Keanu Reeves What Happens When We Die Theory Goes Viral – Watch His Video With Stephen Colbert Here

In a bizarre turn of events, Keanu Reeves gave a profound answer when Stephen Colbert asked the actor what he thinks happens when we die. It was a heavy topic for the late-night show host, and Reeves answer left Colbert speechless.

Mortality is certainly not a topic most celebrities want to discuss when they are doing the talk show circuit. However, it was brought up thanks to Reeves talking about the plot for the upcoming third installment in the cult Bill and Ted franchise. He was discussing the plot for the flick, which is tentatively titled Bill and Ted Face the Music, when the subject of mortality was inevitable.

The plot as Reeves explains, has Bill and Ted writing a song that must reunite the broken universe or life as everyone knows it will be over. They have only minutes to complete the song, which is all about invoking peace in the world. If the crazy duo fails, then the current space-time continuum will be finished.

Once Reeves finished explaining the premise of the movie, Colbert brought up the question that changed their entire conversation.

“So you’re facing your own mortality and the mortality of all existence,” the Late Night With Stephen Colbert host asked before questioning the actor’s thoughts on what he thinks happens to people when we die.

“I know that the ones who love us will miss us,” the 54-year simply stated.

He didn’t say much, but his message left the host speechless. Colbert was silent before reaching over to shake Reeves’ hand and reminding the audience John Wick 3 movie opens later this week.

Keanu Reeves is a man of few words. However, his words regarding what happens to people when they die has made him go viral. They are not only 100% accurate; they are absurdly beautiful. Don’t you agree?

The actor is no stranger to losing someone to death. He was best friends with actor River Phoenix when he passed away from a drug overdose at the age of 23.

Reeves and ex-girlfriend, Jennifer Syme had a stillborn daughter back in 1998. Three years later Syme tragically died in a car crash. However, given the loss he suffered, Reeves has some pretty insightful and not bitter words about death.

Fans can catch Bill and Ted Face the Music in theaters in August 2020.

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UK lawmakers have seized control of Brexit. What happens next?

There were audible gasps in the UK Parliament on Monday night as lawmakers voted to seize control of the Brexit process from embattled Prime Minister Theresa May — the first time in over a century that MPs have taken over the parliamentary timetable from the government.


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Some states allow parents to get out of vaccinations. Then this happens

Two states experiencing a measles outbreak, Washington and Oregon, allow parents to opt out of vaccines simply because they want to.


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What does a national emergency mean? Here’s what happens if Donald Trump declares one

What does a national emergency mean? Here’s what happens if Donald Trump declares one


What does a national emergency mean? Here’s what happens if Donald Trump declares one

Editor’s note: This article was originally published on January 8th. On Friday, January 25th, President Donald Trump said he would agree to temporarily reopen the government but, if Congress continued to reject his plans for a border wall, he may declare a “national emergency.”

President Donald Trump is caught between a wall and a hard place. With a $ 5.7 billion price tag, his proposed southern border wall has divided Congress and sent the nation into its 18th day of a government shutdown—stranding some 800,000 federal employees without pay. On Tuesday night Trump is scheduled to address the nation, interrupting prime-time on broadcast networks for the first time in his presidency.

While a senior White House official told The Washington Post that the president plans to use the airtime to garner support for the wall, it remains unclear whether he might make a more drastic proclamation instead—declaring a “national emergency” and freeing himself to implement more than 100 powers. By invoking such an emergency Trump could potentially begin building his wall and, in a rhetorical dodge, then announce his demands had been met and that he would agree to end the shutdown. But he may also enrage Democrats and provoke a legal battle. Here is what a national emergency really means.

donald trump
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What qualifies as a “national emergency”?

In short, it depends. According to a report put together by the Brennan Center for Justice, both the president and Congress can declare a national emergency whenever they see fit. Despite the severe-sounding label, no broadly agreed-upon “emergency” is actually required. That means that while the underlying data doesn’t support parts of the Trump administration’s argument about the dangers at the souther border — for example, the number of illegal immigrants has decreased over the last two decades and, according to the State Department’s Bureau of Counterterrorism, there is “no credible information that any member of a terrorist group has traveled through Mexico to gain access to the United States”—the president nonetheless can rule it an emergency, The New York Times explains. 

Under the National Emergencies Act, passed in 1976, Congress has the power to end a state of emergency declared by a president. But it has not done so in 40 years, according to the Brennan Center’s report. It seems especially unlikely that Congress would terminate the potential border-related national emergency, given its current makeup, as doing so would require a joint resolution and a signature from the president.

What can a president do with emergency powers?

Build a wall—maybe. Generally, emergency powers can help a president act in dire situations when executive branch’s standard capabilities are too limited. The thinking is that the president is ultimately tasked with safeguarding a nation’s safety and prosperity and, in a crisis, should be empowered to move swiftly as needed.

The Brennan Center identified 136 additional statutory powers that a president may use in the case of a national emergency, two of which may apply to the border wall. The first permits the president to use funding already allocated to military construction to begin “military construction projects not otherwise authorized by law.” The second statute allows the president to take away troops and other resources from Department of Army civil works projects and apply them to “authorized civil works, military construction and civil defense projects that are essential to the national defense.”

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Is that legal?

While both of these statutes provide some legal cover if the president declares a state of emergency to fund the border wall, they each raise important questions. For example, does the wall qualify as “military construction”—a necessary component to the first statute? Or, as the second requires, has Congress already “authorized” a wall? Should the wall’s construction via an emergency be challenged in court, the Supreme Court would likely have to weigh in.

Do presidents regularly declare national emergencies?

Yes. Since the National Emergencies Act became law, presidents have declared at least 58 states of emergency, excluding weather-related events, USA Today reported. In 2009, President Barack Obama declared a national emergency amid the outbreak of H1N1, better known as swine flu and allowed the waiving of some rules such as privacy laws.

What now?

Wait until Trump’s speech at 9 p.m. ET, with a Democratic rebuttal to follow and the networks vowing to provide extensive fact-checking, given the president’s history of untruths and distortions.

This article originally appeared on People.com

The post What does a national emergency mean? Here’s what happens if Donald Trump declares one appeared first on HelloGiggles.

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Ad Check: What Happens If California Limits Dialysis Center Profits?

California voters are being bombarded with ads in what is the most expensive ballot measure campaign this year. They are being asked to decide Tuesday whether the state should limit the profit of kidney dialysis centers to 15 percent over the cost of patient care, with revenue above that rebated primarily to insurers.

What exactly would happen if voters approve Proposition 8 is still vague, and the $ 127 million raised to persuade voters hasn’t made it any clearer.

Both sides are making bold statements. But even the Legislative Analyst’s Office, nonpartisan officials who advise the state Legislature, said Prop 8 could result in a “net positive impact in the low tens of millions of dollars to net negative impact in the tens of millions of dollars.” In other words: No one knows.

Here’s what both sides had to say and what they base it on.

Against Proposition 8

The dialysis companies, mostly DaVita and Fresenius Medical Care, have contributed more than $ 110 million to fight Prop 8, more than six times what the “Yes on 8” campaign has raised. Their ads feature concerned health care professionals and dialysis patients warning voters of the terrible effects Prop 8 would have on dialysis patients and taxpayers in California.

This ad is just one in a series in heavy rotation on TV stations across the state. Like most of the “No on 8” advertisements, it prominently cites the Berkeley Research Group when claiming Prop 8 “would force many dialysis clinics to shut down, and threaten the care that patients need to survive.”

The narrator of the ad goes on to say “studies show Prop 8 will increase health care costs by hundreds of millions of dollars,” again citing the Berkeley Research Group.

The Berkeley Research Group is a large international consulting firm hired by the “No on 8” committee to analyze the proposition’s economic impact. It was paid more than $ 200,000 by the committee, according to campaign finance reports filed with the California secretary of state.

The consulting firm — which is not affiliated with the University of California — based its analysis on financial data from dialysis clinics around the state, including self-reported totals for direct patient care, quality improvements and “non-allowable” costs. Non-allowable costs, which might include some management staff positions and corporate overhead costs, will be ironed out through a public rule-making process if Prop 8 is passed.

The researchers used their own interpretation of non-allowable costs, took that to calculate how many clinics would surpass the 15 percent margin, and then applied the reimbursements that Prop 8 would require to conclude that “most clinics will migrate to having negative operating margins.” The analysis estimated that Prop 8 would increase health care costs for taxpayers by between $ 12 million and $ 2.6 billion annually.

Whether that happens depends on how clinics could adjust their operations to decrease their expenses that are not considered allowable patient care costs.

There is nothing unusual about relying on consultants to supply ammunition for a political campaign. “The effort to marshal research to support an advocacy campaign is not at all uncommon,” said Edward Walker, a sociology professor at UCLA specializing in political lobbying by businesses. He also pointed out that the advocacy campaigns often try to distance themselves from the research they pay for.

The Berkeley Research Group report leaves no room for uncertainty. “It is certain that Prop 8 will result in the closure of numerous clinics and the withdrawal of dialysis services from hundreds of thousands of patients,” the report said.

For Proposition 8

The Yes committee is funded almost exclusively by the Service Employees International Union-United Healthcare Workers West. The union has long fought to organize workers at dialysis clinics. Rather than focus on Prop 8’s possible effects, the “Yes” ads criticize the dialysis industry in general. The labor union has contributed more than $ 17 million to the “Yes on 8” committee, the largest amount SEIU has ever shelled out.

This ad starts out dramatically: “$ 150,000 a year,” the narrator intones. “That’s how much big dialysis corporations charge some patients, a 350 percent markup over the cost of care.” The ad doesn’t cite a source, but the figure roughly matches what industry financial analysts say private health insurance pays for dialysis.

Dialysis companies argue that the low reimbursement rate from Medicare — which covers about 90 percent of patients — is the reason they are forced to charge more for the 10 percent who are covered by private insurance. Those private insurance payments allow them to remain profitable. SEIU argues that high rates for private insurance contributes to higher overall health care costs and points out that the dialysis companies have a higher profit margin than hospitals in the state.

DaVita, a for-profit company that runs half of all dialysis clinics in California and is the biggest contributor to the “No on 8” campaign, reported profits of $ 1.8 billion on revenue of $ 10.9 billion last year, almost all of which came from its dialysis business.

The “Yes on 8” ad also cites an investigation by ProPublica, a nonprofit news organization, which found that the U.S. has one of the highest fatality rates for dialysis in the industrialized world. The narrator says, “Dialysis corporations make a killing, driving up insurance rates while patients report blood stains and cockroaches in their clinics,” while a quote from the ProPublica article is flashed on the screen. It says: “dangerous conditions, inadequate care, higher-than-expected mortality rates.”

While the ProPublica report did find troubling conditions in dialysis clinics around the country, the allegation of cockroaches was from a different report. ProPublica’s investigation examined records from more than 1,500 clinics in a number of states, including California, and it noted filthy or unsafe conditions in almost half of the units. But it doesn’t say the problem is any better or worse in California.

The “Yes on 8” committee’s communications approach is part of an ongoing campaign to challenge the power and profits of large dialysis companies, and organize their workers.

“This is in part a proxy battle between the labor unions and the dialysis centers,” Walker said. “It’s a way to increase the pressure and the leverage.”


This story was produced by Kaiser Health News, which publishes California Healthline, a service of the California Health Care Foundation.

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‘Making a Murderer: Part 2’ Creators Tell All: ‘What Happens When Injustice Is Exposed?’

Photo Illustration by The Daily Beast

Upon its premiere in late 2015, Netflix’s Making a Murderer became an instant phenomenon (and sparked a true-crime documentary renaissance) by bringing to national attention the plight of Manitowoc County, Wisconsin, residents Steven Avery and Brendan Dassey, who in 2005—shortly after Avery was released from prison after serving 18 years for a rape he didn’t commit—were charged with the murder of Teresa Halbach.

Filmed over the course of 10 years, during which time Avery and Dassey were convicted and sentenced to life in prison, Laura Ricciardi and Moira Demos’ series was an exhaustive examination of injustice, laying bare the devious motivations and tactics (including planting evidence and eliciting a false Dassey confession) used by state and law enforcement officials to put the men behind bars. Depressing and enraging in equal measure, it was an expert non-fiction exposé, as compulsively addictive as anything released during our modern binge-watching era.

Fans of Making a Murderer are thus thrilled by its return for an all-new 10-episode run—except, of course, that like its predecessor, the series continues to paint a portrait of the legal system that’s destined to infuriate. Charting Avery and Dassey’s attempts to exonerate themselves with the aid of new lawyers (famed attorney Kathleen Zellner for Avery; Center on Wrongful Convictions of Youth co-founders Laura Nirider and Steve Drizin for Dassey), Ricciardi and Demos’ follow-up affords a detailed look at the myriad obstacles of the post-conviction process, the amazing possibilities afforded by forensic science, and the dogged obstinacy of the state of Wisconsin, which continues to uphold Avery and Dassey’s convictions even in the face of contradictory evidence. Multifaceted, eye-opening and heartbreaking, it’s yet another must-see effort from the directors.

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