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http://www.acrx.org -As millions of Americans strive to deal with the economic downturn,loss of jobs,foreclosures,high cost of gas,and the rising cost of prescription drug cost. Charles Myrick ,the President of American Consultants Rx, announced the re-release of the American Consultants Rx community service project which consist of millions of free discount prescription cards being donated to thousands of not for profits,hospitals,schools,churches,etc. in an effort to assist the uninsured,under insured,and seniors deal with the high cost of prescription drugs.-American Consultants Rx -Pharmacy Discount Network News

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Why do we go back to people who hurt us? A sexologist explains this unhealthy (and common) habit

Why do we go back to people who hurt us? A sexologist explains this unhealthy (and common) habit


Why do we go back to people who hurt us? A sexologist explains this unhealthy (and common) habit

Shelby Sells is an artist, photojournalist, and sexologist known for her exploration of modern sexuality. She has produced numerous videos, interviews, and articles on the subject, and is a sought-after speaker on matters of love, sex, and relationships. Sells is finishing her degree in Psychology with a Human Sexuality focus in hopes of becoming a sex therapist.

We see it time and time again in media, in our friend and family groups, and sometimes even in our personal decisions: The resurrection of painful and toxic relationships. The question is, “Why do we go back people who hurt us?” From a third-party perspective, it’s easy to point the finger and identify the harmful patterns in a person’s behavior, but is it that simple from an insider’s perspective? Not always, and here’s why.

We, as humans, are creatures of habit, meaning that once we develop a routine, it can be hard for us to break free from it.

The instability of an unhealthy relationship provides some folks with a sense of ease, and that’s why they’re drawn to it. There’s nothing to risk or lose when you know the end game is always the same.

For some, familiar pain is a source of comfort, so it comes as no surprise that those people find themselves in a constant cycle of hurt. Where this pain pattern stems from is unique to each individual. It can be related to childhood traumas or variations of abuse at any age. When pain is all you know, it can be challenging to seek alternative behaviors.

There’s also the instances in which we are blinded by love. It’s easy to get caught up in a relationship, even when it’s toxic. Later, we’ll tell ourselves “Maybe they’ll change” or “Maybe things will be different this time” in order to justify going back. Frankly, the drama itself can be addicting for some people. One friend told me that she gave her ex another chance because she believed he had to make up for how he had mistreated her in the past. While people do have the capacity to change, more often than not a person won’t change their innate nature.

Another reason people go back to partners who have hurt them? Because it’s easy.

Investing time and energy into a relationship is a lot of work, and the thought of starting over can seem daunting. Dating takes a lot of effort. Opening ourselves up to someone new inevitably comes with the potential to be hurt again. It’s scary, and that fear alone is enough to keep people at bay. Plus, why start over with someone new when our hurtful partner already knows us so well? It’s especially easy to run back to someone familiar if we are going through an emotional rough patch. When we’ve made ourselves vulnerable to someone and labeled them as a person who knows us, it can be hard to categorize them as unsafe. When you’ve had some distance from a partner, it’s also easy to romanticize the good memories until, suddenly, the bad memories are less significant. After all, repressing negative memories is a tool we use to protect ourselves from re-experiencing trauma.


Lastly, reviving relationships with people who have hurt us has to do with self-worth issues. Trying to break free from a toxic relationship, and then returning to it, feeds and fuels an unhealthy cycle of low self-esteem and feelings of worthlessness. These feelings can make us believe that we are undeserving of, unworthy of, or not good enough for a better love. This idea is heartbreaking—we are all deserving of love and healthy companionship.

Sometimes we go back to unhealthy relationships to seek validation from a partner who was unable to give us what we desired.

We fight to try and gain what they could never provide us the first time around. Also, it’s not uncommon for people in toxic relationships to experience a sort of “Stockholm syndrome” in which they begin to favor their abusers. Many people in this situation are convinced (either by themselves, by their partners, or both) that this is the “best” relationship they’ll ever have. Of course, this is untrue, and a tactic used to justify abuse and neglect.

The good news is that if you or a loved one find yourself in a situation like this, there is hope.

While it may be difficult to leave an unhealthy relationship, there are an abundance of resources out there to help you through the process. Ask yourself if your needs are being met in this relationship and if the pros outweigh the cons. Therapy is a vital outlet in working through the pain, letting go, and unlearning toxic patterns and behaviors. A colleague of mine, Crissy Milazzo, created a website called youfindtherapy.com that helps people access affordable therapy.

Besides therapy, there are a number of support groups, books, and online resources available to those who are trying to make changes in their relationship routine. Remember, a healthy relationship is one where your partner brings out the best in you, where you feel safe and secure, where you have shared goals and values, and where you are both equally emotionally invested in each other and in your future together. It’s never too late to break free from pain and embrace love.

If you or someone you know is an abusive relationship and needs help, check out these resources from The Center For Relationship Abuse Awareness or The National Domestic Violence Hotline. You can call The National Domestic Violence Hotline at 1-800-799-7233 or chat with a counselor online here

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How the Trump Administration’s Attacks on Title IX Hurt LGBTQ Survivors

Education Secretary Betsy DeVos’ latest proposed Title IX guidelines continue the Trump administration’s attack on LGBTQ rights—and leave transgender and queer students in danger.

In the wake of the #MeToo movement’s explosion, LGBTQ activists organized #WerkForConsent, a protest of the Trump administration’s anti-queer, anti-trans and anti-survivor policies. Education Secretary Betsy DeVos’ latest proposed changes to Title IX will only exacerbate the issues they raised. (Ted Eytan / Creative Commons)

Title IX, a groundbreaking 1972 civil rights law, protects students from denial to access to education on the basis of sex. The law originally sought to allow female students more opportunities to pursue education in fields that had traditionally been closed to women, like law and medicine. Title IX provides protection on the basis of sex that works in tandem with other civil rights such as protection from racial discrimination (Title VII) and protection for people with disabilities (Title II).

Since then, Title IX has been responsible for ensuring that schools have sports programs that people of all genders can participate in—guaranteeing access to benefits, programs and activities that are part and parcel of receiving an education and ensuring that students can obtain an education without enduring sexual harassment and abuse.

Though DeVos and the Department of Education purport to care about survivors, the changes they seek to make to Title IX show that survivors, particularly survivors who are not straight or cisgender, are at the bottom of their list of concerns. Higher up on that list? Saving schools money, protecting rapists and abusers, restricting access to healing and justice through Title IX protections for survivors and “religious freedom”—the calling card for the right which has permeated nearly every regulation put forth by the Trump administration.

The administration’s changes to Title IX are no exception. Under DeVos’ proposed rules, schools can opt out of Title IX enforcement entirely without notifying her department, leaving students in the dark about whether their schools protect their equal access to education—or not. You read that right: The Trump administration wants to allow schools that receive federal funding to opt out of protecting students without telling students. Or their own officers. Or anyone.

Title IX is far from perfect—but the law has advanced and fostered equitable access to education for people of all genders and given survivors of sexual violence a means of addressing harm with their institutions to seek the relief they deserve to continue to learn.

Then came Betsy DeVos.

Since her appointment in Fall 2017, the Education Secretary has done everything in her power to turn back the clock on the advancements made by Title IX—with a specific eye towards ignoring, erasing and disempowering LGBTQ communities. DeVos immediately rolled back Obama-era guidance on transgender inclusion, making schools more dangerous for LGBTQ students. Schools are no longer advised to use the name and pronoun of students’ choosing, to allow students to attend school events like prom dressed in the attire that most fits their chosen gender presentation or to let students use the bathroom of their choice.

That was just the beginning. The Trump administration’s latest proposed changes to Title IX are horrifying—restricting reportable harassment to conduct that occurs on campus, limiting who students can report harassment to, requiring named harassers and rapists to potentially cross-examine survivors during live hearings and more. While these and other proposed changes are harmful to all students, none of the changes operate as the free pass to discriminate against LGBTQ students like the religious exemption.

Imagine that a queer student chooses to pursue their college degree at an institution that aligns with their religious denomination, and even though nothing in the admissions material or student handbook says that LGBTQ students are not welcome, this student gets harassed in class one day for being queer. Perhaps another student makes offensive comments about this student’s sexuality or appearance; perhaps other students join in; perhaps this goes on for days, then weeks, until the student no longer feels safe going to class. Knowing this is a violation of their Title IX rights, the student reports this conduct to their school through the proper channels.

Now, imagine that the school receives this complaint—but decides that protecting students from harassment because of their sexuality is not in line with the school’s religious values. Under the proposed guidelines, the school cites a religious exemption and the case is dismissed. The student gets no relief from harassment, and no professors, students or administrators are disciplined for committing or allowing this conduct.

Not convinced? Consider another dangerous scenario: Imagine what happens to a student who is assaulted by another student at a school which has a code of conduct explicitly prohibiting homosexuality. If their assault included a sexual act that would be considered homosexual conduct, the survivor can file a complaint—but the school can then dismiss it, citing a religious exemption, and the student could be disciplined. In situations like these, survivors must face not only the repercussions of violence, but the risk of being outed, disciplined and otherwise further traumatized.

But it gets worse. Imagine that a student did not choose a religiously affiliated school, but is attending because they are a legacy student or it is the only school that offered enough financial aid—and when harassment occurs, this student is expelled for disclosing their gender identity. Imagine that the student is in sixth grade, is transgender and is bullied for using the bathroom of their choice. Imagine that they are a queer athlete recruited to play on a Division I basketball team, but lose their spot after they are outed when filing a Title IX complaint. Imagine that they are bisexual and afraid to report their assault by a person of a different gender for fear they will be more likely to be disciplined due to systemic homophobia.

This is the reality under DeVos’ guidelines. The proposed rule gives schools a free pass to discriminate and block access to civil rights protections for trans and queer students. The Department’s no-notice religious exemption is an escape hatch—schools claim the exemption after a report and evade any responsibility.

The good news is that the no-notice religious exemption is not yet the law. The Department of Education is legally required to hear feedback from the public on the proposed rule through a process known as notice-and-comment, and the comment period is open now for these proposed changes to Title IX and continues through January 28. The Department must respond to comments, and the text of the proposed law can still be changed if we make our voices heard.

LGBTQ youth deserve better. Queer and trans students are not an exception or an anomaly. We are here and we will not be erased. Tell Betsy DeVos to keep her #HandsOffIX using the notice-and-comment tools and resources provided by End Rape on Campus and Know Your IX. Visit HandsOffIX.org for resources.

B. Ever Hanna, Esq. is the Campus Policy Manager at End Rape on Campus.

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Scientists fear uproar over gene-edited babies could hurt future research

WASHINGTON — Scientists working on the frontiers of medicine fear the uproar over the reported births of gene-edited babies in China could jeopardize promising research into how to alter heredity to fend off a variety of disorders. Researchers are rapidly learning how to edit DNA to fight such conditions as Huntington’s, Tay-Sachs and hereditary heart…
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Sky-high prices for air ambulances hurt those they are helping

Sonna Anderson was enjoying a horseback ride through the Badlands in North Dakota in September 2017 when her horse, Cody, got spooked, jerked toward a fence and tripped on a cow track in the dirt. The horse rolled onto Anderson, who hit her head, briefly lost consciousness and broke three ribs.


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‘People are worried and people are scared.’ These workers are hurt by Trump’s trade war, but ineligible for his bailout

The administration’s $ 12 billion bailout is available to specific farmers, but there is no bailout mechanism for a host of other firms losing cash from the trade battle, such as shipping, grain elevators and farm equipment vendors.
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How much will these suspensions hurt the Lakers and Rockets?

What impact will suspensions for Brandon Ingram and Rajon Rondo of the  Los Angeles Lakers and Houston Rockets guard Chris Paul have? As expected, the NBA levied suspensions Sunday in the wake of the altercation during Saturday night’s Rockets win that started with Ingram pushing James Harden and saw both Paul and Rondo throw punches after Paul felt Rondo spit on him intentionally. How will Houston and L.A. replace their suspended players and what kind of difference might that make over the next few games? Let’s take a look. Bad timing for Lakers While there’s never a good time to lose two starters to suspensions, this is a particularly bad one for the Lakers. Besides depriving them of necessary time to build cohesion after the addition of LeBron James (and Rondo) this offseason, it also comes at a point when the Lakers are facing a number of teams that also…
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One Couple’s Honesty Mantra: “If You’ve Got to Hurt Me, Hurt Me” | Black Love | OWN

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http://www.acrx.org -As millions of Americans strive to deal with the economic downturn,loss of jobs,foreclosures,high cost of gas,and the rising cost of prescription drug cost. Charles Myrick ,the President of American Consultants Rx, announced the re-release of the American Consultants Rx community service project which consist of millions of free discount prescription cards being donated to thousands of not for profits,hospitals,schools,churches,etc. in an effort to assist the uninsured,under insured,and seniors deal with the high cost of prescription drugs.-American Consultants Rx -Pharmacy Discount Network News

CHARITY UPDATE :

Click today to request your free ACRX discount prescription card and save up to 80% off of your medicine!

SPECIAL DONATION REQUEST UPDATE:

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