Video Shows Sophisticated Attack on David Ortiz, as Ex-Slugger Remains in Intensive Care

(SANTO DOMINGO, Dominican Republic) — Dominican prosecutors say witnesses and security camera footage show that the attempt to kill former Red Sox star David Ortiz was carried out by two men on a motorcycle and two other groups of people in cars, indicating a new level of sophistication in the attack.

The details were contained in a court document obtained by The Associated Press on Wednesday.

Oliver Moisés Mirabal Acosta, who was captured Tuesday night in the town of Mao in the northern Dominican Republic, was driving a grey Hyundai Accent before mounting the bike driven by 25-year-old Eddy Vladimir Feliz García, the document said.

The document also said the two men were seen on security camera footage talking with other people in the Accent and another Hyundai in a nearby street before the shooting at 9:20 p.m. on Sunday.

“In one of the videos it was possible to observe both the accused and the shooter planning the commission of the incident right on Octavio Mejía Ricard Street, which is parallel to the place where the event took place,” prosecutors said.

The document also reveals ineptitude, saying the driver was captured after he skidded and fell off his bike as the pair tried to flee.

Feliz García’s lawyer says his client is an innocent motorcycle taxi driver who had no idea his passenger was going to commit a crime.

Ortiz is recovering from his wounds in intensive care in Boston.

Sports – TIME

ENTERTAINMENT DEAL UPDATE:

Working together to deliver inclusive, high-quality care

Everybody needs access to health care to meet their individual needs. That’s why Special Olympics Washington is proud to announce Kaiser Permanente as its official health partner. As the presenting sponsor of Special Olympics Washington’s Healthy Athletes and Healthy Communities programs, Kaiser Permanente will provide health care screenings, on-site medical services, and other support for athletes, coaches, and fans.

“Kaiser Permanente provides each of our patients and members with world-class care that best meets their needs,” said Susan Mullaney, regional president for Kaiser Permanente in Washington. “As the official health partner of Special Olympics Washington, we help ensure people with intellectual disabilities have access to inclusive, high-quality care. We are proud of our ongoing partnership with Special Olympics Washington and the incredible athletes, coaches, and fans.”

Despite severe need and higher health risks, people with intellectual disabilities often do not have access to important health services. In addition, most health care providers receive limited training in caring for patients with intellectual disabilities, yet a disproportionate number of these patients have multiple chronic health conditions that need active care management. Kaiser Permanente’s partnership with Special Olympics Washington will help ensure that the health care challenges people with intellectual disabilities face are addressed.

“Partnered together in the Healthy Athletes and Healthy Communities programs, Special Olympics Washington and Kaiser Permanente will help address the critical health care disparity people with intellectual disabilities often face,” said Steve Tarnoff, MD, president and executive medical director of Washington Permanente Medical Group. “We are committed to educating caregivers and community members about inclusive health systems and resources.”

“One of Special Olympics Washington’s top priorities is to improve access to quality health care for people with intellectual disabilities and we couldn’t ask for a better partner than Kaiser Permanente to help fulfill this goal,” said Dave Lenox, president and CEO of Special Olympics Washington. “Kaiser Permanente shares our commitment to health, our community, and inclusion, and we look forward to our continuing partnership with them.”

Kaiser Permanente has long partnered with Special Olympics. Most recently, Kaiser Permanente was the official health partner of the 2018 Special Olympics USA Games which were held in Seattle. This new 3-year agreement deepens Kaiser Permanente’s support of the powerful work of Special Olympics in Washington state.

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Health Care and Green Energy Dominate the Fastest-Growing Jobs of 2019

Climate change and an aging population are driving the demand for the fastest growing jobs in the U.S.

Solar panel installers and those who work on wind turbines can expect to see plenty of opportunities in the next decade, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Many occupations that are centered on the changing environment — like forest fire prevention specialists — are slated to see double-digit increases through 2026.

“We may be looking to make more investments in jobs around climate change,” said Indeed director of research Martha Gimbel, noting however, that new tariffs have negatively affected the job site’s listings for solar installers.

Since 2010, the share of the U.S. population over the age of 59 has increased 17% to more than one-fifth of the country, according to an analysis by The Penny Hoarder of U.S. Census Bureau estimates. That graying of America means more demand for health care services, Gimbel said.

Thinking of changing careers but haven’t got time for four years of college? Take a look at The Penny Hoarder’s Best Jobs of 2019 that Don’t Require a Degree.

But, taking a wider view, she said we are transitioning to more of a service economy in general. While health care occupations may be the fastest growing, others, such as bicycle mechanics, will see similar spikes over the next seven years.

“A lot of the things we’re buying are services now,” Gimbel said.

Taking an even broader view of the job market, occupations that pay the lowest, like home health aide, and those that offer much higher pay, like physician assistant, will grow much faster than jobs that fall in the middle of the pay spectrum.

But, if companies or individuals have a difficult time finding suitable workers for those low-paying jobs — for reasons that include harsher immigration laws — wages could rise along with employment, Gimbel said.

The 10 Fastest-Growing Jobs and How Much They Pay

The Labor Department in May updated its annual and hourly pay data to go along with the employment projections, so let’s take a look at how much you can actually make working in the 10 fastest-growing jobs.

1. Solar photovoltaic installer

A solar panel technician installs a solar array.

Median annual pay: $ 42,680

Projected job growth: 104.9%

Solar photovoltaic installers spend their days climbing onto roofs and installing green-energy panels. The job requires physical strength and endurance, as well as willingness to learn the technical aspects of the solar panels and how they fit into the electrical grid.

Click here for information on how to get into this career.

2. Wind turbine service technician

Median annual pay: $ 54,370

Projected job growth: 96.3%

Another job in the green energy sector slated to grow quickly in the coming years, wind turbine technician is more intense in terms of physical labor and on-the-job danger than that of solar installer. A short stint in technical schoolas little as six months — can have you prepared for this occupation.

The job is not for those who are afraid of heights.

3. Home health aides and personal care aides

Median annual pay: $ 24,200

Projected job growth: 47.3%

Retirement homes can be expensive and most people would prefer to age in place. So as the U.S. population gets older, the demand for in-home care — which is cheaper — is going to rise.

Work as a home health aide doesn’t pay the best, but as Gimbel said, the annual wages may rise faster than most careers as companies find difficulty staffing positions. You only need a high school diploma for this occupation, but working for companies that receive Medicaid or Medicare reimbursements might require additional licensing.

4. Physician assistants

Median annual pay: $ 108,610

Projected job growth: 37.3%

Physician assistants serve as the right hand to doctors or surgeons, and might even be primary health care workers in rural areas. This is the first job of the list that requires a Master’s degree and carries licensing requirements.

Click here for a list of accredited programs. You might want to cross reference it with our list of the best bang-for-your-buck colleges by state.

5. Nurse practitioner

A nurse practitioner examines a patient

Median annual pay: $ 107,030

Projected job growth: 36.1%

Nurse practitioners can perform many of the health care services doctors can, and make six figures, without all that schooling and those residency requirements. The job is slated for double-digit growth due to the aging population. Meanwhile, the number of doctors is only expected to grow 13% for the same period, according to the BLS.

The job does require a Master’s degree.

6. Statistician

Median annual pay: $ 87,780

Projected job growth: 33.8%

We’ve written about the lucrative college majors coming along with the rise of big data and how to become a data scientist. A statistician is essentially the same thing, albeit the term is a little dated.

Statisticians find trends in data to help guide business decisions in just about every industry. Since this job requires lots of coding, a computer science minor will be helpful — and you’ll definitely want a Master’s degree to exceed in this field.

7. App developer

Median annual pay: $ 103,620

Projected job growth: 30.7%

Don’t just think “mobile app” with this fast-growing occupation. Application developers are in demand in nearly every industry, from gaming and entertainment to health care to newspapers.

There are multiple paths to this career, including coding boot camps or just teaching yourself to code.

8. Mathematician

Median annual pay: $ 101,900

Projected job growth:  29.7%

Mathematician is another job that follows the big data trend. You can’t crunch data and statistics without math, right? Federal, state and local governments are the biggest employers of those on this career path, which can mean great benefits.

Typically, a mathematician will need a Master’s degree to land a job. The BLS suggests taking a computer science minor (spoiler: you’ll be doing a lot of coding in this occupation.)

9. Physical therapist aide

Median annual pay: $ 26,240

Projected job growth: 29.4%

Yet another health care career on this list, physical therapist aides get everything ready for the physical therapist to treat a patient.

The job requires only a high school diploma, but you can add up to $ 30,000 to your annual pay by getting an associate’s degree and becoming a physical therapy assistant rather than an aide.

10. Bicycle mechanic

A man repairs a bicycle

Median annual pay: $ 28,960

Projected job growth: 29.3%

In 2017, more than 890,000 Americans commuted by bicycle to work — a 28% increase since 2009, according to U.S. Census Bureau data. That means a lot of demand from folks who’d rather rotate the tires on their bikes than their cars.

There are multiple ways to learn bike repair without paying for classes. We talked to one guy who makes good money flipping bikes. He asked bike-store owners to use their tools to learn the trade. Bicycle co-ops are great places to pick up the knowhow and get an idea of the demand for services in your town.

Alex Mahadevan is a data journalist at The Penny Hoarder.

This was originally published on The Penny Hoarder, which helps millions of readers worldwide earn and save money by sharing unique job opportunities, personal stories, freebies and more. The Inc. 5000 ranked The Penny Hoarder as the fastest-growing private media company in the U.S. in 2017.

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Scouted: How to Properly Take Care of Your Clothes According to the Laundry Tag — And The Products to Do It Right

Have you ever actually looked at the care instructions of your clothing besides the “Dry Clean Only” text? Hunkered beneath the sterile and sometimes overly-complicated text instructions is a set of hieroglyphic-like symbols that depict just how you’re supposed to take care of your garment. These symbols tell you to wash (or don’t), dry (or don’t), iron (or don’t), and bleach (or don’t). We took to Wikipedia and are here to give you a quick and dirty look at what each symbol means and the products you may need to maintain your clothing properly, rather than just tossing it into the wash and hoping for the best.

Washing

Set of 5 Mesh Laundry Bags, $ 8 on Amazon: When it comes to washing your clothing, it’s not just separating lights and darks. You should be thinking about the weight of the items and what you want to put together. When washing delicates, you’ll want to make sure that they’re all together in a separate bag as to not damage them. Even if you’re on the lowest setting of your washing machine, keeping lace underthings together in one place will help keep them from getting holes torn into them by zippers or buttons from other pieces of clothing as they agitate in the drum.

Read more at The Daily Beast.

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http://www.acrx.org -As millions of Americans strive to deal with the economic downturn,loss of jobs,foreclosures,high cost of gas,and the rising cost of prescription drug cost. Charles Myrick ,the President of American Consultants Rx, announced the re-release of the American Consultants Rx community service project which consist of millions of free discount prescription cards being donated to thousands of not for profits,hospitals,schools,churches,etc. in an effort to assist the uninsured,under insured,and seniors deal with the high cost of prescription drugs.-American Consultants Rx -Pharmacy Discount Network News

BEST DEAL UPDATE BY AMERICAN CONSULTANTS RX:

Click today to request your free ACRX discount prescription card and save up to 80% off of your medicine!

SPECIAL DONATION REQUEST UPDATE:

Please help American Consultants Rx achieve it’s biggest goal yet of donating over 30 million discount prescription cards to over 50k organizations in an effort to assist millions of Americans in need. Please click here to donate today!

Perfume Interview: The J-Pop Group Talks Skin Care & Scalp Massagers

Allure’s Devon Abelman sat down with Japanese girl group Perfume ahead of their historic Coachella 2019 set to talk about their favorite beauty technology, scent-related memories, and complete skin-care routines. Plus, the trio shares how they upkeep their iconic hairstyles.
Allure

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More blacks got timely cancer care after ‘Obamacare’: Study

New research suggests that states that expanded Medicaid coverage under the Affordable Care Act eliminated racial differences in being able to quickly start on treatment after a diagnosis of advanced cancer
ABC News: Health

SPECIAL NEWS BULLETIN:

http://www.acrx.org -As millions of Americans strive to deal with the economic downturn,loss of jobs,foreclosures,high cost of gas,and the rising cost of prescription drug cost. Charles Myrick ,the President of American Consultants Rx, announced the re-release of the American Consultants Rx community service project which consist of millions of free discount prescription cards being donated to thousands of not for profits,hospitals,schools,churches,etc. in an effort to assist the uninsured,under insured,and seniors deal with the high cost of prescription drugs.-American Consultants Rx -Pharmacy Discount Network News

BEST DEAL UPDATE BY AMERICAN CONSULTANTS RX:

Click today to request your free ACRX discount prescription card and save up to 80% off of your medicine!

SPECIAL DONATION REQUEST UPDATE:

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Trump admin, SC sued over gay couple turned away by religious foster care agency

Advocacy groups sued the Trump administration and state of South Carolina after a Christian ministry denied a gay couple from participating in its foster care program.
ABC News: Top Stories

SPECIAL NEWS BULLETIN:

http://www.acrx.org -As millions of Americans strive to deal with the economic downturn,loss of jobs,foreclosures,high cost of gas,and the rising cost of prescription drug cost. Charles Myrick ,the President of American Consultants Rx, announced the re-release of the American Consultants Rx community service project which consist of millions of free discount prescription cards being donated to thousands of not for profits,hospitals,schools,churches,etc. in an effort to assist the uninsured,under insured,and seniors deal with the high cost of prescription drugs.-American Consultants Rx -Pharmacy Discount Network News

BEST DEAL UPDATE BY AMERICAN CONSULTANTS RX:

Click today to request your free ACRX discount prescription card and save up to 80% off of your medicine!

SPECIAL DONATION REQUEST:

Please help American Consultants Rx achieve it’s biggest goal yet of donating over 30 million discount prescription cards to over 50k organizations in an effort to assist millions of Americans in need. Please click here to donate today!

Scholarship program diversifies the health care workforce

Kaiser Permanente Northwest has awarded more than a half million dollars ($ 549,000) in college scholarships to 173 diverse high school and college students in Oregon and Washington through its Health Care Career Scholarship Program. The program is part of the organization’s ongoing efforts to improve community health by increasing access to educational opportunity and developing a health care workforce that mirrors the communities it serves. This year’s investment brings the total scholarships awarded since the program’s inaugural year in 2009 to more than $ 4 million.

Scholarships were awarded in amounts of $ 2,000, $ 5,000, or $ 10,000 to 148 high school seniors from public high schools in Kaiser Permanente Northwest’s service area, which spans from Longview, Washington, to Eugene, Oregon. In addition, 25 scholarships were awarded to continuing Kaiser Permanente Scholars, rising college juniors attending a range of higher education institutions who had originally received the scholarships as high school seniors.

Scholarship recipients receive more than financial assistance. Kaiser Permanente also connects recipients with professional development and career learning opportunities throughout college, such as free resume and interview workshops, paid internships, and volunteering opportunities to support their persistence to degree completion and readiness to enter the health care field.

“We are passionate about making health care equitable — it should be accessible and affordable for everyone, no matter their circumstances,” said Ruth Williams-Brinkley, regional president for Kaiser Permanente in the Northwest. “A person’s language, race, or ethnicity shouldn’t be a barrier to good care, but studies show us that patients respond better when they share these characteristics with their providers. By creating a more diverse workforce, we can take a big step toward helping everyone in our communities live their longest, healthiest lives.”

Diverse scholarship recipients will improve quality of health care

Three-quarters of scholarship recipients hail from diverse backgrounds, reflecting the region’s diversity across race, ethnicity, national origin, sexual orientation, gender identity, and abilities. Recipients stand to play a critical role in providing culturally responsive care and creating a vital future for themselves and their communities.

Kaiser Permanente Scholars and Outstanding Educator to be recognized at celebration 

Recipients were honored at a reception and ceremony at the OHSU Collaborative Life Sciences Building in Portland on Saturday, May 11, 2019. The event featured a career fair; a keynote address from Lindia Willies-Jacobo, MD, associate dean of admissions at Kaiser Permanente Medical School; and special master of ceremonies, Imelda Dacones, MD, president and CEO of Northwest Permanente. Keri Pilgrim Ricker, leader of the Health Services Pathway program at Churchill High School, was presented with an Outstanding Educator award and a $ 5,000 donation to the school for her role in facilitating student success for the past 11 years.  

About Kaiser Permanente

Kaiser Permanente is committed to helping shape the future of health care. We are recognized as one of America’s leading health care providers and not-for-profit health plans. Founded in 1945, Kaiser Permanente has a mission to provide high-quality, affordable health care services and to improve the health of our members and the communities we serve. We currently serve more than 12.3 million members in eight states and the District of Columbia. Care for members and patients is focused on their total health and guided by their personal Permanente Medical Group physicians, specialists and team of caregivers. Our expert and caring medical teams are empowered and supported by industry-leading technology advances and tools for health promotion, disease prevention, state-of-the-art care delivery and world-class chronic disease management. Kaiser Permanente is dedicated to care innovations, clinical research, health education and the support of community health.

Contact

Debbie Karman
debbie.a.karman@kp.org
503-813-4060

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NEW PARENT ESSENTIAL UPDATE:

Don Lemon Says He’s All About Taking Care Of His Health These Days – Here’s Why

According to Page Six, Don Lemon is all about his health, in fact, he refuses to eat junk food almost entirely. The CNN anchor recently said to the outlet that he’s more concerned with nutrition and health now that he’s slowly getting older.

Lemon said to reporters from Page Six that he is a “man of a certain age now,” and has to make particular changes to his diet, otherwise, he won’t fare well for the future. “I would have to cut out the fried food,” the CNN anchor remarked.

With that said, however, he still is a “Southern guy” in his soul so he has to eat all of the good southern foods like fried chicken, gumbo, crawfish bisque, crab cakes, hush puppies, french fries, and catfish.

Followers have come to know Don Lemon, especially in the Trump era, for his controversial comments regarding the president, whom he believes to be one of the worst and most damaging politicians in recent memory.

DePaul University professor, Jeffrey McCall, said to reporters from Fox News that Don isn’t a traditional anchor, in the original meaning of the term. The professor explained that Don is at the forefront of a TV show in which his opinions are at the primary focus of the program’s content.

Reported first by Fox News, the outlet explained his break into broadcasting, including his career start as a reporter who dished on breaking news and major stories. Over time, however, his opinions came to be more respected by the left-wing establishment, especially since Trump’s election in 2016.

The academic said to Fox News that Don Lemon’s reporting style was emblematic of the way in which CNN has focused primarily on spouting opinions, rather than fact-based news reports. Whether that be true or not, now that Don is in his 50s, his career is at its peak, and his on-air persona is appreciated by his base over.

If he intends to continue giving his opinion at the network, he needs to cut out all of the fried food, and focus more on foods that serve longevity, rather than just his taste.

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Baby sloth gets slow, but loving, care from mother

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http://www.acrx.org -As millions of Americans strive to deal with the economic downturn,loss of jobs,foreclosures,high cost of gas,and the rising cost of prescription drug cost. Charles Myrick ,the President of American Consultants Rx, announced the re-release of the American Consultants Rx community service project which consist of millions of free discount prescription cards being donated to thousands of not for profits,hospitals,schools,churches,etc. in an effort to assist the uninsured,under insured,and seniors deal with the high cost of prescription drugs.-American Consultants Rx -Pharmacy Discount Network News

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Please help American Consultants Rx achieve it’s biggest goal yet of donating over 30 million discount prescription cards to over 50k organizations in an effort to assist millions of Americans in need. Please click here to donate today!

Listen: A Blitz Of Health Care Bills


Julie Rovner, Kaiser Health News’ chief Washington correspondent, talks with Robin Young on “Here and Now” about Democrats’ plans to push a package of health care bills through the House this week. The measure will give lawmakers a talking point about their efforts to bolster the Affordable Care Act after the Trump administration has sought to weaken it. The package, however, includes several bills with bipartisan support to get generics on the market sooner. So, voting against the package will prove tough for Republicans. Rovner and Young also discuss bipartisan efforts on Capitol Hill to eliminate surprise medical bills that patients get when their doctors or hospitals are outside their insurance network and the administration’s new requirement for drugmakers to add medications’ list prices in TV ads. You can listen to the discussion here.

Kaiser Health News

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Washington now 1st state with long-term care program

Washington Gov. Jay Inslee has signed a bill that makes his state the first to create an insurance benefit to help offset the costs of long-term care.
ABC News: Health

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http://www.acrx.org -As millions of Americans strive to deal with the economic downturn,loss of jobs,foreclosures,high cost of gas,and the rising cost of prescription drug cost. Charles Myrick ,the President of American Consultants Rx, announced the re-release of the American Consultants Rx community service project which consist of millions of free discount prescription cards being donated to thousands of not for profits,hospitals,schools,churches,etc. in an effort to assist the uninsured,under insured,and seniors deal with the high cost of prescription drugs.-American Consultants Rx -Pharmacy Discount Network News

BEST DEAL UPDATE BY AMERICAN CONSULTANTS RX:

Click today to request your free ACRX discount prescription card and save up to 80% off of your medicine!

SPECIAL DONATION REQUEST UPDATE:

Please help American Consultants Rx achieve it’s biggest goal yet of donating over 30 million discount prescription cards to over 50k organizations in an effort to assist millions of Americans in need. Please click here to donate today!

Diabetic Amputations A ‘Shameful Metric’ Of Inadequate Care

LOS ANGELES — On his regular rounds at the University of Southern California’s Keck Hospital, Dr. David Armstrong lives a brutal injustice of American health care.

Each week, dozens of patients with diabetes come to him with deep wounds, severe infections and poor circulation — debilitating complications of a disease that has spiraled out of control. He works to save their limbs, but sometimes Armstrong and his team must resort to amputation to save the patient, a painful and life-altering measure he knows is nearly always preventable.

For decades now, the American medical establishment has known how to manage diabetes. Even as the number of people living with the illness continues to climb — today, estimated at more than 30 million nationwide — the prognosis for those with access to good health care has become far less dire. With the right medication, diet and lifestyle changes, patients can learn to manage their diabetes and lead robust lives.

Yet across the country, surgeons still perform tens of thousands of diabetic amputations each year. It’s a drastic procedure that stands as a powerful example of the consequences of being poor, uninsured and cut off from a routine system of quality health care.

“Amputations are an unnecessary consequence of this devastating disease,” said Armstrong, professor of surgery at Keck School of Medicine of USC. “It’s an epidemic within an epidemic. And it’s a problem that’s totally ignored.”

In California, where doctors performed more than 82,000 diabetic amputations from 2011 to 2017, people who were black or Latino were more than twice as likely as non-Hispanic whites to undergo amputations related to diabetes, a Kaiser Health News analysis found.

The pattern is not unique to California. Across the country, studies have shown that diabetic amputations vary significantly not just by race and ethnicity but also by income and geography. Diabetic patients living in communities that rank in the nation’s bottom quartile by income were nearly 39% more likely to undergo major amputations compared with people living in the highest-income communities, according to one 2015 study.

A 2014 study by UCLA researchers found that people with diabetes in poorer neighborhoods in Los Angeles County were twice as likely to have a foot or leg amputated than those in wealthier areas. The difference was more than tenfold in some parts of the county.

Amputations are considered a “mega-disparity” and dwarf nearly every other health disparity by race and ethnicity, said Dr. Dean Schillinger, a medical professor at the University of California-San Francisco. To begin with, people who are black or Latino are more at risk of diabetes than other groups — a disparity often attributed to socioeconomic factors such as higher rates of poverty and lower levels of education. They also may live in environments with less access to healthy food or places to exercise.

Then, among those with the disease, blacks and Latinos often get diagnosed after the disease has taken hold and have more complications, such as amputations. “If you go into low-income African American neighborhoods, it is a war zone,” said Schillinger, former chief of the Diabetes Prevention and Control Program at the California Department of Public Health. “You see people wheeling themselves around in wheelchairs.”

Part of the outrage for researchers is that medical science has made so much headway in diabetes treatment. Nationwide, fewer than 5 adults out of every 1,000 with diabetes get amputations.

But for those who do, the consequences are profound. More than half of amputations in California from 2011 to 2017 occurred among people ages 45 to 64, according to the KHN analysis, meaning many people are left disabled and dependent on others for care during their prime working years.

From Mother To Son

Jackson Moss leaned back on his couch and raised his right leg. His wife, Bernadette, sprayed antiseptic on a gaping wound on the sole of his foot before dabbing it with Vaseline and rewrapping it with gauze.

A stocky man who used to deliver poultry, Moss, 47, said he had to stop working after his left leg was amputated below the knee about 10 years ago. Later, he lost part of his right foot. With Bernadette’s help, he is trying to save the rest of it.

“If I didn’t have my wife, I don’t know where I’d be,” said Moss, who wears a prosthesis on his left leg and uses a wheelchair. “I can’t get around good like I used to.”

Moss, who lives in Compton, embodies many of the characteristics of people most likely to get diabetic amputations. He is African American with a relatively low family income: about $ 30,000 a year from his Social Security disability check and his wife’s job with the county mental health department.

Moss has not always received regular medical care. His mother, who also had a leg amputated from diabetes, would take him to the doctor when he was a boy. But he stopped going as an adult. He didn’t have insurance during much of his 20s and 30s. Medical care just wasn’t a priority, he said, until about 25 years ago when his blood sugar shot up so high he passed out at home.

Jackson Moss had to stop working after his left leg was amputated below the knee about 10 years ago because of an infected wound that developed in his toe. (Heidi de Marco/KHN)

After he was diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes, he started seeing a physician more often. He tried to avoid sugar, as his doctor recommended, but bad habits die hard. “It takes a lot to eat right,” he said, “and it costs more.”

One day, about 10 years ago, he bumped his toe on the bed. He thought little of it until he developed an infected wound. A fever sent him to the hospital, where his lower leg was removed. A few years later, with his diabetes still poorly controlled, he lost the toes on his other foot.

In recent years, Moss and his wife said, health providers have sometimes ignored their concerns. They recalled trips to the emergency room when they had to convince doctors his fever came from a diabetes-related infection. “They wouldn’t take my word,” he said. The couple did not see it as discrimination, more like dismissiveness.

Now, Moss goes to a clinic run by Martin Luther King, Jr. Community Hospital, which serves a large Latino and black population in South Los Angeles. On a recent visit, his doctor asked if he was staying off the foot with the wound. “I just get up when I have to go to the restroom and to get in and out of the bed,” Moss responded.

Moss hopes someday he will be able to do more — get back to taking his grandsons to Chuck E. Cheese or playing dominoes with friends.

“I just sit here all day long,” he said.

Moss holds the funeral program for his mother, who also had diabetes. (Heidi de Marco/KHN)

‘The Most Shameful Metric’

Amputations typically start with poorly controlled diabetes, a disease characterized by excess sugar in the blood. Untreated, it can lead to serious complications such as kidney failure and blindness.

People with diabetes often have reduced sensation in their feet, as well as poor circulation. As many as one-third of people with the most common form — Type 2 — develop foot ulcers or a break in the skin that can become infected.

Amputations occur after those infections rage out of control and enter the bloodstream or seep deeper into the tissue. People with diabetes often have a condition that makes it harder for blood to circulate and wounds to heal.

The circumstances that give rise to amputations are complex and often intertwined: Patients may avoid doctors because their family and friends do, or clinics are too far away. Some may delay medical visits because they don’t trust doctors or have limited insurance. Even when they seek treatment, some find it difficult to take medication as directed, adhere to dietary restrictions or stay off an infected foot.

Californians with diabetes who have a regular place to go for health care other than the emergency room are less likely to get amputations, according to an analysis conducted for Kaiser Health News by the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research. If they have a plan to control their diabetes, they also have less chance of amputation.

The analysis shows that many amputations could be avoided with better access to care and better disease management, said Ninez Ponce, director of the center.

“It’s the most shameful metric we have on quality of care,” Ponce said. “It is a health equity issue. We are a very rich state. We shouldn’t be seeing these diabetic amputations.”

An amputation often leads to a cascade of setbacks: more infections, more amputations, decreased mobility, social isolation. Research shows as many as three-quarters of people with diabetes who have had lower-limb amputations die within five years.

Patricia Zamora gets ready to clean the wound on her foot on Nov. 1, 2018. Zamora was first diagnosed with gestational diabetes and eventually with conventional Type 2. (Heidi de Marco/KHN)

The health system bears surprisingly large costs for what remains a relatively uncommon problem. A single lower-limb amputation can cost more than $ 100,000. By far, government programs — Medicaid and Medicare — pay for the most amputations.

Experts say the best bet is to intervene well before they become necessary. People with diabetes are “very much in need of the simplest, basic, cost-effective, easy-to-implement treatments,” said Dr. Philip Goodney, director of the Center for the Evaluation of Surgical Care at Dartmouth.

Along with basic measures to control diabetes, regular foot exams are key. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates somewhere between 11% and 28% of people with diabetes get the recommended podiatric care, a yearly foot exam to check for loss of sensation and blood flow. Under federal rules governing Medicaid, the government program for low-income Americans, such care is optional and not covered by every state.

California includes it as an optional benefit, limiting access to such care. An analysis by UCLA researchers estimated that the use of preventive podiatric services saved the Medi-Cal system — California’s version of Medicaid — up to $ 97 million in 2014, based on avoided hospital admissions and amputations, and that savings could be much greater if more patients had access.

Fighting For Jesse

Jesse Guerrero is 12, but already knows what diabetes — and amputations — can do to a family. He has seen how life changed since his mom, Patricia Zamora, had her first surgery. She had to stop working as a group home supervisor. They were evicted and eventually moved into his grandmother’s house in Pomona.

Now, they stay home a lot more than they used to. “I want her to get better so we can finally go places,” Jesse said.

First diagnosed with gestational diabetes, Zamora, 49, eventually was diagnosed with conventional Type 2. Though her mother has diabetes, she said, she didn’t understand the risks.

Her serious troubles started in 2014, when she stubbed her big toe and it turned black and purple. When she finally went to an ER, doctors said it had to be amputated. The next year, after another stumble and another infection, doctors removed the remaining toes on her right foot.

Jesse Guerrero helps take care of his mom, who has diabetes. “I want her to get better so we can finally go places,” he says.(Heidi de Marco/KHN)

Patricia Zamora’s grandmother helps clean her wound. Zamora had to stop working as a group home supervisor. She was evicted and eventually moved into her grandmother’s house in Pomona, Calif.(Heidi de Marco/KHN)

Now, she is fighting a third wound and risks losing the limb below her knee. She uses a scooter and wears a boot to keep the pressure off.

Many days, she wants to give up.

“But I can’t,” she said. “I have Jesse.”

His health is also a concern. Though only in middle school, Jesse is overweight, putting him at greater risk for Type 2 diabetes. She recently took away his PlayStation and signed him up for flag football so he would be more active.

Jesse, too, is scared.

“I don’t want to get my foot cut off,” he said. “I’d rather have a full life than a short one.”

The Gift Of Pain

As hospitals have seen the impacts — and cost — of amputations, some have made efforts to reduce them. Some, like Keck Hospital, have started limb preservation centers, which use cross-disciplinary teams and technology to treat wounds and help patients improve disease management.

Even with a team of specialists, however, saving a limb often depends on patients coming in early rather than waiting until their foot has become dangerously infected. But because their sensation is dulled, they often don’t appreciate the danger.

“How do you get someone to come in if they don’t have pain?” Armstrong said. “They need the gift of pain.”

One of Armstrong’s patients, Cirilo Delgado, has a wound on his heel that could cost him his lower leg. He already lost a toe.

Delgado, 41, knew diabetes ran in his family. His father, 68, has diabetes. His mother, who had diabetes and kidney failure, died at 67. His diabetic sister died at 35 of a heart attack, a possible complication of diabetes.

“I saw them die young,” he said. “I don’t want to be the next one.”

Like Moss, Delgado didn’t always have insurance. And he didn’t seek care for his diabetes until the symptoms got dire.

Delgado used to work at a dry cleaning shop but had to stop because he doesn’t have the balance he once did. His blood pressure fluctuates dangerously, and he needs dialysis three times a week for kidney failure. He has moved in with his father, a truck driver who stopped working to help care for him.

In November, doctors used a skin flap from his leg to try to heal his latest wound. He’s praying he doesn’t get another.

“I know there’s a prosthesis,” he said, “but it’s not the same as a limb.”

METHODOLOGY BOX:

Kaiser Health News analyzed 2011-17 data from California’s Office of Statewide Health Planning and Development (OSHPD) on diabetes patients discharged after lower-limb amputations. OSPHD grouped the amputations into these racial and ethnic categories: white, black, Hispanic and other; and these age groups: under 45, 45-64, 65 and over. To compare amputation rates across groups, KHN calculated crude rates using California population data for each year from the U.S. Census Bureau, and calculated the final age-adjusted rate for each racial/ethnic group using U.S. 2010 population distribution as weights.

California Healthline ethnic media editor Ngoc Nguyen and Kaiser Health News data editor Elizabeth Lucas contributed to this report.

Kaiser Health News

BEST DEAL UPDATE:

This under-$15 skin care brand at Sephora is basic in the best way possible

This under-$ 15 skin care brand at Sephora is basic in the best way possible


This under-$  15 skin care brand at Sephora is basic in the best way possible

Every now and then, a new skin care line comes along and—for lack of a better word—disrupts the beauty world with some innovate aspect. A few years ago, it was The Ordinary (under its umbrella brand, Deciem) did just that, thanks to its combination of straightforward products (in often single-ingredient formulas), stark, minimal packaging, and affordable (like, really affordable) price ranges.

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Looking to target the signs of ageing? Try our AM skincare recipe… . ▪Kaolin Clay – A gentle white clay that works to effectively absorb excess oils and remove toxins from the surface of the skin. Apply after cleansing 1-2 times a week. . ▪Hyaluronic Acid – A powerful hydrator, it works beneath the surface of the skin as a magnet for moisturise helping your cells retain as much of it possible, for plumper, healthier looking skin. . ▪Q10 – An antioxidant working to protect the skin from environmental damage while working to tackle the signs of ageing. . ▪Vitamin C – Another antioxidant, working to brighten and even the skin, whilst boosting collagen production which gives skin it’s plumpness and elasticity. . ▪Squalane oil – A natural skin oil that works to hydrate and protect skin. 100% plant derived, this oil is lightweight and non greasy. It’s also non-comedogenic, so won’t clog pores and can also help regulate excess oil production. . ▪Collagen – A face serum that tightens the skin and targets fine lines and wrinkles.  Collagen is a natural skin protein that helps to support skin firmness, suppleness and elasticity. . ▪Caffeine – An under-eye serum which is an anti-inflammatory antioxidant derived from coffee.  It can help to reduce puffiness, dark circles and prevent skin damage from free radicals which can make dark circles more pronounced. . Got a skincare question? #asktheinkeylist and our team will be happy to help. . . . . . . . #asktheinkeylist #aging #protectskin #glow #skincare #skincaretips #skincareadvice #skincarehelp #skincarejourney #beautifulskin #glowingskin #radiantskin #newlaunch #serum #affordableskincare #skincarecommunity #amroutine #squalaneoil #hyaluronicacid #vitaminc

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Now, The Inkey List, a U.K.-based brand, has emerged with 19 different skin care products, ranging from the usual suspects, like vitamin C and retinol, to innovative, buzzy ingredients like Polyglutamic Acid (a peptide that can hold up to four times the water that hyaluronic acid can). The Inkey List is quickly becoming a favorite in beauty circles, thanks to its ultra-simple approach to skin care—and its single-ingredient formulas.

Rather than create complex, hard-to-understand, multi-ingredient formulas (whose downfall is often that one ingredient out of the several in a product might be an irritant, but it becomes hard to pinpoint when there are so many), the brand focuses on creating the simplest product offerings possible, making it nearly impossible to be anything but transparent with consumers. Why? Well, when the ingredient list is this short, it’s hard to hide things. For example, check out the ingredient list for The Inkey List’s Squalane Oil (spoiler alert: it’s just Squalane).

The best part is that everything in the collection, which is now available at Sephora, is under $ 15.

Browse some of our favorite offerings from The Inkey List below.

The Inkey List Vitamin C
The Inkey List
The Inkey List | $ 9.99


The antioxidant is great for brightening skin and evening out skin tone over time.

The Inkey List Squalane Oil
The Inkey List
The Inkey List | $ 11.99


The ultra-hydrating oil is a must-have, especially for dry skin types.

The Inkey List Retinol Serum
The Inkey List
The Inkey List | $ 9.99


A great starter retinol, if you’re new to the vitamin A derivative.

The Inkey List Glycolic Acid Toner
The Inkey List
The Inkey List | $ 10.99


If it’s visibly smaller pores you’re after, a glycolic acid toner will be your new BFF.

The Inkey List Caffeine Eye Cream
The Inkey List
The Inkey List | $ 9.99


A shot of caffeine, inside and out, can solve any problem, tbh.

The post This under-$ 15 skin care brand at Sephora is basic in the best way possible appeared first on HelloGiggles.

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Reducing care needs of teens with substance-abuse disorders

Screenings, interventions, and referrals can help adolescent teens overcome substance abuse in the short-term. Less is known about the long-term effects of those efforts. A new study from Kaiser Permanente, published in the journal Pediatrics, suggests that the benefits can last for many years and can include sustained reductions in mental health conditions.

In a new study titled “Health Care Utilization Over 3 Years After Adolescent SBIRT,” researchers led by Stacy Sterling, DrPH, MSW, of Kaiser Permanente’s Division of Research in Northern California, found that adolescents with access to SBIRT — short for “screening, brief intervention, and referral to treatment” — were less likely to have mental health or chronic medical conditions after 1 year.

Substance abuse is “closely associated with the top three causes of mortality and morbidity among adolescents — injuries, suicide and homicide,” write the authors. And, they note, adolescent substance use often goes hand-in-hand with other medical and mental health conditions and can lead to higher use of health care services.

In this new study, they found that those with access to SBIRT services had fewer psychiatry visits over 1 and 3 years, and fewer total outpatient visits at 3 years, leading to lower costs and utilization of health care.

“The fact that we saw a difference in substance use problems even 3 years out was surprising,” said Sterling, the study’s lead author. “It suggests that providing access to SBIRT may plant a seed for patients and their care teams, creating awareness about substance use that may help kids avoid future problems.”

The study used data from electronic health records to examine how much health care was used among adolescents with access to SBIRT services, from a randomized clinical trial that compared usual care to 2 other methods of delivering SBIRT in pediatric primary care — delivered by a pediatrician or by an embedded behavioral clinician.

The study was conducted at Kaiser Permanente in Northern California, an integrated health care delivery organization. The sample was taken from the pediatrics department in Oakland, California, and consisted of 1,871 adolescents ages 12 to 18.

“We found that adolescents with access to SBIRT services, regardless of whether it was through their pediatrician or an embedded behavioral health clinician, were less likely to have mental health or chronic medical conditions after 1 year,” Sterling said. “We also found that SBIRT likely leads to lower health care utilization.”

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NEW PARENT ESSENTIAL UPDATE:

In 10 Years, Half Of Middle-Income Elders Won’t Be Able To Afford Housing, Medical Care

In 10 years, more than half of middle-income Americans age 75 or older will not be able to afford to pay for yearly assisted living rent or medical expenses, according to a study published Wednesday in Health Affairs.

The researchers used demographic and income data to project estimates of a portion of the senior population, those who will be 75 or older in 2029, with a focus on those in the middle-income range — currently $ 25,001 to $ 74,298 per year for those ages 75 to 84.

And it doesn’t look good for that group because of the rising costs of housing and health care. The researchers estimated that the number of middle-income elders in the U.S. will nearly double, growing from 7.9 million to 14.4 million by 2029. They will make up the biggest share of seniors, at 43%.

By 2029, more than half of the middle-income seniors will have annual financial resources of $ 60,000 or less, even if the equity in their homes is included. Projections put the average annual assisted living and medical expenses cost in 10 years at $ 62,000, meaning that a majority of the middle-income seniors then will not be able to afford an assisted living facility.

Middle-income seniors are a group that Beth Burnham Mace, one of the study’s authors, said has been often overlooked when policymakers and legislators think about housing and care for aging Americans.

“The low-income cohort has been taken care of by tax subsidies, while the high-income cohort is largely self-sufficient. But the middle-income seniors have been ignored,” said Mace, who is chief economist at the National Investment Center for Seniors Housing and Care, a nonprofit research group.

The study’s authors said they are probably underestimating the extent of the looming problem. They projected out-of-pocket medical costs of only $ 5,000 a year for seniors.

Deborah Carr, chairwoman of the department of sociology at Boston University who studies aging, noted that Americans “are able to live longer today than they have in the past because of medical technology.” The downside, said Carr, who was not affiliated with the study, is “if they’re living for years with dementia or mobility issues, then they have to pay longer for medical care for the additional years they live.”

Indeed, the researchers projected that 60% of the middle-income seniors will have mobility limitations, while 20% will be considered “high needs,” meaning they have three or more chronic conditions and one or more limitations in activities of daily living, such as bathing or dressing. Eight percent will have some form of cognitive impairment.

Seniors living with mobility limitations, chronic conditions or cognitive impairment are more likely to need care and support such as that offered by an assisted living facility.

But that’s not a reality for many.

In her written response to the Health Affairs study, Jennifer Molinsky, a senior research associate at the Joint Center for Housing Studies at Harvard University, addressed the needs of seniors who decide to stay at home as they age instead of going to an assisted living facility. She said these older Americans face a different set of challenges.

“One of the challenges is that most people don’t live in cities,” Molinsky said in an interview. “And most houses in these areas are single-family detached homes. The infrastructure is not set up for safe walking, so you have to drive. People often give up driving as they age. So these locations can be difficult to provide services to people.”

Molinsky said other issues to consider are making homes more accessible by adding ramps for wheelchairs or wall handles in the shower and the cost of these changes.

The other dire warning of the study: While spouses and middle-age daughters have historically provided the bulk of elder care, that is a less likely option in the future because of changing marriage patterns, lower birth rates and the increasing number of adult children who live far from their parents. Some seniors will need to seek paid care.

The study suggests that policymakers could expand Medicare benefits to include access to a wider range of supportive services, or create a new benefit, “Medicare Part E,” that funds long-term care. However, other attempts to set up such a program have run into resistance among lawmakers because of cost.

While Medicaid is the primary payer of long-term nursing home care, right now the program is available only to low-income seniors. Seniors may become eligible if they impoverish themselves. However, lawmakers could also broaden the Medicaid income eligibility requirements or expand options to include home-based care for those with higher-end incomes.

Some seniors are already turning to creative solutions to address their growing need for affordable housing.

Carr said one innovative option she has seen is the Village to Village Network, a community program that allows seniors to stay in their homes but have access to general support services, such as home repairs, transportation, health care and even social activities.

Co-housing, where seniors share a residence, like in the classic TV show, “Golden Girls,” is another solution, Carr said.

Mace said she hopes the study will spark more conversation between public and private sectors for creative ideas to address the issue of housing the growing number of Americans who will turn 75 or older in the next decade.

Her advice to both those seniors and their children is to openly discuss the issue.

“It is a good idea to sit down and talk about what your plan may be,” said Mace. “Talk about what the financial assets are and the housing options. It’s a worthy topic to talk about, though it can be hard, because it helps to avoid putting both children and parents in difficult situations in the future.”

Kaiser Health News

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4.22.19 Which home improvements pay off?; Ponzi scheme busted; How to cut dental care costs

Which home improvements make sense in order to maximize your money?; A ponzi scheme was busted in Florida and ordered to pay over a billion dollars in fines; How can you cut the costs of your dental care?

Learn more about your ad choices. Visit megaphone.fm/adchoices

Watch the video

The post 4.22.19 Which home improvements pay off?; Ponzi scheme busted; How to cut dental care costs appeared first on Clark Howard.

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Back To School Sale – Get up to 40% OFF stylish footwear at Payless.com

These Queer Women Don’t Care That Pete Buttigieg Is Gay—They Want a Female President

Photo Illustration by The Daily Beast / Photos Getty

He makes jokes about Grindr. He embraces his husband in public. He talks about coming out. It’s no surprise that Pete Buttigieg, the Democratic candidate running to be the first openly gay U.S. president, has earned support from across the LGBTQ spectrum. But for some queer women, the primary star is just another white man running for president.

With a record-breaking six women running in 2020, and Hillary Clinton’s bitter defeat still fresh on their tongues, a number of LGBTQ women told The Daily Beast they would simply prefer a female candidate.

“For me, being queer or lesbian, nominating a young, inexperienced white gay man is not my priority,” Duke University professor Ara Wilson told The Daily Beast. “The fact that we have not had women in that high office is, to me, much more marked, much more dramatic, and much more moving.”

Read more at The Daily Beast.

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SPECIAL NEWS BULLETIN:

http://www.acrx.org -As millions of Americans strive to deal with the economic downturn,loss of jobs,foreclosures,high cost of gas,and the rising cost of prescription drug cost. Charles Myrick ,the President of American Consultants Rx, announced the re-release of the American Consultants Rx community service project which consist of millions of free discount prescription cards being donated to thousands of not for profits,hospitals,schools,churches,etc. in an effort to assist the uninsured,under insured,and seniors deal with the high cost of prescription drugs.-American Consultants Rx -Pharmacy Discount Network News

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Click today to request your free ACRX discount prescription card and save up to 80% off of your medicine!

SPECIAL DONATION REQUEST UPDATE:

Please help American Consultants Rx achieve it’s biggest goal yet of donating over 30 million discount prescription cards to over 50k organizations in an effort to assist millions of Americans in need. Please click here to donate today!

Leading health care systems partner to increase access

PORTLAND, Ore. — Kaiser Permanente Northwest, Legacy Health, PeaceHealth and Providence Health & Services have partnered to create the Health Systems Access to Care Fund for community-supported clinics in Oregon and Southwest Washington.

While the Affordable Care Act helped provide more access to insurance, it didn’t alleviate the need for community-supported or free clinics. The $ 1.2 million, multiyear fund is held by the Oregon Community Foundation. By providing both funding and technical assistance, these investments will strengthen the clinics’ capacity and infrastructure as they adapt to the evolving needs of their patients. Factors such as ongoing health care reform, Medicaid transformation and increasing pressure on the health care safety net all have an impact on the clinics.

Community-supported clinics provide a variety of primary care services, often through volunteer physicians and nurses working at evening clinics to serve low-income, uninsured people. While each clinic is unique, they all have one thing in common — they exist because of the support they get from the local community.

“The most typical patient profile for our clinic is a low-wage worker with no health insurance, often working two or more jobs to support their families,” said Martha Spiers, LCSW, executive director of Clackamas Volunteers in Medicine. “They defer their own care in order to maintain housing and other essentials for their families and are often just one medical bill away from homelessness, and months away from disability or the need for emergency room care.”

Spiers adds that “Like our patients, CVIM is often unsure of how we will pay the bills from month to month. This initiative is providing us with critical technical and financial support to create a business plan and ongoing stability for our organization, so we can focus on the needs of our patients.”

The clinics below will be the first to receive grants from the fund; they’ll each receive a $ 100,000 grant over a two-year period:

  • Battle Ground Health Care in Battle Ground, Washington, will develop a sustainable business plan that allows for increased access to health care for uninsured and underinsured people in Clark and Cowlitz counties.
  • Borland Free Clinic in Tualatin, Oregon, will hire a part-time clinic manager and a bilingual lifestyle coach to support the medical director and increase the number of medical clinics and bilingual education opportunities provided to low-income people in Clackamas and Washington counties.        
  • Clackamas Volunteers in Medicine in Oregon City, Oregon, will hire a development director to cultivate support to implement and maintain clinic operations and no-cost patient services in Clackamas County.
  • Free Clinic of Southwest Washington in Vancouver, Washington, will improve its volunteer program and expand its volunteer base, increase awareness to broaden its funding base, and implement a needs assessment of focus populations in Clark County.
  • North by Northeast Community Health Center in Portland, Oregon, aims to grow its patient population by 30%, expand Medicaid contracts and secure funding commitments from key partners.
  • Portland Adventist Community Services in Portland, Oregon, will use the grant to build capacity for business planning, market analysis and partnership outreach and expand the impact of the newly renovated dental clinic for adults living on low or moderate incomes in Multnomah County.
  • Salem Free Clinics in Salem, Oregon, will increase awareness of the clinic’s services to low-income populations in Marion and Polk counties, expand strategic partnerships, and improve the clinic’s newly established Patient Navigation Services.
  • Volunteers in Medicine Clinic in Springfield, Oregon, will use the grant to support delivery of primary and behavioral health services to low-income, uninsured or underinsured Lane County adults with a specific focus on increasing oversight of diabetic patients, instituting a vision services program, outreaching to the Latino community, and improving intra-clinic operations and communication.           

About Kaiser Permanente
Kaiser Permanente is committed to helping shape the future of health care. We are recognized as one of America’s leading health care providers and not-for-profit health plans. Founded in 1945, Kaiser Permanente has a mission to provide high-quality, affordable health care services and to improve the health of our members and the communities we serve. We currently serve more than 12.4 million members in eight states and the District of Columbia. Care for members and patients is focused on their total health and guided by their personal Permanente Medical Group physicians, specialists and team of caregivers. Our expert and caring medical teams are empowered and supported by industry-leading technology advances and tools for health promotion, disease prevention, state-of-the-art care delivery and world-class chronic disease management. Kaiser Permanente is dedicated to care innovations, clinical research, health education and the support of community health. 

Contact
Debbie Karman
debbie.a.karman@kp.org
503-813-4060

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NEW PARENT ESSENTIAL UPDATE:

Maternal Health Week: I Gave Stillbirth At 20 Weeks After Complaining For Weeks, Did I Receive Substandard Medical Care?

Source: Priska Neely / Priska Neely

Black Maternal Health week (April 11-17), founded and led by the Black Mamas Matter Alliance.

My stomach had been hurting all day but I could not possibly be going into labor — I was only at 20 weeks. My water had broken. I had explained these stomach pains to my doctor earlier that month, earlier that week, and even earlier that day. Each time I drove to Beverly Hills for my appointment, I was told I was fine. The bleeding? Just spotting, you’re fine. The cramps? They’re normal, you’re fine. My request to have tests done? “No need, you’re fine.”

Early in my pregnancy, I had begun to wonder if I was receiving substandard medical care. Could my doctor be dismissing me because I was an unmarried, pregnant Black women on Medi-Cal? I was convinced by medical staff that most of my concerns were just typical first-time mother over-worrying. I saw all the upper class Persian women get more attention and face-time with the doctor, while I was getting an average of 10 minutes each visit but I made justifications because I trusted my doctor and his expertise. If this was where many rich women were going for care, I figured I must be in good hands.

My water had definitely broken. When my now husband and I got to the nearest hospital, which was not where I was supposed to deliver, our parents were all there. We were told the baby’s lungs had not fully developed and he would not live outside of my womb. Still, I would have to push. I had to go through the labor and the delivery.

It was not until I delivered the baby, a boy who was stillborn, that I cried. I couldn’t stop screaming the words “no” and “please”. “No” was my disbelief. “Please” was my last appeal to God to change what just happened.

My nurse, an older Black woman, held my hand and treated me with so much care and compassion. My grief would not allow me to hold the baby but she held him for me and pressed him against my chest. I just put my hand on his very small body and held it there, unable to take him into my arms. Today, I wish I would have.

The loss of our first baby was devastating. Seven months later, we found out I was pregnant once again. This time, we switched medical providers.

By month five of my second pregnancy, I was having complications. My new medical staff was checking in with me so frequently that I almost got annoyed. They immediately put me on bedrest. Everyone made me feel like my pregnancy was their priority. It was one of the most difficult periods of my life but the level of care I received gave me hope. It also confirmed for me that although I had previously gone to one of the most coveted medical providers in one of the richest neighborhoods in Los Angeles for my care, I had received racially biased and subpar care.

Despite the excellent prenatal care I was receiving this time around, I spent two months in the hospital before having my son at 27 weeks — an experience that brought me back to the discrimination of my first delivery. I was ignored. I was overlooked. My life and the life of my child were both in danger.

This time, I was told that I couldn’t possibly be having contractions because they weren’t showing up on a monitor. I was feeling such extreme pain that I thought I was dying. After my nurse ignored several of my concerns, I physically grabbed her arms and pulled her down to me and demanded that she check between my legs because the baby was coming.

Alarms went off, nurses were running and a doctor jumped onto my bed and told me she had to stick her hand inside of me to keep my son’s umbilical cord inside. A nurse told me I needed to go under so they could get my baby out immediately. I had little time to think about any of this. I had to give consent although I was unsure and under informed. In seconds, I was unconscious.

I woke up an hour later with a scream. I was in so much pain. I opened my eyes to my mother who informed me that my son was born. “Is he perfect?” I asked. “So perfect.” she responded. Only two pounds and 12 ounces, but perfect.

Today, my son is a beautiful 6 year old who is becoming bilingual, loves dancing, sports and Black people. He has dressed as both Bobby Seale and Malcolm X for Halloween, and throws up the power fist for photos without prompt.

Now, after all of this drama, would you believe I went on to have another baby? Chile…But this time, I knew what my care should look like and that I wanted a full term, safe and happy pregnancy.

My mother had a friend named Rae Jones who ran an organization called Great Beginnings for Black Babies and it was from them that I received so much support and access to resources. I joined the Black Infant Health Program, a California statewide pregnancy education program for Black women, and learned more about my pregnancy and how to advocate for myself. I learned that Black women in America are 2 to 6 times more likely to die from complications of pregnancy and more than twice as likely to lose their babies than white women. My story was just one of many.

Though I did require another surgery to maintain my latest pregnancy, my daughter was born full term with no issues. I then devoted my life to ensuring that other Black women would never have to have three tries in order to get it right. We have so much work ahead of us but there are organizations around the country, most represented in an alliance called Black Mamas Matter, who are fighting to ensure that other Black women don’t experience what I did.

Black mamas, a safe and sacred pregnancy is your birthright and your legacy. Black women were successfully delivering babies back when hospitals wouldn’t even let us in. Connect to doulas and midwives who will assist in making sure your expectations and goals are met. There is a nationwide support system ready to love on you and the life you plan to bring forth. Despite the statistics, we can have the birth experiences that we deserve.

HEAD BACK TO THE BLACKAMERICAWEB.COM HOMEPAGE

Life & Style – Black America Web

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Tom Arnold: My Trump Addiction Is Destroying My Career and I Don’t Care

Photo Illustration by Elizabeth Brockway/The Daily Beast/Getty

“If you want to be a fucking smart ass, then why don’t you call me back? I wouldn’t have even called you or texted you because you’re a pussy who hasn’t done shit…So fuck you!”

Tom Arnold is inside the Regency Bar and Grill in Manhattan, yelling into the phone of a freelance sound mixer he believes has incriminating audio tapes of President Trump. The mixer worked on The Apprentice and then on Arnold’s short-lived Vice show, The Hunt for the Trump Tapes. Arnold believes Vice sent him on a wild goose chase for recordings one of their own had in their possession all along. (Vice declined to comment.)

Setting his phone down next to a half-eaten cheeseburger, he sighs, adjusts his glasses, and looks at me.  

Read more at The Daily Beast.

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SPECIAL NEWS BULLETIN:

http://www.acrx.org -As millions of Americans strive to deal with the economic downturn,loss of jobs,foreclosures,high cost of gas,and the rising cost of prescription drug cost. Charles Myrick ,the President of American Consultants Rx, announced the re-release of the American Consultants Rx community service project which consist of millions of free discount prescription cards being donated to thousands of not for profits,hospitals,schools,churches,etc. in an effort to assist the uninsured,under insured,and seniors deal with the high cost of prescription drugs.-American Consultants Rx -Pharmacy Discount Network News

CHARITY UPDATE:

Click today to request your free ACRX discount prescription card and save up to 80% off of your medicine!

SPECIAL DONATION REQUEST UPDATE:

Please help American Consultants Rx achieve it’s biggest goal yet of donating over 30 million discount prescription cards to over 50k organizations in an effort to assist millions of Americans in need. Please click here to donate today!

