner].”

Actor Robert Kazinsky is making his return to the soap for a brief storyline after more than a decade away.


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‘Prayer Warriors’ Respond To Gregg Leakes’ Instagram Request: ‘Cancer Leave Me Alone’

(Photo Credit: PR Photos) 

Real Housewives of Atlanta” star Gregg Leakes took to Instagram to ask his followers to pray for him because his health took a turn for the worse.

Leakes is currently in the midst of a battle with stage three colon cancer and his condition has been part of wife NeNe’s narrative this season on ‘RHOA.’ However, it appears his health may have worsened a bit as he recently took to Instagram to share a photo of himself in a baseball cap that read ‘I Believe!’ and the caption: “No feeling well today America..Cancer leave me alone…I Bind you in the name of Jesus..”

Instagram Photo

A follow up post was captioned: “Standing in the “Need of Prayer” in Every area of my Life..My Health, Family, My Wife, My Kids Every area.. Cmon Prayer Warriors..”

As reported by CelebrityInsider, fans were swift to flood his comment section with encouraging words and prayers.

“Lord you no his needs. I ask that you continue to give him and his family strength and endurance. Order his steps that he may lead his family as you lead him. It is in Jesus name. Amen and Amen again. We’re praying with you @greggleakes”

“Praying that God’s peace surround you, wife and family! May he restore what is bruised! God is our Source that will provide the resources for every area in our lives! Stay encouraged and continue looking to the hills from which cometh your help! Binding & rebuking the enemy’s plan in Jesus name! Sealing this prayer with the blood of Jesus! No weapons formed may prosper!”

Instagram Photo

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Kaiser Permanente Moanalua Medical Center Receives Women’s Choice Award for Cancer Care

HONOLULU — For the second consecutive year, Kaiser Permanente Moanalua Medical Center has been named one of America’s Best Hospitals for Cancer Care by the Women’s Choice Award®. This evidence-based designation places Moanalua Medical Center in the top 9 percent of 4,797 U.S. hospitals offering cancer care services.

The America’s Best Hospitals for Cancer Care award is based on criteria such as the comprehensiveness of diagnostic and treatment services offered, low rates of infection compared to the national average, national accreditations, and female patient satisfaction and preference ratings on the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) survey.

Kaiser Permanente’s multidisciplinary, team-based approach focuses on all stages of cancer care, from prevention through treatment. The organization holds an annual Cancer Screening and Prevention Fair where medical specialists and counselors provide screening and lifestyle education to hundreds of attendees. Kaiser Permanente also recognizes that women have specialized health care needs. Moanalua Medical Center’s cancer care services include a breast care clinic, which provides cancer patients with a coordinated team made up of oncologists, geneticists, radiologists, surgeons and support staff who provide comprehensive care under one roof.

“Every year, thousands of people in Hawaii receive a cancer diagnosis,” said Jennifer Carney, MD, chief of oncology and hematology at Kaiser Permanente Hawaii. “Getting that news is never easy. We strive to provide coordinated care that takes into account our patients’ total picture of health so we can deliver safer, more effective care that is also more convenient for our members. We’re grateful to be able to make a difference in the lives of our many members, who survive cancer every year.”

In 2016, Kaiser Permanente Hawaii was ranked first in the state on breast and colorectal cancer screenings by the National Committee for Quality Assurance, a national quality assurance organization. In 2017, Moanalua Medical Center received a 3-year accreditation, the longest available, from the American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer (ACS CoC) based on quality measures including early diagnosis, cancer staging, optimal treatment, rehabilitation and end-of-life care.


About the Women’s Choice Award®
The Women’s Choice Award sets the standard for helping women to make smarter choices for themselves and their families. The company and its awards identify the brands, products and services that are most recommended and trusted by women. The Women’s Choice Award is the only evidence-based quality designation that drives consumer and patient appreciation through education, empowerment and validation. Additionally, they recognize those that deliver a recommendation-worthy customer experience. Visit www.WomensChoiceAward.com to learn more.

About Kaiser Permanente
Kaiser Permanente is committed to helping shape the future of health care. We are recognized as one of America’s leading health care providers and not-for-profit health plans. Founded in 1945, Kaiser Permanente has a mission to provide high-quality, affordable health care services and to improve the health of our members and the communities we serve. We currently serve more than 12.2 million members in eight states and the District of Columbia. Care for members and patients is focused on their total health and guided by their personal Permanente Medical Group physicians, specialists and team of caregivers. Our expert and caring medical teams are empowered and supported by industry-leading technology advances and tools for health promotion, disease prevention, state-of-the-art care delivery and world-class chronic disease management. Kaiser Permanente is dedicated to care innovations, clinical research, health education and the support of community health. For more information, go to kp.org/share.

 

###

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Lilly to pay $8B for cancer drugmaker Loxo Oncology

Eli Lilly is spending about $ 8 billion in cash to buy Loxo Oncology, as the drugmaker bulks up on cancer treatments that target certain gene abnormalities. Loxo Oncology could launch a drug next year and targets an abnormality that occurs in several tumor types, including some lung and thyroid cancers, Lilly said in a prepared…
Business | New York Post

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Bayer shares jump after judge’s ruling on Roundup cancer claims

Bayer shares rose by more than 6 percent Friday, a day after a key court ruling in the upcoming trials over whether its Monsanto weedkillers can cause cancer. A federal judge overseeing the lawsuits late Thursday issued the order, which could severely restrict evidence that the plaintiffs consider crucial to their cases. Bayer shares were…
Business | New York Post

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U.S. judge limits evidence in trial over Roundup cancer claims

A federal judge overseeing lawsuits alleging Bayer AG’s glyphosate-based weed killer causes cancer has issued a ruling that could severely restrict evidence that the plaintiffs consider crucial to their cases.


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Nurse Alice: America’s Next Top Model Dies of Breast Cancer at 34

On Dec. 4, 2018, Jael Strauss gave her last breath—ending her battle with stage 4 breast cancer. Strauss had been a contestant on season eight of Tyra Bank’s America’s Next Top Model, was of African American (mother) and Jewish (father) descent, and only 34 years old.

On Oct. 4, she announced her diagnosis in a Facebook post. “I was gonna write some long thing but some of you guys deserve to know, On October 2nd I was diagnosed with stage IV breast cancer. It has aggressively spread throughout my body and is incurable,” she wrote. “With treatment it may prolong my life longer than the ‘few months’ doctors said I could make it. I don’t want to die. I need another one of those miracles that I got back in 2013.”

Following her diagnosis, Strauss’ friends set up a GoFundMe page on her behalf to help alleviate some of the medical costs.

At the end of November, Strauss announced that she had entered hospice care. “First night in hospice. So many things I never knew about life. Or death,” she wrote on Facebook. “So many things.”

According to nationally recognized board-certified diagnostic radiologist, Dr. Nina Watson (aka Dr. Nina) who specializes in Women’s Imaging, this is a story she’s seen one too many times. She goes on to say, “although we would like to think that breast cancer in a woman of her age would be unheard of, unfortunately, it is not. According to the American Cancer Society, it is estimated that 12,770 women in the United States less than 40 years of age were diagnosed with breast cancer in 2017. Since this is below the age of recommended annual screening for the general population, it is important that all women, but particularly black women, know the signs and symptoms of breast cancer and their own personal risk.”

The most common sign of breast cancer is a painless lump. Although most of these lumps will be benign (not cancerous) growths, a woman should have any new lump evaluated by their doctor. Other signs and symptoms would include changes in your skin (new area of thickening or dimpling), changes in your nipple (nipple starting to stick in), or discharge from your nipple (especially if it is bloody). If you notice any of these changes, it is important to be seen by your doctor. Additional testing such as a mammogram or breast ultrasound may be necessary.

There have been important developments in the medical community’s understanding of breast cancer. It is now being recognized that a “one approach fits all” does not apply to breast cancer. While it has been recognized for some time that women of Ashkenazi Jewish descent have an increased risk of breast cancer, it is now being recognized that black women are also at increased risk for the disease. So for Strauss, her risks were greater considering her mixed descent. The American College of Radiology and Society of Breast Imaging are recommending that all women, especially black women, have a risk assessment (calculation of a woman’s lifetime risk of breast cancer) performed at age 30 to see if early screening for breast cancer is needed.

 

The post Nurse Alice: America’s Next Top Model Dies of Breast Cancer at 34 appeared first on Black Enterprise.

Lifestyle | Black Enterprise

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Kaiser Permanente JAMA Study Finds 10-Year Follow-up Interval After Negative Colonoscopies Is Associated with Reduced Risk of Colorectal Cancer and Mortality

OAKLAND, Calif. — Ten years after a negative colonoscopy, Kaiser Permanente members had 46 percent lower risk of being diagnosed with and were 88 percent less likely to die from colorectal cancer compared with those who did not undergo colorectal cancer screening, according to a study published today in JAMA Internal Medicine.

“Our study shows that following a colonoscopy with normal findings, there is a reduced risk of developing and dying from colorectal cancer for at least 10 years,” said study leader Jeffrey Lee, MD, Kaiser Permanente gastroenterologist and research scientist at the Division of Research.

“These findings suggest that physicians can feel confident following the guideline-recommended 10-year rescreening interval after a negative colonoscopy in which no colorectal cancer or polyps were found. There is now solid evidence supporting that recommendation.”

The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force currently recommends colorectal cancer screening for adults at average risk between 50 and 75 years old, with either colonoscopy every 10 years, sigmoidoscopy every five years or fecal testing every year, assuming these tests are normal.

Before this study, there was little evidence supporting the 10-year recommended screening interval after a colonoscopy with normal findings, Lee said. “That uncertainty was concerning because colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the United States.”

To help address the evidence gap for when to rescreen, the retrospective study examined the long-term risk of colorectal cancer and related deaths after a negative colonoscopy in comparison to no screening in more than 1.25 million average-risk members of Kaiser Permanente in Northern California who were of recommended screening age during the 1998 to 2015 study period.

“This large study is the first with a high enough number of average-risk individuals to evaluate cancer risks after colonoscopy examinations, compared with no screening,” said senior author Douglas Corley, MD, PhD, Kaiser Permanente gastroenterologist and research scientist with the Division of Research. “Such information provides greater certainty regarding the appropriate timing for rescreening after a negative colonoscopy.”

Colorectal cancer is an active area of study at Kaiser Permanente.

The National Cancer Institute funded the study through its Population-Based Research Optimizing Screening Through Personalized Regimens consortium.

In addition to Lee and Corley, co-authors were Christopher D. Jensen, PhD, Theodore R. Levin, MD, Natalia Udaltsova, PhD, Wei K. Zhao, MPH, Bruce H. Fireman, MA, and Charles P. Quesenberry, PhD, all of the Kaiser Permanente Division of Research; Ann G. Zauber, PhD, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center; Joanne E. Schottinger, MD, and Virginia P. Quinn, PhD, Kaiser Permanente Southern California Department of Research and Evaluation; and Chyke A. Doubeni, MD, University of Pennsylvania.


