Little Known Black History Fact: Paul Winfield

Over the course of his career, the late Paul Winfield was a critically acclaimed actor who was just the third Black person nominated for an acting Oscar. The Los Angeles native was born on May 22, 1939.

Winfield spent a portion of his youth in Portland, Oregon before returning to his hometown to complete high school. Facing segregation and racism at every turn, Winfield turned to acting and was mentored while in school en route to earning a scholarship to Yale University.

He turned down the scholarship and was quoted saying he felt the responsibility of attending a “rich school” in his words, would prove too difficult. He instead opted to study theater at the University of Oregon, Stanford University, and UCLA.

In 1966, actor Burgess Meredith gave Winfield his first big break by casting him in a pair of plays by poet Amiri Baraka (LeRoi Jones). Sidney Poitier helped Winfield get his first credited movie role in 1969 in the film The Lost Man, and in 1973, he was nominated for the Best Actor Academy Award for the film Sounder.

In 1994, Winfield won the Outstanding Guest Actor Emmy Award for his role in CBS’ Picket Fences after being nominated twice before. He was also an established voice and television actor, appearing in a number of bit roles well into the 21st Century.

Winfield was a gay man but rarely displayed that part of his personal life. He passed in 2004 at the age of 64.


HEAD BACK TO THE BLACKAMERICAWEB.COM HOMEPAGE

 

Black America Web

ENTERTAINMENT UPDATE:

The More You Know: Anyone Can Have PTSD. In Fact, You May Have It Right Now.

Woman sitting home alone

Source: Vladimir Vladimirov / Getty

From May 12-18 it’s National Women’s Health Week, an annual effort put on by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Office to encourage women to be as healthy as possible. To help observe the week, we’re speaking with experts about everything from mental health, diet, pregnancy, fertility issues and more. 

The first time I thought that I may be suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder, I was on the phone weeping to my mother about my period.

Just a few months prior, I’d experienced a miscarriage. It was my first pregnancy, one that I was overjoyed about. I was elated to the point where I was walking around the baby section in Target, beaming at my thoughts for the near future.

When things didn’t work out as I’d hoped, I was heartbroken, but life had to go on. I opted to miscarry naturally, a process I read online could last a few weeks. Unfortunately for me, the process lasted three months. I bled every day, had contractions that I feared, and sobbed on the toilet while looking down at my reality. For three months, I was held captive to my pain, not fully able to let go of the sadness because my body wouldn’t hurry up and let go of the fetus. When it finally did, I tried my best to be strong, but I realized that so many things ended up being a trigger, a reminder of the grief I’d experienced. I found myself speed walking past that same baby aisle in Target to keep myself from acknowledging the shame I was feeling. When I finally stopped bleeding, and then my menstrual cycle began a few weeks later, I started bawling. I was mentally exhausted and tired of seeing red. I couldn’t do it, even for just a few more days. Sitting on the toilet for too long reminded me of late nights I spent bent over, trying to find any sort of relief. Seeing babies reminded me of what I felt I was missing out on. Before I knew it, I was breaking down in tears on the phone with my mother, telling her that I felt like I had PTSD. At the same time though, I assumed I was being overdramatic. “People who have PTSD have been to wars, seen murders and survived attacks,” I would think to myself. I had experienced something that was sad, but common. I couldn’t be suffering from symptoms of something so serious, right?

According to New York metro area-based mental health professional Cindy Bowers, MA, LMHC, I very well could.

“Symptoms of PTSD can be prompted by any experience, direct or indirect, that is perceived to be traumatic,” she said. “Some examples of experiences that can contribute to symptoms of PTSD consist of witnessing or experiencing accidents and assaults, witnessing death or experiencing near-death events, military combat, significant loss of family members, home, employment and natural disasters.”

Those symptoms, according to Bowers, run the gamut. They can include thinking of your trauma to the point where you struggle to sleep, dealing with a strong sense of fear, avoiding things that can remind you of what you’ve been through, and having bodily reactions to memories of your disturbing experience. Such symptoms, whether one or a few, usually occur for at least a month.

“Following exposure to a traumatic event, one may experience symptoms such as intrusive, involuntary or distressing memories of the event, flashbacks, dreams and night terrors, sleep disturbance, memory loss, persistent negative thoughts and emotions associated with anger, shame and horror,” she said. “They may feel detached from their surroundings, exhibit self-destructive behaviors, avoidance of anything that is reminiscent of the event, and having other psychological or physiological reactions to the event.”

After finding myself an emotional wreck once again, I called my mom. She implored me to seek out a counselor to share my feelings with. While she could hear me out during my breakdowns, she was worried that she wasn’t saying the right things that could truly provide me with the support I needed. I was hesitant about the idea at first, but I couldn’t deny that I just needed someone to truly talk to. Bowers says that those who struggle with dark memories of trauma need to seek professional help. There are many options, including social workers, mental health clinicians, psychologists, psychiatrists and nurse practitioners who are experienced in treating PTSD.

“It is imperative for our community to be educated regarding the many forms in which post-traumatic stress disorder can impact them regardless of race, age, class, or socioeconomic status. Such knowledge equips us to access the readily available resources, such as community mental health clinics, private therapy and non-profit associations that provide linkage to PTSD resources, to get assistance,” she said. “It can also help people who feel they are impacted by symptoms of PTSD to have normalized conversations about their experience and reduce mental health stigma, particularly within the African-American community.”

However one chooses to go about dealing with the disorder, it’s important to know you’re not alone. Per the National Alliance for Mental Health, PTSD is something impacting 8 million Americans. Sadly, in addition, Black people have a higher chance of being impacted by violent crimes, which can trigger symptoms of PTSD.

Aside from seeking professional help, and contacting crisis hotlines when you need immediate help (such as The National Alliance of Mental Illness Helpline and National Alliance on Mental Illness), there are things you can do on your own to obtain some peace. With social media especially providing a lot of triggers for people, it’s important to also know how to cope through self-care by tuning and logging out.

“People can take a self-care approach to PTSD, particularly in the social media age, by limiting their exposure to trauma on social media, TV, or the radio,” she said. “There may be ways to set parameters to this content. Some people also take social media and other related breaks or cleanses periodically.”

“It’s also recommended to engage in a grounding activity,” Bowers added. “That can include a deep breathing exercise, a counting exercise in which one may count backwards from a particular number to de-escalate heightened feelings of anxiety, fear or anger, meditation, describing one’s surroundings to focus on the present, or having an object handy that symbolizes safety. Examples of those things can be furry objects, stress balls, a picture of someone or something significant, and having domesticated animals. Journaling can also be effective.”

I’ve done a little bit of everything to ground myself when I’m feeling emotionally overwhelmed by my memories. I log off of social media sometimes, or I use it to help me by searching for things that are humorous. I also do deep breathing in moments where people ask me triggering questions about my plans for parenthood. Nothing has helped more though than seeking out a counselor, whom I see biweekly.

All of these measures haven’t completely helped me to move on from what’s happened and not look back, but they’ve given me the strength to no longer be consumed by it all. More than a year after the beginning of that traumatic episode, I’m grateful to be where I am at now, because it’s far from where I used to be.

MadameNoire

BEST DEAL UPDATE:

Little Known Black History Fact: Sidney Bechet

Among the great pantheon of New Orleans Jazz artists, Sidney Bechet is rightfully near the top of that group of legends. The saxophonist was born May 14, 1897, and according to some, brought forth the concept of the soloist in his genre.

Bechet was largely a self-taught child prodigy who picked up the clarinet at the age of six. By the time he was a teenager, Bechet was a professional musician playing in several New Orleans bands. His playing style was described as improvisational and bold, often standing out among the ensemble sets of the bands.

After a stint with bandleader King Oliver’s group, Bechet moved to New York to join composer Will Marion Cook’s Syncopated Orchestra. It was with the Orchestra that Bechet toured Europe and discovered the straight saxophone, and instrument he remained with for the duration of his professional career. As noted by experts, Bechet was able to bring his bold, innovative style of playing the clarinet to the saxophone.

While in Europe, Bechet spent about a year in jail after a gunfight broke out between him and some other musicians. In his autobiography “Treat It Gentle.” Bechet wrote that he accidentally shot a woman but was trying to shoot a man who insulted him and his playing. After his release from a Paris jail, Bechet was deported and relocated to Berlin, Germany.

Bechet returned to the states in the ‘30s and found work playing and performing but success on the record charts proved to be elusive for him while his past collaborators such as Armstrong and Duke Ellington were becoming superstars. In the ‘40s, Bechet returned to Europe and settled in France were he found fame as a hit-making musician.

Armstrong is credited by most historians for bringing forth the concept of the jazz soloist, but some experts contend that Bechet pioneered the concept in a recording studio mere months before Satchmo did so.

Bechet passed from lung cancer on his birthday in 1959 at the age of 62.

 

SIGN UP FOR OUR NEWSLETTER: 

PHOTO: Library of Congress/Public Domain


HEAD BACK TO THE BLACKAMERICAWEB.COM HOMEPAGE

[ione_media_gallery id=”298469″ overlay=”true”]

 

Black America Web

ENTERTAINMENT UPDATE:

Little Known Black History Fact: Monrovia, Liberia

Liberia is home to the second-established Black American settlement in Africa, Monrovia, the nation’s capital city. It was founded on April 25, 1822 by the American Colonization Society (ACS), an organization that cleared a path for Black Americans to return to the nation of their birth, but their motives were not always benevolent.

ACS members arrived at the site of Monrovia in 1821. The city was first known as Christopolis, but was changed to Monrovia to honor then President James Monroe. Natives in the region saw the ACS and its Black American settlers as invaders, thus igniting clashes between the two groups.

The early days of Monrovia saw an influx of settlers, known as Americo-Liberians, who came to the city and country between 1822 and 1848. Much of the landscape in Monrovia mirrored the Southern United States, as expected. The country gained its independence from America in 1847 and elected its first president, Joseph Jenkins Roberts, the following year.

Liberia has undergone several regime changes since and in 1980, a military coup led by Samuel Doe of the Liberian Army rocked the nation. After Doe was deposed and killed in 1990, the country fell into despair and was ruled by dictator Charles Taylor, who was deposed himself in 2003. Ellen Johnson Sirleaf became the first female African head of state as Liberian president from 2006 to 2018. Now the country is ruled by former professional soccer player George Weah.


HEAD BACK TO THE BLACKAMERICAWEB.COM HOMEPAGE

 

Black America Web

ENTERTAINMENT UPDATE:

Lyft, Uber can’t change fact that the Silicon Valley IPO is just getting worse for public investors

Lyft, Slack, Pinterest and Postmates have already filed. Uber and Airbnb are expected to join before the end of the year. But even with the big names and big valuation initial public offerings in 2019, there is evidence the traditional IPO is dying.
Tech

BEST DEAL UPDATE:

Shop the latest electronics deals direct from Samsung

What The Fact (3-3-19)

Newsy

SPECIAL NEWS BULLETIN:

http://www.acrx.org -As millions of Americans strive to deal with the economic downturn,loss of jobs,foreclosures,high cost of gas,and the rising cost of prescription drug cost. Charles Myrick ,the President of American Consultants Rx, announced the re-release of the American Consultants Rx community service project which consist of millions of free discount prescription cards being donated to thousands of not for profits,hospitals,schools,churches,etc. in an effort to assist the uninsured,under insured,and seniors deal with the high cost of prescription drugs.-American Consultants Rx -Pharmacy Discount Network News

CHARITY UPDATE:

Click today to request your free ACRX discount prescription card and save up to 80% off of your medicine!

SPECIAL DONATION REQUEST UPDATE:

Please help American Consultants Rx achieve it’s biggest goal yet of donating over 30 million discount prescription cards to over 50k organizations in an effort to assist millions of Americans in need. Please click here to donate today!

Fact Checking Trump (and others) at CPAC

The annual Conservative Political Action Conference (CPAC) event attracts college Republicans, populists, nationalists, some libertarians, and the occasional Revolutionary reenactor. For the past three years, it’s also attracted President Donald Trump.


CNN.com – RSS Channel – Politics

SPECIAL NEWS BULLETIN:

http://www.acrx.org -As millions of Americans strive to deal with the economic downturn,loss of jobs,foreclosures,high cost of gas,and the rising cost of prescription drug cost. Charles Myrick ,the President of American Consultants Rx, announced the re-release of the American Consultants Rx community service project which consist of millions of free discount prescription cards being donated to thousands of not for profits,hospitals,schools,churches,etc. in an effort to assist the uninsured,under insured,and seniors deal with the high cost of prescription drugs.-American Consultants Rx -Pharmacy Discount Network News

BEST DEAL UPDATE BY AMERICAN CONSULTANTS RX:

Click today to request your free ACRX discount prescription card and save up to 80% off of your medicine!

SPECIAL DONATION REQUEST UPDATE:

Please help American Consultants Rx achieve it’s biggest goal yet of donating over 30 million discount prescription cards to over 50k organizations in an effort to assist millions of Americans in need. Please click here to donate today!

Little Known Black History Fact: Charlotte E. Ray

While Charlotte E. Ray’s legal career was brief, the trail she blazed as America’s first Black woman lawyer is still inspirational. On February 27, 1872, she left Howard University with a law degree and embarked on her journey before entering into other ventures.

Ray was born January 13, 1850 in New York City. Her father was a notable religious figure and abolitionist. After attending the Institution of the Education of Colored Youth, she became a teacher at a preparatory school connected to Howard University. While working there, she enrolled in the university’s law program under the name C.E. Ray – which some historians believe was a bid to hide her gender although the school reportedly had no such restrictions at the time.

After successfully finishing the three-year program, Ray made history again by becoming one of the first women admitted to the D.C. Bar, and the first woman admitted to practice in front of the Supreme Court of the District of Columbia. Ray opened a practice, using Frederick Douglass’ newspaper to advertise her services, but being a Black woman in a world that didn’t respect her accomplishments made business tough.

The racism and sexism forced her to move north to New York where she returned to teaching. She then joined the woman’s suffrage movement and the National Association of Colored Women.

Ray passed in 1911 at the age of 60.


HEAD BACK TO THE BLACKAMERICAWEB.COM HOMEPAGE

 

 

Black America Web

ENTERTAINMENT UPDATE:

“What The Fact” (2-24-19)

Newsy

SPECIAL NEWS BULLETIN:

http://www.acrx.org -As millions of Americans strive to deal with the economic downturn,loss of jobs,foreclosures,high cost of gas,and the rising cost of prescription drug cost. Charles Myrick ,the President of American Consultants Rx, announced the re-release of the American Consultants Rx community service project which consist of millions of free discount prescription cards being donated to thousands of not for profits,hospitals,schools,churches,etc. in an effort to assist the uninsured,under insured,and seniors deal with the high cost of prescription drugs.-American Consultants Rx -Pharmacy Discount Network News

CHARITY UPDATE:

Click today to request your free ACRX discount prescription card and save up to 80% off of your medicine!

SPECIAL DONATION REQUEST UPDATE:

Please help American Consultants Rx achieve it’s biggest goal yet of donating over 30 million discount prescription cards to over 50k organizations in an effort to assist millions of Americans in need. Please click here to donate today!

“What The Fact” (2/17/19)

Newsy

SPECIAL NEWS BULLETIN:

http://www.acrx.org -As millions of Americans strive to deal with the economic downturn,loss of jobs,foreclosures,high cost of gas,and the rising cost of prescription drug cost. Charles Myrick ,the President of American Consultants Rx, announced the re-release of the American Consultants Rx community service project which consist of millions of free discount prescription cards being donated to thousands of not for profits,hospitals,schools,churches,etc. in an effort to assist the uninsured,under insured,and seniors deal with the high cost of prescription drugs.-American Consultants Rx -Pharmacy Discount Network News

CHARITY UPDATE:

Click today to request your free ACRX discount prescription card and save up to 80% off of your medicine!

SPECIAL DONATION REQUEST UPDATE:

Please help American Consultants Rx achieve it’s biggest goal yet of donating over 30 million discount prescription cards to over 50k organizations in an effort to assist millions of Americans in need. Please click here to donate today!

Little Known Black History Fact: Joe Sample

Joe Sample made his mark in music early on as part of the Jazz and Funk ensemble, The Crusaders. Today is the late Houston native and legendary keyboardist’s birthday.

Sample was born in 1939, and began studying the piano at five years old. He joined bands in high school and while at Texas Southern University. He moved west with a few of his college band members, forming the Jazz Crusaders in Los Angeles.

As the Crusaders began a prolific recording schedule, Sample became an in-demand session player for the likes of Diana Ross, Marvin Gaye, The Jackson Five, and many other notable names. Sample also began releasing solo work in 1969, going on a creative tear in the ‘70s with the Crusaders and via his own albums.

Sample’s last album in 2015, “Christmas With Friends,” was recorded alongside India.Arie. In all, Sample released 24 albums to go with the dozens he recorded as a member of the Crusaders.

Last summer, Sample’s gravesite in Houston was marked with a massive headstone fashioned in the shape of a piano.

Joe Sample passed in 2014 at the age of 75.

PHOTO: Tom Beetz Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 2.0 Generic License.


HEAD BACK TO THE BLACKAMERICAWEB.COM HOMEPAGE

 

[ione_media_gallery id=”298469″ overlay=”true”]

 

Black America Web

ENTERTAINMENT UPDATE:

Little Known Black History Fact: Arturo Schomburg

Arturo Alfonso Schomburg, also known as Arthur Schomburg, was a meticulous historian and important Harlem Renaissance figure. During his career, he was referred to as the “Sherlock Holmes of Black History” due to his exhaustive research on Africa and the diaspora.

Schomburg was born Jan. 24. 1874 to a Black mother from the Virgin Islands and a German father who lived in Puerto Rico. As a boy, Schomburg was told by a teacher that Black history was a farce, which set him on a path early on to prove that doubter wrong.

In 1871, Schomburg moved to Harlem, New York and was an active member of the fight for Cuba and Puerto Rico’s independence. When his home country became part of the United States, Schomburg embraced the African-American community that he was now a part of. This set him on a path of serious study of the connection Black Americans had with Africa.

In 1911, Schomburg founded the Negro Society for Historical Research, and in 1922, he was named president of The American Negro Academy. As a collector and researcher of African art, Schomburg amassed a massive collection which was put on display by the New York Public Library’s Division of Negro Literature, History and Prints in 1926. He became the department’s curator and remained so until his death in 1932.

Today, The Schomburg Center for Research in Black Culture of the New York Public Library boasts more than 10 million items connected to Africa and beyond.


HEAD BACK TO THE BLACKAMERICAWEB.COM HOMEPAGE

 

[ione_media_gallery id=”298469″ overlay=”true”]

 

 

Black America Web

ENTERTAINMENT UPDATE:

Little Known Black History Fact: Grace Bumbry

In the opera world, Grace Bumbry is considered a master of her craft as one of the leading mezzo-soprano vocalists in the world. Today is the St. Louis, Mo. native’s birthday.

Bumbry was born in 1937. Her parents exposed her to the likes of Marian Anderson, who would be an early inspiration. At 16, Bumbry won a contest to enter a local music conservatory, but was denied entry due to her race. The contest promoters, looking to avert controversy, made arrangements for Bumbry to attend Boston University but it was after transferring to Northwestern University, she blossomed. While in Illinois, she studied with opera star and soloist Lotte Lehmann.

In 1961 at the age of 24, Bumbry became in an international sensation after appearing as the first Black opera singer to perform in Bayreuth, Germany with the grandson of composer, Richard Wagner. Although the conservative opera audience and press balked at her inclusion in the production, her performance was so mind-blowing that she was dubbed “The Black Venus.”

The following year, Bumbry was invited to sing at the White House, becoming the first Black opera singer to perform there. This lead to more performances throughout the ’60’s and ’70’s. Bumbry’s controversial switch to soprano in the latter decade divided some critics and observers who questioned if she truly commanded the range to sing at that level.

However, Bumbry brushed aside the talk and continued to perform into the ’90’s, with her last performance taking place in 1997.

From there, Bumbry taught voice and served as a judge in various competitions, and amassed a number of honors, including inclusion into the Kennedy Center Honors in 2009.

PHOTO: Public Domain


HEAD BACK TO THE BLACKAMERICAWEB.COM HOMEPAGE

 

[ione_media_gallery id=”298469″ overlay=”true”] 

 

Black America Web

ENTERTAINMENT UPDATE:

This patient’s medical record said she’d given birth twice — in fact, she’d never been pregnant

Medical record errors are extremely common and can be life-threatening. For 20-year-old patient Morgan Gleason, it took many hours to fix a glaring mistake. 
Health and Science

U.S.HEALTHCARE UPDATE:

Click today to request your free ACRX discount prescription card and save up to 80% off of your medicine!

SPECIAL DONATION REQUEST UPDATE:

Please help American Consultants Rx achieve it’s biggest goal yet of donating over 30 million discount prescription cards to over 50k organizations in an effort to assist millions of Americans in need. Please click here to donate today!

Flu Season and Protecting Yourself at Work: Separating Myth From Fact

Considering 2017 was the deadliest flu season in many years, you may want to think twice about skipping your flu shot. Radio personality JoJo O’Neal from HOT 99.5 in Orlando, Florida, never considered getting a flu shot because she’d never had the flu. And despite her chronic asthma, she considered herself healthy—working out regularly and even competing in several fitness competitions. But in 2018, O’Neal got the flu — not once, but twice. It also complicated her asthma, and she transmitted it to her sister who suffers from lung disease which seriously compromised her health as well.

AARP, an organization dedicated to empowering people to choose how they live as they age, reports an estimated 70% of adults, ages 50-64, have one or more chronic illnesses. And according to the CDC, adults in the same age range had the second highest hospitalization rates for the flu last year. Like many other people O’Neal’s age, the flu is potentially dangerous for those who have other chronic health conditions such as asthma, diabetes, heart disease, and obesity. Yet African Americans and other minorities are among the least likely to get the shot, according to the Department of Health and Human Services (HHS).

Many people avoid the flu vaccine because there are a lot of myths or negative perceptions around it. This includes the belief that the flu vaccine causes the flu, has harmful ingredients, or because they rarely get sick, the vaccine is not needed. Black Enterprise asked Dr. Cedric Rutland, M.D., a spokesperson for the American Lung Association, to clear up a few myths and misconceptions about the flu vaccine and provide tips for dealing with flu in the workplace.

Cedric "Jamie" Rutland

Dr. Cedric “Jamie” Rutland (Instagram)

Myth: Flu vaccination is only important for kids, pregnant women, and people who are really old. I’m healthy and rarely get sick, so I don’t need the vaccine.

Fact: I recommend the flu shot to all of my patients 6 months of age and older as the best way to protect them from the flu. This is incredibly important not only to protect you, but also those around you. One group who often doesn’t realize they are at higher risk is adults 50 years of age and older who feel good and healthy. But what they don’t realize is by the time they reach age 50, they’re much more likely to have one or more chronic health conditions (asthma, heart disease, diabetes) that can make the flu incredibly dangerous – leading to increased hospitalizations and even death. Everyone should get their annual flu shot.

Myth: The flu vaccine causes the flu.

Fact: The flu vaccines administered with a needle do not contain a live virus so they cannot give you the flu. The nasal spray flu vaccine does contain live viruses, but they are weakened, so they do not cause the flu.

What steps should employers take to address or prevent flu in the workplace?

The best way to protect yourself and your coworkers against the flu is to get your flu shot as early in the flu season as possible. You can also help stop the spread of germs by washing your hands, covering your mouth and nose when you cough or sneeze, and stay home from work when you are sick to prevent infecting others.

The post Flu Season and Protecting Yourself at Work: Separating Myth From Fact appeared first on Black Enterprise.

Lifestyle | Black Enterprise

BEAUTY DEAL UPDATE:

Little Known Black History Fact: Kristine Guillaume

For the first time in its 145th year in existence, the student newspaper of Harvard University has named its first Black women as president. Kristine Guillaume will oversee The Harvard Crimson, which bills itself as the oldest running daily college newspaper in the country.

 

Instagram Photo

 

Guillaume, a junior at Harvard University studying African-American Studies along with History and Literature, will lead the 146th Guard of the Harvard Crimson. The Queens, New York native is one of three chairpersons that sit on the Crimson’s Diversity and Inclusivity Committee, which made it a point this year to select editors and staff of varying backgrounds.

In a recent statement after being named president of the Crimson, Guillaume noted that Harvard University’s past as an institution of learning primarily made for White men is no longer its legacy, and that her presence at the Crimson and the university itself signals the changes that will continue to come.

“I want people to think about how to navigate, and feel like they can and get through their education, and feel like they do belong here,” Guillaume said.

Past presidents of the Crimson include the likes of Franklin D. Roosevelt, John F. Kennedy, and CNN president, Jeff Zucker.

HEAD BACK TO THE BLACKAMERICAWEB.COM HOMEPAGE 

Black America Web

ENTERTAINMENT UPDATE:

Backstage with Richard Ridge: Bobby Cannavale Separates Fact from Fiction in His Career on Broadway and Beyond!

Fact Two-time Tony nominee Bobby Cannavale is back on Broadway this season, starring opposite Cherry Jones and Daniel Radcliffe in The Lifespan of a Fact. In a recent interview with Richard Ridge, he opens up about the challenges of taking on thisparticular role, and separates fact from fiction when it comes to some of his past performances
BroadwayWorld.com Featured Content

BEST DEAL UPDATE:

REVIEW: In ‘The Lifespan of a Fact’ on Broadway, Daniel Radcliffe rails against truthiness

“Truth isn’t truth,” Rudy Giuliani famously spluttered on “Meet the Press” last summer, trumping even presidential adviser Kellyanne Conway’s much-derided coinage of the phrase “alternative facts” to explain away a few big little lies about the size of the crowd at the 2017 presidential inauguration.

/entertainment – New York Daily News

FASHION DEAL UPDATE:

Nickelback are immune to your mean tweets, in fact, they relish them

TwitterFacebook

Nickelback are pretty good sports when it comes to being one of the most ridiculed bands on the planet. I guess you have to be.

In the latest edition of Jimmy Kimmel’s way harsh segment “Mean Tweets,” music stars like Pink, Miley Cyrus, The Strokes, Schoolboy Q, Imagine Dragons, Tyga, Dua Lipa, and Gwen Stefani read out awful things people have written about them on Twitter.

Heck, Korn even takes a deep burn with a comparative reference to Nickelback. 

But it’s the ever-slammed, ever-noble Nickelback that takes the final blow, with lead singer Chad Kroeger offering up a quick comeback without missing a beat. Guess he’s heard it all before. Read more…

More about Jimmy Kimmel Live, Mean Tweets, Jimmy Kimmel, Nickelback, and Entertainment


Entertainment

BEST ENTERTAINMENT DEALS UPDATE:

Little Known Black History Fact: C. Delores Tucker

While history might remember C. Delores Tucker as a fiery champion who shouted down the violent and sexist rap lyrics of the ’90’s, the facts reveal she was much more than that. The Philadelphia native is also the first Black woman named secretary of state in Pennsylvania and a notable civil rights activist.

Born Cynthia Delores Nottage, she attended college at Temple University and the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School of Business ahead of her political career. In the ’60’s, Tucker, who married her husband William in 1951, was deeply entrenched in the civil rights movement and marched alongside Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. in 1965. She also worked closely with the NAACP.

In 1971, Gov. Milton Shapp was appointed as state secretary, and formed the first Commission on the Status of Women. Tucker was fired in 1977 for allegedly giving speeches written by state employees and winning honors for them.

In 1990, Tucker and 15 other Black men and women formed the African-American Women For Reproductive Freedom organization. Throughout the ’90’s, Tucker challenged the lyrics of The 2 Live Crew, N.WA., the late 2Pac and others for their bawdy lyrics. Her stance made her the targets of harsh criticism from the rap industry and from free speech advocates.

C. Delores Tucker passed in 2005.

 


HEAD BACK TO THE BLACKAMERICAWEB.COM HOMEPAGE

[ione_media_gallery id=”298469″ overlay=”true”]
Black America Web

ENTERTAINMENT UPDATE: