Girl dies after severe allergic reaction to toothpaste ingredient

A heartbroken California mother is stressing the importance of reading ingredient labels after her 7-year-old daughter suffered a fatal allergic reaction allegedly triggered by her new prescription toothpaste. Monique Altamirano, said her daughter, Denise Saldate, had a dairy allergy, and after years of never seeing milk ingredients listed on toothpaste labels, didn’t check before handing her…
News | New York Post

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College student dies after falling off cliff while posing for a photo

A 20-year-old college student died when she tumbled 100-feet off an Arkansas cliff while posing for a photo, according to reports. Briar Cliff University junior Andrea Norton was re-positioning herself for a picture Saturday when she fell from Hawksbill Crag, a popular hiking destination near Jasper, the Sioux City Journal reported. The environmental science major…
News | New York Post

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Bud Konheim, Nicole Miller’s Chief Executive Officer, Dies at 84 After Biking Fall

Nicole Miller’s longtime business partner Bud Konheim died Saturday, after injuries sustained from a bicycle accident in Connecticut.
Konheim, chief executive officer of Nicole Miller Inc, died at the age of 84 at Norwalk Hospital in Norwalk, Conn., Saturday. The cause of death was not immediately known, Miller said.
Services will be held Friday at the Frank E. Campbell Funeral Chapel in New York City.
Konheim and Miller have been one of the fashion industry’s longest-standing power couples, having worked together for more than 40 years. “He always said, ‘I’ve never had a bad day.’ He loved life and he loved his job.” Miller said. “He just always had this positive attitude. He just loved what he did. He loved the business.”
The irrepressible straight talker Konheim was a big picture thinker who examined the fashion industry from a mile-high perspective. Rather than talk up his own company’s success or most recent news, Konheim was more inclined to first discuss at great length why old-school retail models and other aging business practices weren’t working. Rather than bemoan the state of things, Konheim would fire off a litany of possible solutions. An early adopter of technology for a variety of elements of sales and design,

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Agnès Varda, Leading Light of French New Wave, Dies at 90

Agnès Varda, a leading light of the French New Wave who directed such films as “Cleo From 5 to 7,” “Vagabond” and “Faces Places,” has died. She was 90. Varda’s death from breast cancer at her Paris home was confirmed Friday by her family. “The filmmaker and artist Agnès Varda died from a cancer at […]

Variety

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5th Grader Dies After Fight At South Carolina School

A fifth grader has died after a fight with a classmate at her school, WGN9 reports.

Raniya Wright ,10, and another 5th grader got into an altercation in class and were eventually separated, but collapsed in the school nurse’s office afterwards. The school says no weapons were involved but her family and the community want more answers about what happened.

WGN9 reports:

The student was airlifted to the Medical University of South Carolina in Charleston after the fight, the district said in an earlier statement.

An autopsy is scheduled for Friday, the sheriff’s office said.

A student has been suspended until an investigation into the incident is completed, school officials said. It’s unclear whether that student was involved in the fight.

School officials have not released more details about the altercation.

“Raniya was a wonderful student. She loved to write, spend time with her friends, play basketball and loved being a big sister. She was actively involved in her church as a junior usher,” the district said in a statement. “She will be missed greatly by her family, friends, and the entire school community.”

“Our entire school district is saddened by this event,” the district said. “It is very difficult to experience the death of a young person.”

No cause of death has yet been determined, but Wright’s mother, Ash Wright says her daughter was bullied and wants answers.

The Colleton County School District released a statement via their Facebook page:

“On March 25, a fifth-grade Forest Hills Elementary School student suffered injuries after a fight occurred in her classroom. School administrators promptly secured the scene, ended the fight and called emergency medical services to the school.”

A GoFundMe account in Raniya’s memory has raised over $ 45,000 for the family.

PHOTO: Wright Family/GoFundMe


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Rock Legend Scott Walker Dies

Rock legend Scott Walker, the star among the popular American music band The Walker Brothers, died at the age of 76.

One of the most enigmatic and influential figures in rock history, Walker was also a producer and composer of uncompromising originality.

Walker’s current record label, 4AD, announced his death. He is survived by his daughter, Lee, and his partner Beverly.

“From teen idol to cul
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Actress Katherine Helmond of TV’s ‘Soap,’ ‘Who’s the Boss?’ dies at 89

Actress Katherine Helmond, a seven-time Emmy Award nominee who played lusty matriarchs on the hit television sitcoms “Soap” and “Who’s the Boss” from the 1970s into the 1990s, died last month at the age of 89, her talent agency said on Friday.
Reuters: People News

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Director Stanley Donen, famed for landmark film ‘Singin’ in the Rain,’ dies at 94

Stanley Donen, the former dancer who directed some of Hollywood’s greatest musicals including Gene Kelly’s landmark “Singin’ in the Rain,” “Seven Brides for Seven Brothers” and “On the Town,” has died at age 94, according to media reports.
Reuters: People News

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WATCH: World News Tonight 02/18/19: US Sailor Kissing Nurse in Famous WWII Photo Dies

More than 40 pushups linked to lower heart disease risk for some; Police in California searching for driver who struck 7-year-old girl
ABC News: World News Tonight

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http://www.acrx.org -As millions of Americans strive to deal with the economic downturn,loss of jobs,foreclosures,high cost of gas,and the rising cost of prescription drug cost. Charles Myrick ,the President of American Consultants Rx, announced the re-release of the American Consultants Rx community service project which consist of millions of free discount prescription cards being donated to thousands of not for profits,hospitals,schools,churches,etc. in an effort to assist the uninsured,under insured,and seniors deal with the high cost of prescription drugs.-American Consultants Rx -Pharmacy Discount Network News

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Lee Radziwill, Jackie Kennedy Onassis’ younger sister, dies at 85

Lee Radziwill, the younger sister of Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis who was witness to history in the “Camelot” White House, married a prince and counted Andy Warhol, Truman Capote and Rudolf Nureyev as friends in a star-studded life, has died at the age of 85, according to U.S. media reports.
Reuters: People News

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Trailblazing Major League Baseball Hall of Famer Frank Robinson Dies at 83

Crowding the plate, fearsome and fearless, Frank Robinson hammered his way into the Hall of Fame.

His legacy, however, was cemented that day in 1975 when he simply stood in the dugout at old Cleveland Stadium — the first black manager in Major League Baseball.

Robinson, the only player to earn the MVP award in both leagues and a Triple Crown winner, died Thursday at 83. He had been in failing health and in hospice care at his home in the Bel Air section of Los Angeles. MLB said he was with family and friends at the time.

“Frank Robinson’s resume in our game is without parallel, a trailblazer in every sense, whose impact spanned generations,” Commissioner Rob Manfred said in a statement.

Robinson hit 586 home runs — he was fourth on the career list behind only Hank Aaron, Babe Ruth and Willie Mays when he retired and now ranks 10th. An MVP with Cincinnati and Baltimore, he led the Orioles to their first World Series championship in 1966.

“Frank Robinson and I were more than baseball buddies. We were friends. Frank was a hard-nosed baseball player who did things on the field that people said could never be done,” Aaron posted on Twitter.

“Baseball will miss a tremendous human being,” he said.

An All-Star outfielder in 12 seasons and a first-ballot selection to Cooperstown, Robinson also was a Rookie of the Year, a Gold Glove outfielder and a bruising runner.

But his place in the sport’s history extended far beyond the batter’s box and basepaths.

Robinson fulfilled his quest to become the first African-American manager in the big leagues when he was hired by the Cleveland Indians. His impact was immediate and memorable.

The Indians opened at home that year and Robinson, still active, batted himself second as the designated hitter. In the first inning, he homered off Doc Medich and the crowd went crazy, cheering the whole April afternoon as Cleveland beat the Yankees.

The Reds, Orioles and Indians have retired his No. 20 and honored him with statues at their stadiums.

Robinson later managed San Francisco, Baltimore and Montreal. He became the first manager of the Washington Nationals after the franchise moved from Montreal for the 2005 season — the Nationals put him in their Ring of Honor.

More than half the major league teams have had black managers since his debut with Cleveland.

Robinson later spent several years working as an executive for MLB and for a time oversaw the annual Civil Rights Game. He advocated for more minorities throughout baseball and worked with former Commissioner Bud Selig to develop the Selig Rule, directing teams to interview at least one minority candidate before hiring a new manager.

For all he did on and off the field, Robinson was presented the Presidential Medal of Freedom by George W. Bush in 2005.

Hall of Fame manager Joe Torre played against and worked with Robinson for years.

“He was a tough nut,” Torre recalled at the owners’ meetings in Orlando, Florida. “He never lost that feistiness, which puts a smile on your face … He was always that guy that commanded a lot of respect and he had a presence about him.”

Born Aug. 21, 1935, in Beaumont, Texas, Robinson attended McClymonds High School in Oakland, California, and was a basketball teammate of future NBA great Bill Russell. But it was on the diamond, rather than court, where fame awaited Robinson.

Former Orioles pitcher Jim Palmer, who also gained first-ballot entry into the Hall, once called Robinson, “the best player I ever saw.”

Starting out in an era when Mays, Aaron, Mickey Mantle and Ted Williams were the big hitters, Robinson more than held his own over 21 seasons — if anything, many who watched Robinson felt he never got his full due as an all-time great. He finished with 1,812 RBIs and hit .294 — he played in the World Series five times, and homered in each of them.

Robinson was the only player to hit a ball completely out of old Memorial Stadium in Baltimore and once connected for grand slams in consecutive innings of a game. But he didn’t just slug away, as evidenced by a .389 on-base average boosted by 1,420 walks against 1,532 strikeouts. Extremely alert on the bases, he had 204 steals.

Robinson played the game with grace, yet was known as fierce competitor who combined hard work with natural talent. He planted himself near the plate, yielding to no pitcher, and didn’t seem to care about being brushed back or getting hit by a pitch 198 times.

“Pitchers did me a favor when they knocked me down,” Robinson said. “It made me more determined. I wouldn’t let that pitcher get me out.”

And opposing pitchers noticed.

“Frank Robinson might have been the best I ever saw at turning his anger into runs. He challenged you physically as soon as he stepped into the batter’s box, with half his body hanging over the plate,” Hall ace Bob Gibson once wrote.

“As a rule, I’m reluctant to express admiration for hitters, but I make an exception for Frank Robinson,” Gibson wrote.

Robinson carried a similar philosophy as a baserunner, unapologetically sliding spikes high whenever necessary.

“The baselines belong to the runner, and whenever I was running the bases, I always slid hard,” Robinson declared.

Robinson broke in with a bang as a 20-year-old big leaguer. He tied the first-year record with 38 home runs for Cincinnati in 1956, scored a league-high 122 times and was voted NL Rookie of the Year.

Robinson was the 1961 NL MVP after batting .323 with 37 homers and 124 RBIs for the pennant-winning Reds, and reached career highs in runs (134) and RBIs (136) in 1962.

All-time hits leader Pete Rose joined the Reds the next year.

“He had a huge influence on me when I first came up in ’63,” Rose told The Associated Press by phone. “Frank was a really aggressive, hard-nosed player, and it rubbed off on everybody. Frank was the one who took me under his wings, so to speak. … Frank consistently talked to me about playing the game the right way,” he said.

Robinson was an All-Star, too, in 1965, but Reds owner Bill DeWitt decided Robinson was an old-ish 30 and time to make a move.

That December, Robinson was the centerpiece in what would ultimately be one of the most lopsided trades in baseball history, going to Baltimore for pitchers Milt Pappas and Jack Baldschun and outfielder Dick Simpson.

Robinson became an instant hit with the Orioles in 1966 as the unanimous AL MVP and a Triple Crown winner.

On May 8, he became the only player ever to hit a home run completely out of Baltimore’s home park, Memorial Stadium. The drive came against Cleveland ace Luis Tiant and the spot where the ball sailed over the left-field wall was marked by a flag that read “HERE” that remained in place until the Orioles left for Camden Yards in 1991.

Robinson batted .316 with 49 home runs and 122 RBIs during his first season in Birdland. He then homered in the first inning of the 1966 World Series opener at Dodger Stadium and capped off the four-game sweep of Los Angeles with another homer off Don Drysdale in a 1-0 win in Game 4.

Robinson hit two home runs against Rose and the Reds in teaming with future Hall of Fame third baseman Brooks Robinson to win another crown for the Orioles in 1970.

All told, Robinson was an All-Star in five of his six seasons with Baltimore, reaching the World Series four times and batting .300 with 179 home runs. The cap on his Cooperstown plaque carries on O’s logo.

Pappas went 30-29 over two-plus seasons with the Reds, Baldschun won one game in 51 appearances over two years with Cincinnati and Simpson hit five home runs as a part-time outfielder for the Reds during two mediocre seasons.

Robinson was traded to the Dodgers before the 1972 season. He played for the California Angels in 1973 and was dealt to Cleveland late in the 1974 season.

His managerial debut came 28 years after Jackie Robinson broke the MLB color barrier as a player.

“Every time I put on this uniform, I think of Jackie Robinson,” Frank Robinson said as he began his new role.

Robinson had coached for the Orioles and worked in their front office when he became their manager in 1988 after the team opened at 0-6. Things didn’t get much better right away as Baltimore went on to lose its first 21 games and finished 54-107. The next season, the O’s went 87-75 and Robinson was voted AL Manager of the Year.

Tough and demanding, he went 1,065-1,176 overall as a big league manager.

A no-nonsense guy, Robinson also had a sharp wit. That served him well in Baltimore where, in addition to being a star right fielder, he was the judge for the team’s Kangaroo Court, assessing playful fines for missing signs, uniform mishaps and other things he deemed as infractions.

At the time, the Orioles had a batboy named Jay Mazzone, whose hands were amputated when he was 2 after a burning accident. Mazzone capably did his job for years with metal hooks and became good friends with Robinson.

Some players, though, initially weren’t sure how to treat the teen.

“Frank Robinson broke the ice,” Mazzone said. “He was running his Kangaroo Court and calling a vote among the players, whether to fine somebody or not.”

“It was either thumbs up or thumbs down,” he recalled. “After the vote, he said, ‘Jay, you’re fined for not voting.’ Everybody laughed. After that, I was treated just like everybody else.”

Survivors include his wife, Barbara, and daughter Nichelle.

There was no immediate word on funeral arrangements.

___

AP Sports Writer Joe Kay and AP Baseball Writer Ronald Blum contributed to this report.

Sports – TIME

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R&B Legend James Ingram Dies

Grammy winning legendary R&B singer and songwriter James Ingram died in Los Angeles at the age of 66.

The news of his death was announced by his friend and creative partner Debbie Allen on Wednesday, but she did not reveal the day and cause.

“I have lost my dearest friend and creative partner James Ingram to the Celestial Choir. He will always be cherished, loved and remembered for his genius, h
RTT – Entertainment Top Story

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Dick Miller dies aged 90

OHMYGOSSIP — Dick Miller has died.
The 90-year-old actor – who was best known for his portrayal of Murray Futterman in 1984 classic horror ‘Gremlins’ – passed away due to natural causes on Wednesday (30.01.19), just a month after celebrating his milestone birthday with a party.
A family spokesperson told The Hollywood Reporter that his wife Lainie, daughter Barbara and granddaughter Autumn were by his side when he died.
His loved ones said in a statement: “His sense of humor and the unique way he looked at the world won him many lifelong friends and worldwide fans.”
The ‘A Bucket of Blood’ star’s career spanned over 60 years, and he had over 175 movie credits and 2,000 TV appearances to his name.
Director Joe Dante – who used Dick in almost every project he worked on, including the ‘Gremlins’ films – hailed his friend as one of his “most treasured collaborators”.
He wrote on Twitter: “I’m devastated to report that one of my best friends and most treasured collaborators has passed away. I “grew up” (kinda) watching Dick Miller in movies from the 50s on and was thrilled to have him in my first movie for @RogerCorman..
“We hit it off and every script thereafter I always looked for a role for Dick–not just because he was my friend but because I loved watching him act! But he leaves behind over 100 performances, a bio & a doc–not bad for a guy who hardly ever enjoyed a starring role.(sic)”
‘Baby Driver’ filmmaker Edgar Wright also paid tribute to the ‘Terminator’ star, describing him as the “king of character actors”.
He tweeted: “RIP Dick Miller, surely the king of character actors. A friendly, funny face in Gremlins (1&2), Piranha, the original Little Shop Of Horrors, Not Of This Earth, After Hours & my personal beatnik fav, Walter Paisley in ‘A Bucket Of Blood’. Any role of his was cult movie nirvana.”

Source: IconInsider.com
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R&B Legend James Ingram Dies

Grammy winning legendary R&B singer and songwriter James Ingram died in Los Angeles at the age of 66.

The news of his death was announced by his friend and creative partner Debbie Allen on Wednesday, but she did not reveal the day and cause.

“I have lost my dearest friend and creative partner James Ingram to the Celestial Choir. He will always be cherished, loved and remembered for his genius, h
RTT – Entertainment Top Story

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Andy Gruenberg, Veteran Film Executive, Dies at 68

Veteran film executive Andy Gruenberg, who most recently oversaw theatrical distribution at Netflix, died suddenly on Friday. He was 68. Gruenberg worked on classic films like “Ghostbusters,” “Karate Kid” and “Silverado” while at Columbia Pictures in the 80s and 90s. He then moved to MGM where he served as exec VP of distribution. There he […]

Variety

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Iconic Broadway Star Dies, And Yes, Carol Channing Was Part Black

The show business world is mourning the loss of one of its most iconic theater stars. Carol Channing, known mostly for her role as clever matchmaker Dolly Levi in Broadway’s Hello Dolly! musical, passed away on Tuesday at age 97. Channing was part black and spoke often of the need “to pass” to achieve success.

The actress, singer, comedian, and dancer was a fixture on Broadway and on television, appearing in guest roles on shows including Sesame Street, The Muppet Show, The Love Boat, RuPaul’s Drag Race, and more.

In her autobiography, “Just Lucky I Guess,” published in 2002, Channing revealed that she was in fact, part African American. According to Wikipedia, Channing’s mother Adelaide Glaser was German Jewish and her father, George Christian Channing, was African American and German. Her father was a journalist and a Christian Scientist.

In an interview with former talk show host Larry King in 2002, Channing described her reaction to learning her father was half-black.

…when I found out. I was 16-years-old and my mother told me. And you know, only the reaction on me was, Gee, I got the greatest genes in show business.  Every time I start to sing or dance, I know it, and I’m proud of it.

She revealed in another interview that her mother told her about her father’s heritage because she didn’t want her to be surprised if she “had a black baby.”

carol channing

A young Channing. (Wikimedia)

In her biography, Channing wrote that she kept her heritage secret so she wouldn’t be typecast on Broadway and in Hollywood.

During her interview with King, Channing spoke about her friendship with Louis Armstrong, the musician who helped make the Hello, Dolly! title song a hit.

“[I] campaigned with Louis Armstrong for President Kennedy. We were in the Armory in Washington. We were in the Kiel Auditorium in St. Louis..[]… And we dressed together in this huge locker room, it’s a city block long. But we already knew each other and we’d sit right close together. The most adorable, he wore a handkerchief.

carol channing

Channing performing with Pearl Bailey. (Wikimedia)

Black Enterprise editor Lydia T. Blanco, recalls a memory when Channing visited her school:

I had the opportunity to meet Channing while in middle school in San Francisco. She prided herself on being a native and visited us during an assembly to talk about her work as an actress. We had the conversation about white-passing and Channing shared that that was a part of her story. I believe that her mother shared that her grandmother was black. She even signed my year book!

Later on in college, a play was given in the Little Theater at Bennett and “white-passing” was a subject matter and Carol Channing’s name and career were also mentioned in that setting.

Channing leaves behind one son, Channing Lowe.



 

 

 

 

 

The post Iconic Broadway Star Dies, And Yes, Carol Channing Was Part Black appeared first on Black Enterprise.

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Harold Brown, U.S. defense chief who built, then strove to contain nuclear weapons, dies at 91

Harold Brown, an advocate of nuclear arms control who as President Jimmy Carter’s defense secretary tried but failed to win U.S. Senate approval of a key treaty with the Soviet Union, has died at age 91, the think tank where he worked said.
Reuters: People News

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Jacqueline Devine, wife of late Post editor, dies at 87

Jacqueline Devine, wife of late New York Post editor Frank Devine, died in Sydney, Australia, on Dec. 13 at age 87. She is survived by daughters Miranda, Rosalind and Alexandra, and eight grandchildren. Frank Devine, a distinguished foreign correspondent in New York, London and ­Tokyo, edited Rupert Murdoch’s Chicago Sun-Times before moving to New York…
Media | New York Post

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WWE legend Gene Okerlund dies aged 76

OHMYGOSSIP — WWE legend ‘Mean’ Gene Okerlund has died aged 76.
The Hall of Famer – who made his name as one of the most iconic interviewers in the history of the wrestling business – sadly passed away one year after he was last seen on TV.
In a statement, WWE said: “WWE is saddened to learn that WWE Hall of Famer Gene Okerlund, the most recognisable interviewer in sports-entertainment history, has passed away at age 76.”
He first joined WWE in 1984 and became a staple of its TV programming through his entertaining skits with the likes of close friend Hulk Hogan, ‘Macho Man’ Randy Savage and the Ultimate Warrior.
Okerlund played a huge part in the company’s expansion around the world when Vince McMahon signed him up after his time in the American Wrestling Alliance, and he went on to host shows like ‘Tuesday Night Titans’, ‘Wrestling Challenge’ and ‘Prime Time Wrestling’.
He later joined WCW in 1993 as lead interviewer, working with legends of the industry including Sting, Goldberg and Diamond Dallas Page.
The charismatic star would continue to appear on WWE TV over the years after returning to commentate on the Gimmick Battle Royal at WrestleMania 17, and more recently, he was a cast member on the WWE Network show ‘Legends’ House’.
He was inducted into the WWE Hall of Fame in 2006 by Hogan, who offered a simple tribute on social media.
He wrote: “Mean Gene I love you my brother HH (sic)”
Current WWE boss Triple H tweeted: “A voice and sound track to an entire era of our industry. He was the star of some of @WWE’s most memorable segments.
“‘Mean Gene’ was beloved by all who got to work with him. Our thoughts are with his family at this difficult time. (sic)”
Fellow Hall of Famer ‘Stone Cold’ Steve Austin was also among the many stars and fans to pay their respects.
He said: “Just heard Mean Gene Okerlund has passed away. As an interviewer, pitch man, announcer, or host, he was untouchable. Simply the best.
“Total professional with quick wit, sarcasm, humor, and that golden voice. Condolences to his friends and family. (sic)”
Longtime WWE referee Charles Robinson also paid tribute.
He said: “So sad to hear of the passing of one of the greatest voices in wrestling. Mean Gene you will be missed and we will continue to love you. What a true class act. I am very fortunate to work with you. (sic)”

Source: IconInsider.com
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Legendary WWE Interviewer Gene Okerlund Dies at 76

(MINNEAPOLIS) — Eugene “Mean Gene” Okerlund, who interviewed pro wrestling superstars “Macho Man” Randy Savage, The Ultimate Warrior and Hulk Hogan and became a ring fixture in his own right, has died. He was 76.

World Wrestling Entertainment announced Okerlund’s death on its website Wednesday. No details were given, but Okerlund’s daughter-in-law, Patricia Okerlund, confirmed his death to The Washington Post. A woman who answered the phone at a number listed for Eugene Okerlund in Osprey, Florida, declined comment and referred questions to WWE.

Okerlund started as an interviewer in the Minneapolis-based American Wrestling Association. He moved to WWE in 1984 and hosted several shows, including “All-American Wrestling,” ”Tuesday Night Titans” and “Prime Time Wrestling.”

Former wrestler and ex-Minnesota Gov. Jesse Ventura dubbed Okerlund “Mean Gene.”

A native of Sisseton, South Dakota, Okerlund was known for his natty attire and mustache. He was inducted into the WWE Hall of Fame in 2006.

Sports – TIME

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Hector Xtravaganza, Ball Icon and ‘Pose’ Consultant, Dies

Hector Xtravaganza, “grandfather” of the House of Xtravaganza and consultant for Ryan Murphy’s “Pose,” has died. The House of Xtravaganza announced his death in an Instagram post. “It is with profound sadness the House of Xtravaganza family announce the passing of our beloved Grandfather Hector,” the post reads. “He was a friend to everyone he […]

Variety

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June Whitfield, ‘Absolutely Fabulous’ and ‘Terry and June’ Actress, Dies at 93

Dame June Whitfield, known for her work on “Terry and June,” the “Carry On” movies and “Absolutely Fabulous” has died. The BBC is reporting that Whitfield died on Friday night at 93. Whitfield’s career touched just about every part of the entertainment industry from early radio comedies, acting in the “Carry On” films, to co-leading […]

Variety

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Nurse Alice: America’s Next Top Model Dies of Breast Cancer at 34

On Dec. 4, 2018, Jael Strauss gave her last breath—ending her battle with stage 4 breast cancer. Strauss had been a contestant on season eight of Tyra Bank’s America’s Next Top Model, was of African American (mother) and Jewish (father) descent, and only 34 years old.

On Oct. 4, she announced her diagnosis in a Facebook post. “I was gonna write some long thing but some of you guys deserve to know, On October 2nd I was diagnosed with stage IV breast cancer. It has aggressively spread throughout my body and is incurable,” she wrote. “With treatment it may prolong my life longer than the ‘few months’ doctors said I could make it. I don’t want to die. I need another one of those miracles that I got back in 2013.”

Following her diagnosis, Strauss’ friends set up a GoFundMe page on her behalf to help alleviate some of the medical costs.

At the end of November, Strauss announced that she had entered hospice care. “First night in hospice. So many things I never knew about life. Or death,” she wrote on Facebook. “So many things.”

According to nationally recognized board-certified diagnostic radiologist, Dr. Nina Watson (aka Dr. Nina) who specializes in Women’s Imaging, this is a story she’s seen one too many times. She goes on to say, “although we would like to think that breast cancer in a woman of her age would be unheard of, unfortunately, it is not. According to the American Cancer Society, it is estimated that 12,770 women in the United States less than 40 years of age were diagnosed with breast cancer in 2017. Since this is below the age of recommended annual screening for the general population, it is important that all women, but particularly black women, know the signs and symptoms of breast cancer and their own personal risk.”

The most common sign of breast cancer is a painless lump. Although most of these lumps will be benign (not cancerous) growths, a woman should have any new lump evaluated by their doctor. Other signs and symptoms would include changes in your skin (new area of thickening or dimpling), changes in your nipple (nipple starting to stick in), or discharge from your nipple (especially if it is bloody). If you notice any of these changes, it is important to be seen by your doctor. Additional testing such as a mammogram or breast ultrasound may be necessary.

There have been important developments in the medical community’s understanding of breast cancer. It is now being recognized that a “one approach fits all” does not apply to breast cancer. While it has been recognized for some time that women of Ashkenazi Jewish descent have an increased risk of breast cancer, it is now being recognized that black women are also at increased risk for the disease. So for Strauss, her risks were greater considering her mixed descent. The American College of Radiology and Society of Breast Imaging are recommending that all women, especially black women, have a risk assessment (calculation of a woman’s lifetime risk of breast cancer) performed at age 30 to see if early screening for breast cancer is needed.

 

The post Nurse Alice: America’s Next Top Model Dies of Breast Cancer at 34 appeared first on Black Enterprise.

Lifestyle | Black Enterprise

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Conservative writer Bre Payton dies suddenly at 26 in San Diego

A 26-year-old political writer and TV commentator died suddenly on Friday, a day after being hospitalized with swine flu, her friends and employer said. Bre Payton, a staff writer at conservative news and opinion website The Federalist, was found “unresponsive and barely breathing” Thursday morning by a friend and was rushed to a San Diego…
Media | New York Post

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Bre Payton, Conservative Writer and Fox News Commentator, Dies at 26 After Sudden Illness

Bre Payton, a frequent Fox News commentator and writer for The Federalist, has died after battling a sudden illness.

via People:

“Bre Payton, our beloved staff writer for The Federalist, passed away on Friday in San Diego, California, following a sudden illness,” the online magazine wrote in a statement published on their website.

Politician and friend Morgan Murtaugh revealed on Twitter Friday that she found Payton unconscious and called for help.

“24 hours ago I found my friend unconscious and called 911. She’s been in a coma since and really needs a miracle right now. Please if you’re religious at all, send prayers this way. We really need them.”

Murtaugh later wrote to her followers that “Bre has passed.”

Prior to her death, Payton was battling the flu and “possibly meningitis,” according to a profile on CaringBridge.org, USA Today reported.

Following the news of her death, a number of political figures expressed their sympathy on social media.

“Ben and I are absolutely gutted and horrified by this news. Our prayers for @Bre_payton and her family. We are less vibrant without her— in every possible way. A wonderful, fearless, vibrant, intelligent young woman. Sending prayers to all of her family and friends during this darkness,” Meghan McCain, who recently lost her father Sen. John McCain to cancer in August, tweeted.

Fox News host Shannon Bream also spoke out on Payton’s death writing, “I cannot believe this.”

“@Bre_payton was such a beautiful light, smart and funny and kind and talented. Please pray for her broken hearted loved ones, who are undoubtedly reeling. She was far too young,” Bream added.

Payton graduated from Patrick Henry College in 2015 with a degree in journalism, according to The Federalist.

She joined the news outlet shortly after and quickly moved up to a political commentator featured on Fox News Channel, Fox Business Channel and OANN.

The young journalist is survived by her parents George and Cindy Payton as well as her siblings James, Jack, Christina and Cheekie.

May she rest.

The post Bre Payton, Conservative Writer and Fox News Commentator, Dies at 26 After Sudden Illness appeared first on lovebscott – celebrity news.

lovebscott – celebrity news

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KTLA Anchor Chris Burrous Dies After Being Found Unconscious at Glendale Motel

KTLA anchor Chris Burrous died Thursday afternoon after being found unconscious at a motel in Glendale, Calif. He was 43. Burrous was found unresponsive by Glendale firefighters and died later at a hospital. Firefighters found him “suffering from a medical emergency” in a room at the Days Inn in downtown Glendale, according to the Glendale […]

Variety

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Sister Wendy Beckett, nun and TV art critic, dies at 88

Sister Wendy Beckett, a nun and art historian who became an unlikely television star in Britain in the 1990s, died at the age of 88 on Wednesday, the Carmelite monastery at Quidenham in Norfolk said on Wednesday.


Reuters: Arts

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Guatemalan child dies in U.S. custody

ABC News

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http://www.acrx.org -As millions of Americans strive to deal with the economic downturn,loss of jobs,foreclosures,high cost of gas,and the rising cost of prescription drug cost. Charles Myrick ,the President of American Consultants Rx, announced the re-release of the American Consultants Rx community service project which consist of millions of free discount prescription cards being donated to thousands of not for profits,hospitals,schools,churches,etc. in an effort to assist the uninsured,under insured,and seniors deal with the high cost of prescription drugs.-American Consultants Rx -Pharmacy Discount Network News

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Tribune stock tumbles after McClatchy bid dies

News that the McClatchy bid for Tribune Publishing is dead as a doornail sent the stock spiraling to another new 52-week low on Tuesday — slumping to $ 12.40 a share before closing at $ 12.45, down 4.1 percent. Will Wyatt, a former hedge fund operator, has been looking at the books in recent days to see…
Media | New York Post

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Actress and director Penny Marshall dies at the age of 75

ABC News

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http://www.acrx.org -As millions of Americans strive to deal with the economic downturn,loss of jobs,foreclosures,high cost of gas,and the rising cost of prescription drug cost. Charles Myrick ,the President of American Consultants Rx, announced the re-release of the American Consultants Rx community service project which consist of millions of free discount prescription cards being donated to thousands of not for profits,hospitals,schools,churches,etc. in an effort to assist the uninsured,under insured,and seniors deal with the high cost of prescription drugs.-American Consultants Rx -Pharmacy Discount Network News

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Ken Berry, TV Actor in ‘F-Troop,’ ‘Mayberry R.F.D,’ Dies at 85

Ken Berry, a popular TV actor in the 1960s and ’70s who starred in “F-Troop,” “Mama’s Family” and “Mayberry R.F.D.,” died Saturday. His former wife, actress Jackie Joseph-Lawrence posted the news on Facebook. “F-Troop” co-star Larry Storch wrote on Facebook, “We hope you know how much you were loved. Goodnight Captain.” Berry played Captain Parmenter […]

Variety

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Olivia Hooker, One of the Last Survivors of The Tulsa Race Riot, Dies At 103

After surviving one of the most horrific acts of racialized violence in U.S. history and then making history as one of the first black women to join the U.S. Coast Guard, Olivia Hooker passed away last week at the age of 103.

Hooker was one of the last survivors of the 1921 Tulsa Race Riots, a brutal massacre that decimated a successful African American enclave in Tulsa, Oklahoma, known as Black Wall Street. During the attack, a mob of angry white men set the community ablaze, killing hundreds of black residents and leaving thousands more homeless. Hooker was six years old when the group of torch-carriers destroyed her family home. Back in May, she told NPR that she still remembers hearing an ax crush her sister’s piano.

“I had been in school for two years and I knew about life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness, and I thought it pertained to me until that day,” Hooker told BLACK ENTERPRISE in 2008.

During the riots, Tulsa police and government agents reportedly provided firearms and ammunition to the white citizens, in addition to participating in the violence themselves. “The people who were supposed to protect [us] did not,” Hooker said.

Black Wall Street - Dream Tulsa - After Race Riot of 1921

Black Wall Street after Race Riot of 1921 (Oklahoma State University)

Following the riots, Hooker’s family struggled to recover from the psychological and financial damage inflicted upon them. They moved out of Oklahoma and in 1945, she became the first African American admitted to the U.S. Coast Guard as a member of the Semper Paratus program (SPARs).

Hooker went on to obtain a master’s degree from Columbia University along with a Ph.D. in psychology from the University of Rochester. Later, she worked as a professor at Fordham University in New York, reports The Associated Press.

She, however, remained committed to fighting for justice and reparations for the survivors and descendants of the massacre. In 1997, she joined the Tulsa Race Riot Commission and in 2003, she participated in a class action lawsuit against the city of Tulsa and the state of Oklahoma. The civil rights suit sought compensation for the damages that occurred as a direct result of the government’s involvement in the massacre. The U.S. Supreme Court dismissed the lawsuit in 2005.

In 2015, President Barack Obama honored Hooker during a Coast Guard ceremony, calling her a “tireless voice for justice and equality.” That same year, the Coast Guard named a building on Staten Island after her.

According to her goddaughter, Janis Porter, Hooker died Nov. 21 at their home in White Plains, New York. Porter said she had no surviving relatives and didn’t provide a cause of death. “Her mind was clear, no dementia. She was just tired,” Porter told KTLA 5.

To learn more about the Tulsa Race Riot and how black Tulsans are continuing to fight for justice, read America’s Forgotten Massacre: The Destruction and Revitalization of Black Wall Street.

The post Olivia Hooker, One of the Last Survivors of The Tulsa Race Riot, Dies At 103 appeared first on Black Enterprise.

Lifestyle | Black Enterprise

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Bernardo Bertolucci, Oscar-Winning Director Who Helmed the Provocative ‘Last Tango in Paris,’ Dies at 77

(ROME) — Italian filmmaker Bernardo Bertolucci, who won Oscars with “The Last Emperor” and whose erotic drama “Last Tango in Paris” enthralled and shocked the world, died Monday. He was 77.

Bertolucci’s press office, Punto e Virgola, confirmed the death in an email to The Associated Press. Italy’s state-run RAI said Bertolucci died at his home in Rome, surrounded by family.

“He will be remembered among the greatest in Italian and world film,” the Venice Film Festival, which awarded Bertolucci a lifetime achievement award in 2007, said in a statement.

Bertolucci’s movies often explored the sexual relations among characters stuck in a psychological crisis, as in “Last Tango,” which was banned in his own Italy for over a decade. The self-professed Marxist also did not shy away from politics and ideology, as in “The Conformist,” which some critics consider Bertolucci’s masterpiece.

Despite working with A-list American and international stars, Bertolucci always defended his own filmmaking style against what he said was the pressure of the U.S. film industry. He maintained critical success for most of his career, weathering the controversies that his sexually provocative work would stir and some commercial flops.

“When it comes to commercial cinema, I have the strange pleasure of feeling that I’m from another tribe, an infiltrator,” he told Italian daily Corriere della Sera in 1990.

He was honored for lifetime achievement at the Cannes film festival in 2011.

Bertolucci’s movies also bore the imprint of the director’s own experiences in psychoanalysis. He always said that making films was his way of communicating with the audience. It was his personal language.

“Maybe I’m an idealist, but I still think of the movie theater as a cathedral where we all go together to dream the dream together,” he said upon receiving an award from the Director’s Guild of America for his 1987 film “The Last Emperor.”

That movie handed Bertolucci his greatest success. In 1988 it won all the nine Academy Awards that it had been nominated for — including best movie and best director.

The movie — the first Western feature film to win permission to shoot in Beijing’s Forbidden City — follows the life of China’s last emperor, from child-king at the end of the Qing Dynasty to war criminal and finally to an ordinary citizen in the People’s Republic.

It was filmed in the lush and vivid style that was one of Bertolucci’s trademarks. It featured grandiose scenes and intimate moments, and a flashback structure that is typical of biopics.

Cinematographer Vittorio Storaro, who often worked with Bertolucci and won one of his three Oscars with “Last Emperor,” compared the director to William Faulkner.

“His style is not unlike that of Faulkner who’ll go on for 30 pages without a period. Bernardo doesn’t just use the camera to convey just one sentence. Everything flows into everything else,” said Storaro.

Bertolucci was born in the northern city of Parma on March 16, 1941, the son of poet Attilio Bertolucci and his wife Ninetta. The family moved to Rome when Bertolucci was 13.

He had originally wanted to be a poet like his father, but later turned to movies.

He began his career while still a student at the University of Rome as an assistant director on Pier Paolo Pasolini’s film “Accattone.” A year later, in 1962, he made his first film “The Grim Reaper,” about the murder of a prostitute.

Soon he established himself as one of the brightest young stars of international cinema. By his early 30s, he had already directed highly acclaimed movies: “Before the Revolution” in 1964, a reflection on politics and the middle-class set in the director’s hometown; “The Spider’s Strategem” in 1970, the story of a man who returns to the scene of the killing of his father, an anti-Fascist hero, to discover a web of lies; and “The Conformist,” which is based on an Alberto Moravia novel and depicts the struggle of a man, Jean-Louis Trintignant, to conform to society and expectations in Fascist Italy.

But it was with “Last Tango” that Bertolucci shot to stardom, and notoriety.

The film, starring Marlon Brando and Maria Schneider as a middle-aged man and younger woman who engage in a brutal sexual relationship in a bare Paris apartment, shocked the world and incurred censorship in his native country.

But its raw and improvisational style also earned Brando and Bertolucci Oscar nominations and was likened by New Yorker film critic Pauline Kael to Stravinsky’s “The Rite of Spring” as a revolutionary work of art.

The movie was banned in Italy just after its release in 1972, and was not released again until 1987. The case went back and forth in the courts until the high criminal court banned the film in 1976 and ordered all copies confiscated and destroyed. Bertolucci, Brando and Schneider, as well as the producer Alberto Grimaldi, were sentenced to two months in jail and a fine of $ 40 each — although the jail terms were suspended.

Schneider herself would say she was traumatized by the movie. The actress, who died in 2011, was just 19 during filming and told the Daily Mail in 2007 that a rape scene involving a stick of butter was included without warning.

“I should have called my agent or had my lawyer come to the set because you can’t force someone to do something that isn’t in the script, but at the time, I didn’t know that,” she said.

“Marlon said to me: ‘Maria, don’t worry, it’s just a movie,’ but during the scene, even though what Marlon was doing wasn’t real, I was crying real tears. I felt humiliated and to be honest, I felt a little raped, both by Marlon and by Bertolucci. After the scene, Marlon didn’t console me or apologize. Thankfully, there was just one take,” she said.

Bertolucci then embarked on his most ambitious project, a four-hour epic tale on the lives of two boys — Gerard Depardieu and Robert De Niro — through the political upheavals of the past century in Italy. The movie — “1900” — won some critical praise, but ended up a spectacular commercial flop.

Bertolucci’s later movies included “The Sheltering Sky,” featuring Debra Winger and John Malkovich as an American couple trying to inject new life into their relationship during a trip to Africa. The 1990 work won Bertolucci a nomination at the Golden Globes.

He also directed “Little Buddha” in 1993 with Keanu Reeves as Siddharta; “Stealing Beauty” in 1996 starring Liv Tyler as a teenager discovering sex during a trip to Italy; “The Dreamers,” again an erotic drama set against a political backdrop — in this case the 1968 student riots in Paris — starring Eva Green and Louis Garrel as cinema-loving siblings who strike up a friendship with visiting American student Michael Pitt. The film featured full-frontal male nudity but was released uncut in the United States.

Bertolucci was married to the English writer and director Clare Peploe. They had no children. Peploe is the sister of Mark Peploe, a screenwriter and close friend of Bertolucci’s who worked with the director on a number of projects.

Punto e Virgola, the press office, said Rome’s city hall would host a wake for Bertolucci on Tuesday. A commemorative ceremony open to the public is being planned for a later date, it said.


Entertainment – TIME

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15-Year-Old Boy Dies in His Sleep After ‘Surfing’ on Roof of an Uber — Leading to Driver’s Arrest

A New York Uber driver is accused of manslaughter after three teenage passengers who’d been drinking allegedly paid him to let them climb onto the roof of his moving car — and then one of them fell off and died, PEOPLE confirms.

The driver, 24-year-old Danyal Cheema, of Huntington Station, was charged Monday with second-degree manslaughter in the death of 15-year-old Ryan Mullen, of Cold Spring Harbor.

Cheema is being held in lieu of $ 200,000 bond following his arrest on Sunday. It was unclear if he’d entered a plea. His attorney, Christopher Renfroe, did not immediately respond to PEOPLE’s request for comment.

In the incident shortly after midnight on Sept. 23, Cheema was behind the wheel of his 2010 Toyota Highlander as an Uber driver when he picked up the three teen boys in Huntington, after they had been drinking, according to the Suffolk County District Attorney’s Office.

On the way to their destination, the boys allegedly offered Cheema $ 70 cash — and gave him $ 40 — if he’d let them climb onto the car’s roof at an intersection so they could “car surf” as the vehicle took off, the investigation revealed.

Mullen and a second teen then remained on the roof as Cheema drove along Cove Road, with the third boy recording them in a Snapchat video.

Mullen’s subsequent fall led to head trauma “which resulted in his death,” according to the prosecutor’s office. Although Cheema brought all three boys to their destination at a home in Huntington, Mullen “succumbed to his injuries in his sleep later that day,” the prosecutor’s office said.

• Want to keep up with the latest crime coverage? Click here to get breaking crime news, ongoing trial coverage and details of intriguing unsolved cases in the True Crime Newsletter.

“This was an incredibly bad decision by the defendant and a bad decision by the boys involved,” District Attorney Timothy Sini said in a news release. “But at the end of the day, this defendant is an adult who was contracted to safely bring those boys home and he failed to do that.”

“We have a culture right now where the mindset is, ‘How can we outdo each other?’ Particularly among young people on social media, and we often see the tragic consequences of that,” Sini said. “A lot of young people think they are invincible and that’s something we need to keep drilling in their heads that this could happen to anyone when you engage in this kind of conduct.”

He added: “In this day and age, we often encourage people to use ride sharing services because it’s a safe alternative to drinking and driving. These boys were doing that; they were drinking that night and they made the right decision to contract with a car service.”

“Unfortunately the defendant made a reckless decision and engaged in reckless conduct that caused the death of a young boy, and he will be held accountable for that,” Sini said.

In his obituary, Ryan was remembered as a “loving son” and “fierce friend.”

He “lived life so large and his time here was short,” his family wrote. “God had other plans.”

Cheema faces five to 15 years in prison if convicted of the manslaughter charge. He is due back in court on Friday.


PEOPLE.com

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Stan Lee, the man who brought superheroes to life, dies at 95

ABC News

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http://www.acrx.org -As millions of Americans strive to deal with the economic downturn,loss of jobs,foreclosures,high cost of gas,and the rising cost of prescription drug cost. Charles Myrick ,the President of American Consultants Rx, announced the re-release of the American Consultants Rx community service project which consist of millions of free discount prescription cards being donated to thousands of not for profits,hospitals,schools,churches,etc. in an effort to assist the uninsured,under insured,and seniors deal with the high cost of prescription drugs.-American Consultants Rx -Pharmacy Discount Network News

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Click today to request your free ACRX discount prescription card and save up to 80% off of your medicine!

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A. Barry Rand, Among the First Black CEOs of a Publicly Traded Company, Dies at 73

Addison Barry Rand, known fondly as “Barry,” passed away on Thursday. Rand was an influential business leader who held many high-profile corporate positions. In fact, Rand rose to become Chairman and CEO of Avis Rent A Car Inc. in 1999, the third African American to assume the helm of one of the nation’s 500 largest publicly traded corporations.

Rand had a 31-year career at Xerox at one point heading the company’s then-$ 5-billion marketing group. During his tenure at Xerox, he went on to manage $ 18 billion in revenue and 70,000 employees in over 150 countries.

Rand was highly regarded for his business and marketing acumen. In 1968 he earned his B.S. in Marketing from American University. He first joined Xerox as a sales trainee, citing the company’s “contagious freedom of expression” where he could be “Barry Rand and not somebody’s idea of what I should be.”

He rose from sales representative to executive vice president for worldwide operations. While at Xerox, he was instrumental in ensuring minorities and women had every opportunity for advancement at the company. Under his leadership, Xerox became the most diverse company in the Fortune 50.

He left Xerox in 1999. ”Barry was one of the most loved and respected leaders here, and not just because he succeeded against the odds as an African American,” said Anne M. Mulcahy, a-then Xerox executive vice president told The New York Times in 1999.

When Rand left Xerox to head Avis, he became one of the first African Americans to achieve such a position at a Fortune 500 company and one of the first to lead a publicly-traded company. According to The New York Times, another business icon, Ken Chenault, recommended Rand to Avis.

“Avis offers a great opportunity,” Rand said at the time in a January 2000 interview with Black Enterprise magazine. “It is a Fortune 500 company. It has an international dimension. It is a company that fits my skill set…”

In 2009, AARP tapped Rand as its new chief executive. He was attracted to AARP’s dedication to fighting for the rights of older Americans. He said back then, “AARP’s resources are immense, but so are the goals that it seeks to achieve. The fight will not be easy, but if I’ve learned one thing in my career, it’s that nothing worthwhile ever is.”

The business leader also served as the volunteer chairman of Howard University’s board of trustees. At Howard University, he established the Helen Matthews Rand Endowed Scholarship. Named for his mother, a teacher and principal, the scholarship provides full tuition and a laptop to students pursuing a degree in teacher education. Recipients must make a two-year commitment to teaching in an inner-city or urban environment upon completing their degrees.

Rand is survived by a wife, daughter, and son.

Black Enterprise interview with A. Barry Rand:



The post A. Barry Rand, Among the First Black CEOs of a Publicly Traded Company, Dies at 73 appeared first on Black Enterprise.

Career | Black Enterprise

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Kitty O’Neil, deaf Hollywood stuntwoman who worked on ‘Wonder Woman,’ dies at 72

Kitty O’Neil, a longtime Hollywood stuntwoman whose illustrious career included setting numerous records for speed and performing action sequences in place of Lynda Carter for “Wonder Woman,” has died at 72.

She passed away in South Dakota last Friday from pneumonia, The Washington Post reported.

/entertainment – New York Daily News

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Unvaccinated child dies from flu in Florida

A child in Florida who wasn’t vaccinated has died from getting the flu.
ABC News: Health

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http://www.acrx.org -As millions of Americans strive to deal with the economic downturn,loss of jobs,foreclosures,high cost of gas,and the rising cost of prescription drug cost. Charles Myrick ,the President of American Consultants Rx, announced the re-release of the American Consultants Rx community service project which consist of millions of free discount prescription cards being donated to thousands of not for profits,hospitals,schools,churches,etc. in an effort to assist the uninsured,under insured,and seniors deal with the high cost of prescription drugs.-American Consultants Rx -Pharmacy Discount Network News

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Jim Taylor, Hall of Fame Former Fullback for the Green Bay Packers, Dies at 83

(GREEN BAY, Wis.) — Hall of Fame fullback Jim Taylor of the Green Bay Packers has died at 83.

The team says a family friend told the Packers he died early Saturday.

Taylor played on the great Packer teams and was the league’s MVP in 1962. He won four NFL titles and scored the first rushing touchdown in Super Bowl history.

Taylor spent 10 seasons in the NFL after being drafted in the second round by Green Bay in 1958 out of LSU. He joined a backfield that featured Paul Hornung and began to thrive when Packers coach Vince Lombardi took over in 1959.

Lombardi came up with the concept of the Packers Sweep, which featured pulling guards and Taylor or Hornung running around the end. But it was 6-foot, 216-pound Taylor who showed the play’s punishing promise.

Sports – TIME

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Crew member for Tom Hanks’ Mr. Rogers movie dies in accident on set

A member of the sound crew for an upcoming Mr. Rogers biopic fell two stories to his death in an accident on set, officials confirmed.

James Emswiller, 61, was taking a break from filming “You Are My Friend” starring Tom Hanks at around 7:30 p.m. Thursday when he suffered an apparent medical emergency…

/entertainment – New York Daily News

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Daughter of former Post owner Abe Hirschfeld dies at 72

Rachel Hirschfeld, daughter of late, former Post owner and noted eccentric Abe Hirschfeld, has died. She was 72. Her passing last week in California was confirmed by her brother and real-estate developer, Elie. The cause was not disclosed. Hirschfeld was a renowned animal-welfare lawyer, focusing on estate planning and advocacy. She was one of the…
Media | New York Post

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‘The Hate U Give’ screenwriter dies day before film’s release at age of 58

The screenwriter behind the brand new film, “The Hate U Give” died following a years-long battle with cancer a day before the movie’s release. She was 58.

Audrey Wells succumbed to her illness on Thursday, according to The Hollywood Reporter.

“Over the last five and half years, Audrey fought valiantly…

/entertainment – New York Daily News

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