Love Island has changed its aftercare procedures for series 5

Here’s everything you need to know…

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Love Island 2019 is on its way, confirmed to be returning to our screens next month on 3 June.

But while most people are talking about the ITV2 show for its rumoured contestants and neon pink water bottles, today the show made news for its new duty of care process.

The past year has seen two ex-islanders, Sophie Gradon and Mike Thalassitis, as well as Sophie’s boyfriend Aaron Armstrong, take their own lives, prompting calls for the show to be axed following reports that their mental health was affected from appearing on the show.

sophie gradon

In response to claims that there hasn’t been enough after-care for the show’s contestants who suddenly find themselves catapulted to fame, ITV has today announced their new duty of care processes ahead of season 5.

‘The production team have continued to evolve their processes with each series, as the show’s popularity has risen and the social and media attention on Islanders has increased,’ the statement read. ‘The key changes this year are – enhanced psychological support, more detailed conversations with potential Islanders regarding the impact of participation on the show, bespoke training for all Islanders on social media and financial management and a proactive aftercare package which extends our support to all Islanders following their participation.’

‘Our welfare processes follow three key stages: pre-filming, filming and aftercare,’ Creative Director of ITV Studios Entertainment, Richard Cowles, said of the new strategy. ‘And we are increasing our post filming support to help Islanders following their time in villa.’

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The duty of care process for series 5 includes:

Pre Filming and Filming

  • Psychological consultant engaged throughout the whole series – from pre-filming to aftercare.
  • Thorough pre-filming psychological and medical assessments including assessments by an independent doctor, psychological consultant and discussion with each Islander’s own GP to check medical history.
  • Potential Islanders are required to fully disclose any relevant medical history that would be relevant to their inclusion in the villa and the production’s ability to provide a suitable environment for them.
  • Managing cast expectations: detailed explanations both verbally and in writing of the implications, both positive and negative, of taking part in the series are given to potential cast members throughout the casting process and reinforced within the contract so it is clear.
  • Cast are told they should consider all the potential implications of taking part in the show and work through this decision-making process in consultation with their family and those closest to them, to ensure they feel it is right for them.
  • Senior Team on the ground have received training in Mental Health First Aid.
  • A welfare team solely dedicated to the Islanders both during the show and after.

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Aftercare

  • Bespoke training on dealing with social media and advice on finance and adjusting to life back home.
  • A minimum of eight therapy sessions will be provided to each Islander when they return home.
  • Proactive contact with islanders for a period of 14 months up until the end of the next series.
  • This means contact with the Islander will last for 14 months after the series in which they have appeared has ended, with additional help provided where applicable.
  • We encourage Islanders to secure management to represent them after the show and manage them should they choose to take part in other TV shows, advertising campaigns or other public appearance opportunities.

Love Island returns to ITV2 on 3 June 2019.

The post Love Island has changed its aftercare procedures for series 5 appeared first on Marie Claire.

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US job openings rebound in March, hiring little changed

U.S. job openings rebounded sharply in March, while the pace of hiring was little changed, pointing to a growing worker shortage that could slow employment growth this year.
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How Mother of the Miniskirt Mary Quant Changed the World

Photo Illustration by Elizabeth Brockway/The Daily Beast/Getty

LONDON—She threw out everything that was chaste in a woman’s wardrobe. She raised hemlines above the knee and so created the miniskirt. More than any other fashion designer before or since, she caught the zeitgeist of her time, and of her country as it threw out the constraints of the past.

Finally, Mary Quant is getting the accolade her life merits, in a scintillating show at the Victoria and Albert Museum, a temple of good taste as perceived, collected and exhibited in works dating from ancient Greece to the present.

Quant came softly into American awareness with a story in Life magazine in December, 1960, headlined “A British Couple’s Kooky Styles”. The headline itself is loaded with the contradiction, to American eyes of the time, that anything “kooky” might emanate from a realm so uptight as Britain.

Read more at The Daily Beast.

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How disability complicated my relationship with yoga and changed how I talk to my patients

How disability complicated my relationship with yoga and changed how I talk to my patients


How disability complicated my relationship with yoga and changed how I talk to my patients

When I graduated from physical therapy the second time, my therapist was much more pragmatic than the first one had been. The first time I went to physical therapy was immediately after leaving the hospital. I had cancer and needed several surgeries to remove the tumor and the surrounding malignant tissues. Then I had a stroke after one of these procedures, literally adding insult to injury.

My left arm was paralyzed, my left leg was tired and weak, and my face drooped on one side. Despite all of that, I was still young and relatively healthy. My potential for recovery was incredibly high, so my therapists were convinced that I’d do very well. They celebrated my tiniest improvements and insisted that I focus on a distant and idealistic future: me after cancer, after stroke, with two good hands, two strong legs, and a straight, beaming smile.

I went back to physical therapy two years after my illness. I had proved my first set of therapists right to some extent. By then, my mouth had straightened and my leg had almost totally recovered. My arm and shoulder were another story. They could move again, but slowly and awkwardly. The muscle tone had increased over time leading to stiffness and a constant aching pain. Most significantly, my left hand had lost most of its sensory function and would never recover it. I mentioned the pain and stiffness to my neurologist, and she sent me straight back to physical therapy. Things improved a little bit, but as weeks passed, it became clear that I’d need more than just PT to manage it.

“You know,” my therapist said, scowling as she entered notes into her computer, “you might want to think about taking a yoga class. That arm isn’t going to get much better.”

I bristled.

Woman rolling up yoga mat
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I’m a physician, so I’ve done my share of doling out advice about healthy habits and lifestyle changes.

I’ve talked about low fat diets and leafy greens, taught techniques to improve sleep, decrease stress, and increase physical activity. The one thing that I hadn’t suggested to my own patients was to try yoga. I gave my PT the same skeptical look and half-hearted nod that my patients had given me time and time again when I’d recommend a lifestyle change—I had absolutely no intention of going to yoga class.