Increasing access to top-quality care

<p><b>ROCKVILLE, Md.</b> — Kaiser Permanente, the nation’s largest not-for-profit, integrated health care system, opened a new 40,000-square-foot medical center today at The Exchange in the Potomac Yard area of Alexandria, Virginia.</p>
<p>The newly constructed Alexandria Medical Center offers a wide range of primary care and specialty care services, including adult and pediatric care, women’s health, optometry, and physical therapy. Additionally, the one-stop medical center also offers pharmacy, radiology and laboratory services.</p>
<p>“Kaiser Permanente will open three new medical centers in Virginia this year to provide nationally-recognized care to our members and jobs to our communities,” said <a href="https://share.kaiserpermanente.org/bio/kim-horn/">Kim Horn</a>, regional president of Kaiser Permanente of the Mid-Atlantic States. “Through these facilities and our advanced telehealth capabilities, Kaiser Permanente delivers high-quality care where, how and when our members want it. We are proud to provide our growing membership with local access to excellent care right here in Alexandria.”</p>
<p>The Alexandria Medical Center accommodates Kaiser Permanente’s robust growth and the continuing demand for its top-rated, integrated approach to care delivery, which combines health care and health coverage in one convenient package. Kaiser Permanente provides its members with convenient care by physicians ranked among the area’s “Top Docs,” online access to appointments and care, and medical centers designed with their needs in mind.</p>
<p>“Our patients expect the best of the best, and that’s what our more than 1,500 Permanente physicians provide,” said Richard McCarthy, MD, associate executive director of the Mid-Atlantic Permanente Medical Group, which provides care for Kaiser Permanente members in Maryland, Virginia and the District of Columbia. “Thanks to the exceptional training, experience, and collaboration of our physicians, we earn the highest clinical quality ratings year after year. We are thrilled to bring our award-winning Permanente medicine to Alexandria.”</p>
<p>Located at 3000 Potomac Avenue, the Alexandria Medical Center is Kaiser Permanente’s first medical center in Alexandria, Virginia.</p>
<p>The medical center is located in a 100,000-square-foot building that also serves as the National Industries for the Blind’s new headquarters.</p>
<p>To celebrate the grand opening, Kaiser Permanente is hosting a Community Day on Saturday, April 13, 2019, from 10 a.m. until 3 p.m. Eastern time. Residents are welcome whether they are Kaiser Permanente members or not for a no-cost day of family-friendly fun with wellness activities, a moon bounce, rock climbing wall, spin art bikes, a farmers market, and a live cooking demonstration by Jonathan Till, the executive chef of Evening Star Café. The event will take place at the Alexandria Medical Center, 3000 Potomac Ave., Alexandria, VA, 22305.</p>
<p>Kaiser Permanente is committed to improving the health of the communities where its members and employees live and work. Kaiser Permanente has invested more than $ 4.7 million to increase access to our quality health care for underinsured individuals residing in Alexandria, Virginia. Kaiser Permanente also works to increase access to health care, opportunities for educational and economic fulfillment, and access to healthy fresh foods and physical activity throughout the region.</p>
<p>Kaiser Permanente will open two other new medical centers in Virginia this year. The 38,375-square-foot Colonial Forge Medical Center, which will be located on the Stafford Hospital campus, and the 36,423-square-foot Haymarket Crossroads Medical Center, which will be conveniently located near I-66, will both open later this year. </p>
<p>Kaiser Permanente has been recognized nationally and regionally as one of the top health systems for excellence in patient care outcomes. Out of more than 1,000 health plans evaluated this year, Kaiser Permanente’s Private and Medicare plans in Virginia, Maryland and the District of Columbia, all received the highest possible rating (5 out of 5) from the National Committee for Quality Assurance. The organization’s Medicaid plans in Maryland and Virginia received the highest rating as well. According to the NCQA’s Health Insurance Plan Ratings 2018-19 national report, Kaiser Permanente’s health system in Maryland, Virginia and the District of Columbia is among the top 1 percent of plans in the nation as evaluated by NCQA’s rigorous review process.</p>
<p><br>
<b>About Kaiser Permanente</b><br>
Kaiser Permanente is committed to helping shape the future of health care. We are recognized as one of America’s leading health care providers and not-for-profit health plans. Founded in 1945, Kaiser Permanente has a mission to provide high-quality, affordable health care services and to improve the health of our members and the communities we serve. We currently serve more than 12.2 million members in eight states and the District of Columbia. Care for members and patients is focused on their total health and guided by their personal Permanente Medical Group physicians, specialists, and team of caregivers. Our expert and caring medical teams are empowered and supported by industry-leading technology advances and tools for health promotion, disease prevention, state-of-the-art care delivery, and world-class chronic disease management. Kaiser Permanente is dedicated to care innovations, clinical research, health education, and the support of community health. In the Mid-Atlantic States, Kaiser Permanente provides and coordinates complete health care services for more than 770,000 members through 30 medical centers in Maryland, Virginia, and Washington, D.C. For more information, visit <a href="https://about.kaiserpermanente.org/">about.kp.org</a> or follow us on <a href="https://twitter.com/KPMidAtlantic">Twitter</a>, or <a href="https://www.facebook.com/kpthrive">Facebook</a>.</p>
<p><b>Contact</b><br>
Scott Lusk<br>
Kaiser Permanente<br>
Phone: 202-699-0006</p>
Main RSS Feed | KP Comms

NEW PARENT ESSENTIAL UPDATE:

More care, convenience coming to South Lake Union

<p><b>SEATTLE -</b> <a href="http://www.kp.org">Kaiser Permanente</a> is bringing its unique model of coordinated care to South Lake Union, further expanding patients’ access to their choice of world-class providers in state-of-the-art facilities. Kaiser Permanente members will soon be able to access primary care, mental health and wellness, physical therapy, chiropractic, and lab services in a convenient location at 210 9<sup>th</sup> Avenue N., near Denny Park.</p>
<p>“Our medical office is designed to address patients’ needs today in the most convenient way possible with the highest quality of care,” said Alison Kneisl, MD, a family medicine physician on the new South Lake Union care team. “Members may choose their preference of in-person visits or virtual care when that’s easier.”</p>
<p>The new facility will open on May 28 and appointments with providers are already available. With its unique integrated care delivery model, all Kaiser Permanente providers including those in the new South Lake Union facility are fully coordinated to improve patients’ experience, value, and wellness. Kaiser Permanente members can find convenient care through clinicians ranked among Washington’s best, <a href="https://wa.kaiserpermanente.org/">online access</a> to appointments and care, and convenient care through care chat and a 24/7 consulting nurse hotline.</p>
<p>“South Lake Union has such a unique workforce and residents of all ages,” said Alyce Sutko, MD, a family medicine physician who will practice at the new facility. “Our care team is here to offer full-spectrum primary care to help you live better. We’re excited about the tools and expertise we can offer to support you in your wellness goals.”</p>
<p>Kaiser Permanente continues to invest in its Washington members and communities. Four months ago, it opened a new medical office in Gig Harbor and it has new locations in Ballard, West Olympia, and Smokey Point slated to open within the next year.  </p>
<p>Members can make an appointment at the new South Lake Union medical office through their online member portal or can call the member service center at 888-901-4636.</p>
<h3>About Kaiser Permanente</h3>
<p>Kaiser Permanente, including the Kaiser Foundation Health Plan of Washington, is committed to helping shape the future of health care. We are recognized as one of America’s leading health care providers and not-for-profit health plans. Founded in 1945, Kaiser Permanente has a mission to provide high-quality, affordable health care services and to improve the health of our members and the communities we serve. We currently serve more than 12.2 million members in eight states and the District of Columbia. Care for members and patients is focused on their total health and guided by their personal Permanente Medical Group physicians, specialists and team of caregivers. Our expert and caring medical teams are empowered and supported by industry-leading technology advances and tools for health promotion, disease prevention, state-of-the-art care delivery and world-class chronic disease management. Kaiser Permanente is dedicated to care innovations, clinical research, health education and the support of community health. </p>
Main RSS Feed | KP Comms

NEW PARENT ESSENTIAL UPDATE:

The Briefing Room: Mueller report subpoena, White House health care plan, fight against Robocalls

ABC News

SPECIAL NEWS BULLETIN:

http://www.acrx.org -As millions of Americans strive to deal with the economic downturn,loss of jobs,foreclosures,high cost of gas,and the rising cost of prescription drug cost. Charles Myrick ,the President of American Consultants Rx, announced the re-release of the American Consultants Rx community service project which consist of millions of free discount prescription cards being donated to thousands of not for profits,hospitals,schools,churches,etc. in an effort to assist the uninsured,under insured,and seniors deal with the high cost of prescription drugs.-American Consultants Rx -Pharmacy Discount Network News

CHARITY UPDATE:

Click today to request your free ACRX discount prescription card and save up to 80% off of your medicine!

SPECIAL DONATION REQUEST UPDATE:

Please help American Consultants Rx achieve it’s biggest goal yet of donating over 30 million discount prescription cards to over 50k organizations in an effort to assist millions of Americans in need. Please click here to donate today!

Listen: What’s Up With Trump’s Sudden Turnaround On Health Care?

Julie Rovner, the chief Washington correspondent for Kaiser Health News, joined Stephen Henderson on WDET’s “Detroit Today” show Tuesday to talk about the Trump administration’s recent decision calling for a federal appeals court to overturn the Affordable Care Act. The decision created so many concerns among Republican lawmakers that President Donald Trump has stepped back from comments suggesting the GOP would push through its own health plan this year.  Rovner also takes questions from listeners about the uncertain future of health care policies. Listen here for the conversation.

Kaiser Health News

BEST DEAL UPDATE:

Americans borrow $88 billion annually to pay for health care

Americans borrowed a staggering $ 88 billion in the past year to pay for health care, a new survey finds.


CNN.com – RSS Channel – Health

BEST DEAL UPDATE:

Click today to request your free ACRX discount prescription card and save up to 80% off of your medicine!

SPECIAL DONATION REQUEST UPDATE:

Please help American Consultants Rx achieve it’s biggest goal yet of donating over 30 million discount prescription cards to over 50k organizations in an effort to assist millions of Americans in need. Please click here to donate today!

Trump punts on health care until after the 2020 election

President Donald Trump said late Monday night that Republicans are working on a new health care plan but won’t introduce it until after the 2020 election.


CNN.com – RSS Channel – Politics

SPECIAL NEWS BULLETIN:

http://www.acrx.org -As millions of Americans strive to deal with the economic downturn,loss of jobs,foreclosures,high cost of gas,and the rising cost of prescription drug cost. Charles Myrick ,the President of American Consultants Rx, announced the re-release of the American Consultants Rx community service project which consist of millions of free discount prescription cards being donated to thousands of not for profits,hospitals,schools,churches,etc. in an effort to assist the uninsured,under insured,and seniors deal with the high cost of prescription drugs.-American Consultants Rx -Pharmacy Discount Network News

BEST DEAL UPDATE BY AMERICAN CONSULTANTS RX:

Click today to request your free ACRX discount prescription card and save up to 80% off of your medicine!

SPECIAL DONATION REQUEST UPDATE:

Please help American Consultants Rx achieve it’s biggest goal yet of donating over 30 million discount prescription cards to over 50k organizations in an effort to assist millions of Americans in need. Please click here to donate today!

Here’s what the GOP plans for health care look like

Here we go again.


CNN.com – RSS Channel – Politics

SPECIAL NEWS BULLETIN:

http://www.acrx.org -As millions of Americans strive to deal with the economic downturn,loss of jobs,foreclosures,high cost of gas,and the rising cost of prescription drug cost. Charles Myrick ,the President of American Consultants Rx, announced the re-release of the American Consultants Rx community service project which consist of millions of free discount prescription cards being donated to thousands of not for profits,hospitals,schools,churches,etc. in an effort to assist the uninsured,under insured,and seniors deal with the high cost of prescription drugs.-American Consultants Rx -Pharmacy Discount Network News

BEST DEAL UPDATE BY AMERICAN CONSULTANTS RX:

Click today to request your free ACRX discount prescription card and save up to 80% off of your medicine!

SPECIAL DONATION REQUEST UPDATE:

Please help American Consultants Rx achieve it’s biggest goal yet of donating over 30 million discount prescription cards to over 50k organizations in an effort to assist millions of Americans in need. Please click here to donate today!

Le’Andria Johnson Admits She Felt Her Booking Agent “Didn’t Care” | Iyanla: Fix My Life | OWN

OWN

SPECIAL NEWS BULLETIN:

http://www.acrx.org -As millions of Americans strive to deal with the economic downturn,loss of jobs,foreclosures,high cost of gas,and the rising cost of prescription drug cost. Charles Myrick ,the President of American Consultants Rx, announced the re-release of the American Consultants Rx community service project which consist of millions of free discount prescription cards being donated to thousands of not for profits,hospitals,schools,churches,etc. in an effort to assist the uninsured,under insured,and seniors deal with the high cost of prescription drugs.-American Consultants Rx -Pharmacy Discount Network News

CHARITY UPDATE :

Click today to request your free ACRX discount prescription card and save up to 80% off of your medicine!

SPECIAL DONATION REQUEST UPDATE:

Please help American Consultants Rx achieve it’s biggest goal yet of donating over 30 million discount prescription cards to over 50k organizations in an effort to assist millions of Americans in need. Please click here to donate today!

27-Year-Old Co-Founds Children’s Urgent Care Center in Birmingham

She may be the youngest healthcare administrator in the country. 27-year-old Tiffany Alexander is the co-founder of Pediatrics PM—a pediatric urgent care center in Birmingham, Alabama, reports The Birmingham Times. The facility had its grand opening on March 8, according to a Facebook post by Alexander.

Also listed as the facility’s administrator on the National Provider Identifier Database, Alexander co-founded the clinic which provides after-hours pediatric care.

“I knew I wanted to leave a legacy [after retirement],” Alexander told The Birmingham Times. “In my mind, it was something that could live on forever. It wasn’t conventional health care, it was something different, something out of the box, something we could one day franchise, that could have multiple locations, and reach the entire state.

Alexander also spent several years as an administrator at the University of Alabama. During that time, she managed day-to-day operations of the facility and its associated labs. She was also responsible for the budget and grant funding. She came up with the idea for the pediatric clinic while working at the University of Alabama.

According to the website, Pediatrics PM has a chief medical officer, a medical director, and four physicians. It offers services including urgent care, flu vaccines, and x-rays and lab testing.

Alabama has received national attention for some of the health challenges throughout the state. It consistently ranks as one of the most obese states; has the second highest percentage of people with hypertension; and the third highest rate of people with diabetes.

Recently, the state saw record numbers of children infected with the flu in emergency rooms.

With such alarming statistics, it would seem that Alexander is providing a very important service to her community.

I’ve been fortunate and very blessed, so I’ve always wanted to give back,” said Alexander to The Birmingham Times. “All the things I do go back into community engagement, … go back into giving people the opportunities I’ve been given.”

The post 27-Year-Old Co-Founds Children’s Urgent Care Center in Birmingham appeared first on Black Enterprise.

Lifestyle | Black Enterprise

EMPLOYMENT SEARCH UPDATE:

Black Men Skin Care Brand Challenges The “For All Skin Types” Beauty Claim

Faced with a constant challenge of finding solutions created specifically for men of color, Patrick Boateng II and Blake Rascoe created Ceylon, a skin care brand developed to help men of color adopt an effective skincare routine.

With help from their advisor Dr. Lynn McKinley-Grant, Boateng and Rascoe created Ceylon as an exclusive product for men of color because research shows they are disproportionately affected by skin concerns such as acne scarring, eczema, razor bumps, and hyper-pigmentation.

“The biggest change that we’d like to see in the industry is an end to the lie that the product is for all skin types,” said Boateng. “There are specific skin concerns that disproportionately affect people of color and it is disingenuous for companies to imply that a skincare product that hasn’t been developed with skin of color in mind can, in fact, be a safe and effective product for people like us. For us, it’s important to have safe, effective, and well-researched products that help deal with these issues without the risks that many common products on the market carry.”

Built From the Ground-Up With People of Color in Mind.

Typically, targeting people of color is an afterthought for mainstream beauty brands. So when it comes to marketing and product development the founders leveraged their personal experiences and concentrated their efforts on education and accessibility.

“Together, we thought about how to create products that we would have liked to have when we wanted to take care of our skin. We knew that if we created the answer for us, it could be the answer for many others,” said Boateng. For Boateng it was when living abroad that he experienced daily breakouts and routine acne scarring. Despite trying hundreds of products, nothing seemed to help clear up his skin. For Blake it started in high school, when as a three-sport athlete, a rigorous schedule and constant sweating made it difficult to keep his skin clear. At the time, Blake began using an over-the-counter skin care product recommended by his dermatologist to help combat acne which also ended up bleaching his skin, leaving him with a pale, washed-out complexion.

Black Men Skin Care Brand

Beyond selling skincare products directly to consumers online, the trailblazing duo is also creating a community platform for men of color that fosters improved health and wellness outcomes.

“The most overlooked factors that can negatively affect our skin health include poor nutrition, lack of sleep, daily stress, exposure to air and water pollution, and inadequate personal care practices,” said Boateng. These are the same issues that can actually affect our overall health. So it’s important to note that our dermatological health and overall health are linked. Our ultimate goal is to start a conversation around overall health and wellness. We believe that starts with looking in the mirror.”

The post Black Men Skin Care Brand Challenges The “For All Skin Types” Beauty Claim appeared first on Black Enterprise.

Lifestyle | Black Enterprise

FASHION DEALS UPDATE:

A Mother Learns The Extent Of Her Kids’ Sexual Trauma in Foster Care | Iyanla: Fix My Life | OWN

OWN

SPECIAL NEWS BULLETIN:

http://www.acrx.org -As millions of Americans strive to deal with the economic downturn,loss of jobs,foreclosures,high cost of gas,and the rising cost of prescription drug cost. Charles Myrick ,the President of American Consultants Rx, announced the re-release of the American Consultants Rx community service project which consist of millions of free discount prescription cards being donated to thousands of not for profits,hospitals,schools,churches,etc. in an effort to assist the uninsured,under insured,and seniors deal with the high cost of prescription drugs.-American Consultants Rx -Pharmacy Discount Network News

CHARITY UPDATE :

Click today to request your free ACRX discount prescription card and save up to 80% off of your medicine!

SPECIAL DONATION REQUEST UPDATE:

Please help American Consultants Rx achieve it’s biggest goal yet of donating over 30 million discount prescription cards to over 50k organizations in an effort to assist millions of Americans in need. Please click here to donate today!

Life-Saving Cardiac Care Was ‘A Gift’ for Barry Wagoner

Over Memorial Day weekend, Kaiser Permanente member Barry Wagoner had planned to do yardwork. Instead, he spent most of the weekend on the couch feeling lightheaded and exhausted.

Wagoner made a doctor’s appointment but thought about cancelling when his symptoms improved. Thankfully, he decided to follow through.

“They did an electrocardiogram, and 30 seconds later, a staff member told me, ‘We’re taking you to the emergency department,’” he said. There, Wagoner got some shocking news: He had experienced a heart attack and had 100 percent blockage of a major artery.

To open the blockage and reduce the risk of future heart attacks, interventional cardiologist Thomas Tsai, MD, placed a small mesh tube called a stent in the artery.

Wagoner felt dramatically better in the days that followed. “It was like night and day,” he said. “I didn’t realize how ‘awful’ I’d learned to feel was ‘okay’.”

“The care I received from Kaiser Permanente was a gift. … It was exceptional,” he added. “I can never be thankful enough.”

Learn more about Kaiser Permanente’s pioneering cardiac care.

Main RSS Feed – Kaiser Permanente

NEW PARENT ESSENTIAL UPDATE:

In Good Hands: The Northwest Region’s Top-Rated Cardiac Care

Dale Stickney was healthy, or so he thought. He worked out vigorously in the gym every day, ate a healthy diet, drank enough water, and got plenty of sleep.

There was just one problem: fatigue. “I didn’t have the energy I once had to do everything I wanted to do,” says the now 49-year-old tech entrepreneur.

A checkup with his Kaiser Permanente doctor detected a whooshing noise between Dale’s heartbeats, instead of the steady thrum of a healthy heart. Further tests allowed his care team to diagnose a leaky mitral valve — one of four valves that control blood flow to and from the heart.

Dale would need a surgery called “minimally invasive mitral valve repair” to treat “regurgitation,” a serious condition in which the valve’s flaps don’t close tightly, allowing blood to leak backward into the left atrium.

Over time, a poorly functioning mitral valve can lead to diminished quality of life, heart failure, and eventually, death, according to Thomas Lampros, MD, a board-certified cardiothoracic surgeon.

“We often see otherwise healthy people who have no medical history of heart disease,” Dr. Lampros said. “It’s hard to know why some people’s mitral valves need replacing or repairing. It’s a common, fixable problem.”

A nationally recognized cardiac program

Dr. Lampros, along with William Shely, MD, and Yong Shin, MD, perform mitral valve surgeries and other life-saving cardiac procedures at Kaiser Permanente’s Center for Heart and Vascular Care in Clackamas, Oregon.

Their work — and the work of their team located at Kaiser Permanente’s Mt. Talbert Medical Office and Kaiser Sunnyside Medical Center — was awarded a 3-star rating for mitral valve repair and replacement by the Society of Thoracic Surgeons. Kaiser Sunnyside is the only rated participating hospital in the Northwest to receive the highest rating. 

Kaiser Sunnyside is also the only Northwest site to earn three stars (the highest) for two other heart surgeries — and has done so consistently for the past nine years:

Sunnyside is also the only Northwest site to earn three stars (the highest) for two other heart surgeries — and has done so consistently for the past nine years:

  • Isolated coronary artery bypass grafting
  • Isolated aortic valve replacement

Accolades such as these affirm the high-quality care that Kaiser Permanente members receive. However, the most gratifying reward is when doctors and nurses witness the results of their work: When the marathon runner with a repaired mitral valve can pound the pavement again. Or when a 74-year-old woman can jog a couple miles without running out of breath.

Or, in Dale’s case, when he was once again able to “burn up” the StairMaster at his gym, and also have the energy to launch a new business and thrive with the most important thing in his life — his son, Connor, age 11.

“Those are the real rewards,” said Dr. Lampros. “That’s why we became doctors.”

The heartbeat of success: a team of experts 

Dr. Lampros attributes the Center for Heart and Vascular Care’s quality outcomes to, first and foremost, a team approach.

“As in sports, every member needs to turn in a consistent, strong performance, from top to bottom,” he said. “Those layers of knowledge and skills enable us to ‘win’ on behalf of our patients and their families.”

Twice daily, the entire team checks on cardiac patients at Kaiser Sunnyside Medical Center. That means surgeons, anesthesiologists, hospitalists, nurse practitioners, registered nurses, respiratory therapists, pharmacists, physical therapists, care managers, dieticians, social workers, and anyone else involved with the patient’s care come together to make sure the patient receives the very best care available.

“It’s gratifying to know that all the extra things we do pay off in more years and better quality of life for our patients,” said Dr. Lampros. “If needed, this is where I would want my friends and family to receive care. It’s simply the best.”

His patient, Dale, agreed. “I’ve had a wonderful experience with Kaiser Permanente. They went out of their way to make me and my family feel comfortable.”

He was particularly touched when his son, who was eight-years-old at the time and understandably nervous, asked if his dad could take Smith, the boy’s favorite Lego character, into the operating room with him.

“They put Smith in a sterile package and attached it to my IV pole,” said Dale. “I carry Smith in my laptop bag to this day as I travel throughout the country on business. It’s a constant reminder of my son, why I am committed to continued good health, and the awesome care I received at Kaiser Permanente.”

Learn more about cardiac care at Kaiser Permanente at kp.org/cardiac/northwest.

Main RSS Feed – Kaiser Permanente

NEW PARENT ESSENTIAL UPDATE:

Direct And Unfiltered: John Dingell’s Popular Health Care Tweets

Former Rep. John Dingell, who died Thursday, was known for his strong opinions during his nearly 60 years in Congress. And even after leaving Congress, he continued to express his views through a lively, partisan — and sometimes earthy — Twitter account that attracted a keen following of more than 265,000 supporters and critics.

Although his posts dealt with a wide variety of issues, Dingell’s longtime devotion to improving health care was a frequent topic.

Here is a small sampling of his musings on health care. Click on the examples to see the full post and retweets.

From his many years championing health reform in Congress, Dingell could offer a unique historical perspective of the efforts to expand coverage, a quest he said would make “my pop” proud.

Dingell took great pride in the passage of the Affordable Care Act. He acknowledged it wasn’t perfect. “The only perfect law was handed to Moses on stone tablets by God himself.”

He had no patience with Republican lawmakers’ efforts to repeal and replace the ACA.

And he didn’t take kindly to efforts by “knaves and know-nothings” in recent years to add work requirements to Medicaid programs.

He clearly enjoyed jousting with friends and foes on Twitter.

Kaiser Health News

BEST DEAL UPDATE:

Lady Gaga’s Colorist Patti Song Shares Platinum Hair Care Tips

If you’re considering going platinum blonde sometime soon, it’s crucial that you know what you’re getting into and go in armed with the right knowledge, like how to properly use purple shampoos. In a recent interview, Lady Gaga’s longtime colorist Patti Song revealed about how she keeps the singer’s strands healthy and vibrant, despite dyeing it so often. Check out her advice and more platinum hair-care tips, here.
Allure

BEST DEAL UPDATE:

Kaiser Permanente Moanalua Medical Center Receives Women’s Choice Award for Cancer Care

HONOLULU — For the second consecutive year, Kaiser Permanente Moanalua Medical Center has been named one of America’s Best Hospitals for Cancer Care by the Women’s Choice Award®. This evidence-based designation places Moanalua Medical Center in the top 9 percent of 4,797 U.S. hospitals offering cancer care services.

The America’s Best Hospitals for Cancer Care award is based on criteria such as the comprehensiveness of diagnostic and treatment services offered, low rates of infection compared to the national average, national accreditations, and female patient satisfaction and preference ratings on the Hospital Consumer Assessment of Healthcare Providers and Systems (HCAHPS) survey.

Kaiser Permanente’s multidisciplinary, team-based approach focuses on all stages of cancer care, from prevention through treatment. The organization holds an annual Cancer Screening and Prevention Fair where medical specialists and counselors provide screening and lifestyle education to hundreds of attendees. Kaiser Permanente also recognizes that women have specialized health care needs. Moanalua Medical Center’s cancer care services include a breast care clinic, which provides cancer patients with a coordinated team made up of oncologists, geneticists, radiologists, surgeons and support staff who provide comprehensive care under one roof.

“Every year, thousands of people in Hawaii receive a cancer diagnosis,” said Jennifer Carney, MD, chief of oncology and hematology at Kaiser Permanente Hawaii. “Getting that news is never easy. We strive to provide coordinated care that takes into account our patients’ total picture of health so we can deliver safer, more effective care that is also more convenient for our members. We’re grateful to be able to make a difference in the lives of our many members, who survive cancer every year.”

In 2016, Kaiser Permanente Hawaii was ranked first in the state on breast and colorectal cancer screenings by the National Committee for Quality Assurance, a national quality assurance organization. In 2017, Moanalua Medical Center received a 3-year accreditation, the longest available, from the American College of Surgeons Commission on Cancer (ACS CoC) based on quality measures including early diagnosis, cancer staging, optimal treatment, rehabilitation and end-of-life care.


About the Women’s Choice Award®
The Women’s Choice Award sets the standard for helping women to make smarter choices for themselves and their families. The company and its awards identify the brands, products and services that are most recommended and trusted by women. The Women’s Choice Award is the only evidence-based quality designation that drives consumer and patient appreciation through education, empowerment and validation. Additionally, they recognize those that deliver a recommendation-worthy customer experience. Visit www.WomensChoiceAward.com to learn more.

About Kaiser Permanente
Kaiser Permanente is committed to helping shape the future of health care. We are recognized as one of America’s leading health care providers and not-for-profit health plans. Founded in 1945, Kaiser Permanente has a mission to provide high-quality, affordable health care services and to improve the health of our members and the communities we serve. We currently serve more than 12.2 million members in eight states and the District of Columbia. Care for members and patients is focused on their total health and guided by their personal Permanente Medical Group physicians, specialists and team of caregivers. Our expert and caring medical teams are empowered and supported by industry-leading technology advances and tools for health promotion, disease prevention, state-of-the-art care delivery and world-class chronic disease management. Kaiser Permanente is dedicated to care innovations, clinical research, health education and the support of community health. For more information, go to kp.org/share.

 

###

Main RSS Feed – Kaiser Permanente

NEW PARENT ESSENTIAL UPDATE:

You Care: Amber Rose Sets A NSFW Thirst Trap

The National Film and Television Awards 1st annual UK awards

Source: FayesVision/WENN.com / WENN

It’s 2019, and Amber Rose is back to thirst trapping. 

The proud Slut Walk founder post a photo that showed off part of her derriere (we just wanted to use that word in a post) and a stray nipple with the caption: “Peach Fuzz 🍑

And that’s about all we gotta say about that.

Okay, Rose did have a breast reduction about a year ago, which is relevant.

Instagram Photo

Photo:

The Latest Hip-Hop News, Music and Media | Hip-Hop Wired

BEST DEAL UPDATE:

Health Care Industry Spends $30B A Year Pushing Its Wares, From Drugs To Stem Cell Treatment

Hoping to earn its share of the $ 3.5 trillion health care market, the medical industry is pouring more money than ever into advertising its products — from high-priced prescriptions to do-it-yourself genetic tests and unapproved stem cell treatments.

Spending on health care marketing doubled from 1997 to 2016, soaring to at least $ 30 billion a year, according to a study published Tuesday in JAMA.

“Marketing drives more testing. It drives more treatments. It’s a big part of why health care is so expensive, because it’s the fancy, high-tech stuff things that get marketed,” said Steven Woloshin, co-director of the Center for Medicine and Media at The Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy and Clinical Practice. His study captured only a portion of the many ways that drug companies, hospitals and labs promote themselves.

Advertising doesn’t just persuade people to pick one brand over another, said Woloshin. Sophisticated campaigns make people worry about diseases they don’t have and ask for drugs or exams they don’t need.

Consumer advocates say that taxpayers pay the real price, as seductive ads persuade doctors and patients alike to order pricey tests and brand-name pills.

“Whenever pharma or a hospital spends money on advertising, we the patients pay for it — through higher prices for drugs and hospital services,” said Shannon Brownlee, senior vice president of the Lown Institute, a Brookline, Mass., nonprofit that advocates for affordable care. “Marketing is built into the cost of care.”

High costs ultimately affect everyone, because they prompt insurance plans to raise premiums, said Diana Zuckerman, president of the National Center for Health Research, a nonprofit that provides medical information to consumers. And taxpayers foot the bill for publicly funded insurance programs, such as Medicare.

“These ads can be amazingly persuasive, and they can exploit desperate patients and family members,” said Zuckerman, who was not involved in the new study.

Drug companies spend the bulk of their money trying to influence doctors, showering them with free food, drinks and speaking fees, as well as paying for them to travel to conferences, according to the study.

Dr. Lisa Schwartz and Dr. Steven Woloshin(Courtesy of the Dartmouth Institute for Health Policy & Clinical Practice)

Yet marketers also increasingly target consumers, said Woloshin, who wrote the study with his wife and longtime research partner, Dartmouth’s Dr. Lisa Schwartz, who died of cancer in November.

The biggest increase in medical marketing over the past 20 years was in “direct-to-consumer” advertising, including the TV commercials that exhort viewers to “ask your doctor” about a particular drug. Spending on such ads jumped from $ 2.1 billion in 1997 to nearly $ 10 billion in 2016, according to the study.

A spokeswoman for the pharmaceutical industry group, PhRMA, said that its ads provide “scientifically accurate information to patients.” These ads “increase awareness of the benefits and risks of new medicines and encourage appropriate use of medicines,” said Holly Campbell, of PhRMA.

The makers of genetic tests — including those that allow people to learn their ancestry or disease risk —also bombard the public with advertising. The number of ads for genetic testing grew from 14,100 in 1997 to 255,300 in 2016, at a cost that year of $ 82.6 million, according to the study. AncestryDNA spends more than any other company of its kind, devoting $ 38 million to marketing in 2016 alone.

Some companies are touting stem cell treatments that haven’t been approved by federal regulators. The Food and Drug Administration has approved stem cell therapy for only a few specific uses — such as bone marrow transplants for people with leukemia. But hundreds of clinics claim to use these cells taken from umbilical cord blood to treat disease. Many patients have no idea that these stem cell therapies are unapproved, said Angie Botto-van Bemden, director of osteoarthritis programs at the Arthritis Foundation.

Stem cell clinics have boosted their marketing from $ 900,000 in 2012 to $ 11.3 million in 2016, according to the study.

In recent months, the FDA has issued warnings to clinics marketing unapproved stem cell therapies. Twelve patients have been hospitalized for serious infections after receiving stem cell injections, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Medical advertising today goes beyond TV and radio commercials. Some online campaigns encourage patients to diagnose themselves, Woloshin said.

The website for Restasis, which treats dry eyes, prompts patients to take a quiz to learn if they need the prescription eye drops, said Woloshin, who co-wrote a February study with Schwartz on the drug’s marketing strategy. The Restasis website also allows patients to “find an eye doctor near you.”

Many of the doctors included in the Restasis directory have taken gifts from its manufacturer, Allergan, Woloshin said. The doctor directory includes seven of the top 10 physicians paid by the company, his study says.

In a statement, Allergan spokeswoman Amy Rose said the company uses direct-to-consumer advertising “to support responsible disease awareness efforts.” The ads “do not displace the patient-physician relationship, but enhance them, helping to create well-informed and empowered consumer and patient communities.”

Drug sites don’t just lead patients to doctors. They also provide scripts for suggested conversations. For example, the website for Viagra, which treats erectile dysfunction, provides specific questions for patients to ask.

The website for Addyi, often called the “female Viagra,” goes even further. Patients who answer a number of medical questions online are offered a 10- to 15-minute phone consultation about the drug for $ 49. Patients who don’t immediately book an appointment receive an email reminder a few minutes later.

“This is more evidence,” Brownlee said, “that drug companies are not run by dummies.”

Kaiser Health News

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Kaiser Permanente Urges DHS to Withdraw Proposed Changes That May Prevent Access to Care and Coverage

This week Kaiser Permanente joined numerous organizations, advocacy groups, businesses, and policymakers in urging the U.S. Department of Homeland Security to withdraw a proposed rule to expand the definition of public charge, which may prevent legal immigrants and their families from accessing health care and coverage.

Under the proposed rule, the definition of public charge would include the lawful receipt of assistance from several health, nutrition, and housing programs, which were previously excluded from consideration by U.S. immigration officials when determining whether an individual was likely to become a “public charge.”

Kaiser Permanente is concerned that threatening the immigration status of eligible immigrants as a result of their lawful enrollment in public benefit programs would lead to more people being uninsured and negatively affect the health of millions of people. When people lose coverage and access to affordable care, we can anticipate sicker patients, increased use of emergency rooms, and worsening health outcomes for our communities.

Moreover, this policy has far-reaching implications beyond legal immigrants and permanent residents. Nationwide, over 19 million children live in a family with an immigrant parent, and nearly 9 in 10 (86 percent) of these children are American citizens.

In the best interest of our more than 12 million members and the 65 million people residing in the communities we serve, Kaiser Permanente believes that we must continue to support increased access to high-quality, affordable care, and ensure coverage for more — not fewer — people in this country. The proposed rule jeopardizes access to the care that is delivered by Kaiser Permanente’s more than 22,000 physicians every day.

Kaiser Permanente called on the Department to not penalize the individuals who use these important public benefits, to withdraw the proposed rule, and to maintain the Department’s longstanding guidance on public charge.

Main RSS Feed – Kaiser Permanente

NEW PARENT ESSENTIAL UPDATE:

Here’s how the government shutdown affects health care

Funding for "big-ticket" health programs is already in place.
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http://www.acrx.org -As millions of Americans strive to deal with the economic downturn,loss of jobs,foreclosures,high cost of gas,and the rising cost of prescription drug cost. Charles Myrick ,the President of American Consultants Rx, announced the re-release of the American Consultants Rx community service project which consist of millions of free discount prescription cards being donated to thousands of not for profits,hospitals,schools,churches,etc. in an effort to assist the uninsured,under insured,and seniors deal with the high cost of prescription drugs.-American Consultants Rx -Pharmacy Discount Network News

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Judge says Affordable Care Act will remain in effect during appeal

The federal judge who declared the Affordable Care Act’s individual coverage mandate unconstitutional earlier this month issued an order on Sunday saying despite his previous ruling the law can remain in effect pending appeal.


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http://www.acrx.org -As millions of Americans strive to deal with the economic downturn,loss of jobs,foreclosures,high cost of gas,and the rising cost of prescription drug cost. Charles Myrick ,the President of American Consultants Rx, announced the re-release of the American Consultants Rx community service project which consist of millions of free discount prescription cards being donated to thousands of not for profits,hospitals,schools,churches,etc. in an effort to assist the uninsured,under insured,and seniors deal with the high cost of prescription drugs.-American Consultants Rx -Pharmacy Discount Network News

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Doctors question medical care given to migrant boy who died Christmas Eve

Days after a Guatemalan boy died in US custody on Christmas Eve, infectious disease experts say it appears Felipe Alonzo-Gomez likely had the flu, a potentially deadly illness that can often be treated if caught early enough.


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The dangerous myths that prevent me from getting the endometriosis care I need

The dangerous myths that prevent me from getting the endometriosis care I need


The dangerous myths that prevent me from getting the endometriosis care I need

I’m sick almost every day, gently poking my distended stomach wondering when my pelvis is going to explode. I have debilitating cramps that begin mid-cycle, accompanied by nausea and a fever that breaks around the time I begin to bleed. At age 26, my OBGYN suspects that I have endometriosis, a disease in which uterine lining grows outside of the uterus, attaching to other organs. It has no known cure. In his plush Upper East Side office, he asks if I’ve considered getting pregnant; he tells me that it’s the best way to treat it. I’ve just opened my first adult savings account and don’t have a boyfriend, so no, I haven’t thought about giving birth to a child. I also don’t yet know his claim that pregnancy is a “cure” for endometriosis is a myth.

That year, unable to pull myself out of bed most mornings, I leave my life in N.Y.C. to live with my father in Georgia; he can add me to his company’s health insurance plan. I had been temping in Manhattan and coat checking at night, but these types of jobs don’t offer health benefits. My new doctor refers to my situation as a “working woman’s disease,” and explains that he can’t diagnose me until I have surgery. An ultrasound cannot detect the disease.

For over 6,000 years, women with heavy cramping, pelvic pain, or pain during intercourse have been dismissed by our patriarchal society—so much so that painful periods have been normalized. Doctors do not consider these symptoms medical red flags, but hysterical complaints by psychologically inadequate women with low thresholds for pain. 

Even doctors that do recognize women’s pain as a potentially serious condition are challenged by the lack of research and resources available.

“Endometriosis is a chronic disease, and with little treatment options, women can suffer for decades. The symptoms are vague and can be associated with other disorders like bowel disease. There are no laboratory evaluations that can be done,” says OBGYN Alyse Margaret Kelly-Jones. According to The Endometriosis Foundation of America, it takes approximately ten years for many of the estimated 200 million endo sufferers worldwide to be diagnosed.


My doctor discourages me from having a laparoscopy to remove the adhesions and endometrioma—cysts filled with dark brown blood formed from tissue similar to uterine lining—that have likely migrated outside my womb. Even after surgery, there is no way to prevent it from attacking my insides. So, I wait while collecting a pharmacy of pastel painkillers with too many side effects to take while working or driving or being awake. My treatment plan consists of extra-strength Tylenol, a heating pad, and sleep. On one hand, I count the number of good days I have each month. I pretend every day to be okay. My home in New York feels like a distant memory.

A few months after my doctor’s visit, I am rushed to the hospital for a ruptured cyst after an evening shift at the restaurant where I work. Now, they say I need surgery. The diagnosis is Stage IV endometriosis due to the large number of implants and endometrial cysts that were attached to my digestive tract, pelvic cavity, and rectum. After surgery, I’m told there is tissue left inside me because it was unsafe to remove it. I get to keep it.

Before the disease attaches itself to my insides again, the doctors go over my options: pregnancy (even though more than half of infertile women have symptoms of endometriosis), hormone injections that cause premature menopause, a hysterectomy.

I feel like I am in the dark ages: Have a baby now or remove the organ necessary to have children in the future. I read The Endometriosis Sourcebook for answers, but it is a mystifying disease with little money allocated to understand—or even agree upon—what kind of disease it is and what causes it. Almost all endometriosis websites include a myth versus fact section. While this may sound like progress, it’s a small win.

The myths are just as pervasive and toxic as the illness itself.

I move to Los Angeles because it’s sunny every day and I dream that the health-obsessed city will rub off on me. It’s only in photos that I notice how sick I look, which is curious to others because I don’t “act” sick. As a child, the gauge of sickness was the rise of silver mercury in a thermometer. I’ve learned that there are key symptoms that people respond to: vomiting, fever, broken bones, bruises. What do you do when all of your broken pieces are on the inside? Sometimes vomiting is really nausea; fever is the chills. I call my symptoms chronic fatigue. But am I more tired than a mother with three kids working two jobs? Who isn’t tired?

I shame myself into hiding my pain, but secrets have consequences. My consequences take the deformed shape of deep scar tissue. After my second surgery, they tell me it’s now or never for children. I now have a live-in boyfriend, but he is not ready. I’m not sure if I am either, but I know I want children, so it must be now. My pain is significantly reduced with Chinese herbs and acupuncture, but when I lose my job, I struggle to keep up with weekly sessions. I return to bottles of burnt orange pills and electric heat, and I am unable to carry a pregnancy to term. We miscarry more than once and turn our spare room into an office.


A Twitter search for #endometriosis yields approximately 2,000 posts in a week; the majority are declarations of excruciating pain or stories of not being believed. Images include a crying uterus and selfies in hospital beds. Hashtags like #endometriosissucks, #endometriosisisreal, and #endometriosisresearch are calls for support, solidarity, and action. @xMelissaR04 sums up what our insides feel like: “On my way to work & it feels like Freddy Krueger has his fingers in my uterus ”

In online support groups, the misinformation that young women receive from their physicians feels criminal to me. High school girls are studying for their driver’s exam while getting hysterectomies. After undergoing eight surgeries, Lena Dunham recently chose to have one, but since endometriosis grows over the uterine lining, she still may experience pain. Unlike Dunham, I imagine that these girls may not have the opportunity to get a second opinion. SpeakEndo.com notes that teens’ endometriosis symptoms are the most likely to be written off as bad cramps.

Founder of Seckin Endometriosis Treatment Center (SEC) and endometriosis excision specialist surgeon Dr. Seckin has a different definition of endometriosis. On his website, he writes, “This is endometriosis, menstrual periods that are literally stuck inside of a woman’s body. The implants can grow deep and wide, spreading and clinging to her uterus, appendix, rectum, ovaries, intestines, leg nerves, and other parts of the pelvic region. They are like leeches that attach to, reproduce on, and grow on whatever internal organs they find. They are similar to a slow-growing cancer that invades the organs in the pelvis. In some rare cases, they can spread to the diaphragm, lungs, kidneys, or brain.”

I have been battling endometriosis for over twenty years. It’s the longest and most toxic relationship I’ve ever had. A relationship I can’t escape.

Last month, I fastened my feet into another pair of stirrups, hopeful that a young doctor may have a more progressive approach. He locates a sizable cyst on my left ovary and a sac of fluid above it. “You haven’t been treating it, so I suspect that your endometriosis has grown back. Have you tried Lupron?” he asks me.

I know that several pharmaceutical companies who manufacture Lupron are being sued by a woman whose body attacked her bones after just two injections. “I know many people who’ve had negative experiences with it,” I tell him, which is the truth. He shrugs his shoulders and tells me that getting pregnant would be the best of both worlds. I have no idea what two worlds he is referring to.

While it wasn’t right for him to blame me, I haven’t been militant with my pain management. I stopped going to acupuncture, and even though I subscribe to a healthy vegetarian diet, yoga, and exercise, I’ve only dabbled in holistic treatments such as CBD or hemp oil, Reiki, and essential oils. The truth is, when I feel good, I want to forget that endometriosis exists.

I should have been better, I think—but then I stop myself.

Is this what it means for women to be advocates of their own healthcare? Does it rest on our shoulders to cure ourselves? There may be better ways for me to manage pain, but I didn’t ‘make’ my endometriosis grow back.


As I was writing this essay, I ended up in the hospital for severe pelvic pain, nausea, and the chills.

My blood work results appeared as emails on my phone as I sat in the waiting room. After watching every patient disappear behind the double doors, I asked the receptionist why I was being seen last. “Patients are categorized by the severity of their condition,” she said with a forced smile. I wanted to read her a recent article that cites endometriosis as one of the most painful chronic illnesses. Instead, I nodded and waited my turn.

“The cyst and fluid sac are gone. They must have ruptured,” the ER doctor tells me. “Endometriosis is a terrible condition; I am so sorry that we can’t help you.” I am not an emergency and I can’t be helped at the ER.

“The good news is that your vitals and blood work are great,” he says. “And your pregnancy test was negative.” I winced, knowing that I am nearing the end of my fertility window. I’m glad that he doesn’t pretend to know how to treat me or tell me that I could have cured myself. At least he doesn’t prescribe me a myth. Instead, he prints out the names of five OBGYNS who may have more experience with endometriosis. “They are excellent doctors,” he says, and I believe him because he believes me.

While new marketing campaigns urge women to “speak out” about their symptoms, history has shown that women who speak out are not believed.

We are not in the dark about endometriosis because women ignore their symptoms; we are ignored because women’s bodies are devalued.

This treatment by doctors has reprehensible effects. It falls on our shoulders to raise awareness and dispel myths that pregnancy and hysterectomies cure endometriosis. We need to band together to demand more studies, more funding, more understanding of women’s bodies. After all, it is our bodies that give life.

The post The dangerous myths that prevent me from getting the endometriosis care I need appeared first on HelloGiggles.

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Federal judge in Texas strikes down Affordable Care Act

A federal judge in Texas said on Friday that the Affordable Care Act’s individual coverage mandate is unconstitutional and that the rest of the law must also fall.


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http://www.acrx.org -As millions of Americans strive to deal with the economic downturn,loss of jobs,foreclosures,high cost of gas,and the rising cost of prescription drug cost. Charles Myrick ,the President of American Consultants Rx, announced the re-release of the American Consultants Rx community service project which consist of millions of free discount prescription cards being donated to thousands of not for profits,hospitals,schools,churches,etc. in an effort to assist the uninsured,under insured,and seniors deal with the high cost of prescription drugs.-American Consultants Rx -Pharmacy Discount Network News

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Click today to request your free ACRX discount prescription card and save up to 80% off of your medicine!

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De Blasio doesn’t care what parents think about his elite-school-quota plans

Deputy Chancellor Josh Wallack last week became the highest-ranking Department of Education official to face the public about the DOE’s plans for racial re-engineering of the city’s elite high schools. It didn’t go well: Most of the crowd of 350 parents from Manhattan’s District 2 jeered, booed and otherwise expressed their fury. Yet no amount…
Opinion | New York Post

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Must-Reads Of The Week On Health Care

Your regular Breeze correspondent, and its creator, Brianna Labuskes, is taking a break, but we didn’t want you to be without some semblance of a report today of things you don’t want to miss in health care.

So I’ll do my best at filling in. Be kind, and check back next week for the really good stuff.

One of the biggest bits of news this week was a coughed-up blot clot from the lung. Not sure why that seemed to fascinate people. We can skip that, but feel free to look.

The Atlantic: Doctors Aren’t Sure How This Even Came Out of a Patient

A more authentic bit of news was the report that health care spending slowed in 2017. It’s still growing, mind you, but growing more slowly. That’s not terribly surprising, because it has been slowing for a number of years. What Dan Diamond over at Politico calls “slowth.” It increased 3.9 percent to $ 3.5 trillion, while the year before it had grown 4.8 percent. Another way to look at it: Americans spend $ 10,739 per person on health care. HuffPost had a nice analysis:

HuffPost: America’s Health Care Spending Keeps Rising Really Slowly. Seriously.

Read the full report here.

The New York Times attempts to explain why enrollment in Obamacare is down. Any number of things could factor in, like higher employment at places that offer health insurance, no mandate forcing people to enroll or people signing up for Medicaid. Further study may present an answer.

The New York Times: Why Is Obamacare Enrollment Down?

This week, the Annals of Internal Medicine retracted a 2009 paper by Brian Wasinick, the now-discredited Cornell University researcher. The half-baked paper had claimed that the recipes in the more modern editions of the classic “Joy of Cooking” cookbook had more calories than the original. The always enlightening Retraction Watch website, which tracks medical and scientific research that has been undermined, has the whole story of the delightful sleuthing that led to the debunking. (And while you are on the site, peruse all the other Wasinick papers on food research that have been rescinded.)

Retraction Watch: The Joy of Cooking, Vindicated: Journal Retracts Two More Brian Wansink Papers

One of my favorite writers on health care makes an often overlooked point about health insurance: Its goal ought to be the same as other insurance, that is, to safeguard the financial health of beneficiaries. And Aaron Carroll, who is also a professor of pediatrics at Indiana University School of Medicine, says that several studies show it does exactly that.

Read the whole piece for yourself:

JAMA Forum: Medicaid as a Safeguard for Financial Health

As a bonus on this topic, here is an academic paper surfacing this week on the effects of the Affordable Care Act on mortgage delinquencies. Spoiler: The value of fewer evictions and foreclosures is substantial compared to the cost of the ACA subsidies.

The Effect of Health Insurance on Home Payment Delinquency: Evidence from ACA Marketplace Subsidies

The Commonwealth Fund, a foundation that seeks to improve health care,  wanted to know how the Affordable Care Act affected the uninsured and the insured. As its chart that summarizes its findings issued this week shows, there was considerable movement. The main finding was the number of young adults who switched from Medicaid to individual insurance — and the other direction as well.

The Commonwealth Fund: Who Entered and Exited the Individual Health Insurance Market Before and After the Affordable Care Act?

Commonwealth also conducted a forum on “Being Seriously Ill in America,” which dealt with the financial consequences.

Forbes likes to compile those “30 under 30” lists. (I’ve long wished someone would go back and look at one of those lists from 20 or 25 years ago to see how the luminaries are doing now.) Anyway, it put together a list of people in the health care industry. Most are on the cusp of 30, which might tell you something about how hard it is to get a fast start in the industry. But one person on the honor roll is only 18. In case you were wondering, because I was, Elizabeth Holmes, the founder of the ill-fated Theranos, was on a different “40 under 40” Forbes list in 2014. We hope these folks fare better.

Forbes: 30 Under 30 in Healthcare

This article ran a while back, but I got a kick out of it and just had to mention it. It looked at prehistoric health care. Researchers will never know how much Stone Age dwellers bored their hut mates with discussions of a paleo diet, but they are learning how they performed medical procedures that appeared to have worked.

The Atlantic: Neanderthals Suffered a Lot of Traumatic Injuries. So How Did They Live So Long?

May you survive another whirlwind week of health care news, until next Friday’s breezy recap.

Kaiser Health News

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Prenatal exposure to chemicals in personal care products may speed puberty in girls

Girls exposed to chemicals commonly found in toothpaste, makeup, soap and other personal care products before birth may hit puberty earlier, according to a new longitudinal study. Researchers found that daughters of mothers who had higher levels of diethyl phthalate and triclosan in their bodies during pregnancy experienced puberty at younger ages.
Teen Health News — ScienceDaily

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What Women’s Election Day Victories Mean for the Affordable Care Act

Women’s economic security and access to health care have been under threat since long before President Trump took office, but his election acted as a catalyst—accelerating attacks on our bodily autonomy, health and basic rights. Trump and his allies have undermined the Affordable Care Act (ACA) in every branch of our government—pushing policies that destabilized the insurance market, caused premiums to skyrocket and expanded short-term junk insurance policies that don’t cover basic services like maternity care.

The midterm results were a direct reproach to that agenda. More women ran for and won elected office than ever before, often building platforms around protecting the ACA and pre-existing conditions—and health care was cited time and again as the top issue for women voters, who carried them to victory.

Feminists demonstrated at the Supreme Court in support of the Affordable Care Act in 2016 during oral arguments in a case seeking to weaken its contraceptive coverage mandate. (Victoria Pickering / Creative Commons)

None of this should come as a surprise. Women, especially women of color, have benefitted exponentially from the ACA. Since its implementation, 9.5 million women have gained health insurance and 55 million women are now guaranteed essential benefits like maternity care and birth control coverage, which were often excluded from policies previously. Before the ACA, insurers also routinely charged women up to 1.5 times more than men for the same policy because of common health issues like endometriosis, depression or even pregnancy, and nearly 80 percent of women become mothers but giving birth or having been pregnant was considered a pre-existing condition. Experts estimate that over half of all women and girls—67 million people—have pre-existing conditions.Thanks to the ACA, we’re now protected against that kind of gender discrimination.

The election of more than 100 women to Congress also served as a lightning rod of resistance against the scaled-up attacks on women’s reproductive health and rights that we’ve seen over the past two years, issues that go right to the core of women’s equality and economic security, and made clear a national demand for representation in Congress that reflects the current demographics and values of our country. Polls show that support for legal abortion is at historic highs among Democratic women voters, and growing among Republicans. (More than half of Republican women want Roe v. Wade kept intact.)

That’s also no surprise: One in four U.S. women will have an abortion before she’s 45, and those women are Democrats and Republicans. If we lose Roe, women everywhere will suffer—and women across party lines and state lines know that the right to our autonomy is the right to our destiny. Women know that the ability to choose if, when and how to have kids is inextricably linked to their economic success, health and wellbeing. Restricting or denying abortion access does irrevocable harm to our careers, families and economic security; research shows that women who are denied abortions and forced to carry pregnancies to term are four times more likely to experience poverty. Unwanted births also result in negative outcomes for children compared with planned pregnancies.

Make no mistake: the anti-abortion movement definitely had some wins this year, including the passage of personhood measures in Alabama and West Virginia and the confirmation of Judge Brett Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court. But the wave of feminists taking seats in the House come January will surely stymy some of the persistent efforts to shame, pressure and punish women for the decisions they make about their own lives that we’ve seen growing under Trump’s administration.

The majority of women voters cast their ballots for Democrats because they know women cannot be equal without reliable access to affordable health care and the ability to make choices about their bodies. In November, 41 percent of voters cited health care as the issue driving them to the polls. Women make up half of the population, the workforce and the electorate. Recognition for our voting power across party lines is long overdue, and guaranteeing women the right to plan their own families, and futures, is a fundamental part of that.

The historic wins for women on Election Day were also victories for the Affordable Care Act and the people who rely on its benefits—and that’s no coincidence. In Washington, the new feminists in Congress will have the great responsibility of echoing the message voters sent them in the midterms: respect women’s rights and protect our health care.

Margarida Jorge is the executive director of Health Care for America Now, the national grassroots coalition that ran a $ 60 million five-and-a-half year campaign from 2008-2013 to pass, protect and promote the Affordable Care Act and protect Medicare and Medicaid. HCAN has come back together to fight the Republicans’ all-out effort to take away America’s health care and put people at the mercy of the health insurance companies again.

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The post What Women’s Election Day Victories Mean for the Affordable Care Act appeared first on Ms. Magazine Blog.

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Claire Foy has a secret talent that the Queen probably wouldn’t care for

Watch the queen conquer.

claire foy back pay
Netflix

The day we found out Claire Foy wouldn’t be returning for Netflix’s The Crown was a dark day in our offices, however it’s been amazing to watch how she’s really let her hair down since then. Ever since hanging up her tiara and cloak, she’s taken a role that couldn’t further from the Queen if she tried as Lisbeth Salander in The Girl in the Spider’s Web and she’s now showed off a secret skill never before seen in Buckingham Palace. So if you’ve ever wanted to imagine a younger Queen Elizabeth laying down a sick beat and rapping flawlessly…Claire Foy’s got your back.

The Girl in the Spider’s Web star recently visited the set of The Tonight Show Starring Jimmy Fallon, where she chatted about her new projects and what life was like post-Netflix. While on the show, Fallon and the show’s resident band ambushed her.

‘I’ve heard some weird rumour on the internet,’ Jimmy Fallon began.

She instantly did what any sensible person would do and advised him, ‘Never trust the internet.’

Regardless, Fallon charged on and told her, ‘I heard that you know all the lyrics to Rapper’s Delight.’

If you’re not entirely sure what Rapper’s Delight is, it’s an iconic Sugarhill Gang song which starts ‘I said a hip hop’. (You know the one.) The moment Jimmy Fallon outed her love of the Sugarhill Gang however, she burst into laughter immediately and put her head in her hands.

Fallon told her, ‘You can always say no.’

However, he slyly looked over at the audience who cheered her on as the band started to play. And all props to her, Claire Foy took the microphone and proceeded to raise the roof.

You’re going to want to see the video, which is absolutely amazing to watch above. She somehow manages to nail the song while retaining a distinct posh Britishness about her, which is both endearing and hilarious at the same time.

TBH, we’re just annoyed Jimmy Fallon cut her off early as we could have easily watched an hour of her doing rap covers. Please, Claire Foy – drop a rap album. We’re begging you.

The post Claire Foy has a secret talent that the Queen probably wouldn’t care for appeared first on Marie Claire.

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New Congress To Tackle Burning Health Care Issues, Including Drug Prices

Voters ranked health care as the top issue facing the country after the midterms, according to CBS News exit polling. KHN senior correspondent Sarah Jane Tribble joined “Red and Blue” anchor Elaine Quijano to discuss how Republicans and Democrats are responding to the American public’s call to action — with a focus on skyrocketing prescription drug prices. Tribble and Quijano also explored how the midterms bolstered Medicaid expansion in a handful of states.


KHN’s coverage of prescription drug development, costs and pricing is supported in part by the Laura and John Arnold Foundation.

Kaiser Health News

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Podcast: KHN’s ‘What The Health?’ Split Decision On Health Care

Voters on Election Day gave control of the U.S. House to the Democrats but kept the U.S. Senate Republican. That will mean Republicans will no longer be able to pursue partisan changes to the Affordable Care Act or Medicare. But it also may mean that not much else will get done that does not have broad bipartisan support.

Then the day after the election, the Trump administration issued rules aimed at pleasing its anti-abortion backers. One would make it easier for employers to exclude birth control as a benefit in their insurance plans. The other would require health plans on the ACA exchanges that offer abortion as a covered service to bill consumers separately for that coverage.

This week’s panelists for KHN’s “What the Health?” are Julie Rovner of Kaiser Health News, Rebecca Adams of CQ Roll Call, Margot Sanger-Katz of The New York Times and Joanne Kenen of Politico.

Among the takeaways from this week’s podcast:

  • The Trump administration’s new contraception coverage rule comes after an earlier, stricter regulation was blocked by federal courts.
  • The insurance bills that the Trump administration is now requiring marketplace plans to send to customers for abortion coverage will be for such a small amount of money that they could become a nuisance and may persuade insurers to give up on the benefit.
  • House Democrats, when they take control in January, say they want to move legislation that will allow Medicare to negotiate drug prices. But fiscal experts say that may not have a big impact on costs unless federal officials are willing to limit the number of drugs that Medicare covers.
  • It appears that both Democrats and Republicans in Congress are interested in doing something to protect consumers from surprise medical bills. The issue, however, may fall to the back of the line given all the more pressing issues that Congress will face.
  • One of the big winners Tuesday was Medicaid. Three states approved expanding their programs, and in several other states new governors are interested in advancing legislation that would expand Medicaid.

Plus, for extra credit, the panelists recommend their favorite health stories of the week they think you should read, too:

Julie Rovner: Kaiser Health News’ “Hello? It’s I, Robot, And Have I Got An Insurance Plan For You!” by Barbara Feder Ostrov

Margot Sanger-Katz: Stat News’ “Life Span Has Little to Do With Genes, Analysis of Large Ancestry Database Shows,” by Sharon Begley

Joanne Kenen: The Washington Post’s “How Science Fared in the Midterm Elections,” by Ben Guarino and Sarah Kaplan

Rebecca Adams: The New Yorker’s “Why Doctors Hate Their Computers,” by Atul Gawande

To hear all our podcasts, click here.

And subscribe to What the Health? on iTunesStitcher or Google Play.

Kaiser Health News

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GUIDE TO THE AFFORDABLE CARE ACT: Affordable Care’s Still There

Was the Affordable Care Act (ACA) repealed? Dismantled? What about pre-existing conditions?

As a federal court weighs the constitutionality of the ACA, it’s the cost of health care, and the uncertainty of protections, that’s weighing on most Americans’ minds.

The good news for New Yorkers is “the…

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Affordable Care Act Open Enrollment Starts Nov. 1. Here’s How to Sign Up

When it comes to electing health care coverage, deadlines matter. Miss one, and you could find yourself facing thousands of dollars in medical bills down the road.

Starting Nov. 1 and ending Dec. 15 (in most states), uninsured Americans can sign up for coverage under the Affordable Care Act or renew the coverage they already have.

If you want coverage in 2019, you must enroll during these 45 days unless you later have a qualifying life event, such as getting married or divorced.

Some younger and healthier people may not think coverage is worth the monthly premiums.

But think again, says Gerald Kominski, a professor of health policy and management at UCLA.

“There’s the idea that ‘I take care of myself, I live a healthy lifestyle, I eat well, I don’t smoke — I’m going to be healthy and live forever,’” he says. “Nobody knows what the future holds. People with perfectly healthy lifestyles get sick every day.”

What’s New This Year Under the Affordable Care Act

For the first time since the Health Insurance Marketplace — a federally run service where people can shop for and enroll in private insurance — opened five years ago, Americans will not have to pay a financial penalty for failing to obtain insurance. But experts say it’s still critical to buy coverage.

It costs up to $ 7,500 to fix a broken leg, about $ 30,000 for three days in the hospital and into the hundreds of thousands of dollars to treat cancer, HealthCare.gov says. The average visit to an emergency room in 2016 cost $ 1,917, according to the Health Care Cost Institute.

Most working people can’t cover that kind of expense with their salaries or savings, says Kominski — who, three decades ago as a graduate student, needed an appendectomy that cost $ 15,000. Because he had a student policy, he says, his share was less than $ 100.

In addition, health insurance plans that provide free or low-cost preventive services and promote the early identification of problems reduce the likelihood that more expensive and extensive treatment will be needed later, said Jay Wolfson, professor of public health, medicine and pharmacy at the University of South Florida. Thus, they benefit even people who are healthy — or appear to be.

And when healthier people buy insurance, it costs less for everyone, he said.

How To Shop For an Insurance Plan in the Marketplace

Start by going to HealthCare.gov and clicking “get ready to apply” if you plan to enroll for the first time or “get ready to keep/change” if you had a 2018 plan through the Marketplace, also known as the “exchange.”

Some states operate their own exchanges. If you live in California, Colorado, Connecticut, Idaho, Maryland, Massachusetts, Minnesota, New York, Rhode Island, Vermont, Washington or the District of Columbia, you must apply through your state.

Application deadlines are slightly later in California, Massachusetts, Minnesota and Rhode Island, so be sure to call or check your state exchange’s website. In general, coverage begins Jan. 1, 2019.

Online, you’ll learn how to estimate your 2019 income for the application and find a checklist of information you’ll need, such a such as household size, the Social Security numbers and birthdates of your family members, W-2 forms or pay stubs and policy numbers of any current health insurance. Coverage is available only to U.S. citizens and legal residents.

With insurance through the Marketplace, you’ll pay a deductible and coinsurance — a percentage of a covered health service — of 10% to 40%, depending on which plan you choose. You’ll have to pay only up to an out-of-pocket maximum, and there are no yearly or lifetime dollar limits.

You’ll also get the benefit of discounts that insurance companies negotiate with health care providers. People without insurance pay almost two times as much for care, according to HealthCare.gov.

How to Apply, What’s Covered and What Help Is Available

You can apply by phone, in person with help from a navigator — a person specially trained to walk you through the process — through an agent or broker or by mail with a paper application. Volunteers certified by the Marketplace also may be available through nonprofit organizations such as community health centers or hospitals.

Coverage through the Health Insurance Marketplace is intended for those not covered by insurance at work or by government programs such as Medicaid, Medicare, Tricare (for members of the military, veterans and their families) or CHIP, the Children’s Health Insurance Plan.

Plans that comply with the Affordable Care Act, often called Obamacare, cannot discriminate against people with pre-existing conditions. They also must cover birth control and breastfeeding equipment and counseling, plus 10 “essential” services:

  • Outpatient care.
  • Emergency services.
  • Hospitalization.
  • Pregnancy, maternity and newborn care.
  • Mental health and substance abuse services.
  • Prescription drugs.
  • Mental and physical rehabilitation for people with injuries, disabilities or chronic conditions.
  • Laboratory services.
  • Preventive and wellness services and chronic disease management.
  • Pediatric treatment, including dental and vision care.

You’ll pay different premiums and out-of-pocket costs depending on the plan you choose. The government will subsidize your premiums if your income is between 100% and 400% of the federal poverty level.

Currently, that’s $ 12,140 to $ 48,560 for a single person and $ 25,1000 to $ 100,400 for a family of four. Income eligibility levels are expected to rise slightly for 2019; the new figures won’t be available until Nov. 1, 2018.

The lower your income, the higher the premium tax credit you’re eligible for (i.e. the help you’ll receive).

What Kind of Plans Are Available?

Insurers sell plans in four categories: Bronze (the least coverage and the lowest premiums), Silver, Gold and Platinum (the most coverage and the highest premiums). Depending on where you live, you may find several types of plans at each level.

You’ll want to make sure your doctors are in the plan you choose and that your prescription medications are covered.

You may have a choice of:

  • An exclusive provider organization (EPO), which covers services provided only by doctors and hospitals in a network, except in an emergency. You aren’t required to choose a primary care provider.
  • A health maintenance organization (HMO), which requires you to obtain care from doctors who work for or contract with the HMO, except in an emergency. You may have to live or work in the HMO service area.
  • A point of service plan (POS), which charges less if you use health care providers that belong to a network and requires you to get a referral from your primary care doctor to see a specialist.
  • A preferred provider organization (PPO), in which you pay less for in-network providers, but you can go to out-of-network providers for an additional fee. You don’t need a referral to go to a specialist.

Average unsubsidized premiums vary widely from state to state. The price of the Silver plan for a 27-year-old single nonsmoker ranges from a low of $ 278 per month in Indiana to $ 709 per month in Wyoming, according to the U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services.

The figures apply only to the 39 states that use the HealthCare.gov platform. About 9 million people have coverage through those exchanges, according to the federal government.

Catastrophic Insurance

Catastrophic insurance is another alternative available to people younger than 30 and those who can claim a hardship exemption, such as homelessness, domestic violence or bankruptcy. You must apply for the exemption.

On the upside, catastrophic plans cover the 10 essential health benefits, offer specific preventive services for free and cover at least three visits to a doctor annually before the deductible is met. They also cost about one-third as much as more comprehensive plans.

The large downside is that the deductible — the amount the patient has to pay before the insurance company starts sharing the cost — is $ 7,900. Additionally, these policyholders aren’t eligible for a premium tax credit.

Kominski of UCLA suggests that consumers compare the coverage and cost of a lower-tier plan in the Marketplace before choosing a catastrophic plan.

Coverage That Doesn’t Meet Affordable Care Act Standards

As of Oct. 1, 2018, low-cost health policies became available for a one-year term, renewable for up to three years. Previously, they were sold for a three-month period of coverage only, and were considered stopgap insurance plans for people between jobs or otherwise temporarily without insurance.

It’s important to be aware that these policies don’t comply with the mandates of the Affordable Care Act, meaning they don’t have to cover people with pre-existing conditions or pay for any of the services the act deems essential.

Kominski warns that low-cost policies may seem attractive — until you need medical care. He compares them to a car that’s cheap, but only because it doesn’t have airbags or comply with air-quality standards.

“If you’re shopping for price, you’re going to get what you pay for,” he said. “If you want to expose yourself to risk, we can make health care really affordable.”

Susan Jacobson is an editor at The Penny Hoarder. She also writes about health and wellness. Follow her @SusanJacobson44.

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This was originally published on The Penny Hoarder, which helps millions of readers worldwide earn and save money by sharing unique job opportunities, personal stories, freebies and more. The Inc. 5000 ranked The Penny Hoarder as the fastest-growing private media company in the U.S. in 2017.


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Readers And Tweeters: Are Millennials Killing The Primary Care Doctor?

Letters to the Editor is a periodic feature. We welcome all comments and will publish a selection. We edit for length and clarity and require full names.


Health Care Wasted On The Young

I feel Sandra Boodman’s thesis is inadequate without a historical comparison to how young people accessed health care five, 10 or 20 years ago (“Spurred By Convenience, Millennials Often Spurn The ‘Family Doctor’ Model,” Oct. 9). As a family medicine doctor practicing for 33 years, my experience is that healthy young people use medical services only for urgent care and pregnancy until they develop chronic conditions. And, as a society in general, we have become more demanding about receiving services “now.”

Why should medical care not change as our expectations change? Certainly we have the technological ability to provide a portable health record one could take from site to site to improve continuity. We also have the ability to have a single electronic medical record or shared information hub so one’s health info can be accessed by any provider anywhere.

However, demanding “now” care at any convenient site does not allow one provider to get to know a person in a way to better inform them of how that individual’s situation (emotional-social-economic) impacts their health. So, convenience has its price.

— Dr. Kevin Walsh, Ellensburg, Wash.


Family physician Ajoy Kumar of Florida led a lively debate on Twitter and, in a series of tweets, emphasized how important it is to build doctor-patient relationships early because “nobody is young and healthy forever.”

— Dr. Ajoy Kumar, St. Petersburg, Fla.


It’s not so much the new generation as it is the age group. I didn’t have a primary care physician from the time I entered university until I was 42. I also only went to the doctor when I had a particular problem to deal with. Even back then (25-30 years ago), a $ 200 deductible meant I could pay for insurance but could not afford to use it for anything other than a dire emergency. Of course, back then almost everything was traditional indemnity, so we all paid full-freight unless you were covered by one of the nascent HMOs (which often controlled costs by denying care).

— Brenda F. Bell, North Plainfield, N.J.


Another primary care doctor bemoaned the trend as part of a larger move away from generalized medicine:

— Dr. Holly Mitchell, Amarillo, Texas


As long as we are talking about new models for medicine, here’s a plea for “human-centered design thinking”:

— Julie Schilz, Northglenn, Colo.


Laryngitis On The Campaign Trail?

It isn’t surprising that health care is a priority issue for voters (“Health Care Tops Guns, Economy As Voters’ Top Iissue,” Oct. 18). After all, the chief cause of personal bankruptcy is medical bills. Nor is it surprising that voters have not heard much about health care from midterm election candidates, who know the future success or failure of the health system and their political futures depend on how they respond to voters’ top concerns. It is much safer for our political leaders to leave the administration of the health system to the insurance companies.

But, so far, private insurers have shown they are more concerned with shareholders’ concerns than patients’. The result is a fragmented, impersonal health system overrun by multiple insurance plans, each with different copays, deductibles and insurance panels — where doctors are held captive by insurers’ regulations. If we vote people into office because we believe they will respond to our needs, why are so many of them so quiet on health care?

— Dr. Edward Volpintesta, Bethel, Conn.


Metrics Show Medicaid Is True To Its Mission

Both Medicaid enrollees and taxpayers see real results from Medicaid health plans — despite contrary claims (“As Billions In Tax Dollars Flow To Private Medicaid Plans, Who’s Minding The Store?” Oct. 19). Medicaid plans are held to high standards by the states, improving health, quality and savings for millions of Americans, including children, veterans, seniors and people with disabilities.

Medicaid plans run many programs to improve patient health — driving quality, coordinating care, and helping patients stay compliant with treatment. The vast majority of every Medicaid dollar pays for care, while Medicaid plan profit margins average less than 2 percent.

Medicaid plans report metrics that are made public. Results show that insurance providers saved states about $ 7 billion in 2016 alone — helping states realize the highest value for their Medicaid investment. Research shows that Medicaid enrollees have access to care that is similar to those who have coverage through their jobs, and are satisfied with their coverage.

Medicaid serves nearly 75 million Americans. Insurance providers know that Medicaid must work for those who rely on it — and the hardworking taxpayers who pay for it. We are committed to working together to ensure that Medicaid is effective, affordable and accountable.

— Matt Eyles, president and CEO of America’s Health Insurance Plans (AHIP), Washington, D.C.


A tweeter reading the same story noted the outsize level of Medicaid oversight compared with that of corporate America.

— Fran Quigley, Indianapolis


Imagine No Big Pharma

I know that we are all supposed to think the pharmaceutical industry is the savior of our country and that without them life itself would not be possible. What if we instead began to think of them as just the manufacturers of medication? What if we did our own drug research (maybe researching medication to treat millions instead of medication to make millions) and collected bids from every drug manufacturer for production only? What if we used tax dollars to pay for the manufacturing of the medications, and patients had to pay only a token pharmacy fee? I wonder what that would look like.

— Dr. David Herring, Staunton, Va.


Unamusing Cartoon

The publication by Kaiser Health News of a Nick Anderson cartoon with the caption “Inadequate Mental Health Services” above a picture of a prescription bottle reading “RX for Violence” from which bullets spill forth, is both surprising and deeply disappointing (‘Alternative Treatment’? Oct. 18).

How easy it is to imply that gun violence, indeed violence of any type, is largely attributable to untreated or undertreated, mental health conditions. But the facts, which I and millions of readers have come to expect from KHN, say otherwise. Mass shootings, the thought of which this cartoon invokes, account for less than 1 percent of gun violence, and for which mental health is a factor in but a small minority of cases. And while suicides are in fact increasing, and 85% of completed suicides involve guns, this too is only a small fraction (about 2%) of gun violence in the U.S.

It would be expected that KHN editors would be familiar with the oft-cited statistic that only about 4% of all violence may be attributed to people with serious mental illness, and the fact people with mental health conditions are far more likely to fall victim to violence than to perpetuate it against others.

As a trusted source of factual news, it is shocking that Kaiser would perpetuate and reinforce the erroneous, albeit widely held belief, that mental illness (treated or not) equates to gun violence.

— Debbie Plotnick, vice president for mental health and systems advocacy, Mental Health America, Alexandria, Va. 


I appreciate the perspective that inadequate mental health services can lead to negative consequences for the individual and, ultimately, for society. However, the implied connection between mental illness and violence is unfairly stigmatizing and not supported by evidence. In addition, the use of a prescription bottle seems to suggest that medication is the prescription for “adequate mental health services,” which vastly oversimplifies the need for a range of services that should be included in an effective, comprehensive system of care. I hope that you will consider removing this cartoon from your website, as it is harmful to engaging and truly supporting people with mental health needs.

— Jenifer Urff, Northampton, Mass.


A Call For Deeper Reporting

I was disappointed by Phil Galewitz’s reporting on the negative aspects of Medicare Advantage HMOs (“Medicare Advantage Plans Shift Their Financial Risk To Doctors,” Oct. 8), although it was nice that he quoted me and that you incorporated “risk shifting” into the headline. Galewitz cites a Health Affairs report but should have mentioned years of reports by the Government Accountability Office and the Medicare Advisory Payment Commission detailing overpayments and risk analysis and overpayments. There is a big dark side to Medicare Advantage plans that patients/consumers do not understand. They think it’s all about “free” care. It is hard to sue these HMOs for medical malpractice and failure to coordinate and manage care — which is what they promise to do. Medicare Advantage needs more critical reporting.

—Dr. Brant S. Mittler, San Antonio, Texas


For a Georgia reader, the story raised more questions:

— Colleen Mahaney, Woodstock, Ga.


On Shooting Down Sky-High Bills …

We in Montana were frustrated in our process to address the balance billing issues for air ambulance, with little success (“Will Congress Bring Sky-High Air Ambulance Bills Down To Earth?” Sept. 27). But the issue arises from insurance companies inserting a coverage cap in the policy, stacking deductibles for in- and out-of-network carriers. Much about this issue is aimed at air companies. They are solely responsible for their charge practices. But insurers also share the responsibility for their decisions to put those who are insured at risk as they seek to constrain premiums by policy design.

— Bob Olsen, Helena, Mont.


… And Missing The Mark?

The Oct. 19 Facebook Live broadcast (“Facebook Live: What About Those Sky-High Air Ambulance Bills?”) failed to note critical facts and provided misinformation. Alarmingly, this may cause patients to question whether they should board an air medical flight even when their physicians or first responder requests the transport based on patient need. We’d like to set the record straight.

1. Insurance Coverage

FACT: Dr. Naveed Kahn’s insurer’s payment was far lower than the actual bill, and air medical services, like all health care providers, are required by federal law to “balance bill” the patient the remainder. Dr. Kahn’s insurance company failed to adequately cover his bill.

[Editor’s note: KHN’s coverage did not focus on the mechanics of “balance billing,” but rather the prohibitive amount of the original bill.]

2. State Regulation

FACT: States can and do regulate air ambulances. Court decisions and Department of Transportation opinions have reaffirmed states’ authority to regulate all medical aspects of air medical transportation. This includes standards and coordination of patient care, including protocols controlling which air medical operator is called to a scene. Air medical operators never self-dispatch; they are called by trained first responders and medical personnel, operating under state authority.

3. Medicare Fee Schedule

FACT: The implementation of the Medicare Fee schedule did not increase rates for air ambulance services; it changed the way air ambulances are reimbursed, increasing the rates for some and dramatically decreasing the rates for others. While the data demonstrates the industry has grown over the last 37 years, according to “An Economic Analysis of the U.S. Rotary Wing Air Medical Transport Industry”, 22 of those growth years occurred before the implementation of the Medicare Fee Schedule.

Industry growth, over a 30-year period, reflects growth in demand for air medical transport services in response to continued closures of rural hospitals and trauma centers. Air ambulances are filling that gap — more aircraft means better coverage and better outcomes.

— Carter Johnson, SOAR (Save Our Air Medical Resources) Campaign, Washington, D.C.

Kaiser Health News

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Media | New York Post

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This bitter House race in New York shows how health care is dominating the battle for Congress

In swing districts such as New York's 19th, Democrats have tried to leverage health care to their advantage while taking care not to move too far to the left on the issue and open themselves to GOP attacks. 
Politics

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GOP Gubernatorial Candidate John Cox: Limit Government In Health Care

John Cox stood on a presidential debate stage and told the audience that he was glad abortion wasn’t legal in 1955.

If it had been, he said, he wouldn’t have been born.

“I wouldn’t be standing here before you today. This is personal to me,” Cox said in the 2007 GOP presidential primary debate, explaining that his biological father walked out on his mother.

“My mother took responsibility for me,” he said. “She’s glad she did, and I’m glad she did.”

Cox, California’s Republican candidate for governor, frequently invoked his anti-abortion views during his unsuccessful political bids for Congress and president. He unapologetically framed himself as the anti-abortion candidate – a Christian who believes in the right to life, and whose “absolute opposition to abortion on demand” was born from his mother’s circumstances.

Cox has been less vocal about his abortion views in blue-state California, where Republicans, Democrats and independents overwhelmingly favor a woman’s right to choose. But his argument that it is an issue of personal responsibility provides a window into Cox’s thinking when it comes to health care overall: He contends that free markets, combined with people taking responsibility for their actions, ought to guide health care policy — and that government should mostly stay out of it.

His views on health care contrast starkly with those of the Democratic gubernatorial nominee, Lt. Gov. Gavin Newsom, who calls for health care coverage for all Californians, and supports the creation of a single-payer, government-run health care system financed by taxpayers. In the latest Public Policy Institute of California poll released in late September, Cox trailed Newsom by 12 percentage points among California’s likely voters, with 7 percent undecided.

As a candidate for governor, Cox has not released detailed health care positions. Nor would he agree to an interview with California Healthline to explain his views or allow those closest to him to comment.

On Monday, with less than a month before the election, Cox issued a statement following a live gubernatorial debate saying that he supports affordable health care for everyone, including those with preexisting conditions. He again failed to provide any specifics.

A review of his statements, old and current campaign websites, and interviews with previous campaign aides portrays a successful businessman who believes in limiting government in health care and in general — a political philosophy inspired by Jack Kemp’s focus on free enterprise, fiscal conservatism and family values during the 1988 presidential campaign.

Cox, who grew up in a Chicago suburb he describes as lower-middle class, became a successful tax attorney, investor and developer before getting involved in Illinois Republican politics. He didn’t do as well in that arena: He ran unsuccessfully for Congress — the House in 2000 and the Senate in 2002 — and for Cook County Recorder of Deeds in 2004 and president in 2008.

“John is a principled guy. He didn’t come from much and he did very well,” said Nicholas Tyszka, who was Cox’s campaign manager in his U.S. Senate bid. “He’s certainly more of a limited-government guy who believes if you give people an opportunity to do good things, they will.”

Cox, 63, settled in California permanently in 2011, and now lives in the affluent San Diego suburb of Rancho Santa Fe.

He has spent much of his campaign lamenting California’s high cost of living, along with the recent gas tax increase that he is encouraging voters to repeal in November.

Cox’s mindset of limited government, combined with his conviction of personal responsibility, feeds his argument that competition is the answer to rising health care costs, high prescription drug prices and nurse shortages.

“I’ve heard him say many times health care should be run more by the free markets and the federal government should have less involvement,” said Phil Collins, a Republican county treasurer candidate in Nevada who worked on two of Cox’s campaigns in Illinois.

In Monday’s statement, Cox complained that “our current system was designed by political insiders and health care corporate lobbyists to protect their monopoly profits, not to provide decent health care at a reasonable price.”

Cox said previously that, if elected governor, he isn’t interested in defending the Affordable Care Act, and that if Congress and the Trump administration were to repeal the law, the millions of Californians who now have coverage could go into high-risk insurance pools. That could increase the ranks of the uninsured.

In the hour-long debate Monday hosted by KQED, a San Francisco National Public Radio affiliate, Newsom challenged Cox’s desire to repeal the ACA and criticized his abortion views when asked how the confirmation of Brett Kavanaugh to the U.S. Supreme Court could affect California.

“It could have a profound impact on Californians, on their reproductive rights, which you believe a woman does not have a right to choose, regardless whether or not they are raped or a tragic incident of incest,” Newsom said.

Cox, who has dodged questions about his views on abortion during the gubernatorial campaign, did so again during the debate, saying only that he would appoint justices in California who will respect the U.S. and state constitutions.

“The things I’ve seen him say are very much aligned with what we hear coming out of the Trump administration and the Republican leadership of Congress,” said Dr. Andy Bindman, a primary care doctor at Zuckerberg San Francisco General Hospital and professor at the Philip R. Lee Institute for Health Policy Studies at the University of California-San Francisco who helped draft the Affordable Care Act.

When the state legislature this year considered bills that would have opened Medi-Cal, California’s Medicaid program, to unauthorized immigrants between ages 19 and 25, as well as those 65 and older, Cox went on national television to call the Democratic plans a “freebie” and told Fox News that “our government has been grabbed by a bunch of people who believe that government is the most important thing.” The bills died in the legislature.

Cox has also criticized Newsom for advocating both a single-payer system, which he says would destroy California’s economy, and health coverage for unauthorized immigrants.

“Gavin Newsom wants to make problems even worse, by increasing the costs of health care of Californians and then rewarding those who cut in line,” Cox said in an August news release. “If we want to see how Newsom’s government health care would work, just look at the DMV.”

If elected governor, Cox said in his post-debate statement, he “will break up the health care corporate monopolies, make insurance companies compete and turn patients into consumers with power over their health care dollars.”

He declined to provide any details in response to questions submitted to his campaign.

Bindman said Cox is taking a page out of the national Republican playbook — bash the Affordable Care Act without offering solutions.

“John Cox is not talking a lot about health care other than saying what he’s against because he doesn’t have any viable alternatives that ensure people retain coverage,” Bindman said.

But over the years, Cox has made suggestions that display his confidence in free markets to solve problems. What exists now, he argued in his 2006 book, “Politic$ , Inc.,” is an “illogical system” where insurance companies and government have taken over individual patient care.

The solution, Cox argued both in his book and on his website as a presidential candidate, would be to end the federal tax deduction for employee health insurance, opening the door to more competition and lower prices. Like auto insurance, consumers ought to be able to choose their own health insurance plans in a free market, he said.

The poor could benefit from a limited government voucher program, he proposed, one with incentives to save money and get preventive care, as well as health savings accounts that encourage consumers to find care at the most reasonable cost.

“Wealthier people may well have better choices, but that should be one of the awards for upward mobility,” he wrote.


This story was produced by Kaiser Health News, which publishes California Healthline, a service of the California Health Care Foundation.

Kaiser Health News

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Women in Kenya Want Access to Quality Maternal Health Care

what women want in kenya

In April 2018, hundreds of partners joined forces to launch What Women Want, a global campaign to hear directly from one million women and girls about their top request for quality reproductive and maternal healthcare services. Through an exclusive blog series, Ms. is sharing their demands and their stories. 

The What Women Want campaign aims to amplify women’s demands for quality reproductive and maternal health care around the world. Translated into more than 14 languages, the campaign strives to hear from women from all backgrounds, cultures and locations—and has partnered with over 300 global organizations that support and empower women with HIV, women with disabilities and health professionals in over 100 countries to make that possible.

Recently, What Women Want heard from thousands of women in Kenya about their top request for quality reproductive and maternal health care. Here’s what they have to say.

According to the Partnership for Maternal and Child Health, the maternal mortality rate in Kenya remains high, at 488 maternal deaths per 100,000 live births. (For reference, the maternal mortality rate in the United States is 26.4 per 100,000 live births, which is still lacking when compared to peer nations.)

We know that nearly all maternal deaths are preventable. Significant disparities in maternal mortality rates tell us that programming efforts and advocacy work must be adjusted to reach women everywhere—not just in the world’s richest countries, and not just in major cities.

Accessibility to quality health care centers is a major issue that contributes to high maternal mortality rates in Kenya. Around half of Kenyan women are delivering in health care facilities, and only 44 percent are assisted by a skilled medical professional.

Since 1990, the global maternal death rate has decreased by 44 percent, and more women than ever are using maternal healthcare services—but much of this progress was achieved in high-income areas, leaving some countries with little or no improvement. Today, 99 percent of maternal deaths take place in developing countries—with just 13 countries accounting for two-thirds of these deaths.

Within countries with high maternal mortality rates, there are significant disparities in maternal mortality and maternal healthcare utilization. In Sub-Saharan Africa, for example, the utilization of prenatal, delivery and postnatal care varies greatly with personal characteristics such as geographic region, race, income level, employment and marital status.

Progress is being made, and we should be encouraged by the monumental decreases in maternal mortality and increased access to reproductive health care, but it isn’t enoughWe need to strive for more.

We must listen to the voices of those who are too often left behind. When we can raise the voices of women in every part the world, we will be closer to a time in which every woman, everywhere, is empowered to speak out and closer to receiving quality, equitable maternal and reproductive health care.

Join the one million women mobilizing for global change by adding your voice at www.whatwomanwant.org.

Claire McGee is a sophomore at Ohio University in Athens, Ohio studying Public Health and Spanish. She spent this past summer as a Communications, Fundraising and Respectful Maternity Care Intern for the White Ribbon Alliance in Washington, D.C.

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Now that fall is here, it’s a good time to start thinking about tweaking your skin care regimen, as cold, drier air usually calls for lots of moisture and a little less exfoliation. If you aren’t sure about which crucial steps of your routine you should actually ditch or keep, we asked experts to share some helpful skin care dos and don’ts to consider before winter arrives. Here are 9 fall skin care tips and tricks you’ll definitely want to keep in mind.

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This article originally appeared on TotalBeauty.com

The post 9 Fall Skin Care Rules Dermatologists Want You to Follow appeared first on theFashionSpot.

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Melania Trump, maybe America’s most private first lady ever, opens up in an exclusive interview with ABC News.
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Tevin Campbell Doesn’t Care If You Call Him Gay Because He Can Sing: “Y’all Homophobes Gotta Do Better”

2015 Soul Train Music Awards - Arrivals

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via MadameNoire:

Tevin Campbell may not have released a new studio album since 1999, but the 41-year-old is still considered a beloved musical figure. However, that hasn’t kept the trolls of today’s social media culture from persistently trying to paint Campbell a certain way.

There have been questions about drug use, rumors that he’s been a victim of molestation, and all sorts of comments about his sexuality. Whether or not he was gay became a big question following his arrest for soliciting oral sex from an undercover policeman in 1999. When it comes to his sexuality, the “I’m Ready” singer decided to let folks know this week, after being weary of ugly comments about it, that no matter what they say, it doesn’t matter. He can still sing circles around your faves.

“Y’all homophobes gotta do better,” he wrote on Twitter. “The thing you will never ever be able to say about me is ‘that boy can’t sing.’ That’s the day I will be sitting at home crying and that day will be never.”

Campbell has spoken about his sexuality in the past. During an interview with former publication Sister 2 Sister, he told Jamie Foster Brown that he’s “try-sexual,” which is a way of saying he’s “open-minded.”

“I’m not gay, but there’s a lot of different things that I do like, sexually,” he said. “Being in the business, you are introduced to a lot of different things. I’m not gay, but I’m a freak and I think a lot of people know what a freak is.”

He also told IMissTheOldSchool back in 2009 that his sexuality shouldn’t be of concern to others.

“That’s nobody’s business. If someone is interested in me and they wanna be my friend or whatever, then we can talk. It’s nobody’s business what I like to do behind closed doors, just because I am a celebrity,” he said. “I hate that. And I like the fact that people wanna know. Let ‘em wonder. I like to leave a little bit to the imagination. But if you happen to get to know me and we hit it off… I share a lot of personal things with friends, which is a normal thing to do.”

After Thursday’s tweet, the real question is…when are we getting some new music, Tevin?!

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Students Across California Want Abortion Care on Campus—And They’re Not Done Fighting for It

California Governor Jerry Brown last week vetoed a popular measure that would have expanded abortion access for college students across the state.

Nearly three years ago, students at the University of California in Berkeley began fighting for better access to abortion on campus. The student government ultimately passed a resolution endorsing their call for on-campus medication abortion access, but administrators then failed to act on their demands—so students turned to local lawmakers. 

California’s College Student Right to Access Act, known in the legislature as SB 320, was written by three reproductive justice activists from UC Berkeley. The measure, introduced by state Senator Connie Leyva, passed through the state legislature with overwhelming support. A group of donors even came forward willing to fund its mandate: on-campus medication abortion access for all public college students in the Golden State intending to terminate a pregnancy in the first 10 weeks.

But the fierce and proactive attempt to expand women’s reproductive rights was stopped in its tracks by one man who deemed it inconsequential: Last Monday, Jerry Brown vetoed the act, calling it “not necessary.”

But just because Governor Brown was never in need of abortion care on campus doesn’t mean no one else is. More than 500 students in the UC and California State University systems seek out abortions monthly, and these students would have a much easier time getting the care they need if their university health centers had the means to offer it. Many students have to travel far distances to get to appointments, and, for a medical abortion, usually need to make it to at least two appointments.

Costs go up with every additional hurdle put in front of women seeking abortions—which was the case fo Jessy Rosales, who opened up to Huffington Post about her own off-campus abortion at 20: 

Jessy Rosales was a 20-year-old student at the University of California, Riverside, when she got pregnant. She had used protection and was not ready to become a mom, so she went to her campus health center to ask about the abortion pill—actually a combination of two medications that can safely end a pregnancy.

She left with a list of recommended providers. But the first clinic she called told her it did not perform abortions. And the second was a crisis pregnancy center—a facility that seeks to dissuade women from having abortions.

“I’m a first-generation student. For a large majority of my life, my parents didn’t have health insurance, so I didn’t really know what I was doing trying to navigate through the medical system,” Rosales, now 22, recalled in a conversation with HuffPost.

Finally, more than two months after her positive pregnancy test, she went to a nearby Planned Parenthood health center, where she was able to get an in-clinic abortion. It cost her roughly $ 400—a lot of money for a student supporting herself with part-time work and federal loans—and she was told she was too far along to be a candidate for the abortion pill at that point. (It must be taken before 10 weeks of gestation.)

“Had they provided abortion medication on my campus, I would have been able to get the care I needed when I needed it,” Rosales said.

Two-thirds of UC students and one-third of CSU students don’t own a car; 62 percent of them also live 30 minutes or more from a clinic. Often, these clinics are not open on the weekend, which only adds to their burden. 

Going through with a legal and time-sensitive medical procedure shouldn’t take that much work. Seizing an opportunity to ease the process of managing an unwanted pregnancy is far from “not necessary” for the students who must arrange transportation, cover costs, miss class or skip work to make it possible to access the care they need.

“Governor Jerry Brown, on his own, determined what was a legitimate burden in accessing abortion and neglected the experiences of countless students who explained the obstacles and burdens they faced when making a reproductive health decision as a California public university student,” Adiba Khan, one of the students who led the fight for SB 320, told Ms. “To get elected, he has expressed he is ‘pro-choice,’ but then when given the chance to expand access, to what he has repetitively claimed he believes is a right, he vetoes it. This is the behavior of a coward. He has disappointed thousands of students and denied them better agency over their futures.”

Students from across California joined in Khan’s frustration, taking to social media to slam Brown for his decision after news broke that he was vetoing the legislation.

Advocates and activists from across the country also weighed in, showing solidarity with the students who made SB 320 possible and calling on Brown and other lawmakers to do better by the women they serve.

“At its core, SB 320 affirmed the constitutional right of college students to access abortion care promptly and without delay,” Senator Leyva wrote in a statement. “As the Trump Administration continues to unravel many of the critical health care protections and services for women, legislation such as this is urgently needed to make sure that Californians are able to access the full range of reproductive care regardless of where they may live.”

She also vowed to continue fighting. “In the months and years ahead,” she declared, “I will continue fighting to make sure that college students have access to medication abortion on college campuses. I am hopeful that our incoming Legislature and Governor will agree that the right to choose isn’t just a slogan, but rather a commitment to improving true access to abortion for students across California.”

Miranda Martin is a feminist writer and activist and an editorial intern at Ms. She has written for a variety of publications and been published by The Unedit and Project Consent. Miranda recently graduated from University of Wisconsin La Crosse with a major in Interpersonal Communications and a double minor in Creative Writing and Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies. She loves to travel, read, exercise and daydream about the fall of the patriarchy.

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The Latest Thing Millennials Are Killing? The Primary Care Doctor

Millennials are killing everything from car ownership to home ownership to beer to vacations to the institution of marriage itself, if the headlines are to be believed. (Full disclosure: I am a millennial.) So why not add another victim to the list? In this case, the primary care doctor.

A Kaiser Family Foundation (KFF) survey and followup analysis by Kaiser Health News found that 26% of 1,200 respondents said they didn’t have a go-to primary care physician. But, digging a bit deeper, the survey found sharp generational shifts fueling that trend: Nearly half (45%) of 18-to-29 year olds said they didn’t have a primary care doctor. That figure fell to 28% for Americans aged 30 to 49 and just 18% and 12%, respectively, for people in the 50-to-64 and 65-plus cohort.

Some of this can likely be explained by a divergence of needs. It’s not implausible to think that, the older you get, the more you may want to have the security of a personal medical professional versed in your health history.

But it also represents a sea change in thinking likely fostered by an increased emphasis on convenience (and, perhaps, increasingly transitory lifestyles), according to some experts. A same-day telehealth appointment in a stranger could prove more valuable to some than a long-standing relationship with a doctor who may not be available at the click of a button.

The broader question is: What long-term effects will this shift have on public health? People with chronic conditions, for instance, may benefit from the stability of a primary care doctor who can provide continuous (and, theoretically, more personalized) care. At the same time, Americans who live in the numerous areas with a shortage of doctors may have entirely understandable reasons for pursuing more transitory medical relationships.

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