About the Kaiser Permanente Division of Research
The Kaiser Permanente Division of Research conducts, publishes, and disseminates epidemiologic and health services research to improve the health and medical care of Kaiser Permanente members and society at large. It seeks to understand the determinants of illness and well-being, and to improve the quality and cost-effectiveness of health care. Currently, DOR’s 600-plus staff is working on more than 400 epidemiological and health services research projects. For more information, visit www.dor.kaiser.org or follow us @KPDOR.

About Kaiser Permanente
Kaiser Permanente is committed to helping shape the future of health care. We are recognized as one of America’s leading health care providers and not-for-profit health plans. Founded in 1945, Kaiser Permanente has a mission is to provide high-quality, affordable health care services and to improve the health of our members and the communities we serve. We currently serve more than 12.3 million members in eight states and the District of Columbia. Care for members and patients is focused on their total health and guided by their personal Permanente Medical Group physicians, specialists and team of caregivers. Our expert and caring medical teams are empowered and supported by industry-leading technology advances and tools for health promotion, disease prevention, state-of-the-art care delivery and world-class chronic disease management. Kaiser Permanente is dedicated to care innovations, clinical research, health education and the support of community health. For more information, go to share.kaiserpermanente.org.

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NEW PARENT ESSENTIAL UPDATE:

Cancer surpasses heart disease as leading cause of death in many US counties

An important transition is happening across the United States: Cancer was the leading cause of death in more counties in 2015 than 13 years earlier, a new study finds. However, the opposite was true for heart disease during that period; fewer counties reported it as the top killer.


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Fish Oil And Vitamin D Pills No Guard Against Cancer Or Serious Heart Trouble

A widely anticipated study has concluded that neither vitamin D nor fish oil supplements prevent cancer or serious heart-related problems in healthy older people, according to research presented Saturday at the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions. Researchers defined serious heart problems as the combined rate of heart attacks, stroke and heart-related deaths.

Although hundreds of studies of these supplements have been published over the years, the new clinical trial — a federally funded project involving nearly 26,000 people — is the strongest and most definitive examination yet, said Dr. Clifford Rosen, a senior scientist at the Maine Medical Center Research Institute who was not involved in the research.

Doctors have been keenly interested in learning the supplements’ true value, given their tremendous popularity with patients. A 2017 study found that 26 percent of Americans age 60 and older take vitamin D supplements, while 22 percent take pills containing omega-3 fatty acids, a key ingredient in fish oil.

The new study also suggests there’s no reason for people to undergo routine blood tests for vitamin D, said Rosen, who co-wrote an accompanying editorial. (Both were published in the New England Journal of Medicine.). That’s because the study found that patients’ vitamin D levels made no difference in their risk of cancer or serious heart issues, Rosen said. Even people who began the study with clear vitamin D deficiency got no benefit from taking the supplements, which provided 2,000 international units a day. This amount is equal to one or two of the vitamin D pills typically sold in stores.

A recent Kaiser Health News story reported that vitamin D testing has become a huge business for commercial labs — and an enormous expense for taxpayers. Doctors ordered more than 10 million vitamin D tests for Medicare patients in 2016 — an increase of 547 percent since 2007 — at a cost of $ 365 million.

“It’s time to stop it,” said Rosen of vitamin D testing. “There’s no justification.”

Dr. JoAnn Manson, the study’s lead author, agrees that her results don’t support screening healthy people for vitamin D deficiency.

But she doesn’t see her study as entirely negative.

Manson notes that her team found no serious side effects from taking either fish oil or vitamin D supplements.

“If you’re already taking fish oil or vitamin D, our results would not provide a clear reason to stop,” Manson said.

Manson notes that a deeper look into the data suggested possible benefits.

When researchers singled out heart attacks — rather than the rate of all serious heart problems combined — they saw that fish oil appeared to reduce heart attacks by 28 percent, Manson said. As for vitamin D, it appeared to reduce cancer deaths — although not cancer diagnoses — by 25 percent.

But slicing the data into smaller segments — with fewer patients in each group — can produce unreliable results, said Dr. Barnett Kramer, director of the cancer prevention division at the National Cancer Institute. The links between fish oil and heart attacks — and vitamin D and cancer death — could be due to chance, Kramer said.

Experts agree that vitamin D is important for bone health. Researchers didn’t report on its effect on bones in these papers, however. Instead, they looked at areas where vitamin D’s benefits haven’t been definitely proven, such as cancer and heart disease. Although preliminary studies have suggested vitamin D can prevent heart disease and cancer, more rigorous studies have disputed those findings.

Manson and her colleagues plan to publish data on the supplements’ effects on other areas of health in coming months, including diabetes, memory and mental functioning, autoimmune disease, respiratory infections and depression.

Consumers who want to reduce their risk of cancer and heart disease can follow other proven strategies.

“People should continue to focus on known factors to reduce cancer and heart disease: Eat right, exercise, don’t smoke, control high blood pressure, take a statin if you are high risk,” said Dr. Alex Krist, a professor of family medicine and population health at Virginia Commonwealth University.

Kaiser Health News

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Rescue cat detected Oregon woman’s breast cancer, owner says

When one Oregon woman rescued a cat from a local humane society, she never thought her own life would be saved.

Michelle Pierson says her feline Mia noticed a lump that ended up being breast cancer and that the early detection has given her a better shot.

