Former Moschino Employee Accuses Store Manager of Racial Profiling in New Lawsuit

On the very day that ​Italian luxury fashion house Moschino was celebrating Federico Fellini at its ​Pre-Fall 2019 collection​ presentation​​ came the news that the brand was being sued by a former employee who alleges, among dozens of other claims, that a West Hollywood Moschino retailer was …

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Former Black Employee Files Suit Against Moschino for Racially Profiling Black Shoppers

Shamael Lataillade, a former employee at a Moschino boutique in West Hollywood, California, filed a lawsuit against the Italian luxury clothing company for racial discrimination against her and shoppers of color. In the suit, Lataillade claims that employees at the store were instructed to racially profile black patrons who didn’t appear to be wealthy and classify them using a racist codename.

Lataillade says a store supervisor would call black clientele “Serena” and ordered employees to follow and watch them closely if they weren’t wearing diamonds or name brand clothing, according to documents obtained by TMZ. Associates were also told to tell so-called “Serenas” that certain items were out of stock. The female supervisor even went as far as sometimes recording the license plate numbers of black clients. In one instance, she purportedly called the police to report a “suspicious” customer who Lataillade says turned out to be a high-profile rapper.

In addition, Lataillade, who is a Haitian-American woman, claims that the supervisor stereotyped her as someone who practices voodoo. Lataillade argues that she was then fired for speaking out about the “Serena” code word and other forms of racism she faced.

Ironically, the code word “Serena” seems to be a reference to iconic tennis star Serena Williams, who boasts a net worth around $ 180 million.

In response to the suit, which seeks unspecified damages, Moschino denied Lataillade’s charges and told TMZ the company “complies with applicable equal employment laws and values and respects all customers and clients regardless of their race or background.”

Nevertheless, this lawsuit points to the notorious phenomenon of “shopping while black,” an epidemic that dates back to the 20th century, when department stores prohibited black shoppers from using their main entrance and trying on clothes in fear their skin would tarnished items. Oprah Winfrey even fell victim to the “shopping while black” stigma back in 2013, when a Zurich store clerk snubbed the billionaire and suggested that she could not afford a $ 38,000 purse.

The post Former Black Employee Files Suit Against Moschino for Racially Profiling Black Shoppers appeared first on Black Enterprise.

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Kaiser Permanente Donates $10,000 to American Diabetes Association in Honor of Outstanding Employee Volunteer

HONOLULU — Kaiser Permanente Hawaii is donating $ 10,000 to the American Diabetes Association in recognition of the outstanding volunteer efforts of Anne LaPorte, RN, CDE, an endocrinology nurse and certified diabetes educator at Kaiser Permanente’s Honolulu Medical Office. LaPorte is the third of six employees to be recognized for her volunteer service with the opportunity to donate $ 10,000 to a nonprofit of her choice, in celebration of Kaiser Permanente’s 60th anniversary in Hawaii.

“Anne is a passionate advocate for diabetes education, in our Kaiser Permanente clinic as well as in the community,” said Dave Underriner, president of Kaiser Foundation Health Plan and Hospitals, Hawaii Region. “Her dedication to creating healthier communities through proactive measures such as education and access is a reflection of our organization’s commitment to improving health and wellness in Hawaii.”

LaPorte specializes in diabetes education at Kaiser Permanente, and for the past five years has volunteered her expertise to support education and prevention initiatives for the American Diabetes Association Hawaii office. She runs a support group for Kaiser Permanente members and non-members with type 1 diabetes, which has evolved into a community resource for people living with diabetes. She also frequently participates in educational programs and health fairs at local schools and businesses to educate the community about preventing diabetes through healthy habits and behaviors. Through ADA, LaPorte collaborated with Zippy’s Restaurants to create a diabetes-friendly menu offering healthy alternatives for diners with diabetes. LaPorte has been recognized by ADA’s Hawaii Chapter as the nurse educator of the year for the past two years.

Kaiser Permanente has a long history of giving back to Hawaii’s communities and supporting local nonprofits, schools and government initiatives through grants, sponsorships and volunteerism. From 2013 to 2017, Kaiser Permanente Hawaii contributed $ 3.4 million in grant funding to community organizations, government agencies and partners to promote health statewide. Every year, the organization brings together thousands of employees and their family members to participate in volunteer projects, including environmental restoration for Kaiser Permanente’s annual Martin Luther King Jr. Day of Service, campus beautification at Hawaii schools, and health screenings at the Special Olympics and other community events.


About Kaiser Permanente
Kaiser Permanente is committed to helping shape the future of health care. We are recognized as one of America’s leading health care providers and not-for-profit health plans. Founded in 1945, Kaiser Permanente has a mission to provide high-quality, affordable health care services and to improve the health of our members and the communities we serve. We currently serve more than 12.2 million members in eight states and the District of Columbia. Care for members and patients is focused on their total health and guided by their personal Permanente Medical Group physicians, specialists and team of caregivers. Our expert and caring medical teams are empowered and supported by industry-leading technology advances and tools for health promotion, disease prevention, state-of-the-art care delivery and world-class chronic disease management. Kaiser Permanente is dedicated to care innovations, clinical research, health education and the support of community health. For more information, go to kp.org/share.

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Kaiser Permanente Hawaii Welcomes New Regional Director of Employee and Labor Relations

HONOLULU — Kaiser Permanente Hawaii has hired Kristie Chorny as the Hawaii Region director of employee and labor relations. She will provide leadership and guidance within the areas of labor relations, employee relations and equal employment opportunity/affirmative action for the organization’s Hawaii Region.

Chorny brings over 20 years of experience in human resources and labor relations to her role, serving most recently as director of Labor Relations at Kaiser Permanente Northern California, one of the organization’s largest regions. She provided labor relations consultation and support in a region consisting of over 73,000 bargaining unit employees and serving more than 4 million health plan members throughout 21 hospitals and 30 medical office facilities.

As Hawaii Region director, Chorny supports labor strategies for staffing effectiveness and operational effectiveness initiatives. Her accomplishments include work on Kaiser Permanente’s Labor Management Partnership, an innovative model for labor relations that provides an integrated and collaborative approach to contract negotiations and quality care delivery.

Prior to joining Kaiser Permanente, Chorny’s career included management and labor relations roles at Kellogg, Foss Maritime and Verizon Communications. She earned her bachelor’s degree in human resource management and master’s degree in organizational management from Spring Arbor University in Spring Arbor, Michigan.


About Kaiser Permanente
Kaiser Permanente is committed to helping shape the future of health care. We are recognized as one of America’s leading health care providers and not-for-profit health plans. Founded in 1945, Kaiser Permanente has a mission to provide high-quality, affordable health care services and to improve the health of our members and the communities we serve. We currently serve more than 12.2 million members in eight states and the District of Columbia. Care for members and patients is focused on their total health and guided by their personal Permanente Medical Group physicians, specialists and team of caregivers. Our expert and caring medical teams are empowered and supported by industry-leading technology advances and tools for health promotion, disease prevention, state-of-the-art care delivery and world-class chronic disease management. Kaiser Permanente is dedicated to care innovations, clinical research, health education and the support of community health. For more information, go to kp.org/share.

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These 6 Tips Can Help You Move From From Part-Time to Full-Time Employee

Wishing for more from your part-time or seasonal gig?

For workers who’d prefer to be full-time, the difference goes beyond a bigger paycheck.

Depending on the company, full-time employment can mean a benefits package that includes health insurance and paid time off along with the stability of a reliable schedule.

As of November 2018, more than 4.8 million part-time workers in the U.S. said they’d rather be working full time, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. That’s 2.9% of the labor force.

Although that group was nearly twice as large (9,233,000) in March 2010, the most recent figure is still larger than the pre-recession lows of 3,900,000 back in March 2006.

And that number doesn’t count “voluntary” part-time workers, which includes those who might otherwise want to be full time but have to cut back on work hours due to rising child care expenses or family caregiving costs.

But making the leap to full-time employee demands more than wishing. Read on for tips to turn your part-time gig into a more, ahem, full-filling career.

Going From Part-Time to Full-Time Work

 Emily Kapit poses for a portrait

Before rushing into your boss’s office to demand an increase in hours, consider what your goals are, advises career strategist Emily Kapit with ReFreshYourStep.com.

“Are you looking for a 40-hour-per-week job? Are you looking for simply more hours?” she asks. “Or are you looking for the full shebang, including benefits and everything?”

Preparation is essential, since asking for full-time status should be no different than negotiating a job offer or salary increase, Kapit says.

Here are six tips to arm you for the ask.

Know What Is the Difference Between Part Time and Full Time

Researching your company’s policies should be your first step, since the definition of part time and full time can vary by employer.

Although the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics identifies part-time employees as individuals working one to 34 hours per week, the Fair Labor Standards Act, the federal wage and hour law, doesn’t define full- or part-time employment.

That means one company’s full-time employee could work 40 hours, while another might consider anyone working more than 32 hours full time. And benefits associated with those classifications can vary, too.

Consult your human resources department, hiring manager or employee manual to help you understand your organization’s policy.

List Your Accomplishments

Now is not the time to be humble.

If you’re going to make the case to your boss that the company needs you more, you’ll need to present measurable accomplishments from your part-time tenure, according to Kapit.

“What have you done that has made a difference, that has been impactful, that would not have happened without you?” Kapit asks.

To simplify the process for identifying your achievements, she suggests answering three questions: What did you do? How did you do it? What was the outcome?

This method also applies to seasonal workers even if you’ve only been at the job for a few weeks.

“You have less time to prove yourself,” Kapit says. “But it’s also the nature of the job to have done a lot in a short amount of time.”

Make Your Boss’s Job Easier

Building a good relationship with your boss can help solidify your place on the team. One good way to do that is by volunteering to take on tasks that make your supervisor’s job easier, Kapit advises.

“If your manager knows they can depend on you and that you are being proactive and have foresight into what’s happening, that’s how you build a really strong relationship,” she says.

By changing your mindset so you no longer view the job as temporary, you’ll demonstrate why you deserve to be there full time, according to Scott Waletzke, head of enterprise recruitment strategy at Adecco Staffing USA.

“Set yourself apart and be that individual who is going to have that positive outlook or that positive attitude every single day when you come into work,” he says. “View that job as just an extended interview.”

Network With Those Who’ve Made the Leap

If you haven’t already, introduce yourself to other employees who have successfully made the leap from part time to full time, Kapit advises.

“Ask them for their insight, ask them for their support — especially if they had to have that same conversation with the same [supervisor],” she says.

Networking is a great way to garner support, but Kapit cautions that it only works as part of a bigger strategy.

“If you have built all the great relationships but have really not done anything, that’s really not going to be helpful,” she says. “The main game plan is do a great job because it’s all going to boil down to: How have you been impactful?”

Prepare to Negotiate

So when’s the best time to talk to your boss about your desire for full-time employment?

“There’s no time like the present,” Waletzke says. “No one’s going to know what you want out of that job unless you tell them what you’re looking for.”

And by going in prepared with your list of needs and accomplishments, you’ll be ready to confidently approach the negotiation as a discussion rather than a plea, Kapit says.

“That question, ‘What can we do?’ is very strategic,” she says. “It’s opening it up as a true dialogue between two people, as opposed to ‘I want this’ or ‘I’ll defer to you.’”

And don’t forget to think outside the box — or your current job at the company.

“If it’s not in your current role, perhaps there is another full-time position available in another department,” Kapit says. “This is particularly true for seasonal employees looking to make a post-holiday leap.”

Always Be Looking

Even armed with a list of accomplishments and an armada of advocates, your boss might say no to your request to become a full-time employee.

“Unfortunately, as an employee, you don’t necessarily always see behind the scenes,” says Waletzke, who notes there are any number of reasons a boss may decline, including budgetary reasons or hiring criteria restrictions.

If you’re a seasonal or temporary worker, Waletzke strongly recommends finishing the assignment, since your manager might provide a reference — or possibly a job in the future.

“Definitely stick it out and stay for the long haul, because you might even pick up some skills along the way,” he says.

By developing a professional, well-researched approach, you’re creating a guide for your ongoing career journey, Kapit stresses.

“Know that’s it’s not personal, and it’s just a matter of continuing your job search,” says Kapit. She adds that until you find a job that offers you the hours and pay you want, “You should always be looking.”

Tiffany Wendeln Connors is a staff writer at The Penny Hoarder. Data journalist Alex Mahadevan contributed to this article.

This was originally published on The Penny Hoarder, which helps millions of readers worldwide earn and save money by sharing unique job opportunities, personal stories, freebies and more. The Inc. 5000 ranked The Penny Hoarder as the fastest-growing private media company in the U.S. in 2017.

