Rochelle Humes bans diet talk around daughters

OHMYGOSSIP — Rochelle Humes has banned diet talk around her young daughters.
The star – who has Alaia-Mai, six, and Valentina, two, with husband Marvin Humes – explained how she wants her girls to grow up without worrying too much about their weight, and she has even scolded her own mother for breaking the important rule.
She told The Mirror: “She was like, ‘Oh I need to go on a diet before your birthday’. That’s fine to say to me, but I don’t like that around my girls.
“I’ll be like, ‘Right, we need to eat this because we need to look after our teeth.’ ”
Meanwhile, Rochelle’s husband Marvin previously insisted the couple have no more plans to add to their brood, and he revealed they are “done” having children.
He said:”I always say never say never but I’m pretty sure that we’re done [having kids] now. We’re very lucky, do you know what I mean?
“We’re lucky to have such a great family. I was never that dad that was desperate to have a boy, I love having two girls, and we’re very happy.”
And the 34-year-old singer and DJ feels “extremely lucky” to have Rochelle, 28, in his life.
He recently added: “Regardless of what position you’re in we are extremely lucky. I think I’ve got my parents to thank from my side because they’re still together and they’ve been my role models in life, my dad’s taught me a lot. “Ultimately she’s my best friend, we love each other very much and we’re lucky enough to have each other. We’ve been together for nine years now, it feels like nine months but so much has happened and we’ve been through some incredible moments. We’re very grateful and know how lucky we are.”

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Heart Health Scare Leads to Plant-Based Diet and Lifestyle Changes

February is Heart Health Awareness Month, a time to remind ourselves that heart conditions can often be prevented when people make healthy choices and manage their health conditions.

Steve Peters, a 57-year-old game designer from Culver City, California, is a perfect example. Last year, he began to find it difficult to do the things he enjoyed, such as riding his bike to the beach. Even climbing stairs became a challenge.

“I was getting out of breath very easily, and just assumed it was because I was overweight and out of shape,” Peters said.

Peters suffered from high blood pressure and type 2 diabetes, but said those conditions were under control with medication and that shortness of breath was not something he had experienced before.

One day, he was walking home from lunch with friends and had to stop 6 times to catch his breath. “My chest was tight; it felt like I was having a heart attack,” he recalled.

Within a week, Peters ended up in the intensive care unit at Kaiser Permanente West Los Angeles Medical Center, where a sonogram of his heart and chest revealed one liter of fluid surrounding his heart. After a procedure to extract the fluid around his heart, Peters said: “I immediately felt 100 percent better, like a Ferrari engine had been put in me.”

After this health scare, his cardiologist, Jennifer Nguyen, MD, worked with him to implement lifestyle changes to further reduce his risk of having a heart attack.

“Based on his risk factors, I told him that he is at increased risk of having a heart attack and needed to make a major lifestyle change,” Dr. Nguyen said.

Since Peters had struggled to lose weight in the past, Dr. Nguyen recommended he adopt a plant-based diet, which he has been adhering to since last June. He already has lost 25 pounds and hopes to lose 25 more.

“My type 2 diabetes is turning around, and my bloodwork is finally in the normal range,” Peters said, adding he hopes to get off some of his medications soon. “I’m not the kind of guy who likes to count calories, but it has been easier than I thought to avoid meat, dairy, and processed sugar.” He noted that he allows himself a few “cheat days” every now and then.

Peters is taking charge of his health, and encourages others to do the same.

“What I learned over the last year is that if something doesn’t feel right, don’t be shy about it,” he said. “Don’t ignore it! Bring up your concerns to your doctor. They can only act on the information you give them.”

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Even When Not In Rome, Eat A Mediterranean Diet To Cut Heart Disease Risk

Once again, your mother was right. You really do need to eat your vegetables. And while you are at it, put down the bacon and pick up the olive oil, because new research supports the contention that switching to a Mediterranean diet could significantly decrease the risk of heart disease.

According to a study published Friday in JAMA Network Open, people who followed this type of diet had 25 percent less risk of developing cardiovascular disease over the course of 12 years.

The diet’s components make sense to anyone who follows nutrition news. Avoid red meat in favor of “good” fats like fish and poultry. Swap out salt for herbs and spices. Ditch butter and margarine and opt for olive oil instead. Most important, eat a lot of fruits and vegetables. Nuts are good, so are whole grains. And, every once in a while, have a glass of red wine.

Since the 1950s, researchers have pointed out this diet’s possible cardiovascular benefits. More recently, it has been credited with addressing any number of ills, including Alzheimer’s disease, asthma and helping pregnant women control factors that lead to high-birth-weight babies and contribute to obesity risk factors as kids grow.

Until Friday’s study, though, no randomized trials had been conducted in the U.S. to determine this diet’s long-term effects. This research also sought to shed light on the molecular underpinnings of why.

The mechanisms by which the Mediterranean diet reduced cardiovascular disease “were sort of a black box,” said Shafqat Ahmad, the lead author of the paper and a researcher in the department of nutrition at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. “We know it reduced cardiovascular risk,” he added, but the precise ways it had this effect over time “are not well understood.”

Ahmad and his co-authors, using a panel of nine biomarkers in blood tests, were able to isolate exactly why the diet reduces heart disease.

The three biggest biological mechanisms were changes in inflammation, blood sugar and body mass index.

Inflammation was the issue for Meg Grigoletti, a 23-year-old graduate student from New Jersey who switched to a Mediterranean diet when she was recovering from back surgery in 2014. Her doctors recommended it to reduce swelling, hoping it would ease the pain in her back and help her migraines.

“It’s more of a lifestyle than a diet,” Grigoletti said. “It taught me what food is good for me and what’s not.”

Researchers followed more than 25,000 women who were part of the Women’s Health Study, a survey of female health professionals older than 45. At the beginning of the study, participants completed a questionnaire on 131 different foods to assess their diets. They were then assigned different “MED scores” on a scale of 1 to 9, based on how closely they followed the Mediterranean diet.

There were three levels, people who scored between zero and 3 were on the low end, 4 to 5 was in the middle and 6 and up was categorized as a high intake of Mediterranean diet foods.

The participants’ cardiovascular health was then tracked for 12 years.

When all was said and done, those in the middle category saw a 23 percent reduction in risk, and the upper category had 28 percent less risk of cardiovascular disease.

Heart disease is the leading cause of death for both men and women, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention — claiming about 600,000 lives each year. Coronary heart disease is the most common form, killing more than 370,000 people annually. Each year, about 735,000 Americans have a heart attack.

The authors pointed out that these findings do have limitations. For instance, the study relied on self-reported data, which isn’t always accurate — especially when it involves diet choices. The participants, all of whom were female health professionals, also might lean toward healthier behaviors than the rest of the population.

The results of the study weren’t a shock to Dr. Andrew Freeman, the director of cardiovascular prevention and wellness at National Jewish Health hospital in Denver. He wasn’t involved in the study but has been recommending a Mediterranean diet, or a similar version of it that emphasizes vegetables and fruit, to his patients for years.

“There’s a lot of noise out there, but the signal that’s been out there the longest is this kind of plant-based diet is the best.”

He also acknowledged that there is a lot of competing nutritional information swirling around the airwaves and the internet, which amounts to “a whole lot of hype” that makes healthy eating habits a difficult regimen for many consumers.

And doctors often don’t have clear information, either. “The vast majority of cardiologists and health providers in general have very little nutrition training,” Freeman said.

He switched to a mostly plant-based diet after his residency, and lost 35 pounds. He now recommends this approach to his patients, too. He said he has seen his patients’ conditions — heart disease, high blood pressure and diabetes — improve.

“Nutrition and lifestyle medicine is the place where there’s a chance of a cure,” Freeman said.

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