Nick Viall Defends Hannah B. After Ex Corinne Slams Her As Bachelorette

Defending her honor! Nick Viall’s ex-girlfriend Corinne Olympios may not be thrilled with ABC’s choice of Hannah Brown as the next Bachelorette, but the former Bachelor has other thoughts.

Viall, 38, commented on Us Weekly’s Instagram post in which Olympios said that “anyone” would’ve been a better choice as show lead.

“Hannah is going to prove many people wrong,” he wrote on Friday, May 10.

Viall Defends Hannah B Next Bachelorette

The businessman’s former flame, 27, was candid about her thoughts on the former beauty queen, 24, while speaking to Us earlier this week. “It’s just random. Like, why?” she asked about Brown’s new lead status. “It’s, like, there’s nothing there that would have made me be like, ‘I need to see her again on TV. I need to see her find love.’ Like, she wasn’t even someone that I was like, ‘I want her to find love.’”

She insisted: “Nobody loved her. When you hear someone being the Bachelor or the Bachelorette, it’s someone you loved and felt for on the season.”

The Bachelor in Paradise alum said she would still watch Brown’s search for companionship, however. “Am I interested in it? Absolutely not. Will I watch it? Absolutely yes,” she told Us.

Other Bachelor Nation alums have also expressed their doubt that the season 23 Bachelor contestant has what it takes to carry the show.

Season 13 Bachelorette Rachel Lindsay told Us in March that though she thinks Brown is “very, very nice,” she wasn’t her “first choice” or her “favorite.”

Ben Higgins, who starred on season 20 of the Bachelor, weighed in on Brown’s new venture to Us in April. “This is a little intimidating for her,” he said. “It’s a little scary, it’s a little wild and she isn’t prepped for it. Like, I don’t think she expected to be the Bachelorette, nor did she desire to be the Bachelorette after her season. So, this is all kind of a shock. … I’m really excited for her season.”

Season 11 Bachelorette Kaitlyn Bristowe is in also in Brown’s corner: The “Off the Vine” podcast host sounded off in March about the backlash Brown received after she was announced as the Bachelorette: “People are giving her s–t, they’re being so mean to her, [saying] ‘She smiles too much,’ she said. “I’m like, really? That’s what you’re gonna pick her apart for? Smiling too much? What a psychopath! ‘Stop smiling, you psycho!’”

She concluded, “I’m so sorry that she was chosen as the Bachelorette and you don’t like her for these reasons that don’t make any sense to me, but give her a goddamn chance.”

Season 15 of The Bachelorette will premiere on ABC on Monday, May 13, at 8 p.m. ET.

Us Weekly

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Game of Thrones star Hannah Murray admits playing anorexic teen on Skins was ‘one of the happiest times of her life’

GAME Of Thrones’ Hannah Murray has admitted that playing anorexic teen Cassie Ainsworth on E4 drama Skins remains one of her happiest work memories – despite finding international super-stardom in the HBO fantasy series.

The 29-year-old actress appeared on Lorraine earlier today, where she admitted that her 2007-2008 castmates are like her “siblings”.

Hannah appeared on Lorraine earlier today

Speaking about the popular show, Hannah said: “Some of the happiest times of my life, I fell in love with acting so hard and fast when I first started working on Skins.

“Then those people that I worked with on the show are like my best friends, they are almost like my siblings really, we are that close.

“I see them all the time, they’re such an important part of my life – that thread from that first job is still very, very consistent.”

The star took a break from acting to further her studies after finding fame in Skins, landing the recurring role of wildling Gilly in the second series of Game of Thrones in 2012.

Hannah played troubled anorexic Cassie in teen drama Skins

The actress says her Skins castmates, including GoT’s Joe Dempsie [bottom left] are like her ‘siblings’
Getty – Contributor

Together with Samwell Tarly, Gilly played a key role in discovering the truth about Jon Snow’s legitimate parentage – and is one of the few characters to have survived to see in the final series of the show.

Speaking to Christine Lampard on the ITV breakfast show, Hannah revealed that she struggles to keep the top secret content of the show under wraps – and even spoiled the show for one of her friends at his birthday party.

She explained: “I always want to tell everyone, I once ruined a big spoiler for my friend at his birthday party – I just decided to tell him everything.

Hannah plays wildling Gilly in Game of Thrones
HBO
Joe plays Gendry in Game of Thrones – but he and Hannah are yet to share a scene together


“I am always worried I am going to get in trouble, so I am relieved the show is coming out so I can finally talk about it with everyone.”

The much-anticipated final series of Game of Thrones hit our screens in the early hours of Monday morning, with Hannah’s fellow Skins’ alumni, Joe Dempsie, also reprising his role of Gendry for the season.

Hannah previously confessed that she has always hoped Gilly and Gendry’s storylines will cross so that she can be reunited with her close pal on set.

As of yet, the two characters haven’t met in Westeros – and with just five episodes left of the hit series, the odds of an on-screen Skins reunion aren’t looking too likely.


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How Colton Underwood Really Feels About Hannah Brown Being the Next Bachelorette

Hannah Brown, Colton UnderwoodColton Underwood is sharing his thoughts on the new star of The Bachelorette, Hannah Brown.
The Bachelor alum got to know the 23-year-old Alabama native when she appeared as a contestant…

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Which ‘Bachelorette’ Alum Would Hannah G. Want to Meet in ‘Paradise’?

Hannah Godwin may not have found love with Colton Underwood, but that doesn’t mean she’s done with searching for The One on reality TV. So, does that mean Bachelor in Paradise will be her next stop? It’s definitely an option.

“I know that, personally, I caught major feelings in this whole entire experience, so I think I’d definitely be open to catching feelings, but hopefully it would be on a two-way street situation instead of just a one-way,” Godwin, 23, told Us Weekly in an exclusive interview, adding that she’s looking for someone “who’s humble, openminded, hard-working and caring.”

If The Bachelor star does end up appearing on season 6 of the ABC hit series, she may already have her eye on someone.

Blake Horstmann: My ‘Healing Process Was Long’ After Becca Kufrin Breakup
Blake Horstmann on ‘The Bachelorette’. ABC/Paul Hebert

“I think that there’s a few really good options and I’d have to meet with them in person and see if there’s a connection,” Godwin told Us. “I don’t know. I think Blake [Horstmann]’s a cutie.”

Horstmann was the runner up on Becca Kufrin‘s season of The Bachelorette and is — lucky for Godwin — single and ready to mingle.

“I’m always interested in dating and you never know when the love of your life is going to walk into your life. So I’m definitely open to all of that,” the Colorado native, 29, told Us during JustFab’s finale viewing party on March 12, adding that while Paradise is still a few months away, it’s definitely a possibility for him. “If I’m single, I will probably be on Paradise.”

The sales rep better be ready to impress Godwin’s parents, too! The content creator admitted to Us that it was tough for her to rewatch Underwood ask her father for permission to propose, only to break up with her shortly after. However, her family couldn’t be more supportive.

“They’re the most selfless people. There’s not a selfish bone in their body and they’re just making sure that I’m OK. I’m sure for them, it was confusing because they did think that I was going to be engaged to this guy,” she said. “But they’ve just been really supportive and so loving throughout all of this, and they’ve seen my highs and they’ve seen my lows, but that’s what they’ve done my whole life. I’ve been so lucky to go through all of this with them and I think it’s made our relationship with them even stronger.”

With reporting by Emily Marcus

Us Weekly

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Hannah Gadsby Is ‘Comfortable’ Not Being Funny in First Stand-up Set After ‘Nanette’

Ben King/Netflix

In the early 1700s, a physician named James Douglas, a quasi-famous midwife known for performing public dissections of female pelvises in his home, came across a wrinkle of uterine flesh he hadn’t seen before. The region was a tiny cavity, sort of like a kangaroo’s flap, which expands if a woman needs more room during pregnancy. The doctor called his anatomical New World the “Pouch of Douglas.” Medical dictionaries describe Douglas’ revelation as “an extension of peritoneum between the posterior wall of uterus and the rectum in females,” but it’s basically a reproductive crawl-space. As findings go, it’s about as close as you can get to discovering nothing. In comedian Hannah Gadsby’s latest stand-up set, a work-in-progress which runs through March 9 at the Hayworth Theater in L.A., she compares the little flap to the extra zipper on a suitcase. “It’s a potential space,” she told the crowd. Gadsby’s calling her new show “Douglas.”

If there’s a specific subtext behind the choice to name her set after the nothing-discovery of an 18th century pelvis dissector, Gadsby doesn’t mention it outright. Douglas is also the name of her dog. But the new show arrives on the heels of Nanette, a comedy special which aired on Netflix last summer, sending waves through the think-piece internet and comedy Twitterverse. The special, for those who managed not to hear about it, had nothing to do with the name Nanette, and everything to do with a problem Gadsby saw in her industry—namely, an expectation that comedy minorities make themselves the butt of the joke. The polarizing show, which begins as a fairly unremarkable set, before taking a serious twist into Gadsby’s account of a hate crime, prompted two tiresome debates: one over whether it heralded the end of stand-up, and another over whether it constituted stand-up at all. But whatever the special meant for its genre, Nanette signaled something fairly straightforward about Gadsby’s career: “I’m quitting,” she told the crowd. She didn’t, as it turns out. And in Douglas, the comic is workshopping what, exactly, not-quitting looks like.

“It’s hard to know what this show should be,” Gadsby told the audience Thursday night, “because I quit comedy.” Douglas is a work-in-progress at its most fundamental. (“This is rough as guts,” she says at one point, “but I feel pretty comfortable, because Nanette wasn’t funny, and, well…”) A willfully half-finished ninety minutes of performance, it’s almost admirably sloppy. Gadsby zig-zags between subjects, goes on long tangents, cuts herself off mid-sentence, drops huge, sometimes hackneyed, personal bombshells, and practices crowd-work to varying, occasionally laborious, degrees of success. But with any rough draft, the audience bears witness to all the potential versions a piece might become, and in Douglas, Gadsby seemed to be staring down two possible paths.

Read more at The Daily Beast.

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Hannah Gadsby Is ‘Comfortable’ Not Being Funny in First Stand-up Set After ‘Nanette’

Ben King/Netflix

In the early 1700s, a physician named James Douglas, a quasi-famous midwife known for performing public dissections of female pelvises in his home, came across a wrinkle of uterine flesh he hadn’t seen before. The region was a tiny cavity, sort of like a kangaroo’s flap, which expands if a woman needs more room during pregnancy. The doctor called his anatomical New World the “Pouch of Douglas.” Medical dictionaries describe Douglas’ revelation as “an extension of peritoneum between the posterior wall of uterus and the rectum in females,” but it’s basically a reproductive crawl-space. As findings go, it’s about as close as you can get to discovering nothing. In comedian Hannah Gadsby’s latest stand-up set, a work-in-progress which runs through March 9 at the Hayworth Theater in L.A., she compares the little flap to the extra zipper on a suitcase. “It’s a potential space,” she told the crowd. Gadsby’s calling her new show “Douglas.”

If there’s a specific subtext behind the choice to name her set after the nothing-discovery of an 18th century pelvis dissector, Gadsby doesn’t mention it outright. Douglas is also the name of her dog. But the new show arrives on the heels of Nanette, a comedy special which aired on Netflix last summer, sending waves through the think-piece internet and comedy Twitterverse. The special, for those who managed not to hear about it, had nothing to do with the name Nanette, and everything to do with a problem Gadsby saw in her industry—namely, an expectation that comedy minorities make themselves the butt of the joke. The polarizing show, which begins as a fairly unremarkable set, before taking a serious twist into Gadsby’s account of a hate crime, prompted two tiresome debates: one over whether it heralded the end of stand-up, and another over whether it constituted stand-up at all. But whatever the special meant for its genre, Nanette signaled something fairly straightforward about Gadsby’s career: “I’m quitting,” she told the crowd. She didn’t, as it turns out. And in Douglas, the comic is workshopping what, exactly, not-quitting looks like.

“It’s hard to know what this show should be,” Gadsby told the audience Thursday night, “because I quit comedy.” Douglas is a work-in-progress at its most fundamental. (“This is rough as guts,” she says at one point, “but I feel pretty comfortable, because Nanette wasn’t funny, and, well…”) A willfully half-finished ninety minutes of performance, it’s almost admirably sloppy. Gadsby zig-zags between subjects, goes on long tangents, cuts herself off mid-sentence, drops huge, sometimes hackneyed, personal bombshells, and practices crowd-work to varying, occasionally laborious, degrees of success. But with any rough draft, the audience bears witness to all the potential versions a piece might become, and in Douglas, Gadsby seemed to be staring down two possible paths.

Read more at The Daily Beast.

Got a tip? Send it to The Daily Beast here

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Photo Flash: Bryce Pinkham, Hannah Elless and More Head Into Rehearsal for BENNY & JOON At Paper Mill Playhouse

Paper Mill Playhouse presents the East Coast premiere ofBenny amp Joonwith book byKirsten Guenther, music byNolan Gasser, lyrics byMindi Dickstein, based on the Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer motion picture written by Barry Berman and Leslie McNeil.
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Watch ‘The Possession of Hannah Grace’ Exclusive Featurette: Mind Games

Watch 'The Possession of Hannah Grace' Exclusive Featurette: Mind Games

Fresh out of rehab, former cop Megan Reed (Shay Mitchell) can imagine nothing more soothing and relaxing than working by herself on the graveyard shift at a hospital morgue. What could possibly go wrong when you're surrounded by dead people?

In The Possession of Hannah Grace, everything goes wrong for poor Megan after the arrival of the titular corpse, a young woman who obviously suffered greatly before she died. "Megan thinks she's hearing things," explains Mitchell. Yet…

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‘The Possession of Hannah Grace’ May Scare the Dead Back to Life; Here’s Everything We Know

'The Possession of Hannah Grace' May Scare the Dead Back to Life; Here's Everything We Know

"When you die, you die" is a phrase that is repeated several times in the trailer for The Possession of Hannah Grace, which is a thought that can reassure anyone worried that the dead might return to life in a very bad mood. Of course, countless horror movies have sought to disprove that phrase by reanimating corpses to very frightening effect.

The Possession of Hannah Grace introduces the protagonist in a sympathetic manner before quickly moving on to its scary setup, making sure…

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