Princess Eugenie’s wedding hair looks awfully familiar

We’ve got deja vu

Princess Eugenie married her long-term partner, Jack Brooksbank, today at St George’s Chapel, Windsor Castle – five months after her cousin Prince Harry married Meghan Markle at the same place.

princess eugenie's wedding dress

REX/Shutterstock

Eugenie’s dress was pretty incredible – that low back, that train, that designer, that secret message – we could go on. And the celeb guest list was out of this world.

And that’s all before we’ve got onto her hair & make-up. Wow.

princess eugenies wedding dress

AFP/Getty Images

According to Harpers Bazaar UK , Eugenie’s hair was done by Sonny-Jo MacFarlane at Hari’s Salon in Chelsea. Perhaps the Princess’ regular hair stylist? He created a low chignon with loose tendrils, topped with an art-deco tiara borrowed from the Queen. Sound familiar?

The only difference is that Eugenie took the modern approach and opted against a veil.

Fancy recreating this look at your wedding? Gorka Aararas, Creative Director at Charles Worthington Salons has given us an easy step-by-step.

Step 1: Set the hair in rollers or tongue it and then pin to set the curls.

Step 2: Separate the front from the back.

Step 3: Backcomb the back on the crown area, then pin into the lower nape.

Step 4: Put the remaining up to create a soft romantic and relaxed chignon.

Step 5: Place your tiara or headpiece on top of the parting of the hair.

Step 6: Lastly, with the front of the hair that has been curled, brush the hair softly and sweep the sides of the hair up adding that relaxed and effortless look.

For her make-up look, Princess Eugenie kept it natural on the lip, but chose a brown smokey eye to accentuate her green eyes. Hannah Martin, Pro and Artistry Manager for Bobbi Brown, created the look.

 

 

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Does the Quality of Nic Cage Films Depend on the Length of His Hair?

You could never accuse Nicolas Cage’s hair of being boring. It fluctuates as constantly as the quality of his movies — and it’s starting to look like there might be a link between the two. The theory goes: the longer the hair, the worse the film. Does this hold any weight or is it a hair-brained idea? Let’s take a look.

SHORT HAIR


Nic Cage in Face/Off.

Face/Off is surely one of Cage’s best films, and the face-swapping crime thriller sees him sporting a tidy short back and sides, with only a bit of length on top when the wind picks up. This correlates perfectly with the finesse of this critically-acclaimed feature, which also happens to be one of John Travolta’s finest.

The smart, darkly funny romance Leaving Las Vegas is a terrific showcase of Cage’s talents in the right context, and sure enough his barnet is about as short as an alcoholic character can sport: unkempt but under control with no attempt to disguise the thinning.

John Dahl’s neo-noir Red Rock West is one of Cage’s most highly-rated films ever, and he keeps his sideburns as short and tidy and the back of his hair, even shaving on camera in one scene. There is a daring amount of flick on top, however, which falls down onto his face from time to time, threatening to ruin the movie.

Bad Lieutenant: Port of Call New Orleans sees Cage do one of his best bonkers acts as a drug-addicted cop, but his hair is kept relatively in check, slicked back in all but his most crazy scenes. In terms of body, there’s a reassuring bounce that’s in keeping with the film’s generally offbeat vibe.

Not only is Cage’s hair quite short in the excellent Adaptation but it is also unusually curly, not just in homage to the writer Charlie Kaufman, but surely in a nod to the film’s quirky and frequently baffling story which includes Cage also playing Charlie’s fictional twin brother, Donald.

That said, there are anomalies in the short camp: The Wicker Man is a woeful remake with a surprisingly curt cut, while the very average Gone In 60 Seconds sees Cage opting for an equally average ‘do.

MID LENGTH

Cage’s new film Mandy is getting rave reviews but the occult horror is seriously weird and disturbing — and not only does he have an unkempt mid-length mane, but he has the rare addition of a beard. Approach with caution.

Kick-Ass has many fans but it’s not universally acclaimed, with many critics reeling at the extreme violence in the superhero story. Accordingly, Nic not only sports a hint of length in this film, but a controversial moustache.

Wild At Heart is another cult classic but it only scores 65% on aggregator sites — accordingly, Cage’s jet black hair is a little longer at the back and has the habit of going, well, wild.

The Weather Man is an unusually forgettable Cage film that’s bland but watchable. The same can be said of his locks: longer on top with a brushed-forward fringe — quite the broadcaster’s combover.

While Nic’s back hair is cropped reasonably short in Ghost Rider, the top cut is unusually choppy and spiky, making this another audience-dividing comic book movie that only scores 26% from critics.

LONG HAIR


Nic Cage in Season of the Witch.

The misfire Drive Angry also has a highly unfortunate hair situation for our hero: a thinning, bedraggled longish sun-bleached mop with scraggy stubble. Avoid the look, avoid the movie.

A classic case of taking yourself too seriously, Season of the Witch is a terrible film with a mane to match. Cage’s windswept hair is almost long enough to get tangled in his chainmail. Look the other way.

Cage’s thick, flowing locks in the The Sorcerer’s Apprentice are far more spellbinding than the film’s perfunctory plot. Though the film is marginally better than other long-locked Cage specials, it confirms that he should be cautious of both family fare and longer hair.

Con Air should by rights be a mid-length Cage film, but his hair in this actioner is defiantly long and bouffant at the bottom, even giving a mullet effect when blowing in the wind. Most of us see Con Air as a guilty pleasure, but the guilty party here might be the hair and make up department.

So, there you have it. There are exceptions to every rule, but it seems that the Cage hair theory might just wash — much like how the quality of a Matthew McConaughey movie depends on how quickly he takes his shirt off. But that’s another story…

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Hair Accessories for Grown Women: What’s Appropriate for Work, Play, and Beyond?

hair accessories for grown women

Because everything old is new again, scrunchies, headbands, and claws are back in style and being offered as hair accessories for grown women, and I can’t wait to hear readers’ thoughts on them. I know some people have always been Team Scrunchie; I myself have always been Team Claw (and of course, the old black Ouchless elastic I wear on my wrist pretty much every waking hour). But there are strong opinions about this! Are you going to give headbands a whirl in 2018? Are some of the more decorative options (like the goldish star claw) just not appropriate for most women over a certain age (like 16)? For those of you who have strong opinions FOR hair accessories, which stores make the best hair accessories in terms of comfort, durability, price, look, etc?

Psst: our last poll on what kind of hair accessories are appropriate for the office … in 2009!


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(Pictured above, all from Free People because I happened to be browsing the site: kimono clip / scrunchie / claw / headband. And for those of you who are on Team Drugstore Elastic, do you prefer Goody Ouchless or Scünci? Has anyone tried “Amazon choice” of Munax?)

For my $ .02, I probably will give headbands a whirl again — but only with ones I already own. I’ll probably skip the scrunchies just because I don’t think my round face shape looks particularly great with a low ponytail, and I feel like that’s where scrunchies excel. I’ve always like claws for comfort and an easy half-up-do or (with a huge claw) a French twist — but those tend to be bad hair days for me so I probably don’t want to try more attention to my hair with something really decorative.

Looking for more sedate options for hair accessories for grown women? Ann Taylor, J.Crew, and Nordstrom (particularly from these two drool-worthy brands) have a ton of similar styles.

Ladies, let’s hear from you — what are your thoughts on hair accessories for grown women? What looks do you wear the most for work and play — what products are you excited about to be back in style?

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