U.S. NEWS’ BEST HOSPITALS 2018-19: Robotic mitral valve surgery at Weill Cornell

Just one day after undergoing open-heart surgery last May, Dr. Kenneth W. Holloway was discharged from NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell Medical Center.

He walked out with a bottle of strong pain relievers, acetaminophen and five small incisions, each about the size of the top of a pencil eraser.

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From Craig Mack to Chris Cornell: A Requiem for Mid-‘90s Music

Photo Illustration by Elizabeth Brockway/The Daily Beast

Former Bad Boy star Craig Mack’s death on March 12, reportedly from congestive heart failure at the age of 46, was a shock to so many fans of the Brentwood-born rapper who’d shot to stardom in 1994 on the success of his single “Flava In Ya Ear” and its classic remix. His former producer Alvin Toney and longtime friend, fellow hip-hop veteran Erick Sermon, shared that Mack had heart problems that finally claimed his life but he’d spent his last years shunning the spotlight and keeping his problems away from media attention.

The death of Craig Mack joins what seems like a litany of fallen artists who defined so much of mid-‘90s music. For a certain age group, 1994-1996 were epochal years—that period when genres like “alternative rock” and “gangsta rap” were firmly set in the mainstream, having broke through big in the early 1990s. R&B had undergone a metamorphosis, as well, with the decline of new jack swing and the rise of an even more street-oriented sensibility via urban acts like Mary J. Blige and Jodeci. But if you remember those years vividly, it’s hard not to feel a part of that era has been gutted by early death. Hell, that period was defined by martyrdom, to a certain degree.

Of course, the biggest popular music-related story of 1994 was the April 5 suicide of Kurt Cobain that year. The Nirvana frontman had spent more than two years as the most hyper-scrutinized rocker on the planet, and the pressures of fame and his own deteriorating emotional and physical state led him down a dark path that ended in heroin and a heartbreaking note to his fans. The suicide came just a few months after the release of In Utero, Nirvana’s third album, and their soon-to-be-acclaimed live album MTV Unplugged In New York would be released in November. With music videos for songs like “All Apologies” and “Heart-Shaped Box” in steady rotation on MTV, Cobain’s death at 27 became a flashpoint for rock music and youth culture. While at the time, he seemed to be among the last of the rock stars that truly mattered, in the years since, so many of his contemporaries have also left this world far too soon, and Cobain is now one of several of the lost voices of the mid-1990s.

Read more at The Daily Beast.

The Daily Beast — Entertainment

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From Craig Mack to Chris Cornell: A Requiem for Mid-‘90s Music

Photo Illustration by Elizabeth Brockway/The Daily Beast

Former Bad Boy star Craig Mack’s death on March 12, reportedly from congestive heart failure at the age of 46, was a shock to so many fans of the Brentwood-born rapper who’d shot to stardom in 1994 on the success of his single “Flava In Ya Ear” and its classic remix. His former producer Alvin Toney and longtime friend, fellow hip-hop veteran Erick Sermon, shared that Mack had heart problems that finally claimed his life but he’d spent his last years shunning the spotlight and keeping his problems away from media attention.

The death of Craig Mack joins what seems like a litany of fallen artists who defined so much of mid-‘90s music. For a certain age group, 1994-1996 were epochal years—that period when genres like “alternative rock” and “gangsta rap” were firmly set in the mainstream, having broke through big in the early 1990s. R&B had undergone a metamorphosis, as well, with the decline of new jack swing and the rise of an even more street-oriented sensibility via urban acts like Mary J. Blige and Jodeci. But if you remember those years vividly, it’s hard not to feel a part of that era has been gutted by early death. Hell, that period was defined by martyrdom, to a certain degree.

Of course, the biggest popular music-related story of 1994 was the April 5 suicide of Kurt Cobain that year. The Nirvana frontman had spent more than two years as the most hyper-scrutinized rocker on the planet, and the pressures of fame and his own deteriorating emotional and physical state led him down a dark path that ended in heroin and a heartbreaking note to his fans. The suicide came just a few months after the release of In Utero, Nirvana’s third album, and their soon-to-be-acclaimed live album MTV Unplugged In New York would be released in November. With music videos for songs like “All Apologies” and “Heart-Shaped Box” in steady rotation on MTV, Cobain’s death at 27 became a flashpoint for rock music and youth culture. While at the time, he seemed to be among the last of the rock stars that truly mattered, in the years since, so many of his contemporaries have also left this world far too soon, and Cobain is now one of several of the lost voices of the mid-1990s.

Read more at The Daily Beast.

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SPECIAL NEWS BULLETIN:

http://www.acrx.org -As millions of Americans strive to deal with the economic downturn,loss of jobs,foreclosures,high cost of gas,and the rising cost of prescription drug cost. Charles Myrick ,the President of American Consultants Rx, announced the re-release of the American Consultants Rx community service project which consist of millions of free discount prescription cards being donated to thousands of not for profits,hospitals,schools,churches,etc. in an effort to assist the uninsured,under insured,and seniors deal with the high cost of prescription drugs.-American Consultants Rx -Pharmacy Discount Network News

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Chris Cornell, Dave Grohl Donate Items to Unique Addiction Recovery Fund

Chris Cornell, Elton John, Dave Grohl, Iggy Pop and former Nirvana bassist Krist Novoselic are among the high-profile musicians who donated personal items used to create a unique line of timepieces, the Rock LTD Collection,

This article originally appeared on www.rollingstone.com: Chris Cornell, Dave Grohl Donate Items to Unique Addiction Recovery Fund

Rolling Stone Latest Music News

ENTERTAINMENT UPDATE:

Chris Cornell Music Therapy Program Established in Seattle

The Seattle-based nonprofit Childhaven announced the establishment of the Chris Cornell Music Therapy Program Thursday in honor of what would have been the late musician's 53rd birthday. Cornell's widow, Vicky Cornell, committed $ 100,000 to Childhaven to

This article originally appeared on www.rollingstone.com: Chris Cornell Music Therapy Program Established in Seattle

Rolling Stone Latest Music News

ENTERTAINMENT UPDATE:

Toxicology Report Reveals Chris Cornell Had Prescription Drugs In His System

Chris Cornell, the former Soundgarden frontman who died last month, reportedly had prescription drugs in his system at the time of his death, according to a toxicology report obtained by TMZ. 

The report states Cornell had Naloxone (an opiate antidote), Butalbital (sedative), Pseudoephedrine (decongestant) and barbiturates in his system at the time of his death. It also states he appeared to have taken four 1mg tablets of Lorazepam (Ativan). 

Cornell reportedly had four needle puncture wounds on his left arm, per the report, though it is believed they came from the EMTs who administered the Naloxone in an attempt to counteract the overdose. 

“Many of us who know Chris well, noticed that he wasn’t himself during his final hours and that something was very off. We have learned from this report that several substances were found in his system. After so many years of sobriety, this moment of terrible judgment seems to have completely impaired and altered his state of mind,” Cornell’s wife Vicky told TMZ in a statement.

She continued, “Something clearly went terribly wrong and my children and I are heartbroken and are devastated that this moment can never be taken back. We very much appreciate all of the love we have received during this extremely difficult time and are dedicated to helping others in preventing this type of tragedy.”

Cornell died last month while he was still on tour with Soundgarden. His death was ruled a suicide. 

In a statement at the time, the singer’s representative Brian Bumbery called the rocker’s death “sudden and unexpected.”

According to sources who spoke to TMZ, Vicky believes her husband was too high to realize the extent of his actions and did not mean to take his own life

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