The 48-year-old, who’s still fighting the…

Life Style – New York Daily News

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Early risers ‘less likely to develop breast cancer’

Women who are considered morning people are less likely to develop breast cancer than those who have more energy in the evenings, according to researchers.
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Who is Victoria Derbyshire? BBC TV host and ex Radio 5 Live presenter who has battled breast cancer

VICTORIA Derbyshire is a journalist who presents her own BBC current affairs programme.

Here’s everything you need to know about the broadcaster who won her battle against breast cancer…

Pixel8000

Victoria Derbyshire breast cancer diary showed her journey with chemotherapy. She admitted that losing her hair was worse than having a mastectomy[/caption]

Who is Victoria Derbyshire?

Victoria Derbyshire was October 2, 1968, in Lancashire.

She attended Bury Grammar School for Girls before studying English language at the University of Liverpool.

She then took a post-graduate degree in TV and radio journalism at Preston Polytechnic (now the University of Central Lancashire).

Victoria had a tough childhood, and has claimed that her father was abusive to her, her mother, and her younger brother and sister.

PA:Press Association

She thanked viewers for their ‘tremendous messages’ as she returned to work after having a mastectomy following a diagnosis for breast cancer[/caption]

What is Victoria Derbyshire’s background?

Her journalism career began as a local radio presenter before she joined BBC Radio 5 Live in 1998.

In this role she presented the breakfast show alongside Julian Worricker. The programme won Gold Sony awards in 1998 and 2002.

Following a break for maternity leave, Victoria then presented a morning show with Nicky Campbell.

On this show she famously fled the studio in tears, mid-news bulletin, after a falling-out during an interview she’d had with, then Home Secretary, David Blunkett in 2003.

She has also done a variety of TV shows such as Watchdog and Sports Talk on Channel 4.

She has covered some of the biggest global stories such as 9/11, the Paris Concorde crash, general elections, World Cups and Olympic Games.

Getty Images

Hosting How Should I Vote? – The EU Debate at The Briggait on May 26, 2016, in Glasgow[/caption]

In 2009 her BBC Radio 5 Live programme became the first live show broadcast from Zimbabwe, following President Mugabe’s lifting of restrictions on international journalists.

It made history twice more when it became the first to broadcast live from an abortion clinic in 2012, and later that year from an animal testing laboratory.

Now she presents her own daily news and current affairs programme on BBC Two.

When did Victoria Derbyshire have breast cancer?

In 2015 she announced via Twitter that she had breast cancer, and then recorded video diaries of her battle with the disease.

The vlogs detailed everything about her cancer treatment from chemo and radiotherapy to her eventual mastectomy.

In May 2017 she finished her treatment and got the all clear.

Speaking to the BBC she said: “Obviously I never want [the cancer to reoccur], I never want to go through chemotherapy again ever, I just do not want it to come back…

“I just want this to have been a blip and get on with my life, my kids’ life, my partner’s life, my family’s future.”

In March 2018 she raised awareness of the illness when she bared all for ITV’s The Real Full Monty in March 2018.

 

 

TV and Showbiz – latest celebrity news, gossip, photos, TV and film reviews | The Sun

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Novartis drug cut death risk by 35 percent in gene mutation breast cancer

An experimental cancer drug that Novartis hopes will raise the profile of its oncology portfolio cut the risk of death or disease progression by more than a third in breast cancer patients with a hard-to-target gene mutation.


Reuters: Science News

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New Alexa tool helps women check for signs of breast cancer

Still don’t know what to look out for when it comes to breast cancer? Fear not because leading charity Breast Cancer Care has teamed up with Amazon’s virtual assistant Alexa to share potentially life-saving information on the signs and symptoms of breast cancer. Alexa will now be able to guide women through a breast check,…
Technology News & Reviews | New York Post

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Roche takes on Loxo, Bayer in gene-defined cancer class

Roche’s entrectinib cancer pill was shown to shrink tumors in 57 percent of patients within a group that can only be identified via genetic profiling, as the Swiss drugmaker challenges an alliance of Bayer and Loxo Oncology in a new targeted treatment area.


Reuters: Science News

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Grief Kills, Marijuana 2.0, Cancer Risk In Tall People

“Grief is itself a medicine”, said William Cowper, a popular English poet. But for some, it can prove fatal. In this week’s “Did you know?” column, we are presenting interesting findings about the impact of grief on human health, Marijuana 2.0 in the making, and link between height and cancer risk.
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AstraZeneca’s Lynparza shown to put brakes on ovarian cancer

An AstraZeneca drug that blocks a cancer cell’s ability to repair its genetic code greatly reduced the risk of ovarian cancer worsening in a phase III trial, underpinning its lead against two U.S. rivals in the same class.


Reuters: Science News

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‘Weed the People’ Explores Medical Marijuana for Kids With Cancer

Marijuana, both medicinal and recreational, is growing more mainstream. Medical marijuana is now legalized in a majority of states, and 62% of Americans support legalizing it outright — but in the political realm, the plant has long been controversial.

Now, a new documentary called Weed the People, which opens in some theaters in October, explores the potential of medical marijuana for childhood cancers and the regulatory hurdles facing people who want to use cannabis. The film, which was executive produced by former talk-show host Ricki Lake, follows five families using cannabis oils to treat pediatric cancers. Some of the children used cannabis alongside treatments like chemotherapy, while others turned to the drug after conventional treatments had failed.

Lake became interested in medical marijuana when her late ex-husband, Christian Evans, began researching cannabidiol (CBD) — a compound in marijuana that does not cause a high —for his own health issues, including chronic pain and ADHD. (Evans died by suicide last year.) The two met a young girl with a tumor disorder whose family was desperate to get her off chemotherapy, and they helped connect her with a doctor who specializes in medical marijuana. Lake and her production partner, director Abby Epstein, were inspired to find other families in similar situations and tell their stories on screen. They made Weed the People to explore the potential of medical marijuana, and the regulatory challenges families and researchers must overcome to use it.

“I want to get people seeing it as a medicine, seeing what it was able to do for these children, and fight for this medicine to be available to everyone who needs it,” Lake says. “It’s a human rights issue.”

The film paints a rosy, anecdotal picture of the effectiveness of cannabis oils; some of the children featured had their tumors shrink substantially or disappear entirely, even if they were using cannabis oils in place of chemotherapy and other conventional treatments. “You can’t say the ‘cure’ word,” Lake says, “but how else do you explain it?”

But the concept is far from proven and could even be dangerous. While there is some evidence that marijuana can ease chronic pain and chemotherapy side effects, the American Cancer Society (ACS) warns that “relying on marijuana alone as treatment while avoiding or delaying conventional medical care for cancer may have serious health consequences.” And while some studies have shown that compounds in marijuana can slow growth of or kill tumor cells in animals or lab dishes, evidence in humans — particularly around marijuana oils — is lacking, the ACS says. While conventional treatments like chemotherapy are still the standard, pediatric cancer providers are increasingly voicing their support for the use of medical marijuana, particularly in palliative or end-of-life care when other treatments may not be necessary.

More research is needed to learn about the potential effects and limitations of cannabis-derived medicines for both adult and pediatric cancers. As the families and experts in Weed the People see it, this lack of evidence is precisely the problem — and it’s exacerbated by current regulations around medical marijuana.

Marijuana, like heroin and LSD, is classified by the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) as a Schedule I drug, meaning it has “no currently accepted medical use and a high potential for abuse.” But in June, the FDA approved the first drug derived from marijuana, a purified version of CBD called Epidiolex, for kids and adults suffering from two rare forms of epilepsy; the DEA then rescheduled Epidiolex (but not CBD as a whole) to schedule V, the lowest restriction classification for controlled substances. Researchers who wish to study cannabis need a Schedule I drug license and must submit to background checks and site visits from the DEA.

The DEA also only permits one institution, the University of Mississippi, to grow marijuana for study, though DEA spokesperson Melvin Patterson says it is planning to grant additional licenses to other growers, which would “increase access to marijuana for researchers, potentially increase the number of available strains for research, and may foster additional research on marijuana.”

This means scientists are limited to studying only the products and formulations available from the University of Mississippi, which doesn’t include popular consumer products like vapes and edibles, says Dr. Jeff Chen, director of the University of California Los Angeles Cannabis Research Initiative. “At my office at UCLA, I look out my window and I can count two dispensaries that I can see,” Chen says. “We can’t touch that cannabis—not even to understand what’s in it.”

As a result of these challenges, many families who wish to use cannabis, including those in the documentary, are forced to buy it from sources outside the conventional medical system, and must trust that what they’re using is safe. “I just find it absolutely staggering to accept that in this day and age, with the billions of dollars that are spent on cancer research, the medicine we were relying on was made in somebody’s kitchen,” says Angela Smith in the film, whose son, Chico, uses cannabis oils to treat his soft tissue cancer.

Chen, who was not in the film but shares its frustration with current marijuana regulations, became swayed by the medical potential of cannabis compounds early in his career, when he encountered a young patient with epilepsy whose parents were treating her with CBD. Unfamiliar with CBD, Chen and his colleagues almost called Child Protective Services to intervene—until Chen looked into the compound further and saw how much he didn’t know.

“That’s when I realized that science had completely left cannabis in the dark,” Chen says. “It was time for science to step up and really to push on this issue. I felt a duty.” Today, Chen works to understand the health benefits and risks of marijuana and its many compounds, including CBD.

The film also touches on funding challenges associated with marijuana research, an impediment Chen has encountered with his own research. While the government does fund some marijuana research, Chen says the “vast majority” of federal dollars go toward understanding the harms of cannabis, not the potential benefits. Researchers who wish to study how marijuana may improve treatment for conditions ranging from cancer to chronic pain are largely left to find the money themselves, Chen says.

These roadblocks have led many researchers, including those quoted in the film, to call for looser marijuana scheduling, but the DEA denied two such petitions in 2016. Dr. Igor Grant, director of the Center for Medical Cannabis Research at the University of California San Diego, who was not in the film, agrees that current regulations have made research more difficult, and says marijuana probably doesn’t belong in schedule I. But he says he doesn’t believe that the government is actively trying to stifle cannabis research, as many people—including some in Weed the People—have alleged.

Grant says there’s some evidence that the barriers are becoming fewer. His lab recently made history by importing research-approved marijuana from Canada, a move that suggests U.S. researchers may soon have greater access to the plant. That access, combined with lighter regulations from the government, could open new doors, Grant says.

“You would have to both reschedule it and increase the availability of manufacturers,” he says. “This could be a joint effort between states, manufacturers, academia and federal [regulators].”

This type of collaboration is crucial, Lake says, and she hopes her documentary will garner public support for it. “I’m really hoping to reach the people who really have this idea that this drug is bad,” Lake says. “It’s a matter of just changing mindsets and having them fight to have access to this plant. I do believe change is coming.”


Entertainment – TIME

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Roche lands Tecentriq trial win, still trails Merck in lung cancer

Roche’s Tecentriq plus chemotherapy boosted lung cancer patients’ survival by nearly five months, study data released on Monday showed, underscoring benefits of the Swiss group’s immunotherapy but still leaving it trailing a rival’s drug.


Reuters: Science News

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Roche scores win in slowing aggressive type of breast cancer

An immunotherapy cocktail from Roche helped slow an aggressive type of breast cancer where new treatments have proven elusive, offering positive news for the Swiss drugmaker as it chases medicines produced by its rivals.


Reuters: Science News

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Julia Louis-Dreyfus reveals why she went public with her cancer fight

It wouldn’t have been Julia Louis-Dreyfus’ first choice to be so public about her battle with breast cancer.

The former “Seinfeld” star, who completed her final round of chemotherapy in January, explains in a new interview why she opted to open up about her fight against the disease after being…

/entertainment – New York Daily News

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Elvis Costello Is Mad as Hell: ‘I’ll Punch the Next Person’ Who Says I’m Struggling With Cancer

Stephen Done

“I know that’s a very attractive headline to say I’ve got cancer, but it’s just not founded in fact,” Elvis Costello insists after I mention a recent story that said he was in remission.

“I’m not going to critique other writers, because I had a very nice conversation with a young man the other day, and 99.9 percent of the article he wrote was really interesting, but he used the word ‘remission’ to describe my health, and therefore his editor decided to put cancer in the headline,” Costello explains, noticeably still upset about the incident. “I’m not in remission because I didn’t have cancer. How could I be in remission? I was relieved of something that may have caused cancer. So out of respect to my friends who recently have lost that particular fight, and to those that continue to have it, of which I have rather too many, I’d rather everyone get the words right.”

In fact, Costello and I had corresponded last summer, and he had claimed then he was fine, if a bit shocked and suitably heartened that anyone cared about his health, even while headlines made it sound as though he was at death’s door after he’d been forced to cancel a string of live shows.

Read more at The Daily Beast.

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Facebook Live: The Cancer Divide

If you get cancer, how long you live may depend on factors outside of your control: your race or ethnicity. Where you live. Your age. The type of insurance you have.

Although Californians and Americans overall are living longer with cancer, some communities fare better than others. There are many reasons for this cancer divide. Certain groups may not have regular access to doctors or cancer screening. Smoking and physical inactivity play a role, as does exposure to air pollution.

On Friday, Kaiser Health News senior correspondent Anna Gorman discussed cancer disparities with Dr. Kenneth Kizer, a University of California-Davis professor. Kizer is the director of the Institute for Population Health Improvement, which works with the state Department of Public Health to manage California’s cancer registry.

Survival differs based on race and ethnicity, geography and income, Kizer said during the discussion.

“Overall, as a blanket statement, people who are poor and economically challenged do less well than people who are not in that situation,” he said.

Kizer explained that many factors influence how long people live with cancer, including whether they have access to cancer screening and high-quality treatments. Having health insurance increases the odds of getting better care, he said.

“However, it’s not that simple, because not all health insurance is the same,” he added. “So, the better health insurance you can get the … more likely you’ll end up in a place where you can get evidence-based treatment.”

To read Gorman’s previous coverage about how Californians with cancer are faring, please click here.


This story was produced by Kaiser Health News, which publishes California Healthline, a service of the California Health Care Foundation.

Kaiser Health News

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Tina Turner reveals how she planned for assisted suicide after cancer diagnosis but was saved by her husband’s kidney

TINA TURNER has revealed she was so ill she considered assisted suicide — until her husband saved her life by donating his kidney.

The soul icon fell in love with music producer Erwin Bach, 16 years her junior, in 1985 after suffering years of ill-treatment at the hands of ex-lover Ike.

Tina Turner reveals how she found happiness in her new auto-biography My Love Story
Tina Turner reveals how she found happiness in her new auto-biography My Love Story
Getty – Contributor

Tying the knot 28 years later, the singer says their 2013 wedding was one of the happiest days of her life.

But, in her new autobiography — My Love Story, out later this month — Tina, 78, revealed how she started feeling faint during that day as the party gathered for photos.

It was the first sign of an impending stroke.

Just three months later, she woke up and felt a lightning bolt in her head and right leg.

Tina was married to Ike Turner, suffering domestic abuse and reveals she was beaten on the head by a wooden spoon
Tina was married to Ike Turner, suffering domestic abuse and reveals she was beaten on the head by a wooden spoon
1964 GAB Archive

Tina said: “I tried to speak but I couldn’t get any words out.

I was having a stroke.”

It left Tina unable to walk or use her right arm.

And, to add to her troubles, doctors also found she had high blood pressure which left her kidneys working at just 35 per cent of their normal function.

Yet Tina now admits she “foolishly” scuppered her treatment by ditching her medication and instead turned to homeopathy — a decision which almost cost her her life.

Her homeopath had claimed toxins in the water near her Château Algonquin home in Switzerland were damaging her body, so she set about replacing the water pipes and having the water purified by crystals.

‘I was overwhelmed by the enormity of his offer’

But the blunder sapped her strength, leaving her unable to walk from room-to-room.

Another shock diagnosis, early stage intestinal cancer, led to part of her intestine being removed.

By 2016, Tina’s kidney function was down to 20 per cent, leaving her unable to eat.

Tina admits at one point she thought of assisted suicide — legal in Switzerland — and signed up to be a member of Exit, “just in case”.

Ms Turner here poses with her late son Craig who took his own life
Ms Turner here poses with her late son Craig who took his own life
Facebook

She said: “I think that’s when the idea of my death became a reality for Erwin.

He was very emotional about not wanting to lose me, not wanting me to leave.

“He said he didn’t want another woman, or another life; we were happy and he’d do anything to keep us together.

Then he shocked me.

Erwin Bach and Tina married in 2013 after Mr. Bach proposed three times
Erwin Bach and Tina married in 2013 after Mr. Bach proposed three times
Getty – Contributor

“He said he wanted to give me one of his kidneys.

“I was overwhelmed by the enormity of his offer.”

Tina, who has notched up 200million in record sales, is no stranger to struggle.

Hers has been an extraordinary journey, from being an unwanted child picking cotton in the tiny ­segregated backwater of Nutbush, Tennessee, to years of being too afraid to leave her abusive first husband Ike.

When Tina went on stage the first time with Ike she thought he was 'real ugly'
When Tina went on stage the first time with Ike she thought he was ‘real ugly’
Getty – Contributor

She once said: “My struggle started inside my mother’s womb.

I suffered all the way from childhood right up until the end of Ike.

“What kept me on course was me, it was something I was born with.”

In July this year, that strength was tested again.

After she left Ike her career stalled buy then the album Private Dance launched her into the mainstream
After she left Ike her career stalled buy then the album Private Dance launched her into the mainstream
not known check with features

As the chart queen posed for photographers on the red carpet outside a fashion show in Paris, her eldest son Craig, 59, was in Los Angeles, about to turn a gun on himself.

Eight days later, Tina posted a picture of herself scattering her boy’s ashes off the coast of California, accompanied by the words: “My saddest moment as a mother.”

Tina, who was born Anna Mae Bullock, was just 18 years old when she gave birth to Craig in 1958.

She was determined to be a good mother, having been deserted by her own mum Zelma at ten.

Her father left three years later.

Tina performed with Mick Jagger in Live aid to sold out crowds in 1985
Tina performed with Mick Jagger in Live aid to sold out crowds in 1985
Rex Features

The baby’s father was the ­saxophonist in a band she became obsessed with after moving to St Louis, Missouri.

Its frontman was Ike Turner.

One night when she was in the audience, he invited her on stage and, wowed by her voice, later asked her to tour with them.

There was no romantic attraction initially.

Tina has performed at the Grammy's a number of times including sharing the stage with Beyonce in 2008
Tina has performed at the Grammy’s a number of times including sharing the stage with Beyonce in 2008
AP:Associated Press

It was only when she was trying to escape the advances of another musician she found herself in Ike’s bed — even though she knew then: “He wasn’t right for me”. ­

In 1960, the pair had son Ronnie.

Two years later they wed.

In 1966, they hit the big time with single River Deep Mountain High, which hit No3 in the UK.

Ms Turner's singing career began with Ike but after leaving him she became a household name
Ms Turner’s singing career began with Ike but after leaving him she became a household name
AP:Associated Press

More hits followed, along with the first of Tina’s eight Grammy awards.

But at home, she was nothing but a punchbag for cocaine addict Ike.

Describing the first beating at his hands, she recalled: “It was against the head, always against the head.”

But it was not until July 1976 that she finally fled with just 36 cents in her pocket.

Tina performed with Mel Gibson in Mad Max Beyond Thunderdome
Tina performed with Mel Gibson in Mad Max Beyond Thunderdome
Corbis – Getty

For a few years, her career stalled — but then in 1984 came her solo album Private Dancer.

The album sold 20million copies and gave her her first US No1 ­single with What’s Love Got To Do With It.

In 1985 she starred in Mad Max Beyond Thunderdome with Mel Gibson — the same year she met German-born record executive Erwin, after he picked her up at an airport.

Tina recalled: “My heart was going da-dum.


I thought, ‘Oh my God, this is love at first sight.’”

They have been together since. The secret, according to Tina, is simple. She noted a few years ago: “What’s love got to do with it? A lot!”

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Tamara Tunie shares heartfelt dedication to breast cancer awareness

One look at Tamara Tunie’s resume and you wonder when she sleeps. The TV veteran isn’t a household name, but she’s quietly become one of the most prolific actresses in Hollywood — appearing, in the past year alone, in “Blue Bloods” (CBS), “Dietland” and “Better Call Saul” (both on AMC) and the BBC’s “Black Earth…
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Why Sandra Lee kept cameras rolling during her cancer treatment

At the opening of Sandra Lee’s new documentary, she confronts her own harsh, new reality. “You actually have breast cancer. Cancer,” the 52-year-old says, sounding incredulous. “That word will put the fear of God in you like you’ve never felt before. But you don’t realize what that feels like inside your body until it’s about…
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Black Women Face High Risk, Dangers And Death Rates With Breast Cancer

Breast Cancer Awareness Month in October presents another opportunity to spread information about the disease and how it affects Black women. The disease is responsible for a high death rate in women of color, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Black women are 40 percent more likely to die from breast cancer despite doctors diagnosing the disease in African-American and white women at about the same rate, the CDC reported. Also, Black women are more often found to have triple-negative breast cancer, an aggressive type that frequently returns after treatment.

Age is also a big factor: breast cancer incidence rates were higher among African-American women younger than 60 years old but lower among those who are 60 or older.

One reason for this statistic could be that medical professionals tend to find this cancer at an earlier stage in white women.  Also, Black women may have inadequate medical care, including limited access to cancer screening technology.

Doctors encourage women, especially those at high risk due to a family history or having BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes, to get out ahead of the disease. Early detection measures such as mammograms and screenings are strongly recommended. Women can visit local hospitals that offer low-cost mammograms or call their local American Cancer Society chapter for help with screenings or doctor referrals.

In addition, researchers continue to look into why some women are more susceptible to triple-negative breast cancer, in order to find better treatment options.

Women can also choose a healthier lifestyle for a better chance of lowering risks for the disease. BreastCancer.org recommends exercise, a nutritious diet and avoiding smoking and alcohol as important in the battle against breast cancer — one that many women can win regardless of race.

Many women are speaking out to spread awareness about breast cancer and helping women to fight it. Serena Williams posted a powerful message about the disease recently.

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Managing Your Career Through Breast Cancer

As we recognize October as Breast Cancer Awareness Month, I am reminded of the story of a woman I met a decade ago who serves as an excellent example of how to maintain your career, dignity, and mental well-being as you face this challenge.

In June of 2005, Hannah Burns was managing director of corporate communications at Lehman Bros., and fulfilling one of her major responsibilities: getting the company’s quarterly earnings results out to the public. As the numbers were being released, Burns set up a meeting with her boss – he believed she was going to update him on the media’s coverage of the data. Instead, she had to deliver a far more difficult story.

“I’ve got good news, and bad news,” she told him. “The good news is that it’s early and very treatable, the bad news is that I have breast cancer.”

Burns describes herself as a private person, but she went straight to her boss’s office when her doctor delivered the news over the phone. “Being in my function I couldn’t just disappear and not tell anybody. I just wanted to get it off of my chest and move on. It was an easy conversation. He was incredibly sympathetic, and shocked.”

The fact that this mother of two daughters had her disease detected early had her believing that she would be able to “get it off of her chest and move on.” The next few months, however, would prove to be a physical and emotional challenge that she could not have imagined.

Three weeks later, there was the surgery, which was followed by a rigorous four-month period of chemotherapy, bone marrow shots, and then seven weeks of radiation.

In a feat that can be described as nothing short of heroic, aside from a one week recovery period after surgery, Burns only missed one day of work throughout her entire four months of treatments.

“In addition to wanting to teach my daughters a lesson on how to work through adversity, the firm was so supportive that I wanted to do my absolute best to show my gratitude,” says Burns. “The firm said do whatever you need to do to get well. Knowing you’ve got that support is half the battle.”

Not only did Lehman provide Burns with inspiration, but the firm also gave her the flexibility to work through her challenge. She had her treatments on Wednesdays, did not have to return to work, and she was able to come in late on Thursday’s. Burns says her worst side effects set in on Friday afternoons, and Lehman allowed her to leave in the afternoon. The company also provided her with car service to and from the office throughout the entire ordeal.

breast cancer

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What to Do if This Happens to You

One of the many things Burns has taught me was that not everyone–not even corporate giants like Lehman Bros.– have all the answers. She simply had to tap into her courage and give the company a blueprint to help her best navigate this challenge. Otherwise, her boss may not have known what to do and there may have been a different result.

If you find yourself trying to work through this situation, here are some tips that may help:

1. Talk to your doctor before your employer

You need to know what you can expect physically and psychologically so that you can be clear about your needs to your employer. That way you can come to your boss with a clear plan of action. Burns, for example, purposely scheduled her treatments on Wednesday’s. That way she would have the weekend to recover when the worst of the side effects hit about 48 hours later. She knew she would need Friday afternoons off.

“Work is a very important part of a women’s life, and if she can continue to work, she’s going to do better,” says Dr. Ruth Oratz, renowned oncologist and associate professor of clinical medicine at New York University School of Medicine. “But they need to be flexible, and realize that they may have to make some changes.” Oratz adds that work is not going to be an option for all women.

2. Be true to yourself when talking to your boss

“How much you tell your boss depends on your own personal style,” according to Kate Sweeney, co-founder of Cancer and Careers. “If you have an open relationship, be open. If not, just present the situation, and tell them what you will need.” Also, if you have an open relationship with your co-workers, you will likely want to share details of your recovery. If you’re more private you may just want to say “I’m doing fine,” and don’t be afraid to leave it at that.”

3. Find out what your company has done with employees in this situation in the past

This is particularly true when it comes to leave and benefits. You are trying to determine if former policies will work for you. Suppose, for example, you want to work from home, yet you find out this has not been allowed. You want to be able to bring that up to your boss, as something you will need. Maybe your company has never been in this situation before. You need to find out if it is going to be up to you to guide them, when it comes to helping you remain as productive as possible.

4. Know your legal rights

In the U.S., for example, people with cancer are protected under the Americans with Disabilities Act which gives you rights in the workplace. In addition, protection is provided under the Family Medical Leave Act, which provides 12 weeks of unpaid leave a year. The weeks do not have to be taken consecutively. Human resources departments can be a great resource when it comes to knowing your legal rights. They can also be of great help with your insurer. A company calling on your behalf will likely have a lot more leverage with an insurance firm than you calling as an individual.

5. Pay attention to how you feel

If you take time off for treatments, you can expect to have a lot of mixed emotions as you transition from patient back to employee. If you don’t feel psychologically up to speed, you may want to seek out some counseling, or attend workshops and seminars to refresh your work skills. Physically, take a look at your work space. Tell your employer if it needs to be redesigned with something like back support.

 


Editor’s Note: This article was updated on Oct. 1, 2018. It originally published on Feb. 4, 2016.

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