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Ray Charles Foundation Employee Claims She Was Fired After Uncovering Possible Fraud

The Ray Charles Foundation is being sued by a former employee who claims she was fired after she reported possible fraudulent transactions.

According to court documents obtained by The Blast, Thu Tran says she worked as an accountant for the charitable organization from 2014 until she was let go on July 9, 2018.

Tran claims in January, she complained to a member of the board of directors about “suspected misappropriate of funds, diversion of charitable assets, and other fraudulent conduct.”

The suit says that Tran believed Valerie Ervin, president of the foundation, “had engaged in suspicious financial transactions related to a vehicle purchase, travel expenses, and home improvement, among others matters.”

In the following months, Tran claims that Ervin “began to systematically strip away” her job duties and excluded her from board meeting she had previously attended. Tran claims she was also kept out of financial and tax audit meetings.

Tran claims that in “an effort to avoid unwanted attention and embarrassment of a possible investigation into misappropriation of funds and assets,” Ervin terminated several board members and employees of the foundation.

Then in July, Tran claims she was let go by the Ray Charles Foundation.

Tran is suing the foundation and Ervin, claiming wrongful termination and other workplace-related violations. She is seeking unspecified damages.

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Tesla is seeking $167 million in damages from the former employee Elon Musk accused of sabotage

Tesla's legal battle with ex-employee Martin Tripp is turning even more acrimonious. The electric vehicle maker is now seeking $ 167 million in damages from the former process engineer, Nevada case filings reveal. 
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Kaiser Permanente Honors Employee Volunteerism With $10,000 Donation

HONOLULU — Kaiser Permanente Hawaii is donating $ 10,000 to Breastfeeding Hawaii in recognition of the outstanding volunteer efforts of Jane Gallagher Felix, APRN, a registered nurse in the obstetrics-gynecology department at Kaiser Permanente Koolau Medical Office. Felix is the second of six employees to be recognized for her volunteer service with the opportunity to donate $ 10,000 to a nonprofit of her choice, in celebration of Kaiser Permanente’s 60th anniversary in Hawaii.

“Jane has gone above and beyond in her commitment to supporting the health of mothers and babies across Hawaii, and we’re proud to honor her volunteer service with this donation,” said Dave Underriner, president of Kaiser Foundation Health Plan and Hospitals, Hawaii Region. “Kaiser Permanente Hawaii believes in giving back to the communities we serve, and we’re grateful for the opportunity to celebrate our 60th anniversary by recognizing our passionate and dedicated employees.”

Felix has chosen to direct her donation to Breastfeeding Hawaii, a nonprofit with a mission to improve the health of women and children through breastfeeding education and support. Breastfeeding Hawaii is the state affiliate of the United States Breastfeeding Committee, a national public health coalition. A longtime board member and current board secretary, Felix is involved with educational program development, research, strategy, outreach and community events for the organization. She volunteers her time to educate expecting parents at events such as the Baby Expo, meets with pediatricians and partners to discuss education efforts and is part of a team that is working to organize a donor breast milk bank in Hawaii.

Kaiser Permanente has a long history of giving back to Hawaii’s communities, supporting local nonprofits, schools and government initiatives through grants, sponsorships and volunteerism. From 2013 to 2017, Kaiser Permanente Hawaii contributed $ 3.4 million in grant funding to community organizations, government agencies and partners to promote health statewide. Every year, the organization brings together thousands of employees and their family members to participate in volunteer projects, including environmental restoration for Kaiser Permanente’s annual Martin Luther King Jr. Day of Service, campus beautification at Hawaii schools, and health screenings at the Special Olympics and other community events.


About Kaiser Permanente
Kaiser Permanente is committed to helping shape the future of health care. We are recognized as one of America’s leading health care providers and not-for-profit health plans. Founded in 1945, Kaiser Permanente has a mission to provide high-quality, affordable health care services and to improve the health of our members and the communities we serve. We currently serve more than 12.2 million members in eight states and the District of Columbia. Care for members and patients is focused on their total health and guided by their personal Permanente Medical Group physicians, specialists and team of caregivers. Our expert and caring medical teams are empowered and supported by industry-leading technology advances and tools for health promotion, disease prevention, state-of-the-art care delivery and world-class chronic disease management. Kaiser Permanente is dedicated to care innovations, clinical research, health education and the support of community health. For more information, go to: kp.org/share.

