These tube socks are inspired by iconic MTA subway tiles

Wearing public transit can be way more delightful than riding it. Pals and artists Abraham El Makawy and Michael Saunders — who are also fifth-generation Brooklynites — have been making transportation-themed merch under the brand name AINT WET since 2012. “What I love about the trains is that they’re ultimately the grand equalizer,” El Makawy,…
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Vetements’ Fall 2019 Show Was Inspired by Teenage Dirtbags and our Addiction to Smartphones

Despite having told numerous fashion outlets in 2017 that Vetements would be abandoning fashion shows because “shows have nothing to do with clothes anymore,” Vetements designer Demna Gvasalia is still sending fashion down the runway. On Thursday in Paris, the label presented its Fall 2019 …

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Places to travel that are inspired by famous books

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We’re going to be honest; we’re complete bookworms! Because of, this, many of the books often inspire us to travel far and wide in search of these magical fictional places – and there are so many places we’d go. We’d start off at Hogwarts to hang out with Dumbledore in the castle; we’d then take a trip to the Shire to have a second breakfast with Pippin and Merry, and then pop on through the wardrobe to don our fur coats and explore Narnia. Of course, these places aren’t real (sob), but some are! Here are five places you can actually travel to that are inspired by famous books.

Snæfellsjökull Volcano, Iceland – Journey to the Center of the Earth

Okay, so visiting a volcano isn’t exactly the most common travel destination in the world – but it is so worth it. This volcano is Iceland was the inspiration for Jules Verne’s famous Journey to the Center of the Earth, which was published in 1864. The Snæfellsjökull Volcano is a whopping 700,000 years old – and even has a glacier on the top of it! According to Verne and his awesome novel, the entrance to the center of the Earth is through the volcano. Although, we don’t suggest you try this out for yourself. An average tourist isn’t allowed to climb to the top of the volcano, but you can take a tour around the Snæfellsjökull National Park which will give you amazing views of this novel inspiration.

Whitby, United Kingdom – Dracula

Even if you haven’t read the incredible book that is Bram Stoker’s Dracula, you’ll probably still know the story of the evil vampire, Count Dracula, who moves from Transylvania to England and resides in his castle. Well, that castle still exists today. In the book, Count Dracula moves to Whitby, in the UK, and the castle was based on Whitby Abbey – a 16th-century monastery which is still standing (although it is missing a roof). In fact, Bram Stoker first got the idea for Dracula while he was walking around the Abbey, and he first read about his muse, Vlad Dracul, in the local library in Whitby. So why not take a trip to Whitby, walk in Bram Stoker’s shoes and try to write your own vampire story?

Big Sur, United States of America – Big Sur

We don’t need to give you two guesses on which book was based on Big Sur. Of course, it’s Jack Kerouac’s 1962 masterpiece, Big Sur! This novel follows the life of Kerouac and Lawrence Ferlinghetti as they settle down for three months in a cabin, located in the Bixby Canyon in Big Sur, California. Although the novel isn’t exactly happy-go-lucky with flowers and marshmallows, the description of the location is beyond belief, and you just have to see it for yourself! You could even stay in a cabin, just like Kerouac.

Hathersage, United Kingdom – Jane Eyre

Charlotte Bronte’s Jane Eyre is one of the most iconic books of all time – and it’s believed that Bronte got most of her inspiration from the village of Hathersage, in Derbyshire, UK. This little village is steeped in rolling hills and green forests, with tiny little cottages and manor houses. Bronte visited Hathersage in 1985, drawing on the location and North Lees Hall to create her own story and Thornfield Hall. So grab your copy of Jane Eyre, take a stroll through the grounds of North Lees Hall and the Peak District National Park and have a read within the midst of the inspiration.

Prince Edward Island, Canada – Anne of the Green Gables

Hopefully, you’ve all read Anne of the Green Gables – if not, you need to get on that ASAP! Lucy Maud Montgomery published her first book in 1908 which was based on the Green Gables Farm she often visited as a child. Nowadays, the area is called the Green Gables National Park and is located on Prince Edward Island in Canada. If you visit, you can check out the surrounding woods and buildings that inspired her ‘Lover’s Lane,’ ‘Haunted Woods’ and ‘Balsam Hollow.’ What could be better?

Are you looking for your next travel destination? Are you a book lover? We think you’ve found your answer. Books are great at conjuring up beautiful scenes, epic castles and intricate village life in our heads, but how great would it be to go see your favorite locations in real life?

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The post Places to travel that are inspired by famous books appeared first on Worldation.

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A Series of Surreal Wave Prints Inspired By Jonathan Wilson’s Dreams

It might seem odd, growing up in Wisconsin and having rarely lived less than a few hours from the ocean that I should dream of waves, but there they are: a regular companion to my sleep.  I often think of them as my “frustrated surfing dreams” as usually, I find myself in front of some waves, but almost always something gets in the way of actually going out to surf: usually the lack of a board or the waves disappear, or I get distracted as the dream takes me off in another direction. A psychologist would probably have a field day with the meaning of these dreams, but for me, the more significant aspect is the waves and ocean themselves. Often the sense of place is so vivid and charged that these places and waves exist as a feeling in my body that I can recall days, weeks, even years later. And often the situations are surreal in unlikely ways: waves breaking in a narrow canal in a suburban neighborhood, on top of and down the side of a cliff of a large caldera, on top of a small set of bleachers in a field. A few weeks ago I found myself trying to surf inside a small living room filled with water. Usually, I never make it into the water, and if I do I rarely have a board, and if I do end up with a board it might end up being a floppy mess, or a rug, or piece of cardboard. I can count on one hand (missing a few fingers) the number of times I have actually found myself properly surfing in a dream and those dreams lived up to the lightness and grace one would expect from surfing without a physical body.

 

Hokusai's "The Great Wave off Kanagawa"
Hokusai’s “The Great Wave off Kanagawa”

 

Despite its overuse, I feel that Hokusai’s Great Wave off Kanagawa remains as one of the truly incredible images to grace humanity, and is a continuing inspiration to me as an artist, surfer, and lover of the ocean. Part of my motivation to create these images is to attempt to convey the power and grace of waves as Hokusai did. Considering the number of surfers and lovers of the ocean, I am sometimes surprised at the lack of good wave art. Also, surf art tends toward turquoise tubes and pink sunsets, which is one beautiful face of the ocean…

…but there is also the dark, moody side which deserves to be seen and learned from:  the mysterious energy of the ocean that comes to us at night like a living being, the element of water, the astral plane, la luna and the stirrings of our emotional being, the unstoppable tide of the feminine way.

 

Wave Dream #1
Wave Dream #1

 

With these dreams as my inspiration, I am undertaking a series of images to capture (if not the specifics of my dreams) the impact of the energy of the ocean in the astral plane: rolling, flowing, and surging in surreal and magnificent waves.

About the Prints

I am planning on creating a series of 10 images, two of which I have already completed.  I have chosen the medium of linoleum block printing with its bold, graphic darks and lights and elegant lines to conveys the power, grace, and mystery of the ocean.

These prints are all completely original and unique images inspired by my dreams.  I hand-carve the linoleum blocks and then hand-print them on Japanese mulberry washi paper.  Each image will be printed in a limited edition series of 200 prints, so that is all that will ever be printed.  They will be hand signed, editioned and stamped by me.  The image size is 8” x 10”, mat size: 13” x 15”, and outer frame dimensions about 14” x 16”.

 

Wave Dream #2
Wave Dream #2

 

Why Kickstarter?

At the basic level, my project will not be very difficult to accomplish—just some paper, ink, time, and elbow grease. What I really need is a little indication that the world might wants these images to come into being: to feel out if the surfing and larger wave-loving communities find enough pleasure in my surreal imaginings to support my efforts. I have set a modest goal of $ 700 which will 1) convince me that there is enough interest in my images to go through with the project and 2) provide me the startup cash needed to make the prints and either make or order custom-made frames.

And, as it turns out I will be moving back to Korea very soon, so it will be more difficult and expensive to make, sell, and ship these prints in the U.S., which makes this KickStarter test all the more important to convince me to go through with the full print series.

Thank you for visiting and considering my Kickstarter campaign.  I hope you enjoy my images.  I look forward to meeting you and trying to delight you with future images in this series.  Please share my campaign with anyone you know who loves the ocean and its waves.

Sincerely,

Jonathan Wilson

Risks and challenges

The only real challenge to completing this project is the fact that I will be moving to Korea mid-December. Getting them all printed before then will not be a problem, but framing and sending them out will be a bit more challenging. However, I have a few willing family members who can help me take care of that, so I don’t anticipate any real issue.

The other issue is that I was really hoping to get this campaign going in time for the holiday season for people that might want to give the gift of wave art to their favorite surfing loved-ones. I’m getting started quite late, but I still want to try to get them shipped out to supporters before Christmas. This is why I am running the campaign for a slightly short 21 days. However, it still might be difficult to get them to you by Christmas. Then the main issue will be that I plan to order custom-made frames and mats which may not arrive in time. But worst case scenario, you won’t have them by Christmas. Note: for orders outside the United States, I definitely won’t be able to get them to you before Christmas.

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Questions about this project? Check out the FAQ

The post A Series of Surreal Wave Prints Inspired By Jonathan Wilson’s Dreams appeared first on .

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Yandy’s Meghan Markle Halloween Costume Inspired By Royal Wedding Dress

In case you want to showcase your love of the royal family this Halloween in a very unusual way, Yandy created what appears to be a sexy Meghan Markle costume. It’s a Halloween costume inspired by the Givenchy wedding dress Meghan Markle wore to her wedding to Prince Harry, though quite a bit shorter.
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How one veteran’s Vietnam horrors inspired ‘This Is Us’

Last season’s “This Is Us” featured a few scenes of Jack Pearson’s (Milo Ventimiglia) 1971 tour of duty in Vietnam. Tuesday night’s episode will focus entirely on Jack’s time in Southeast Asia. Entitled “Vietnam,” the episode is based on the experiences of novelist Tim O’Brien, whose 1990 story collection “The Things They Carried” chronicled his…
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