Ken Berry, TV Actor in ‘F-Troop,’ ‘Mayberry R.F.D,’ Dies at 85

Ken Berry, a popular TV actor in the 1960s and ’70s who starred in “F-Troop,” “Mama’s Family” and “Mayberry R.F.D.,” died Saturday. His former wife, actress Jackie Joseph-Lawrence posted the news on Facebook. “F-Troop” co-star Larry Storch wrote on Facebook, “We hope you know how much you were loved. Goodnight Captain.” Berry played Captain Parmenter […]

Variety

SHOPPING DISCOUNT UPDATE:

Olivia Hooker, One of the Last Survivors of The Tulsa Race Riot, Dies At 103

After surviving one of the most horrific acts of racialized violence in U.S. history and then making history as one of the first black women to join the U.S. Coast Guard, Olivia Hooker passed away last week at the age of 103.

Hooker was one of the last survivors of the 1921 Tulsa Race Riots, a brutal massacre that decimated a successful African American enclave in Tulsa, Oklahoma, known as Black Wall Street. During the attack, a mob of angry white men set the community ablaze, killing hundreds of black residents and leaving thousands more homeless. Hooker was six years old when the group of torch-carriers destroyed her family home. Back in May, she told NPR that she still remembers hearing an ax crush her sister’s piano.

“I had been in school for two years and I knew about life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness, and I thought it pertained to me until that day,” Hooker told BLACK ENTERPRISE in 2008.

During the riots, Tulsa police and government agents reportedly provided firearms and ammunition to the white citizens, in addition to participating in the violence themselves. “The people who were supposed to protect [us] did not,” Hooker said.

Black Wall Street - Dream Tulsa - After Race Riot of 1921

Black Wall Street after Race Riot of 1921 (Oklahoma State University)

Following the riots, Hooker’s family struggled to recover from the psychological and financial damage inflicted upon them. They moved out of Oklahoma and in 1945, she became the first African American admitted to the U.S. Coast Guard as a member of the Semper Paratus program (SPARs).

Hooker went on to obtain a master’s degree from Columbia University along with a Ph.D. in psychology from the University of Rochester. Later, she worked as a professor at Fordham University in New York, reports The Associated Press.

She, however, remained committed to fighting for justice and reparations for the survivors and descendants of the massacre. In 1997, she joined the Tulsa Race Riot Commission and in 2003, she participated in a class action lawsuit against the city of Tulsa and the state of Oklahoma. The civil rights suit sought compensation for the damages that occurred as a direct result of the government’s involvement in the massacre. The U.S. Supreme Court dismissed the lawsuit in 2005.

In 2015, President Barack Obama honored Hooker during a Coast Guard ceremony, calling her a “tireless voice for justice and equality.” That same year, the Coast Guard named a building on Staten Island after her.

According to her goddaughter, Janis Porter, Hooker died Nov. 21 at their home in White Plains, New York. Porter said she had no surviving relatives and didn’t provide a cause of death. “Her mind was clear, no dementia. She was just tired,” Porter told KTLA 5.

To learn more about the Tulsa Race Riot and how black Tulsans are continuing to fight for justice, read America’s Forgotten Massacre: The Destruction and Revitalization of Black Wall Street.

The post Olivia Hooker, One of the Last Survivors of The Tulsa Race Riot, Dies At 103 appeared first on Black Enterprise.

Lifestyle | Black Enterprise

EMPLOYMENT SEARCH UPDATE:

Bernardo Bertolucci, Oscar-Winning Director Who Helmed the Provocative ‘Last Tango in Paris,’ Dies at 77

(ROME) — Italian filmmaker Bernardo Bertolucci, who won Oscars with “The Last Emperor” and whose erotic drama “Last Tango in Paris” enthralled and shocked the world, died Monday. He was 77.

Bertolucci’s press office, Punto e Virgola, confirmed the death in an email to The Associated Press. Italy’s state-run RAI said Bertolucci died at his home in Rome, surrounded by family.

“He will be remembered among the greatest in Italian and world film,” the Venice Film Festival, which awarded Bertolucci a lifetime achievement award in 2007, said in a statement.

Bertolucci’s movies often explored the sexual relations among characters stuck in a psychological crisis, as in “Last Tango,” which was banned in his own Italy for over a decade. The self-professed Marxist also did not shy away from politics and ideology, as in “The Conformist,” which some critics consider Bertolucci’s masterpiece.

Despite working with A-list American and international stars, Bertolucci always defended his own filmmaking style against what he said was the pressure of the U.S. film industry. He maintained critical success for most of his career, weathering the controversies that his sexually provocative work would stir and some commercial flops.

“When it comes to commercial cinema, I have the strange pleasure of feeling that I’m from another tribe, an infiltrator,” he told Italian daily Corriere della Sera in 1990.

He was honored for lifetime achievement at the Cannes film festival in 2011.

Bertolucci’s movies also bore the imprint of the director’s own experiences in psychoanalysis. He always said that making films was his way of communicating with the audience. It was his personal language.

“Maybe I’m an idealist, but I still think of the movie theater as a cathedral where we all go together to dream the dream together,” he said upon receiving an award from the Director’s Guild of America for his 1987 film “The Last Emperor.”

That movie handed Bertolucci his greatest success. In 1988 it won all the nine Academy Awards that it had been nominated for — including best movie and best director.

The movie — the first Western feature film to win permission to shoot in Beijing’s Forbidden City — follows the life of China’s last emperor, from child-king at the end of the Qing Dynasty to war criminal and finally to an ordinary citizen in the People’s Republic.

It was filmed in the lush and vivid style that was one of Bertolucci’s trademarks. It featured grandiose scenes and intimate moments, and a flashback structure that is typical of biopics.

Cinematographer Vittorio Storaro, who often worked with Bertolucci and won one of his three Oscars with “Last Emperor,” compared the director to William Faulkner.

“His style is not unlike that of Faulkner who’ll go on for 30 pages without a period. Bernardo doesn’t just use the camera to convey just one sentence. Everything flows into everything else,” said Storaro.

Bertolucci was born in the northern city of Parma on March 16, 1941, the son of poet Attilio Bertolucci and his wife Ninetta. The family moved to Rome when Bertolucci was 13.

He had originally wanted to be a poet like his father, but later turned to movies.

He began his career while still a student at the University of Rome as an assistant director on Pier Paolo Pasolini’s film “Accattone.” A year later, in 1962, he made his first film “The Grim Reaper,” about the murder of a prostitute.

Soon he established himself as one of the brightest young stars of international cinema. By his early 30s, he had already directed highly acclaimed movies: “Before the Revolution” in 1964, a reflection on politics and the middle-class set in the director’s hometown; “The Spider’s Strategem” in 1970, the story of a man who returns to the scene of the killing of his father, an anti-Fascist hero, to discover a web of lies; and “The Conformist,” which is based on an Alberto Moravia novel and depicts the struggle of a man, Jean-Louis Trintignant, to conform to society and expectations in Fascist Italy.

But it was with “Last Tango” that Bertolucci shot to stardom, and notoriety.

The film, starring Marlon Brando and Maria Schneider as a middle-aged man and younger woman who engage in a brutal sexual relationship in a bare Paris apartment, shocked the world and incurred censorship in his native country.

But its raw and improvisational style also earned Brando and Bertolucci Oscar nominations and was likened by New Yorker film critic Pauline Kael to Stravinsky’s “The Rite of Spring” as a revolutionary work of art.

The movie was banned in Italy just after its release in 1972, and was not released again until 1987. The case went back and forth in the courts until the high criminal court banned the film in 1976 and ordered all copies confiscated and destroyed. Bertolucci, Brando and Schneider, as well as the producer Alberto Grimaldi, were sentenced to two months in jail and a fine of $ 40 each — although the jail terms were suspended.

Schneider herself would say she was traumatized by the movie. The actress, who died in 2011, was just 19 during filming and told the Daily Mail in 2007 that a rape scene involving a stick of butter was included without warning.

“I should have called my agent or had my lawyer come to the set because you can’t force someone to do something that isn’t in the script, but at the time, I didn’t know that,” she said.

“Marlon said to me: ‘Maria, don’t worry, it’s just a movie,’ but during the scene, even though what Marlon was doing wasn’t real, I was crying real tears. I felt humiliated and to be honest, I felt a little raped, both by Marlon and by Bertolucci. After the scene, Marlon didn’t console me or apologize. Thankfully, there was just one take,” she said.

Bertolucci then embarked on his most ambitious project, a four-hour epic tale on the lives of two boys — Gerard Depardieu and Robert De Niro — through the political upheavals of the past century in Italy. The movie — “1900” — won some critical praise, but ended up a spectacular commercial flop.

Bertolucci’s later movies included “The Sheltering Sky,” featuring Debra Winger and John Malkovich as an American couple trying to inject new life into their relationship during a trip to Africa. The 1990 work won Bertolucci a nomination at the Golden Globes.

He also directed “Little Buddha” in 1993 with Keanu Reeves as Siddharta; “Stealing Beauty” in 1996 starring Liv Tyler as a teenager discovering sex during a trip to Italy; “The Dreamers,” again an erotic drama set against a political backdrop — in this case the 1968 student riots in Paris — starring Eva Green and Louis Garrel as cinema-loving siblings who strike up a friendship with visiting American student Michael Pitt. The film featured full-frontal male nudity but was released uncut in the United States.

Bertolucci was married to the English writer and director Clare Peploe. They had no children. Peploe is the sister of Mark Peploe, a screenwriter and close friend of Bertolucci’s who worked with the director on a number of projects.

Punto e Virgola, the press office, said Rome’s city hall would host a wake for Bertolucci on Tuesday. A commemorative ceremony open to the public is being planned for a later date, it said.


Entertainment – TIME

ENTERTAINMENT DEAL UPDATE:

15-Year-Old Boy Dies in His Sleep After ‘Surfing’ on Roof of an Uber — Leading to Driver’s Arrest

A New York Uber driver is accused of manslaughter after three teenage passengers who’d been drinking allegedly paid him to let them climb onto the roof of his moving car — and then one of them fell off and died, PEOPLE confirms.

The driver, 24-year-old Danyal Cheema, of Huntington Station, was charged Monday with second-degree manslaughter in the death of 15-year-old Ryan Mullen, of Cold Spring Harbor.

Cheema is being held in lieu of $ 200,000 bond following his arrest on Sunday. It was unclear if he’d entered a plea. His attorney, Christopher Renfroe, did not immediately respond to PEOPLE’s request for comment.

In the incident shortly after midnight on Sept. 23, Cheema was behind the wheel of his 2010 Toyota Highlander as an Uber driver when he picked up the three teen boys in Huntington, after they had been drinking, according to the Suffolk County District Attorney’s Office.

On the way to their destination, the boys allegedly offered Cheema $ 70 cash — and gave him $ 40 — if he’d let them climb onto the car’s roof at an intersection so they could “car surf” as the vehicle took off, the investigation revealed.

Mullen and a second teen then remained on the roof as Cheema drove along Cove Road, with the third boy recording them in a Snapchat video.

Mullen’s subsequent fall led to head trauma “which resulted in his death,” according to the prosecutor’s office. Although Cheema brought all three boys to their destination at a home in Huntington, Mullen “succumbed to his injuries in his sleep later that day,” the prosecutor’s office said.

• Want to keep up with the latest crime coverage? Click here to get breaking crime news, ongoing trial coverage and details of intriguing unsolved cases in the True Crime Newsletter.

“This was an incredibly bad decision by the defendant and a bad decision by the boys involved,” District Attorney Timothy Sini said in a news release. “But at the end of the day, this defendant is an adult who was contracted to safely bring those boys home and he failed to do that.”

“We have a culture right now where the mindset is, ‘How can we outdo each other?’ Particularly among young people on social media, and we often see the tragic consequences of that,” Sini said. “A lot of young people think they are invincible and that’s something we need to keep drilling in their heads that this could happen to anyone when you engage in this kind of conduct.”

He added: “In this day and age, we often encourage people to use ride sharing services because it’s a safe alternative to drinking and driving. These boys were doing that; they were drinking that night and they made the right decision to contract with a car service.”

“Unfortunately the defendant made a reckless decision and engaged in reckless conduct that caused the death of a young boy, and he will be held accountable for that,” Sini said.

In his obituary, Ryan was remembered as a “loving son” and “fierce friend.”

He “lived life so large and his time here was short,” his family wrote. “God had other plans.”

Cheema faces five to 15 years in prison if convicted of the manslaughter charge. He is due back in court on Friday.


PEOPLE.com

Fashion Deals Update:

Stan Lee, the man who brought superheroes to life, dies at 95

ABC News

SPECIAL NEWS BULLETIN:

http://www.acrx.org -As millions of Americans strive to deal with the economic downturn,loss of jobs,foreclosures,high cost of gas,and the rising cost of prescription drug cost. Charles Myrick ,the President of American Consultants Rx, announced the re-release of the American Consultants Rx community service project which consist of millions of free discount prescription cards being donated to thousands of not for profits,hospitals,schools,churches,etc. in an effort to assist the uninsured,under insured,and seniors deal with the high cost of prescription drugs.-American Consultants Rx -Pharmacy Discount Network News

CHARITY UPDATE:

Click today to request your free ACRX discount prescription card and save up to 80% off of your medicine!

SPECIAL DONATION REQUEST UPDATE:

Please help American Consultants Rx achieve it’s biggest goal yet of donating over 30 million discount prescription cards to over 50k organizations in an effort to assist millions of Americans in need. Please click here to donate today!

A. Barry Rand, Among the First Black CEOs of a Publicly Traded Company, Dies at 73

Addison Barry Rand, known fondly as “Barry,” passed away on Thursday. Rand was an influential business leader who held many high-profile corporate positions. In fact, Rand rose to become Chairman and CEO of Avis Rent A Car Inc. in 1999, the third African American to assume the helm of one of the nation’s 500 largest publicly traded corporations.

Rand had a 31-year career at Xerox at one point heading the company’s then-$ 5-billion marketing group. During his tenure at Xerox, he went on to manage $ 18 billion in revenue and 70,000 employees in over 150 countries.

Rand was highly regarded for his business and marketing acumen. In 1968 he earned his B.S. in Marketing from American University. He first joined Xerox as a sales trainee, citing the company’s “contagious freedom of expression” where he could be “Barry Rand and not somebody’s idea of what I should be.”

He rose from sales representative to executive vice president for worldwide operations. While at Xerox, he was instrumental in ensuring minorities and women had every opportunity for advancement at the company. Under his leadership, Xerox became the most diverse company in the Fortune 50.

He left Xerox in 1999. ”Barry was one of the most loved and respected leaders here, and not just because he succeeded against the odds as an African American,” said Anne M. Mulcahy, a-then Xerox executive vice president told The New York Times in 1999.

When Rand left Xerox to head Avis, he became one of the first African Americans to achieve such a position at a Fortune 500 company and one of the first to lead a publicly-traded company. According to The New York Times, another business icon, Ken Chenault, recommended Rand to Avis.

“Avis offers a great opportunity,” Rand said at the time in a January 2000 interview with Black Enterprise magazine. “It is a Fortune 500 company. It has an international dimension. It is a company that fits my skill set…”

In 2009, AARP tapped Rand as its new chief executive. He was attracted to AARP’s dedication to fighting for the rights of older Americans. He said back then, “AARP’s resources are immense, but so are the goals that it seeks to achieve. The fight will not be easy, but if I’ve learned one thing in my career, it’s that nothing worthwhile ever is.”

The business leader also served as the volunteer chairman of Howard University’s board of trustees. At Howard University, he established the Helen Matthews Rand Endowed Scholarship. Named for his mother, a teacher and principal, the scholarship provides full tuition and a laptop to students pursuing a degree in teacher education. Recipients must make a two-year commitment to teaching in an inner-city or urban environment upon completing their degrees.

Rand is survived by a wife, daughter, and son.

Black Enterprise interview with A. Barry Rand:



The post A. Barry Rand, Among the First Black CEOs of a Publicly Traded Company, Dies at 73 appeared first on Black Enterprise.

Career | Black Enterprise

EMPLOYMENT UPDATE:

Kitty O’Neil, deaf Hollywood stuntwoman who worked on ‘Wonder Woman,’ dies at 72

Kitty O’Neil, a longtime Hollywood stuntwoman whose illustrious career included setting numerous records for speed and performing action sequences in place of Lynda Carter for “Wonder Woman,” has died at 72.

She passed away in South Dakota last Friday from pneumonia, The Washington Post reported.

/entertainment – New York Daily News

SPECIAL DEALS UPDATE:

Unvaccinated child dies from flu in Florida

A child in Florida who wasn’t vaccinated has died from getting the flu.
ABC News: Health

SPECIAL NEWS BULLETIN:

http://www.acrx.org -As millions of Americans strive to deal with the economic downturn,loss of jobs,foreclosures,high cost of gas,and the rising cost of prescription drug cost. Charles Myrick ,the President of American Consultants Rx, announced the re-release of the American Consultants Rx community service project which consist of millions of free discount prescription cards being donated to thousands of not for profits,hospitals,schools,churches,etc. in an effort to assist the uninsured,under insured,and seniors deal with the high cost of prescription drugs.-American Consultants Rx -Pharmacy Discount Network News

BEST DEAL UPDATE BY AMERICAN CONSULTANTS RX:

Click today to request your free ACRX discount prescription card and save up to 80% off of your medicine!

SPECIAL DONATION REQUEST UPDATE:

Please help American Consultants Rx achieve it’s biggest goal yet of donating over 30 million discount prescription cards to over 50k organizations in an effort to assist millions of Americans in need. Please click here to donate today!

Jim Taylor, Hall of Fame Former Fullback for the Green Bay Packers, Dies at 83

(GREEN BAY, Wis.) — Hall of Fame fullback Jim Taylor of the Green Bay Packers has died at 83.

The team says a family friend told the Packers he died early Saturday.

Taylor played on the great Packer teams and was the league’s MVP in 1962. He won four NFL titles and scored the first rushing touchdown in Super Bowl history.

Taylor spent 10 seasons in the NFL after being drafted in the second round by Green Bay in 1958 out of LSU. He joined a backfield that featured Paul Hornung and began to thrive when Packers coach Vince Lombardi took over in 1959.

Lombardi came up with the concept of the Packers Sweep, which featured pulling guards and Taylor or Hornung running around the end. But it was 6-foot, 216-pound Taylor who showed the play’s punishing promise.

Sports – TIME

ENTERTAINMENT DEAL UPDATE:

Crew member for Tom Hanks’ Mr. Rogers movie dies in accident on set

A member of the sound crew for an upcoming Mr. Rogers biopic fell two stories to his death in an accident on set, officials confirmed.

James Emswiller, 61, was taking a break from filming “You Are My Friend” starring Tom Hanks at around 7:30 p.m. Thursday when he suffered an apparent medical emergency…

/entertainment – New York Daily News

SPECIAL DEALS UPDATE:

Daughter of former Post owner Abe Hirschfeld dies at 72

Rachel Hirschfeld, daughter of late, former Post owner and noted eccentric Abe Hirschfeld, has died. She was 72. Her passing last week in California was confirmed by her brother and real-estate developer, Elie. The cause was not disclosed. Hirschfeld was a renowned animal-welfare lawyer, focusing on estate planning and advocacy. She was one of the…
Media | New York Post

SPECIAL DISCOUNT DEAL:

‘The Hate U Give’ screenwriter dies day before film’s release at age of 58

The screenwriter behind the brand new film, “The Hate U Give” died following a years-long battle with cancer a day before the movie’s release. She was 58.

Audrey Wells succumbed to her illness on Thursday, according to The Hollywood Reporter.

“Over the last five and half years, Audrey fought valiantly…

/entertainment – New York Daily News

SPECIAL DEALS UPDATE: