Podcast: KHN’s ‘What The Health?’ A ‘Healthy’ State Of The Union

Health policy played a surprisingly robust role in President Donald Trump’s 2019 State of the Union address.

The president laid out an ambitious set of health goals in his speech Tuesday to Congress and the nation, including reining in drug prices, ending the transmission of HIV in the U.S. during the next decade and dedicating more resources to fighting childhood cancer.

Meanwhile, in Utah and Idaho, two of the states where voters last fall approved expansion of the Medicaid health program, Republican legislatures are trying to scale back those plans.

This week’s panelists for KHN’s “What the Health?” are Julie Rovner of Kaiser Health News, Anna Edney of Bloomberg News, Margot Sanger-Katz of The New York Times and Alice Ollstein of Politico.

Among the takeaways from this week’s podcast:

  • The Trump administration is proposing to change the drug rebates in Medicare so that consumers purchasing the medicines get more of the savings and the middlemen negotiating the deals get less. But that effort could lead to increased insurance premiums — a consequence that could have significant political repercussions.
  • Trump’s pledge to end HIV transmissions in 10 years was a bit of a surprise since the disease had not been much of a priority in earlier moves by the administration.
  • The efforts to restrict Medicaid expansion approved by voters in Utah and Idaho show the limitations of referendums and could impact a move to get a Medicaid expansion question on the Florida ballot.
  • An intriguing study this week showed that medications to treat cardiac problems saved Medicare money. The results were surprising because generally public health officials suggest that prevention is important to improve health but doesn’t necessarily save money.

Also this week, Rovner interviews KHN senior correspondent Phil Galewitz, who investigated and wrote the latest “Bill of the Month” feature for Kaiser Health News and NPR. It’s about a man with a minor problem — fainting after a flu shot — and a major bill. You can read the story here.

If you have a medical bill you would like NPR and KHN to investigate, you can submit it here.

Plus, for extra credit, the panelists recommend their favorite health policy stories of the week they think you should read too:

Julie Rovner: NPR’s “Texans Can Appeal Surprise Medical Bills, But the Process Can Be Draining,” by Ashley Lopez

Margot Sanger-Katz: The Los Angeles Times’ “In Rush to Revamp Medicaid, Trump Officials Bend Rules That Protect Patients,” by Noam N. Levey

Anna Edney: Bloomberg News’ “Ketamine Could Be the Key to Reversing America’s Rising Suicide Rate,” by Cynthia Koons and Robert Langreth

Alice Ollstein: The Washington Post’s “’It Will Take Off Like a Wildfire’: The Unique Dangers of the Washington State Measles Outbreak,” by Lena H. Sun and Maureen O’Hagan

To hear all our podcasts, click here.

And subscribe to What the Health? on iTunesStitcher or Google Play.

Kaiser Health News

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Young and Healthy Community Health Grant

Like adults, children get stressed. But when children experience severe or prolonged adversity such as physical abuse or extreme poverty, the impact can damage their developing brains and harm their lifelong health and well-being.

Young and Healthy, a nonprofit that assists under-resourced children and families in Pasadena through prevention, education and enhanced health care services, is working to help reduce the toll of toxic stress. The organization will pilot a trauma-informed school model in the Pasadena Unified School District in which administrators, teachers, staff and parents are prepared to recognize, and respond to, those impacted by traumatic stress. In addition, students are provided with clear expectations and communication strategies to successfully guide them through stressful situations. The goal is not only to provide tools to cope with extreme situations, but also to create an underlying culture of respect and support.

“Relationship is key to the trauma-informed approach – having an adult who truly listens and finds a way to connect with that child can make all the difference.”

— Juliane Reynoso, assistant superintendent, elementary, Pasadena Unified School District

“Research indicates that the single most important aspect of healing the hurt of trauma in children is a positive, nurturing relationship with an adult,” said Mary Donnelly-Crocker, executive director, Young and Healthy. “Young and Healthy is committed to creating a healthy community by educating children, parents and educators on how to become more aware of, and sensitive to, those who have suffered trauma. In turn, Pasadena can become a trauma-informed community.”

An estimated one-third of the children living in greater Pasadena need the type of services Young and Healthy offers. Kaiser Permanente Southern California has partnered with the organization for more than 20 years on community health grants to help children and families access needed medical and dental care. More recently, Young and Healthy has expanded its focus to include addressing environmental, social and emotional factors that influence health. This past fall, Kaiser Permanente funded a $ 95,000, one-year grant to support Young and Healthy’s pilot program to launch the trauma-informed model within 10 Pasadena Unified School District campuses.

“This valuable project led by Young and Healthy will help reduce mental health stigma and build resilience in individuals, organizations and the community,” said Sandra Silva, director, community health, Kaiser Permanente Southern California. “By understanding and responding to trauma, school administrators, teachers and staff can help reduce its damaging impact, support critical learning and create a more positive school environment.”

Long-term impact of childhood trauma

The landmark Centers for Disease Control and Kaiser Permanente ACEs (Adverse Childhood Experiences) Study demonstrated the link between childhood trauma and the increased risk for chronic disease as an adult, as well as emotional and social difficulties.

Inspired by the ACEs Study, Young and Healthy has been working to decrease the effects of trauma. Efforts have ranged from collaborating with community partners to convene a Pasadena Trauma-Informed Care Initiative and conducting trauma-informed training for various organizations, to providing a mindfulness curriculum for young PUSD students. Creating and implementing a trauma-informed school model became a natural next step. The pilot program will include:

  • Providing training and technical assistance to leadership teams representing the participating schools to create and implement site-specific plans.
  • Developing a comprehensive report with project results, evaluation and recommendations as a tool for other Pasadena Unified School District schools to implement the model.
  • Formalizing a Trauma-Informed Care Committee to establish standards to identify as trauma-responsive agencies. The committee includes representatives from Pasadena Unified School District, City of Pasadena Public Health Department, Huntington Hospital, Head Start Pasadena, Pasadena Office of the Young Child and other community organizations.

“We are grateful for Kaiser Permanente’s partnership,” Donnelly-Crocker said. “They helped provide the seed money to start and continue our trauma-informed work that will help transform how our community recognizes and responds to people who have experienced trauma – ultimately improving the community’s health and well-being.”

To learn more about Kaiser Permanente Southern California’s work in the community, visit http://community.kp.org.

 

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Healthy holidays and a sunscreen rethink: top five travel trends for 2019

Rising eco-awareness, wellness breaks and a farewell to passports … we look at changes in the world of travel for the year ahead

Last October, Club 18-30 holidays staggered off into the sunset, aged 50. To the relief of Mediterranean resorts that had spent decades dealing with the carnage caused by epic drinking challenges, it appears that buckets of warm sangria – or worse – have lost their appeal. We have entered the era of the healthy holiday, driven by young people who want to be sober enough to take a flattering selfie. The rise of ‘ego travel’ was cited by Thomas Cook when it retired the Club 18-30 brand, turning its focus on its Casa Cook and Cook’s Club brands, design-conscious hotels with gyms, tasting menus, upmarket cocktails and yoga.

Continue reading…
Travel | The Guardian

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Rosario Dawson On Staying Healthy, Making Deals In DMs & How Motherhood Changed Her Life | PeopleTV

PeopleTV

SPECIAL NEWS BULLETIN:

http://www.acrx.org -As millions of Americans strive to deal with the economic downturn,loss of jobs,foreclosures,high cost of gas,and the rising cost of prescription drug cost. Charles Myrick ,the President of American Consultants Rx, announced the re-release of the American Consultants Rx community service project which consist of millions of free discount prescription cards being donated to thousands of not for profits,hospitals,schools,churches,etc. in an effort to assist the uninsured,under insured,and seniors deal with the high cost of prescription drugs.-American Consultants Rx -Pharmacy Discount Network News

CHARITY UPDATE:

Click today to request your free ACRX discount prescription card and save up to 80% off of your medicine!

SPECIAL DONATION REQUEST UPDATE:

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Healthy Living During The Holidays

Dr. Susan Reinhard, a registered nurse, senior vice president and director of AARP public policy institute, joins us this morning on behalf of AARP to discuss healthy living during the holiday season and beyond.

She is a nationally recognized expert in health and long-term care, with extensive experience in conducting, directing and translating research to promote policy change.

Q&A

WHAT IS AARP’S APPROACH ON HEALTH?

AARP’S HEALTHY LIVING INITIATIVE, WHICH I AM EXCITED TO BE LEADING, IS TO EMPOWER PEOPLE 50-PLUS TO LIVE THEIR HEALTHIEST LIVES POSSIBLE.

AARP WANTS TO HELP YOU TAKE A WHOLE-BODY APPROACH TO YOUR HEALTHY LIVING GOALS AND HELP YOU TAKE CONTROL OF YOUR HEALTH AS YOU AGE.

A WHOLE-BODY APPROACH TO HEALTHY LIVING MEANS IMPROVING HOW YOU EAT, SLEEP, EXERCISE, AND CONNECT WITH OTHERS AT EVERY STAGE OF AGING.

ON AARP.ORG/HEALTH YOU MAY FIND TOOLS, RESOURCES, AND INFORMATION RANGING FROM EXERCISE TO BRAIN GAMES, FROM COOKING DEMONSTRATIONS TO CONNECTING WITH YOUR COMMUNITY, FROM BETTER NUTRITION TO BETTER SLEEP.

HEALTHY LIVING IS AS MUCH ABOUT MAKING SMALL CHANGES TO YOUR EVERYDAY ROUTINE, AS IT IS ABOUT BIG LIFE-CHANGING BEHAVIORAL COMMITMENTS.

WHAT’S A SMALL CHANGE THAT PEOPLE CAN CONSIDER?

WALK 30 MINUTES A DAY.

AS PART OF OUR HEALTHY LIVING WORK, THIS PAST SPRING WE LAUNCHED A FIT AND FUN CHALLENGE TO PROMOTE PHYSICAL ACTIVITY AND FITNESS. THE CHALLENGE INSPIRED THOUSANDS OF PEOPLE TO WALK 30 MINUTES A DAY FOR EIGHT WEEKS THROUGH AN INTERACTIVE WEBSITE THAT ALLOWED PEOPLE TO MAKE THAT COMMITMENT, CONNECT AND SHARE STORIES, AND GAIN INSPIRATION AND TIPS FROM A LEADING FITNESS EXPERT. THE CHALLENGE ENDED FOR THIS YEAR BUT WE ENCOURAGE YOU TO START OR CONTINUE YOUR 30 MINUTE WALKS.

FOR NEW YEAR’S RESOLUTIONS, EXERCISE CAN BE A POPULAR ONE. HOW CAN WE KEEP UP THE MOTIVATION TO EXERCISE?

SOME TIPS ARE STOP MAKING EXERCISE ABOUT HOW YOU LOOK, WRITE DOWN EXACTLY WHEN AND WHERE YOU WILL EXERCISE, OR HAVE A PLAN B.

ALSO, PRIORITIZE CONVENIENCE. DAVID MAXFIELD, CO-AUTHOR OF CHANGE ANYTHING, SAYS “SET YOUR WORKOUT CLOTHES NEXT TO YOUR BED THE NIGHT BEFORE, AND KEEP EXERCISE EQUIPMENT VISIBLE AND NEARBY.

YOU CAN EVEN MAKE IT SOCIAL. YOU ARE MORE LIKELY TO EXERCISE CONSISTENTLY IF YOU WORK OUT WITH OTHER PEOPLE.

FOR MORE TIPS ABOUT EXERCISING AND EXERCISES, GO TO AARP.ORG/HEALTH.

DURING THE HOLIDAYS PEOPLE TEND TO EAT MORE, WHAT CAN WE DO TO STAY HEALTHY DURING THE HOLIDAYS?

EAT BEFOREHAND. FASTING BEFORE A HOLIDAY DINNER CAN BACKFIRE. CYNTHIA SASS, A NUTRITIONIST AND AUTHOR OF SLIM DOWN NOW SAYS, “EAT REGULAR, OR SMALLER, MEALS BEFORE ANY FEAST.”

SHE ALSO RECOMMENDS AT ANY BUFFET TABLE, LOOK AT ALL THE OPTIONS BEFORE PUTTING THINGS ON YOUR PLATE. CHOOSE ONE OR TWO SPLURGE FOODS AND TRY TO BALANCE WITH OTHER LIGHT, HEALTHY CHOICES LIKE CUT VEGGIES.

ANOTHER TIP CYNTHIA PROVIDES IS TO PHYSICALLY DISTANCE YOURSELF FROM THE BUFFET.

WHAT ARE SOME ACTIVITIES WE CAN DO FOR EATING HEALTHY DURING AND BEYOND THE HOLIDAYS?

IF YOU WANT A HEALTHY HEART AND A NUMBER YOU ARE HAPPY WITH ON THE SCALE, EAT BRAZIL NUTS, PUT DOWN YOUR FORK AT 6 PM AND WEIGH YOURSELF EVERY DAY.

THESE ARE FINDINGS FROM STUDIES AT THE AMERICAN HEART ASSOCIATION’S ANNUAL MEETING FOR ADVANCES IN CARDIO VASCULAR SCIENCE.

OTHER ACTIVITIES CAN BE TO USE A SMALLER PLATE TO CONTROL PORTION SIZE, USE SPICES/HERBS TO FLAVOR FOOD INSTEAD OF SALT, AND READ PACKAGED FOOD LABELS TO MAKE HEALTHIER CHOICES AS RECOMMENDED FROM THE GLOBAL COUNCIL ON BRAIN HEALTH CONVENED BY AARP.

ASIDE FROM WATCHING WHAT WE EAT, WHAT COULD WE DO AROUND THE TABLE?

TALK ABOUT HEALTH. RECENTLY, THROUGH A TELEPHONE TOWN HALL CO-HOSTED WITH THE 100 BLACK MEN OF AMERICA, WE WERE ABLE TO REACH OUT AND CONNECT ON THE TOPIC OF PRE-DIABETES AMONG THE AFRICAN AMERICAN/BLACK COMMUNITY, A POPULATION AT HIGH RISK FOR THE CONDITION ACCORDING TO THE CENTER FOR DISEASE CONTROL AND PREVENTION. ONE IN THREE AMERICAN ADULTS HAVE PRE-DIABETES AND NEARLY 90% OF THOSE DON’T EVEN KNOW THEY HAVE IT, AS STATED BY THE C-D-C. TO LEARN MORE AND TAKE THE PREDIABETES RISK TEST, GO TO AARP.ORG/PREDIABETES.

WE HAVE LISTENERS FROM ALL ACROSS THE COUNTRY THAT MAY BE TRAVELLING TO THEIR LOVED ONES THIS HOLIDAY. WHAT ARE SOME HEALTHY LIVING TIPS THEY CAN TAKE AWAY?

WHILE YOU ARE TRAVELING, STAY HYDRATED. USE EYE DROPS AND A SALINE NASAL SPRAY, SAYS SHARON BERQUIST, M.D. AT EMORY HEALTHCARE IN ATLANTA. SHE ALSO RECOMMENDS TO DRINK PLENTY OF FLUIDS, PARTICULARLY IF YOU ARE ON MEDICATION. HOT DRINKS ARE GOOD FOR HYDRATION AND THE STEAM WILL HELP MOISTURIZE MUCUS MEMBRANES, A BARRIER AGAINST BACTERIAL VIRUSES IN THE NOSE AND MOUTH.

IF YOU ARE ON A FLIGHT, BE AWARE THAT ALCOHOL CAN DEHYDRATE YOU. ALSO ON LONG FLIGHTS, GET UP AND WALK EVERY TWO HOURS TO LOWER YOUR RISK OF BLOOD CLOTS IN YOUR LEGS.

USE AN AIR VENT IF YOU HAVE ONE IN THE PLANE, TRAIN, OR CAR. THE AIR VENT HELPS CREATE AIR FLOW THAT WILL MOVE GERMS OUT OF YOUR SPACE.

ALSO TO HELP KEEP AWAY THE GERMS, BRING AN ALCOHOL-BASED GEL SANITIZER – ONE WITH AT LEAST 60% – TO USE ON YOUR HANDS AFTER TOUCHING SURFACES THAT OTHERS MAY TOUCH FREQUENTLY – LIKE A DOOR HANDLE.

WHAT CAN WE LOOK FORWARD TO THE NEW YEAR FROM AARP?

LOOK OUT FOR ANOTHER FIT AND FUN CHALLENGE AND OTHER HEALTHY LIVING EVENTS, SUCH AS A TELEPHONE TOWN HALL. SO STAYED TUNED FOR MORE HEALTHY LIVING GUIDANCE, TOOLS, AND SOLUTIONS THAT WE CAN PUT TO USE AT AARP.ORG/HEALTH.

Life & Style – Black America Web

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I have three healthy kids, but I’ll never forget the pain of my miscarriage

I have three healthy kids, but I’ll never forget the pain of my miscarriage


I have three healthy kids, but I’ll never forget the pain of my miscarriage

Trigger Warning: This essay describes graphic memories of a miscarriage.

When I gave birth to my son, I was certain it was the biggest accomplishment of my life. When anyone asked me how I liked motherhood, I proudly said it was the greatest thing I’d ever do. So, 10 months after our son made us parents for the first time, my husband and I decided we were ready for baby number two. Effortlessly, I became pregnant within a month. I was ecstatic. Yes, I’d have two babies in diapers at the same time, but the unconditional love was addictive. Creating that love by adding to our family made all the sense in the world.

My first doctor’s appointment confirming my pregnancy was exciting. My son had been unplanned, so my anxiety about being pregnant and unwed had prevented me from enjoying the first stage of that pregnancy. I was eager to enjoy every moment this second time around. After some lab work, I was confirmed to be officially pregnant.

My husband accompanied me to my next appointment a week later; he was as excited about our newest addition as I was. I slipped into my hospital gown while my husband and I flirted and laughed. Soon, we excitedly watched our baby show up on the screen for the first time. We were so eager that it took a moment to realize what the ultrasound machine revealed: A small 7-week-old fetus with no heartbeat.

My doctor seemed unperturbed as she instructed me to get dressed before leaving the room. I put on my clothes in silence. The joyful atmosphere from before was completely erased while we waited for the doctor to say what we already knew. Like one in four pregnancies, mine had ended in miscarriage.

My doctor confirmed it, and there was no explanation for what happened. There were no condolences given. She only stated the simple facts and told me the fetus should pass soon without trouble. I was too numb to respond.

That weekend was spent in tears as I experienced bleeding. I tried to rationalize the miscarriage. Why did it happen? What did I do to cause it? I wanted answers, but there was no way to find them.


I returned to work the following Monday, knowing that everyone was aware of my miscarriage. But I was relieved—having someone innocently ask about my pregnancy would set me off all over again. Instead, I was handled with kids gloves and I couldn’t bring myself to resent it. I felt more fragile than ever.

I was processing the weekly payroll in my office, and that’s when I felt it happening. I excused myself to a private bathroom and sat heavily on the seat. To this day, I can’t explain how it felt, but I could feel my body passing something more than blood. I knew my body had to release the remainders of the fetus, but I had no understanding of how physically substantial a miscarriage can be. I thought my bleeding over the weekend would be the end of it, but now I knew I was wrong. I affixed an oversized pad to my underwear and went back to my desk.

But I still felt it—those telltale uncomfortable signs of bleeding through my pad. I went back to the bathroom; it was like I’d entered a scene from a bloody horror movie. I quickly changed my pad, shaking as I cleaned myself as much as I could.

But I bled through the second pad, and this time, I was frantic. The bleeding wouldn’t stop. I was traumatized. Not knowing what to do, I took out my phone and called my boss. He answered with a chipper voice, no doubt expecting a payroll question.

“I’m miscarrying in the bathroom,” I told him. “Help me.”

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I don’t know if it was my words or the panicked way I said them, but he and our team’s head of HR knocked at the bathroom door almost instantly. Through the door, I explained what was happening. They wanted to call an ambulance; I wanted my husband. I wanted my parents. I didn’t want to experience this there.

They coaxed me out of the bathroom and I waited for my ride to the ER. I continued bleeding uncontrollably, shaking violently as my boss tried to keep me alert. I remember his comforting words, but they were overshadowed by the horrified look in his eyes.

Mumbled apologies tumbled from my lips—but I wasn’t even sure what I was sorry for. Scaring them? Bleeding all over the place? Bringing my trauma to work? Failing this baby as a mother?

My husband met me at the ER. We were ushered to a triage where we waited for far too long, and I felt the final drop of a heavy mass. Suddenly, the proof of my unborn second child laid on the floor of the triage. I couldn’t look at it.

Just like my OBGYN, the ER doctor walked in, gave me the facts of my miscarriage, and sent me away.

I wasn’t sure what was worse: leaving the fetus that had been in my womb behind or enduring heartless treatment from doctors in the most harrowing time of my life.


It took me years to talk about my miscarriage.

Instead, I did all the things you’re supposed to do. I named her June Jose for the month she was lost and for my father. My dad planted a flowering bush in her honor. I waited to have another child. I spent my third and fourth pregnancies doing everything I could to grow healthy babies—and I did. Still, there was a pain I couldn’t shake, that I still can’t.

In a strange way, I don’t think I’m meant to forget that pain. Living children spend their entire existences are spent filling us with joy, love, worry, frustration, and a litany of other feelings. We love them more each day, and they teach us in both subtle and grand ways. Children lost in pregnancy or infancy aren’t exempt from inspiring these feelings—they just do it in a different way. The what-ifs intensify those feelings. These children who were lost are simultaneously infinite in their possibilities and finite in their reality. I’ll never know for sure that my child was a girl. I’ll never know if she had my eyes or my husband’s smile. I’ll never know what it feels like to hold her.

