Why the Hell Are We Still Reading Ernest Hemingway?

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As the light industry of books on Ernest Hemingway continue to spill over into the 21st century, we now know everything about the most famous American writer except why we still read him.

Many of Hemingway’s contemporaries—Sherwood Anderson, Thomas Wolfe, Sinclair Lewis—have faded into the twilight realm of the praised but unread while Hemingway is alive and well on the syllabuses of colleges and even high schools. We’ve had studies of his prose style, Hemingway’s Laboratory by Milton Cohen (2012); his war service, The Ambulance Drivers: Hemingway, Dos Passos and a Friendship Made and Lost During World War I (2017) by John McGrath Morris; his boat, Hemingway’s Boat: Everything He Loved in Life and Lost by Paul Hendrickson (2011); his final trip to Spain, Looking for Hemingway by Tony Castro (2016); and collections of his letters, though he told a biographer of F. Scott Fitzgerald, “I write letters because it is fun to get letters back, not for posterity. What the hell is posterity, anyway?” (Bullshit, of course; if he wasn’t trying to shape his own posterity, why save all the letters?)

This year there are three more Hemingway volumes. Autumn in Venice: Hemingway and His Last Muse by Andrea Di Robilant is a fascinating story about Hemingway’s love of Venice and the affair he had there with a young woman thirty years his junior.

Read more at The Daily Beast.

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Daniel Radcliffe explained why he’ll probably never see Harry Potter and the Cursed Child

Daniel Radcliffe explained why he’ll probably never see Harry Potter and the Cursed Child


Daniel Radcliffe explained why he’ll probably never see <em>Harry Potter and the Cursed Child</em>

In a November 21st appearance on Late Night with Seth Meyers, Daniel Radcliffe—aka the OG Boy Who Lived—was asked if he’s ever planning on seeing Harry Potter and the Cursed Child—the play that centers on Harry Potter’s son. And it turns out Radcliffe likely won’t be sitting in the audience any time soon. The actor explained that it’s not that he doesn’t necessarily want to see it; rather, he thinks the whole experience will direct lot of pressure and scrutiny his way.

“I’ve been asked this a lot, and I feel like I always give a really boring, terrible answer,” he told Meyers. “I’m probably not going to see it. I don’t have plans to. Not because I think it would throw me into some existential crisis of like, ‘Oh, is that what happened?’ But more so I just feel like it would not be a relaxing evening in the theater.”

He continued, “I feel like I would be being watched for my reaction. And maybe that is complete conceited and egotistical and people wouldn’t care. But I do feel like if I was just surrounded by Harry Potter fans, it would be a little odd.”

Okay, he’s definitely not wrong. We have a feeling literally every single Harry Potter fan on the planet and their mom would want to know what Radcliffe thought of the stage show, and that definitely does sound stressful. So basically, we get it, dude.

Radcliffe is currently starring in the Broadway comedy The Lifespan of Facts, and you can get tickets now.

The post Daniel Radcliffe explained why he’ll probably never see <em>Harry Potter and the Cursed Child</em> appeared first on HelloGiggles.

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Trump says he’ll be briefed on CIA assessment about journalist’s killing

President Donald Trump said Saturday that he will be briefed by the CIA on its assessment about the killing of journalist Jamal Khashoggi.


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Generation Z Is Powerful as Hell, and Sabrina Spellman Is Here to Lead Them

WARNING: This articles contains spoilers for the first season of Chilling Adventures of Sabrina. Proceed at your own risk, witches.

Greendale is a town that’s been lost in time. It’s late September at Baxter High School and walking the halls feels like drifting through a montage of different decades: Posters about the upcoming school dance cover the walls, loose pieces of homework float around with Tumblr domains scrawled in cursive, and ghost-like black and white portraits hang in the school library. Teenagers amble around, dressed like Grease extras in tailored button-downs and a-line dresses, their lips rouged and their shoes shined.


Jaz Sinclair as Rosalind Walker and Kiernan Shipka as Sabrina Spellman.

If Greendale — the idyllic small town where Netflix’s new series, Chilling Adventures of Sabrina, takes place — feels like someone handpicked the best parts of the ‘60s, ‘70s, and ‘80s, and then meticulously pieced them all together, that’s exactly what it should feel like. Chilling Adventures is supposed to make you feel nostalgic — even if you’re not quite sure for what.

“We’re trying to pride ourselves very much on being timeless,” production designer Lisa Soper said during a September visit to the show’s set in Vancouver. “You see cell phones [but also] Victorian dresses.” Soper described the show’s aesthetic as “a layering of history” that gives every viewer “a chance to grab onto something they’re nostalgic for.” But for all the nostalgia Millennials and Gen Xers might feel watching the genre-bending show — it’s part teen drama, part horror — Sabrina Spellman and her magical crew clearly belong to a new wave of young viewers: Generation Z.

Generation Z Questions Everything

Poised between girlhood and adulthood, half-witch and half-mortal Sabrina Spellman (played by Kiernan Shipka) is refreshingly unwilling to compromise. No, she will not sign her namesake away to the Devil in exchange for immense magical powers on her 16th birthday — but she also won’t forfeit those powers entirely. Sabrina refuses to conform to any easy definition, despite immense pressure from the female adults she loves and trusts — her two witch aunts, Hilda (Lucy Davis) and Zelda (Miranda Otto), and her deceptive mentor Miss Wardwell (Michelle Gomez) — and the male authority figures she refuses to follow — High Priest of the Church of Night and headmaster of her magical school, Father Blackwood (Richard Coyle), and the head of her mortal school, Principal Hawthorne (Bronson Pinchot).

During the 10-episode first season of Chilling Adventures, Sabrina often marches around the sprawling, cozy-creepy Spellman home that doubles as a mortuary, announcing that there’s some kind of supernatural problem plaguing Greendale. On one such occasion, Zelda croaks back, “Mephistopheles, save us from the melodramatics of a teenage witch.” She’s not wrong: Sabrina’s conviction, stubbornness, and flair for the dramatic are emblematic of most teenagers wielding the confidence of youth. But Sabrina’s also grounded, logical, and uncommonly objective — and those qualities are especially emblematic of Generation Z.


The Weird Sisters: Adeline Rudolph as Agatha, Abigal Cowen as Dorcas, and Tati Gabrielle as Prudence.

“It’s so important, it’s so important, to ask questions all the time,” Shipka, who’s 18 years old and a member of Gen Z herself, said during the set visit. “I think that it’s really cool to see a character that is truly questioning these beliefs, and especially for younger people to see that.” Though she wouldn’t call her on-screen persona a role model, Shipka does want her peers to absorb Sabrina’s overall message. “I’m very excited that some 13-year-old girls are going to be watching this show and have [Sabrina] as a character to think about, or [to] be for Halloween. She’s a really strong, smart, educated girl and I couldn’t be prouder to be part of a show that has very clear intentions [on] that front.”

You Can’t Scare These Kids With Fake Blood

Like every generation that was once the youngest, Generation Z is a fascinating mystery to everyone who’s older than them. We know all too well that Millennials ruin everything and Gen Xers only care about themselves, but what about Gen Z? Do they really eat Tide Pods? What’s the deal with Zendaya and Mechee? Why don’t they understand the subtle art of burning CDs?

Cultural questions aside, the cut-off for Millennial birthdays is 1997, making the oldest members of Generation Z around age 21. By 2020, they’ll comprise 2.56 billion members of the population and 40% of all consumers. They have the potential to become major players in the upcoming 2018 midterm elections, as well as the 2020 elections. In short, they’re immensely powerful. But, like Sabrina, they’re still learning how they want to use that power; they’re not sure if they want to summon Hellfire just yet.


Miranda Otto as Zelda Spellman.

Chilling Adventures is a sister show to the CW’s Riverdale. Greendale is just a boat ride across Sweetwater River away from Riverdale. and they share a creator in Roberto Aguirre-Sacasa. With both shows, Aguirre-Sacasa is pushing the envelope with teen content — characters in Riverdale use sex as an emotional coping mechanism (back in 2001, it took Pacey and Joey four seasons to do the deed on Dawson’s Creek), while Chilling Adventures is more horror show than teen drama, full of blood magic and devilry and heart-eating (we had to wait three seasons for Angel to finally suck on Buffy’s neck in 1999, and even then we only saw tiny trickles of blood). But TV alone can’t push a generation to maturity. Aguirre-Sacasa is simply answering the new demands of a generation forced to grow up too fast.

In Chilling Adventures, the adults are just as flawed and complex as the teens — they’re too busy murdering (and resurrecting) each other, engaging in religious BDSM, and stealing babies to keep tabs on the teens. More often than not, Sabrina and her friends help themselves. When no one will punish the Baxter High jocks for bullying, Sabrina and the three Weird Sisters (Tati Gabrielle, Adeline Rudolph, and Abigail Cowen) cast a spell to blackmail them with incriminating photos; when Principal Hawthorne bans books, Sabrina and her best friend Rosalind Walker (Jaz Sinclair) form WICCA (Women’s Intersectional Creative and Cultural Association). Gen Z has shown similarly fierce independence.

Reared on screens and nursery rhymes about how to survive when someone walks into your school with a gun, this new generation doesn’t just hang out on MySpace and tweak the emo lyrics in their AIM away messages. They’ve used social media to educate themselves on issues and hold political leaders accountable. They’ve called out authority figures that people twice (and thrice) their age fear. They’ve spearheaded national protests.


Michelle Gomez as Miss Wardwell.

And we shouldn’t be surprised. Gen Z grew up surrounded by books and major movie franchises about looming dystopia and teens leading political revolution; even John Green’s wildly popular non-dystopian young adult fare centers around teen death (The Fault in Our Stars, Looking for Alaska) and abandonment (Paper Towns). Much like Sabrina gleefully watching a zombie movie while everyone around her shields their eyes from the horror, it’s really hard to scare these kids. They’ve been unblinkingly watching the horror play out on every available platform their whole lives.

The New Generation Won’t Let Anyone Define Them

Older members of the Chilling Adventures cast agree that their younger castmates are different than they were at a similar age. Gomez said that Shipka has taught her “how to behave professionally.” She laughed, “At 18, I was dumb as hell. And they’re really together, these kids.” Davis echoed the sentiment, saying, “I was never that at 16; I was never that brave [or] outspoken, and Kiernan [Shipka] is that. She shows a very different generation nowadays. When I am around the young ones on the show, they teach me so much. I love being around them, their energy and their light that they bring with them; it’s wonderful to bask in.”

The new generation is also ushering in social change. Chilling Adventures includes storylines about intersectional feminism, toxic masculinity, workplace harassment, living with a disability, and, most centrally, gender identity. Sabrina’s warlock cousin Ambrose (Chance Perdomo) identifies as pansexual and is attracted to both men and women in the show, and her best friend Susie Putnam (Lachlan Watson) spends the season beginning what Watson describes as a “queer journey.”

“These new narratives [aren’t] necessarily spoken of or given light,” 22-year-oldPerdomo said about the show’s gender representation. “It’s kind of about time. We’ve seen the heroic white male story perpetuated throughout Hollywood since time immemorial. So now to have a pansexual person of color played with depth and as a multi-faceted individual is not only artistically satisfying, it’s gratifying to be able to showcase that. [Ambrose is] a human being that’s more representative of the world we live in.”

That representation is both a refreshing step toward more inclusive gender representation on TV and a logical narrative to include for the show’s key demographic: Studies show that 38% of Gen Zers don’t believe that gender defines a person, and 56% of 13-20 year-olds know someone who uses gender neutral pronouns.


Lachlan Watson as Susie Putnam.

Watson, clear-eyed and eloquent, has been through a queer journey similar to Susie’s and prefers male pronouns — and talking about gender is his favorite thing to do. “There were a lot of points in my life where I thought I knew who I was, but I didn’t,” the 17-year-old explained. “I knew who I thought I was supposed to be; I knew how I thought I was supposed to identify and how I was supposed to act and how I was supposed to dress. I was who I was for other people, and that’s never gonna be fulfilling.”

That refusal to meet past cultural expectations is a common theme among the young cast members. Tati Gabrielle — who’s 22 years old and plays Prudence, Sabrina’s frenemy and leader of the Weird Sisters — said, “I think [the show] can appeal to my generation in terms of figuring out who you are and going to the limits.” She also hopes Chilling Adventures can teach her generation, especially young women, “to believe in something and to stand strong by your beliefs. We can take a stand despite the pressures the world puts on us; we can, at any point, step out of that and defy the laws of social interaction, or defy the place we’re supposed to fit into.”

Gen Z is Growing Up and Growing More Powerful

If the first season of Chilling Adventures is a story about a young girl embracing her power and crossing the threshold into adulthood, the (unconfirmed but inevitable) second season will be about how she decides to use it. In the season finale, Miss Wardwell pushes her young pupil to embrace her prospective greatness: “Own your power. Don’t accept it from the Dark Lord. Take it, wield it.”

In person, Gomez takes a more measured approach about the moment when Sabrina finally signs her name away to Satan and receives her dark magic (and witchy platinum blonde hair). “It’s a girl in the last moments of her childhood as she becomes an adult,” Gomez said, “and what happens to all of us in those last moments when you cross that threshold into young adulthood — and the responsibilities that come with being that.”

It’s too perfect a parallel, too broad a sweep to say that Sabrina’s singular potential to power change mirrors that of an entire generation. But when the real-life equivalent of the Greendale Thirteen — ghosts of old political grudges, dangerous relics of times passed, specters of an outdated belief system — threaten the people they love and the values they hold, you can bet that Generation Z will follow Sabrina across the threshold and sign away their childhood comforts in exchange for power. That day is coming, and you can expect Hellfire.



The post Generation Z Is Powerful as Hell, and Sabrina Spellman Is Here to Lead Them appeared first on FANDOM.

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Hell Is Other People — Why Multiplayer Horror Games Are the New Hotness

One of the best horror games around is Dark Souls. It’s tense, frightful, laden with gothic imagery, and punishing in a way that is often mistaken for ‘difficulty.’ But at some point in every Dark Souls fan’s life, they’re just not scared any more.

If you’re running around naked with a giant hammer fighting bosses, there’s a decent chance you don’t find the game scary anymore. You’ve moved beyond timid caution into mastery — maybe even mockery. That’s not a fault of the game — actually, what makes Souls fans so rabid in their praise for the series is that FromSoftware accounts for and accommodates this.

Sadly, many other horror games don’t have the robust gameplay to accommodate this transition. That’s why you need to look at multiplayer horror games if you’re trying to find something you can return to over and over for your healthy dose of stress relief. Here are some of the best to take a look at.

People… What a Bunch of Pricks

DayZ is the grandaddy of Multiplayer Survival Horror. For years Survival Horror was used to describe any game where you were surviving and horror was involved. Where resources were scarce and scary things lurked around every corner. Silent Hill, Resident Evil, Alone in the Dark — all of these were labelled ‘survival horror’.

At the time, we didn’t know the true meaning of either.

In those games, survival meant you’d be struggling to remain at 100% health. At best, you’d have to combine some herbs, or do some simplistic inventory management. Nowadays, survival means you wake up in the middle of nowhere and you need to decide whether you prioritise not starving to death or finding a weapon to protect yourself.

And horror involved meekly peeking around corners lest a dude in a Pyramid Head helmet catch you unawares. These days, it involves cowering in a dilapidated house, terrified of firing your weapon because you’ll attract zombies — and possibly worse.

While DayZ might have died off a bit since its heyday thanks to a lengthy development cycle, there are some fantastic alternatives out there. Rust is almost as old as DayZ, and while it strays closer to the survival than the horror, it’s grown into a very impressive game over the years.

A brand new one that is capturing the attention of lapsed DayZ fanatics is SCUM. This elaborate sweat simulator balances the survival and the horror nicely — adding in a crazy amount of data via biometrics to allow players to fully understand why they’re constantly dying of starvation, or a B12 deficiency or because you haven’t pooped recently.

Against that, the horror is ramped up thanks to the existence of menacing robot sentinels designed to guard the high loot areas of the map — these serve as scary obstacles for players trying to acquire the best gear. In PVP situations the robots focus in on the sound of gunfire, forcing you to make tough decisions about whether you’ll engage in combat or not. Add to that the reanimated corpses of former players, and SCUM can be extremely scary.

“Nobody Trusts Anybody Now.”

If Survival games aren’t your thing — and let’s face it, spending eight hours getting gear and food together only to die to a random zombie can burn anyone out — then Thing-a-likes might be more up your alley.

Playing on our inherent distrust of one another, Thing-based multiplayer horror games lean heavily on social interaction as a skill differentiator. A reference to the John Carpenter classic The Thing, these games are technically asymmetrical co-operative experiences. You and the other players work together to complete objectives around the playing area until you reach your end goal — be it extraction or escape.

The twist is that members of your party are working against you. They’re monsters, you see, and they don’t want you to escape — they want you to die!

The horror inherent is obvious — you can’t trust anybody, and as the game progresses tension mounts as the monster gradually becomes more powerful. Talking to your teammates is critical here, which might rule it out for some — but telling your crew who they can or can’t trust is usually the only way to survive.

The role of monster is generally randomly assigned, which means anyone could be a monster — including you. Even as a monster, the tension is still there — you’ll fail if you can’t kill your teammates in time, or if they find out your terrible secret, so there’s a delicate balancing act at hand as you play through the game.

One of the best in this genre is Deceit. A free-to-play game, Deceit is half-Saw, half-The Thing. You’re locked in a level, completing simplistic puzzles to escape the clutches of an unseen madman, unsure whether those locked within are monsters or humans.

Unfortunate Spacemen is a little more constructed in its gameplay — the objectives make more sense, and there’s a good sense of humour pushing it along — but it’s also more expensive, and currently only in Early Access. It’s worth keeping an eye on if you enjoy the Thing-a-like style of play, but Deceit should have you covered for now.

One, Two, Freddy’s Coming For You

The Slasher style of MP Horror lays the asymmetrical horror out for you from the get-go. In these games, you know there’s a killer, and you need to avoid them to escape. There’s no questioning whether a teammate messed up on purpose, or crazy accusatory shouting matches — there’s you, a handful of powerless teammates, a bunch of objectives and a terrifyingly powerful killer.

These are some of the best, purest horror experiences. Knowing the killer is nearby and desperately trying to stay hidden, balancing your own safety against the fact that you need to complete objectives to actually win, trying to keep your teammates alive, or to rescue them from doom — in Slasher style games, you get the opportunity to test whether you would make the same mistakes as the victims in films.

Dead by Daylight is the obvious stand-out in this category. It had a rough start, with inconsistent networking and some poor level design resulting in a number of unfair deaths at times. But the consistent support from the developer Behavior Digital has turned it into a brilliant test of nerves for players who queue as a survivor. And if you want, you can play as a killer as well. With killers inspired by some of the best slasher villains ever, Dead By Daylight is a fantastic horror game.

Friday the 13th: The Game is the other big name in this genre, and while it’s graphically more impressive than Dead by Daylight, and does some interesting things thanks to its connection to the film series, a significant increase in cost and ongoing legal issues mean it isn’t worth getting into.

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Elvis Costello Is Mad as Hell: ‘I’ll Punch the Next Person’ Who Says I’m Struggling With Cancer

Stephen Done

“I know that’s a very attractive headline to say I’ve got cancer, but it’s just not founded in fact,” Elvis Costello insists after I mention a recent story that said he was in remission.

“I’m not going to critique other writers, because I had a very nice conversation with a young man the other day, and 99.9 percent of the article he wrote was really interesting, but he used the word ‘remission’ to describe my health, and therefore his editor decided to put cancer in the headline,” Costello explains, noticeably still upset about the incident. “I’m not in remission because I didn’t have cancer. How could I be in remission? I was relieved of something that may have caused cancer. So out of respect to my friends who recently have lost that particular fight, and to those that continue to have it, of which I have rather too many, I’d rather everyone get the words right.”

In fact, Costello and I had corresponded last summer, and he had claimed then he was fine, if a bit shocked and suitably heartened that anyone cared about his health, even while headlines made it sound as though he was at death’s door after he’d been forced to cancel a string of live shows.

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