The post Kaiser Permanente Honors Employee Volunteerism With $ 10,000 Donation appeared first on Kaiser Permanente.

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Amazon the latest big tech firm to face employee revolt

Workers at tech giants are beginning to take action when they don’t like what their powerful employers are up to. This week, Amazon employees are reportedly looking to force Chief Executive Jeff Bezos to address the company’s controversial sale of facial-recognition technology to law enforcement agencies, including ICE. The plan, according to e-mails viewed by…
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Is Employee Advocacy at Odds with Building Your Personal Brand?

Within the past several years, companies have adopted digital employee advocacy as a way to harness the power of their workforce for low-cost, high-impact marketing, sales, and recruiting. But if you are an employee, you may be questioning whether your quest to be loud and proud for your company conflicts with your goal of building your personal brand.

Your Social Networks Are Your Currency

When you first tweeted in 2009, you began to piece together a following that may predate your time at your current job—including those LinkedIn contacts; classmates from your alma mater; and relationships that span the gamut of your professional existence. Your Facebook page is a virtual backyard barbecue that includes, in some cases, people with whom you even went to elementary school. Are they really that excited to hear about your company?

Your networks are your currency. Your social platforms are your real estate. They have value, and your company recognizes this. Do you?

Now, consider again if you have allowed the employee advocacy movement to come into conflict, or worse, overtake your personal brand real estate, and/or currency. It is very easy to do. If you work for a company that you are proud of, it doesn’t take much to inundate your social networks with your company news and never think twice about it.

That digital advocacy platform is just the convenient and gentle nudge you need to deliver your company’s expectations. And after all, it is opt-in; it’s pretty and user-friendly and takes little to no thought to share. No one is forcing you to post. Right?

Employees as Company Influencers

Here are some of the latest predictions for employee advocacy from Everyone Social. Among them, professional use of personal brand handles is surging. That prediction is linked to the idea that the algorithms on popular sites are putting the squeeze on brands, making it tougher for their organic content to be seen unless they fork over a sizeable spend.

Let us also consider the other popular method that brands use to hopscotch the algorithm predicament: influencer marketing. According to recent research, brands are spending billions of dollars with individuals to share their messages, products, and services with their communities, less likely reached by companies because they lack the strength of niche influence that celebrities and even micro influencers wield.

So, companies are beginning to opt for employees as influencers because outside of the cost of the platform itself, employee advocacy is essentially next-gen, mini-micro influencer marketing on a budget.

Ted Rubin, CMO of Photofy and emcee/host of Brand Innovators Summits, says digital employee advocacy—if executed correctly by the brand—can work for the company and the employee.

“If executed correctly by the brand, and it rarely if ever is, the two can work together to great advantage for both the brand and the employee,” said Rubin. “I believe employee advocacy is most often a win for the brand but can be a much bigger long-lasting win, and truly empower employees, if executed to best advantage with employee benefit at the heart.”

The Importance of Personal Branding

Is personal branding really that important? Experts say now, more than ever, positioning oneself digitally for the next opportunity is paramount, whether it is within your current company or somewhere else. It can be as simple as a powerful summary on your LinkedIn page, or as involved as contributing as a thought leader to a respected publication. Even a blog or compelling microblogging or social posts can go a long way.

And this isn’t selfish or self-promotion, despite what some may believe. This is career survival in the digital age.

Building your personal brand is also smart. Consider that with many companies right-sizing for digital transformation, or shifting to meet consumer and customer demands, often that means surplus. In June 2018 alone, many of the most recognizable brands announced layoffs. The trend will likely continue as more automation takes over like artificial intelligence.

John G. Graham Jr., employer brand and digital evangelist, suggests employee advocacy and personal branding can and should co-exist, but employee advocacy extends past social platforms through speaking opportunities and other spokesperson opportunities. He travels the world sharing how it should work.

“The promise that I offer to employees who engage in advocacy efforts on behalf of the company is visibility and exposure of their personal brand to broader audiences,” Graham said. “Yes, the employer brand is gaining visibility and exposure as a secondary benefit but the reality is you’re raising your profile by adding value to your personal networks via relevant content that resonates. It’s really a win-win.”

However, Graham warns about sharing company news on your personal social networks.

“I don’t advocate that employees share company content through their personal profiles, for a few reasons: 1) Your network isn’t that interested in your company if the content you’re sharing isn’t relevant to their own personal interests. 2) It’s viewed as disingenuous and inauthentic. 3) The company has corporate channels that employees can share content from if they choose.”

How Employees Can Control Their Personal Brands

So can this assumption that employees’ social platforms are fair game for a company hurt your chances of actually leveraging what is actually yours for a career advantage? Does it create a culture of expectation from peers and even superiors that if you aren’t sharing company news, you are not all in for the company? Can it cause colleagues or bosses to criticize posts that are solely about your career interests, thoughts, and aspirations? Do these company initiatives create unreal expectations for their employees to leverage their social capital for nothing in return?

Dare we ask, is this exploitation?

Graham says that employees can and should take control of their social handles, social equity, social media currency, communities, and networks and that can also benefit your company. He says employer brands should provide shareable digital content that will add value to the employee and their personal networks. Otherwise, companies risk jeopardizing the very trust their employees have established with their own social networks.

“Leveraging the employee network as a means of extending company content reach and engagement, in my opinion only benefits the company at the potential risk of the employee networks being turned off by corporate exploitation,” he said. “Instead, companies should seek to curate value-add content that their employees can share so as to be more credible and valuable to their networks.”

He added, “Doing so ensures that if and when their employees share company-related content, their networks are more apt to engage with it because they’ve proven themselves trustworthy and a reliable source of content worth engaging with in the past.”

Companies: Be Thoughtful about Employees’ Social Networks

Rubin shared advice on how brands can provide content that actually engages your employee’s social communities instead of turning them off with commercialism.

Set some formal guidelines, but stay fluid. Rubin says that if companies clamp down too hard on employees they may simply back away from participating. Train them, then crowdsource.

“Offer in-house social training, led by your best in-house (but only if you really have them) and local experts,” said Rubin “Consider offering incentive programs. It can be something as simple as public recognition, but reward those employees who provide the most relevant ideas and responses on how best to empower them to build and leverage their personal brands.”

Remember that your employees are your company’s best resource. Rubin says to make the most of employee passion and individuality.

“Provide content that helps them become experts, leaders, and go-to resources, he said. “They’re already social, so start thinking of how you can empower your employees to have their own voice, and you will discover many can, and will, become your company’s most active and valuable social advocates.”

Employees: Take Control of Your Social Capital

So now that you know you are one of your company’s most valued influencers, it is time to act like it. Here are three steps that I’ve learned since 2007 when most of these social platforms launched; running a small business that leveraged its employees as ambassadors online and even leveraging employee advocacy as part of communications plans for some familiar brands. They might help you navigate this brave new world of corporate employee advocacy while managing and growing your personal brand in the digital space.

Tip the scales in your own favor. Your company is great. They are doing wonderful things in the community. Awesome. They also have a marketing spend that dwarfs your own. In fact, you likely don’t have one. Engage the 80:20 rule if you just can’t help sharing about your company, or feel the pressure to from colleagues, dare I say, bosses. That 80% is for you. Spend time crafting a deliberate approach to delivering rich and useful content for your community that will benefit them. If a social share from your company aligns with your passions and brand and provided useful content, for example, tips and advice on career and leadership, share it; but do not alienate your community members who’d rather hear more about what they can relate to…most often, that is your ideas and useful shares that have meaning to you and by extension, them.

Have an informed point of view. This doesn’t mean the opinionated posts that aren’t grounded in data that have become the norm on Facebook. This is about your informed, research-driven and seasoned worldview when it comes to your industry and your business. Focus your content and shares on this sweet spot. Again, if company content aligns then share that too, but in moderation.

Guard your social real estate. It is precious. Don’t just give it away. Understand that it is the one place you have to add your unique value, tell your story, and tell it well. Have a deliberate approach that focuses on no more than three broad topic areas that align with your brand and execute against it methodically. Spend some time thinking about your purpose, and it will be apparent to your networks, recruiters, and prospects. Your job is a part of that story, but be careful not to make it the headline.

The post Is Employee Advocacy at Odds with Building Your Personal Brand? appeared first on Black Enterprise.

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