No matter how full my heart is, there will always be a smaller corner of it that aches just for her, and I’ve accepted that it is supposed to be that way. My sorrow is never ending, but so is my love for the child I lost.

If you have suffered a pregnancy or infant loss, you can find your local chapter of Share Pregnancy and Infant Loss Support here, and get their help during this time.

The post I have three healthy kids, but I’ll never forget the pain of my miscarriage appeared first on HelloGiggles.

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‘Teach Flu A Lesson’ Strives to Help Kids Stay Healthy This Season

No one wants to be sick, especially during the holidays, which is why it is especially important school-aged children get the annual flu vaccine this fall.

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, flu is the leading cause of illness, and last year’s flu season was the deadliest in more than a decade. Young children are especially at risk. The flu spreads quickly in tight quarters such as elementary school classrooms, and children’s developing immune systems may be more susceptible to colds and flu. Children who live in low-income communities may be at even greater risk because their access to health care and preventive vaccines is often limited.

Thanks to the voluntary Teach Flu a Lesson program, thousands of underserved students throughout Southern California can receive increased protection against the influenza virus this season at no charge. The innovative partnership among Kaiser Permanente, the California Department of Public Health, 10 school districts, and 11 nursing schools is making more than 8,000 flu vaccines available at school-based vaccination clinics.

By providing the vaccine to communities with below-average vaccination rates, Teach Flu a Lesson helps ensure the most vulnerable communities can reduce their risk for infection and enjoy better health this winter.

“This program is so important — it is not only about protecting the individual child, but also protecting the school from a larger outbreak, and protecting the student’s family, including younger siblings,” said Margaret Khoury, MD, pediatric infectious disease specialist and regional lead of the Kaiser Permanente Southern California Flu Vaccination Program.

“Reaching out to the community and making protection available to children every flu season is the way to go,” Dr Khoury said. “Removing obstacles to getting the flu shot is the key to our success and what makes this program a model.”

Bradley Jacoby, DO and Riverside Community College nursing students.

Bradley Jacoby, DO, Southern California Permanente Medical Group (bear costume), and Riverside Community College nursing students partner for the Teach Flu a Lesson program.

This year, Teach Flu a Lesson is expected to be especially successful because of the return of FluMist, the nasal spray vaccine option. Working with the California Department of Public Health, Kaiser Permanente is making both FluMist and the standard flu shot available to young students with their parent’s or guardian’s permission. Kaiser Permanente also helped to secure assistance from local nursing schools, whose nursing students are administering the vaccines.

“The FluMist is great,” said Kevin Moore, practice specialist at Kaiser Permanente, who helps lead the Teach Flu a Lesson program with Lisa Buffong, associate medical group administrator. “It is quick to administer and less traumatic for students compared to a shot, and we know it is just as effective.”

This year, 112 Southern California schools are hosting the vaccination clinics. Participating school districts include:

  • Antelope Valley: Lancaster
  • Los Angeles County: Baldwin Park and El Rancho
  • Orange County: Anaheim, Buena Park, Santa Ana, and Savana
  • Riverside County: Riverside
  • San Bernardino County: Yucaipa
  • South Bay: Torrance

“Every year, many students miss important instructional time in the classroom because they are home sick with the flu,” said Christopher Downing, superintendent, Anaheim Elementary School District. “The value of the Teach Flu a Lesson is that it helps lower this public health barrier and ensures access to a flu shot for all of our students.”

Now in its sixth year, Teach Flu a Lesson began at schools in early October and will continue through mid-December.

“As we head into the holiday season, the key to staying healthy for children is getting the vaccine, combined with handwashing, and of course healthy eating and sleep,” said Dr. Khoury. “That’s the recipe for wellness.”

To learn more about Kaiser Permanente Southern California’s work in the community, please visit http://community.kp.org.

The post ‘Teach Flu A Lesson’ Strives to Help Kids Stay Healthy This Season appeared first on Kaiser Permanente.

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Creating a Healthy Sales & Marketing Relationship

If you’re an owner of a construction company, you may find the world of marketing a bit intimidating. With more than 85% of all home improvement projecting starting online, it’s more important now than ever to optimize your digital marketing strategy to align with your sales goals. Whether your company handles all marketing campaigns in-house, you utilize a third-party lead generation service, or a mixture of the two, we’ve compiled 3 keys to a healthy Sales & Marketing relationship that will help your team surpass your revenue goals.

The post Creating a Healthy Sales & Marketing Relationship appeared first on Modernize.

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