Occasionally a health fad sweeps the nation, and suddenly every other person you know is claiming that it cures everything from obesity to ADHD. When my friends, family, and well-meaning strangers found out that I had cancer, they suggested that I try a number of these remedies to treat it. I was told to eliminate sugar and red dye, to go vegan or paleo, to eat more blueberries to get rid of inflammation. Colonics would rid me of toxins, they said. Essential oils would help with the sadness, they claimed.

After my surgeries and after the stroke, when I walked with a slight limp and my arm was still at its weakest, I started getting suggestions about exercise. Cross fit and Soul Cycle and even pole aerobics. But yoga was the one recommended to me most often. I heard miraculous stories about how it made people fit and strong, how it cured depression and back pain and asthma. If yoga could do all of those things, my would-be advisers reasoned, then surely it would work for me.


I knew that people were trying to help, but their suggestions quickly started weighing on me. There seemed to be an undercurrent beneath the advice: I was a broken thing that needed to be fixed. Or worse, that I could fix myself but I simply wasn’t trying hard enough.

The more time passed, the stronger that feeling became—especially once I started to look healthy and “normal” again. If I mentioned my mobility issues or asked for some kind of accommodation, I was often met with looks of shock, confusion, or disbelief. Some people wanted more details and asked probing questions about my hand and my illness. Others shared their own stories about disability—I am forever grateful for those people. However, some others eyed me critically. They made unsolicited suggestions for improving my mobility, always getting to yoga eventually. They didn’t seem to listen when I told them what would and wouldn’t work for me.

Woman receiving physical therapy in the hospital
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I completed my second round of PT and incorporated the therapist’s recommended exercises into my daily routine. My shoulder loosened a bit but the pain persisted. I went to a pain clinic where I got injections in my neck, shoulder, back, and upper arm every three months. I tried patches, pills, creams, and massagers—nothing seemed to work. My sleep got worse. So did my anxiety. I was in my neurologist’s office waiting for another follow up appointment when I noticed a brochure on the table. A new yoga studio had opened nearby and offered special classes for PT graduates in addition to their regular schedule. The people in the pictures looked so happy, so healthy.

It took two months, three attempts to sign up, and continuous support from a chronically ill yogi friend before I actually stepped into the studio for my first class.

I shuffled to the back of the room, hoping to hide behind more seasoned yogis. Unfortunately, only two other women showed up and they looked just as bewildered as I did. The teacher was placid, personable, and impossibly fit as I imagine many yoga teachers are. She didn’t ask us why we were there or ask us to share about our respective medical traumas. She smiled and started class. She showed us two or three modifications for each pose, encouraged us to take breaks as we needed them, and offered assistance when we struggled. And oh did I struggle. I spent half of the class trying not to fall and the other half of the class cursing myself in my head. This was yoga and it was kicking my butt. I don’t know what I was expecting but it wasn’t to end up shaking and drenched in sweat twenty minutes in. The teacher smiled. I’m convinced that she could read minds. “Don’t think about what you look like,” she said. “Don’t think about what you can’t do. Just focus on what brought you here and do what’s best for your body.” My shoulder ached. I moved on to the next pose.

Group of women in a yoga class
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Yoga is not a miracle drug. It did not cure my cancer or heal my brain. My shoulder still hurts. I still have anxiety. I cannot be fixed, but I am not broken.

What yoga has done for me is help my body and I coexist with each other.

My shoulder still hurts, but maybe a little less now. My arm is still stiff, but it is stronger. There are still moments when I flash back to the intensive care unit where I was stroked out, strapped down, and terrified. That old panicky feeling creeps up and threatens to choke me. I close my eyes and focus on my breath.

I still don’t suggest that my own patients try yoga when they’re in recovery—at least not right away. If nothing else, illness has been an excellent teacher. I’ve learned so much about what it means to have a disability, how to be a better physician, and how to work more empathetically with patients. Every therapy isn’t for everybody, so it’s important to listen to disabled people, learn each person’s wishes and goals, and figure out what works best for them. Knowing that I could be the first or the fiftieth person to suggest any kind of therapy (including yoga) means that I had better know whether it’s even feasible for them before I start talking. If I think that yoga may help a patient and they agree, then that’s when we can have a meaningful discussion about how to practice safely.

I may never be able to do a handstand or even much of a pushup. That’s okay. I am stronger in ways that I never thought I could be. I will probably always be annoyed every time a new health fad becomes popular, 150knowing that at some point someone will suggest that I give it try. I’ll probably give them that same skeptical look and half-hearted nod and then grudgingly—but invariably—return to my yoga mat.

The post How disability complicated my relationship with yoga and changed how I talk to my patients appeared first on HelloGiggles.

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Becca McCharen-Tran’s Chromat Has Changed Fashion. Now Look at Her Clothes

Photo Illustration by Sarah Rogers/The Daily Beast / Photos by Getty

Heroines celebrates women across a variety of fields who are breaking barriers and creating change. This is the second profile in a five-part series in celebration of International Women’s Day.

Last summer, Chromat designer Becca McCharen-Tran was walking down Knickerbocker Avenue in Bushwick, Brooklyn, when she saw a man wearing one of her pieces.

It wasn’t one of the neon-colored bodysuits or structural cages made famous by Chromat fans such as Beyoncé and Ariana Grande. Instead, the man had on a pair of jeans she had made out of her apartment nearly a decade before.

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I started ballet lessons aged 26 – this is how it changed my body

To mark the release of Rudolf Nureyev biopic, The White Crow, Victoria Fell started four weeks of intensive ballet training – and the results were amazing

ballet

Surprising fact: I never attended a ballet class as a child. As a slightly more robust kid, I gravitated more towards climbing trees and pony camp, where I spent rainy afternoons eating packed lunches in old caravans.

So ballet, which is often a rite of passage for young girls was something I never got into: no tutu, no pink tights, none of those impossibly tidy hair buns. Apart from a two-month foray into the world of classical dance at the age of 11 when I had ambitions of becoming a musical theatre sensation, my experience with the art form is zero.

Which is why when offered the chance to train with Bennet Gartside, I jété’d (sorry, not sorry) at the chance. A Principal Character Artist of The Royal Ballet, who also runs Everybody Ballet, Bennet coached Ralph Fiennes leading up to the production of his new film based on the life of ballet legend Rudolph Nureyev, The White Crow, so that he could get a better understanding of the art form. Safe to say then, that I would be in good hands.

Would I be sugar plum failure, or would it turn out that ballet was the pastime I was born to do? Only time would tell.

Week 1, Day 1

I am anxiously lurking outside the Royal Opera House in Covent Garden, and I’m pretty sure that at this point, I’m the personification of imposter syndrome. However, Bennet is an absolute pro at making even the most inexperienced beginner (me) feel welcome. We start with the first few basic positions of arms, then move on to legs, and I am immediately using muscles that have pretty much lain dormant for the last 26 years, AND using them all simultaneously. By the end, I had managed a plié and learned what turnout is, and how important it is. Not bad for Day 1.

ballet challenge

My first picture – it might look like I am merely standing on my tiptoes, but I am thinking about at least 6 different posture-related matters at this point.

Week 1, Day 2

Ballet takes mental, as well as physical strength, and the fact that I’m up at 6.30am to do a class before work proves this. After a quick warm-up, today we ventured into the realms of tendus and battements – the latter involving lifting your leg off the floor. It’s so much harder than it looks, and I feel a wave of pride when I manage to bring my straight leg and pointed-ish toe to the heady heights of about 5cm off the floor.

Post-class, I am raring to go for the work day ahead. Outside of classes, I’ve also started thinking about my posture more – the muscles in my back are frankly, killing me, but I already feel that I am sitting and standing more upright.

Week 2, Day 1

The muscles in my back are finally back to normal, but the fact that it’s taken a week is a pretty worrying sign of how bad my posture actually was before. Today’s class was filled with jétés, battements, and even the odd grand battement, but the most fascinating thing for me has been seeing how my body has responded to the training. Bennet has been catering for an old injury in my left knee (I sledged into a wall on a Norwegian mountain aged 9, as one does), yet ballet is the only sport I’ve undertaken where my left leg has a noticeably weaker side… it’s no exaggeration to say that ballet uses every muscle.

Big thank you to the team at Bloch, who put up with my many questions about ballet shoes and have the most social media-friendly packaging ever.

Week 2, Day 2

Today we moved away from the safety of the barre into no man’s land, where we worked on jumps, and this is some serious cardio. Thankfully, having played netball at school definitely helps with the jumping, however the muscle memory for flailing my arms around (interception queen) also remains, which isn’t particularly balletic.

Leaving the class, I felt pretty positive about my new-and-improved posture, but then I see actual Royal Ballet company members gliding into the studio incomprehensibly gracefully as I leave, and realise that I definitely need to keep on practising.

Week 3, Day 1

Today we faced a milestone in my ballet training: the pirouette. However, like most things in ballet, the effortless appearance of these spins is very, very deceptive. The checklist of muscles to keep engaged is lengthier than usual, so means that pirouette prep takes a lesson – there is balancing, there is turnout, there are toes that need to be pointed. This element of ballet is as much as a cerebral workout as it is a physical one, and I’ve noticed that the mornings where I have my ballet lessons before work are often the most productive.

Attempting an arabesque (note the intense concentration).

Week 3, Day 2

Last lesson’s prep came to fruition today… well, sort of. I spun, and I spotted and I almost succeeded at a pirouette (again, see the Marie Claire Insta channel for the evidence). I don’t think I’ll be able to master pirouettes by the end of the challenge, but trying to is amusing enough.

From the way my clothes are fitting me, I am seeing the toning effects of ballet first-hand. This is only with two sessions a week: imagine what the professionals go through, working and training six days a week.

Week 4, Day 1

The final week is here. The pirouettes are still as hard as they were the week before, but my muscle memory has developed to the point where the mental checklist of muscles to squeeze and tighten is being ticked off so much quicker than at the beginning.

Today also saw me attempt what can only be described as ‘speed tendus’, which illustrates the general position I find myself in with ballet, where my mind understands what I need to do but my body just won’t play ball. Having said that, I’ve noticed a definite improvement in my stamina and my consistency, which makes doing 14 of these moves in a row a fraction easier.

Week 4, Day 2

We went all out for our last sessions: think jumps, think turns, think chassés across the diagonal of the floor. All this in The Clore Studio, an incredible rehearsal and performance space in the Royal Opera House, which has hosted such names as Princess Margaret in the audience… no pressure then.

An hour of putting what I’d learned into action, and the mental checklist that I went through with every balance and tendu was getting quicker and quicker. It’s also probably rose-tinted glasses, but in this session, it felt like I was able to balance for longer and could lift my legs higher and more accurately than even the session before. And with a final chassé smiling at my imaginary Royal audience, our final lesson was over.

The Clore Studio

So, what did I learn?

Even in four weeks, a lot. Firstly, a huge thanks to Bennet Gartside, whose knowledge and patience made what could have been a fairly embarrassing challenge (I am that clumsy) so much fun. Post-challenge, my posture is noticeably better and I have so much more awareness of what each muscle in my body controls and is capable of doing: even something as simple as trying to stand in the middle of a tube carriage during rush hour without taking anyone out is easier.

Add on to this a somehow even greater respect for just how intense ballet is, and just how much effort it takes to make an art form so intensely difficult look so breathtakingly easy, and I’m sold.

I’ll see you at the barre.

The White Crow is out on March 22.

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Bigger Paydays, Famous Friends and a Little Heartbreak: All the Ways Life Has Changed for Queer Eye’s Fab Five in Only a Year

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How one agent changed fashion by opening the modeling world

In 1985 Gail O’Neill was selling copiers for Xerox when a photographer spotted the 23-year-old beauty at JFK Airport and gave her the name of model agent Frances Grill. O’Neill had no portfolio and had never walked on a catwalk before she stepped into Click, the Manhattan agency Grill started in 1980. Plus she wasn’t…
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This London Exhibit Shows How Christian Dior Changed Fashion Forever

Courtesy Adrien Dirand via Victoria & Albert Museum

LONDON—The rich and powerful have long delighted in wearing Dior. At the Victoria and Albert Museum’s blockbuster exhibition, Christian Dior: Designer of Dreams, you can see the dresses worn by Princess Margaret, ballet dancer Margot Fonteyn, and several more recent designs shown off on the red carpet by actresses including Jennifer Lawrence.

“Christian Dior only designed for his ‘maison’ for ten years (owing to his sudden death in 1957),” said Oriole Cullen, the curator of the V&A’s biggest fashion exhibition since its blockbuster Alexander McQueen show, Savage Beauty, in 2015.

“Still, his name is known all over the world, speaking to the legacy of the six talented designers that have carried the name forward,” she added, referring to the half-dozen artistic directors that have succeeded Dior, including Yves Saint Laurent, Marc Bohan, Raf Simons, Gianfranco Ferre, and, most strikingly, John Galliano, who was fired from Dior in 2011, after being caught on film shouting “I love Hitler,” and anti-Semitic slurs. (He is now creative director of Maison Margiela.)

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‘Life Has Changed Very Dramatically.’ Meet the ‘Fiji Water Girl’ Who Became the Star of the 2019 Golden Globes

Kelleth Cuthbert is having a pretty good week. In just a couple of hours, the Los Angeles-based model became the Internet crowned Fiji water girl sensation for holding water bottles at the 76th Golden Globes. But if you’ve been on social media recently, you already know that.

Pictures of the “Fiji water girl” in the background of celebrity red carpet photos have been circulating at an impressive pace since Sunday’s broadcast. Though she was just doing her job as one of Fiji’s brand ambassadors at the event (responsible for keeping all the stars hydrated), she ended up in photos with Tony Shalhoub, Idris Elba, Dakota Fanning and even Heidi Klum lovingly kissing her fiancé, which Cuthbert tells TIME was one of her favorite photos of the night.

“I’ve worked with Fiji before, but this has never happened,” Cuthbert says.

Originally from Toronto, Canada, Cuthbert has been working as a fashion model and commercial actress for twelve years, so she is certainly no stranger to Hollywood. “I think it’s fun to work the red carpet and look at the fashion, but I never get starstruck,” she says.

Cuthbert says her Instagram following was around 53,000 before Sunday’s event. At press time, she has 189,000 followers—more than 256 percent increase. Though she’s still working on trucking through all of the emails, messages and comments she’s gotten since the Globes, she’s already been featured on the Late Late Show with James Corden.

And she’s gotten her fair share of marriage proposals on Instagram.

But because Cuthbert herself has gone viral, Fiji inevitably has, too. This marketing ploy was more than successful: Marketing analytics firm Apex Marketing Group estimates that Fiji would have had to spend $ 12 million for the same amount of brand exposure. But this wasn’t the first time the brand has worked with models in a similar fashion. Cuthbert has worked with Fiji at other events, including the Emmys. This one, luckily for both the brand and for the model, just happened to have some incredible photo-ops.

Despite working in the industry for more than a decade, Cuthbert isn’t quite used to her newfound fame. “Just a couple days ago, I was walking my dog with no makeup and sweatpants on—maybe even had my pajamas on. Life has changed very dramatically,” she says. But as for what’s next, she’s excited. “I just have to sift through everything and figure out what offers are good, but I definitely would love to do more acting, more modeling, and just to be really busy—really productive.”


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Rosario Dawson On Staying Healthy, Making Deals In DMs & How Motherhood Changed Her Life | PeopleTV

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How 2018 Changed the Film Industry

2018 has been a transformative year for film, with social and political movements, technological leaps, and new approaches to marketing and distribution fundamentally changing the industry. With the following having far-reaching consequences for how movies are made and what movies are made, as well as how we watch them.

The Netflix Paradox

Super Bowl Sunday is now as much about advertising as it is sport. With movie studios spending millions (and MILLIONS) airing trailers during the game’s ad breaks. But this year was different. As a trailer for The Cloverfield Paradox — featuring the first footage we’d seen from the film — screened early on. And concluded with the words “Coming very soon.”

They weren’t lying. Because as soon as the Super Bowl was over, the third film in the Cloverfield franchise dropped on Netflix. In a move that was deemed “unprecedented,” “groundbreaking” and “a game-changer” by both filmmakers and commentators.

The launch certainly shook things up, with Twitter practically melting down at the prospect of a new JJ Abrams-produced film being available in a matter of hours. The buzz making the launch a marketing masterstroke.

Unfortunately, the actual movie was pretty bad. And with Netflix keeping their cards close to their chest regarding numbers, we have no idea how many times the film was actually viewed. But in terms of disrupting the release schedule, and changing the way in which films are both distributed and promoted, the launch of The Cloverfield Paradox was huge.

Crazy Rich Representation

2018 was an important year for representation, in terms of both race, and sexuality. Disney kicked off the year with Black Panther, the first MCU movie to be fronted by an African-American. And the film became a bona fide phenomenon, grossing more than any other superhero movie ever at the U.S. box office, and grossing $ 1.3bn globally. Making Black Panther the ninth most successful film of all time.

Romantic comedy Crazy Rich Asians hit screens in August, and became the sleeper hit of the summer. Based on the novel of the same name by Kevin Kwan — and revolving around an American professor discovering that his girlfriend’s Singapore family are “crazy rich” — the film grossed a whopping $ 238m worldwide, from a budget of just $ 30m.

Being the first release by a major studio to focus on a gay teen romance, Love, Simon was a more modest, but no less important success. Based on a bestselling book by Becky Albertalli, and directed by Arrowverse mastermind Greg Berlanti, the movie followed closeted Simon Spier’s efforts to figure out the identity of the classmate with whom he’s fallen in love online, while also trying to avoid being outed by a blackmailer. The film cost $ 17m, and made $ 66m.

Those numbers don’t lie, proving that audiences want to see more diversity and better representation onscreen, and hopefully paving the way for true change.

Cinemas Become a Quiet Place

Movie theatres can be grim venues, filled with the noise of chatter, phones and rustling wrappers and popcorn. But this year, for 90 minutes, audiences were forced into silence. Thanks to A Quiet Place.

The hugely successful horror film — directed by John Krasinski — takes place in a post-apocalyptic world where a family is forced to live in silence to avoid being eaten by noise-sensitive monsters.

Meaning that — to fully appreciate the conceit — audiences also had to sit in silence. With that collective effort to stay quiet heightening the reality, increasing the tension, and helping to make A Quiet Place maybe the most effective horror movie of 2018. And the best thing to happen in movie theatres for years.

The Inclusion Rider Shakes Things Up


Frances McDormand in Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri, for which she won the Oscar.

When Frances McDormand said the words “Inclusion Rider” during her Three Billboards Oscar acceptance speech in March, it sent something of a shock-wave through the film industry. Speaking to press backstage, she explained, “It means that you can ask for and/or demand at least 50% diversity, not only in casting, but also [in] the crew.”

Media researcher Stacy Smith came up with the concept — alongside civil rights attorney Kalpana Kotagal and producer and actor Fanshen Cox DiGiovanni — to ensure proper representation for women, people of colour, the LGBTQ community, and those with disabilities. It was outlined in a Hollywood Reporter op-ed in 2014, while Dr. Smith described it during a 2016 TED Talk thusly…

“The typical feature film has about 40 or 50 speaking characters in it. I would argue that only eight to 10 of those characters are actually relevant to the story. The remaining 30 or so roles, there’s no reason why those minor roles can’t match or reflect the demography of where the story is taking place. An equity rider by an A-lister in their contract can stipulate that those roles reflect the world in which we actually live.”

And while change like this — behind the camera as well as in front of it — takes time, there’s already been movement within the industry. Industry bigwig Ari Emanuel introduced the idea at WME, asking his agents to support the concept by explaining its benefits to the firm’s clients when negotiating deals. And Warner Bros. became the first major Hollywood studio to adopt the policy. Kicking off with Michael B. Jordan movie Just Mercy.

“Inclusivity has always been a no-brainer for me, especially as a black man in this business,” Jordan explained in a statement. “It wasn’t until Frances McDormand spoke the two words that set the industry on fire — inclusion rider — that I realised we could standardise the practice.”

He added, “This is a legacy-bearing moment.”

Peter Jackson Revolutionises the Documentary

They Shall Not Grow Old was a labour of love for director Peter Jackson. A WWI documentary about British soldiers fighting on the Western Front, Jackson took 100-year-old footage and modernised it by colourising, constructing missing frames, and employing lip-readers to figure out what the soldiers were saying, and voice actors to bring their words to life.

As Jackson explained at the film’s London premiere: “I wanted to reach through the fog of time and pull these men into the modern world so they can regain their humanity once more.”


Peter Jackson’s film was a towering technical achievement.

The results are jaw-dropping, the combination of ancient filmmaking techniques with modern technology reaching through that fog, and giving voice to a generation that’s long gone.

Jackson believes that this is just the beginning. They Shall Not Grow Old features footage supplied by the Imperial War Museum, and there are archives all over the world filled with film that could benefit from the same process. Bringing the past to life so audiences can witness history as never before.

Fandom Champions #BallsForBoobs

OK, this one might not have changed the film industry. Yet. But it’s a campaign that we’ve kicked off here at Fandom, and an issue that’s close to Editor Kim Taylor-Foster’s heart…

“For too long, female nudity has outweighed male nudity on screen – not just in the volume of women we see fully naked or partially nude but also in the way female versus male bodies are shot,” Taylor-Foster explains. “#BallsForBoobs seeks to balance that inequality. I’m all for nudity – we should all be far less prudish – but that means that alongside freeing the nipple, we need to free the ‘nad too. Tit for tat and all that.

“#BallsForBoobs proposes that for every bare breast seen on screen, we get a naked nut-sack too. Matching sack for every rack shown is a step closer to eliminating objectification, and a win for equality.”

You can see our first steps towards making #BallsForBoobs happen in the Outlaw King video above and Blockers interview below…

Stuff We Liked That Everyone Else Seemed to Hate in 2018

The post How 2018 Changed the Film Industry appeared first on FANDOM.

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#MeToo One Year Later: Has Your Workplace Culture Changed?

About 10 years ago, Tarana Burke launched the Me Too movement—an anti-sexual assault initiative launched to support survivors of sexual abuse, assault, and harassment. For a while, the movement quietly persisted  But in 2017, multiple sexual assault and harassment allegations against Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein reignited the #MeToo movement and sparked chaos, conversation, and change across workplaces around the world.

To gain some insight into how the #MeToo movement has changed workplace culture, we interviewed Sarah Morgan, the senior human resources director for SafeStreetsUSA and founder of BuzzARooney L.L.C., a Human Resources Management, and leadership consulting company.

As an HR professional, how has #MeToo impacted workplace culture? 

In a way that didn’t exist before, the #MeToo movement created more awareness about the spectrum of sexual harassment in the workplace. We used to think these incidents were uncommon and happened infrequently. #MeToo flipped these misconceptions on their head and showed sexual harassment as commonplace and rampant, which it’s been for a long time. I have yet to meet a woman who does not have at least one #MeToo story from their career, from early professional women to women nearing retirement. The #MeToo movement no longer allowed companies to pretend like sexual harassment were someone else’s problem that happened in an isolated vacuum. #MeToo let the world know that sexual harassment in the workplace happens to all of us in one form or another.

Because of #MeToo, many of my clients and colleagues have reached out to me for guidance on how to update their orientation and annual training for employees and managers. Men seem afraid of saying or doing something that will be misconstrued as harassment or discrimination. Women seem more hyper-aware as events occur and more willing to speak up than in the past. These are both good things. We cannot eradicate harassment and discrimination without awareness and active participation from men, especially those in positions of authority and influence, which equals power. We also need women who are both willing to come forward with the stories of their experiences and willing to believe and support other women who choose to speak up.

In my work environment, I ensured our workplace harassment training for both employees and managers were very comprehensive, so we didn’t have to change much of our current practices because of #MeToo.

Why might women be afraid to speak up about harassment at work?

Women are afraid to speak up because they do not think they’ll be believed, and they do not trust action will be taken to stop the issue and/or to protect them from retaliation after the issue is reported.

As much as HR tries to protect confidentiality, it is not uncommon for word to get out and become office gossip when a claim is filed. The same victim shaming that happens to women who are victims of sexual assault happens to women who are victims of sexual harassment in the workplace. What you wore and how you behaved and what you did/didn’t do and how you could have avoided or prevented the incident(s) all impact how you’re viewed and judged both by the company and by your peers. No woman wants to go through all of that just to keep getting a check at a job that’s only paying her $ 0.50 – 0.85 for every white male $ 1. Many women choose not to report and instead they just seek work elsewhere. Once they are out of the environment, only a fraction of women report the issue or file a lawsuit.

Can you explain HR’s role in handling employee harassment claims?

HR is responsible for educating employees and managers about what is and what is not harassment in the workplace as well as the actions one should take when they are a victim or a witness to harassment in the workplace.

When an issue is brought to our attention, HR is responsible for conducting a thorough investigation to either substantiate or refute the claimant’s version of the events. During an investigation, HR will speak with and get written statements from witnesses, and review evidence, such as timesheets, emails, video and phone recordings, chat and text messages, social media messages, etc. After everything has been reviewed, HR will make recommendations for corrective action; this includes discipline up to termination and sometimes additional training for other employees who need remedial or refresher instruction. Corrective action may also include changes in schedule, supervisor, or work area to limit interactions between the parties going forward.

It is a difficult role to balance because what the complainant wants does not always match what is in the best interest of the company.

We have to balance the needs and rights of everyone involved, not just the complainant. Sometimes this means a form of corrective action other than termination for the person accused of harassment where the evidence or the severity of the issue does not support termination. HR often feels between a rock and hard place because of this.

Many HR professionals find we are unsupported by other members of management in our recommendations to have zero tolerance toward sexual harassment. I’ve been in this place at several times in my career; I can say it is awful to feel incapable of bringing some measure of justice to a person who already feels powerless. I am glad for the #MeToo movement because it makes companies think more critically about their decisions and the implications. #MeToo is forcing companies to live up to the values they espouse surrounding fairness and equity and inclusive workplaces that are free from harassment and bullying.

When we are focused on cultivating safe spaces where employees can be both creative and accountable, companies thrive and flourish and don’t fear the #MeToo movement as a threat to success.

The post #MeToo One Year Later: Has Your Workplace Culture Changed? appeared first on Black Enterprise.

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Cohen believed Trump would pardon him, but then things changed

Michael Cohen, the former personal attorney for President Donald Trump who is now a key witness in special counsel Robert Mueller’s Russia investigation, was under the impression Trump would offer him a pardon in exchange for staying on message in support of the President in discussions with federal prosecutors, according to two sources.


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A dog changed this man’s life, then he made the most life-affirming Netflix show of 2018

Netflix dogs documentary

Glen Zipper had a life-changing moment back in 2003, when he was working as a criminal prosecutor and somewhat adrift, not happy with his career. He met a dog — a skinny canine named Anthony, with patches of hair missing that got taken to a local shelter. Anthony never left his mind, from the minute Glen first laid eyes on him.

He ended up calling the shelter to check in on him, found out he was due to be euthanized, so the then-prosecutor rushed to the shelter, and everything changed. Inspired by the volunteers taking care of dogs, he decided to become one himself. He started volunteering, and his newfound love of man’s best friend eventually gave him an idea. In a world as divided as the one we live in today, why not tell a series of stories about one of the few things everyone can agree on — namely, how much we all love our fluffy, four-legged companions.

Continue reading…

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A dog changed this man’s life, then he made the most life-affirming Netflix show of 2018 originally appeared on BGR.com on Sat, 17 Nov 2018 at 15:45:53 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.


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Bethesda Changed the Way Avalanche Did Production for ‘Rage 2’

Sometime next year we’ll all get to play Rage 2, a frantic mix of Mad Max vehicle combat and Bulletstorm execution combos. It’s an odd project that probably has more DNA from other franchises than its own — and that’s a good thing. While the first Rage was forgettable, the second looks much better.

We’ll have to play it before we know for sure, but in the meantime we were able to speak to Tim Willits, studio director at id Software, about the knowledge sharing between id Software and Avalanche Studios – one the grandfather of traditional level design, the latter more versed in open worlds – and also how Bethesda checks three key metrics at each milestone to make sure targets are being hit without resorting to crunch.


Tim Willits id Software Bethesda headshot
Tim Willits, studio director at id Software.

FANDOM: We imagine being a level designer under you is both enlightening and challenging, having one of the people who helped create level design as we know it as your boss.

Tim Willits: I love level design. Because I feel level design is kinda where the rubber meets the road in terms of gameplay.

You know I still, when I get the chance, help some of the younger level designers with their levels. It’s really rewarding. Like when I go to Sweden, and I meet with Avalanche on Rage 2. The level designers – they’re so funny – they call it Willits University. So I get them all in a room, and bring up the whiteboard, and I’m like “Okay! Let’s talk about corners…This is a typical corner. But if you add a cutout here, and move the wall here, there’s a little extra gameplay. Most people turn right here… And here’s how to draw attention to something… ” So there are some techniques and things I’ve learned over the years that I try to teach people.


Rage 2 flying hovering mutant enemy
Airborne enemies will add some verticality.

In the old days, when it was just like one or two people working on levels, we did everything. But nowadays level design is kind of a group effort. Where you have a blackout person, and you have a lighting person, an environment art person… So levels are far better now than when I was younger, but they require a much more concerted effort, and better communication between each person who adds to the level at some point.

But I try to work with the kids as much as I can. Newer designers. I love it. Some people just have a gift. Some of the new folks we have on the team are so good. They’re far better than I ever was. It’s fun working with them.


Convoy Rage 2 attack
The Mad Max vibes are not exactly hidden.

You were involved in the earliest days of FPS level design, going from the technological innovation to perfecting how it should be used. Now that open worlds are a more mature technology, what does perfection in open world level design look like to you?

I have learned a lot about that. I discovered that I did know know as much as I thought I did about level design. Before I started working on this.

For example, I’d sit down with the Avalanche designers. And we’d be talking about a mission. And I would go straight into classic id Software mode. And be like “Okay, you start here, we go here, this guy jumps out, and this explodes, and this opens…” And the guys are looking at me, and say “Okay, what happens if you drive a tank through the back door?” And I’m like “Oh, I didn’t think of that.”

So I’ve definitely learned to approach level design differently. So in an open world, it’s the robustness. It’s creating fun play spaces that you can approach from any direction. But then also, you need AI which is smart. Which is way harder than you think. Open world AI is so difficult to program. Because the player can do anything, and approach from anywhere. And when you play Rage 2, you’ll see where we try to push the player in certain directions, that’s the id Software coming out.

So perfect level design is robust enough to approach from anywhere, the AI is smart enough to react, and play spaces that are fun and exciting from any direction.


Giant mutant football helmet miniboss
Things you shoot in this game tend to blow up.

It also has to double as a level for vehicle combat and infantry combat. Outside spaces are used for both, is that right?

So one of the things we struggled with in Rage… We had some fun things in Rage. We had some great levels, we had some great driving. But they were all disconnected. Which kind of made the game feel like separate pieces. Whereas in Rage 2, we’re in a complete open space.

And obviously yes, things like the tunnel, the sewers, there’s a main entrance that you go in. And when you go in there, you’re going to have to feel like you’re really in that area.

But then you just walk out back, and you get your stuff, and you’ve gotta find your car, and you talk to the person that sent you there. Whereas then we have some more areas that are more open and accessible from all directions. So I think we have a good mix. It flows well, nothing feels jarring. There’s no level loads, which is nice.

That’s I think the biggest issue with the first game, all the level loads and all the pieces that didn’t feel like they fit together.


Flexing bandit punk enemy in Rage 2 spiked hair
Using different moves will help your combat combo, similar to Bulletstorm.

The hot topic at the moment is crunch, and some Rockstar apologists point to the attention to detail in Red Dead Redemption 2 as a reason why crunch is a “necessary evil.” Do you think any game could be special in that way, or is crunch just a failure of management planning?

At Bethesda we try to have regular check-ins where we check scope, time, and resources. Because you know every game you start with has more scope than you can ever do. But at each point, along the way, we figure out if we’re still good on all of those.

So we’ve applied those techniques to working with Avalanche, so yes they have their own sprints, and their own scrums, and their own internal development, and they’re very organised. But we had to really change the way they do production, we had to make sure they hit big milestones.

Whenever we have a big sprint, we have a thing we’ll do on Thursdays where we’ll have taco day. We’ll line those up, with our sprints. We have the big team meeting, where the departments showcase what they’ve been working on in the sprint. Then we talk about what the next sprint’s going to be, and then we’ll go eat tacos. Or we’ll have cupcakes or something.

We often give our managers a little leeway there, if you work really hard here we’ll give them a little more time off there. But we try hard not to have death marches, if you like to call them that, in our scheduling, and our check-ins, and it’s a whole thing, it’s a multi-year process that Bethesda has done really well with.


‘Red Dead Redemption 2’ and the Myth of Necessary Crunch

The post Bethesda Changed the Way Avalanche Did Production for ‘Rage 2’ appeared first on FANDOM.

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Idris Elba Reveals How Fatherhood Changed Him | Sexiest Man Alive 2018 | PeopleTV

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By wearing these jeans, Meghan changed the life of 30 women

While some people might think the cost of Meghan Markle’s Australian wardrobe might have been high, you can’t deny that the Duchess is great at showing her support for emerging brands and designers.

Plus, Meghan is an advocate of sustainable and ethical fashion, which she proved by wearing one particular pair of jeans more than five times on the tour.

Said jeans are by Australian brand Outland Denim, who use organic cotton and natural vegetable dyes to make their jeans.

View this post on Instagram

What a week for Outland Denim! Never could we have imagined the overwhelming support shown to our brand, our team and our mission since the Duchess of Sussex wore our Harriet jean not once but multiple times during her stay in Australia for the Invictus Games. This quiet, dignified, but determined support for our brand – and the humanitarian cause it represents – means the world to us, to our beautiful seamstresses, and to the 15 young women who are now feeling the empowerment of employment thanks to the "Markle Effect"! Meghan's modelling of positive change through the power of fashion sets a precedent for all other people with a public profile. Now to enjoy watching the Royal couple in New Zealand along with the rest of the world! 🌎 #madedifferent #zeroexploitation . . . . . 📸 Annette Dew/Newspix, Samir Hussein/Getty images

A post shared by Outland Denim (@outlanddenim) on

But more importantly, by wearing them, Meghan changed the life of 30 women. You see Outland Denim employ women in Cambodia who have been enslaved or sexually exploited.

Once the Duchess was spotted wearing the black Harriet jeans, these sold out within 48 hours, resulting in a massive 640% increase in sales.

Outland Denim has said that as a result, it can employ up to 30 more women.

In an Instagram post, it said, ‘Thanks to the Duchess’ choice in denim, we’re pleased to announce that it will be possible to employ a further 15 to 30 seamstresses in our Cambodian production house in the coming weeks, and the recruitment process has already begun’.

Another one read, ‘This quiet, dignified, but determined support for our brand – and the humanitarian cause it represents – means the world to us, to our beautiful seamstresses, and to the 15 young women who are now feeling the empowerment of employment.’

Excellent news indeed.

The post By wearing these jeans, Meghan changed the life of 30 women appeared first on Marie Claire.

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Spencer Matthews: Becoming a dad has changed my outlook

OHMYGOSSIP — Spencer Matthews admits becoming a dad has changed his outlook on life.
The 29-year-old TV star – who has two-month-old son Theodore with his wife Vogue Williams – has revealed how parenthood has transformed his perspective of the world.
He shared: “I mean, life has a whole new meaning as any parent will tell you. It’s wonderful.”
Spencer explained that Theodore has quickly become the priority for the loved-up duo.
He said: “Our priorities have changed now that we have Theodore, it’s kind of less about us and more about him, which is completely in line with our opinions about how to be good parents.”
Spencer also revealed that he and his wife are already looking forward to having another baby.
He told MailOnline: “Vogue and I are very much looking forward to starting our family and we feel complete and delighted with the way everything has gone. We’ve very much looking forward to expanding on our family.”
Prior to giving birth, Vogue revealed she felt ready to become a mother and was looking forward to the challenge of parenthood.
The Irish star – who suffered with morning sickness for the first three months of her pregnancy – managed to continue working right up until her due date, which she felt was linked to her commitment to staying active.
She said: “I’m totally ready for it. Physically I’m feeling really good.
“I’ve been so lucky with my pregnancy. I had quite bad morning sickness and heartburn but, for the most part, I’ve been okay. I’m still able to work, but I have to nap every day. I’m so excited, I just want the birth to happen.”

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This teen’s body was ‘bending by the hour.’ His 18th surgery changed his life

John Sarcona was at a baseball game when his mother Joanne found the bloodied T-shirts in his laundry hamper. His bedding was bloody too, and she knew something had gone terribly wrong.


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A chart shows how everything has changed since Trump became president

Since Donald Trump won the presidency, he has presided over both one the most tumultuous politics in recent memory as well as the best economy the country has seen in years.
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Jon’s Final Words Changed Everything on ‘Million Little Things’

'A Million Little Things' REcap
David Giuntoli and Stephanie Szostak on ABC’s ‘A Million Little Things.’ ABC/Jeff Weddell

Moving on isn’t easy – in fact, it may seem impossible for the Dixon family. Jon’s (Ron Livingston) wife, kids and best friends attempted to move forward during the Wednesday, October 3, episode of A Million Little Things. While it’s not easy, at least they have each other.

The episode picked up the day after the funeral, with everyone gathering at Delilah (Stephanie Szostak)’s house for breakfast, to make sure she wasn’t alone. However, the tension with Eddie (David Giuntoli) was still in the air, and they struggled to keep it hidden throughout the episode. It didn’t help that it was Sophie’s father-daughter recital and her dad had just died. When she needed someone to stop in, she chose Eddie.

Of course, Delilah thought it was a horrible idea, especially after she found Eddie’s necklace in Jon’s bedside table. Clearly, he had known about their affair. Eddie didn’t want to step aside because he felt he had to be there for Sophie. However, he froze just before it was time to perform, passing the baton to Rome (Romany Malco). Rome, who has continued to suffer with his own suicidal thoughts and even went back to the spot Jon took his own life, stepped in perfectly. It may have been because Jon had been coming to him for help … or he was teaching him the dance moves because he had planned the suicide.

While waiting for the dance to begin, Eddie listened to Jon’s voicemail (even though he told his friends Jon didn’t leave one). “Hey it’s Jon. I was hoping to speak to you, not just leave you a message,” his best friend said on the message. “I just need you to do me a favor: love each other.”

However, that wasn’t Jon’s only surprise. He had also left the restaurant to not just Regina (Christina Moses) but also Delilah – something his wife didn’t even know, even though he’d been talking about buying the restaurant for a year. He assistant Ashley (Christina Ochoa) played coy when delivering the news, assuming that she had known. Little did she know, Ashley had opened the folder that Jon had left to his wife, the folder she never even gave to Delilah.

Inside was a goodbye letter that included the following phrases: “There’s an envelope behind the painting; Ashley had no idea I was going to do this; ask her what she’s doing, as I don’t want you; doesn’t know what you know, she will be protected.” Ashley found Jon’s life insurance plan behind the painting, which revealed his primary beneficiaries were Eddie, Rome, Gary (James Roday) and a mystery woman named Barbara Morgan.

'A Million Little Things' REcap
Allison Miller and James Roday on ABC’s ‘A Million Little Things.’ ABC/Jeff Weddell

Elsewhere in the episode, Gary and Maggie (Allison Miller) continued to get closer while she pushed away a man from her past — maybe even a husband? — and admitted that even though she had cancer for the second time (something she’s still hiding from Gary), she’s happier than she’s ever been.

When Gary wasn’t with her, he was spending time with Jon’s son, Danny, who was questioning his sexuality and wondering if he was to blame for his dad’s suicide. In a touching moment, Gary told Danny that if his dad did know that his son was gay, he would love him even more, just like Gary did.

A Million Little Things airs on ABC Mondays at 10 p.m. ET.

If you or someone you know is in emotional distress or considering suicide, call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK (8255).

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Holy Roller at 40: How a Raiders’ fumble-turned-TD changed the NFL

Forty years ago, because of a fantastic finish between the Chargers and Raiders, the rules about fumbling the ball forward were changed.
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