Origin of Sino-Tibetan language family revealed by new research

The Sino-Tibetan language family consists of more than 400 languages spoken by around 1.4 billion speakers worldwide, including major world languages like Chinese, Tibetan and Burmese. However, despite the importance of these languages for understanding the prehistory of East Asia, their relationships and origins remain controversial. A study by an international team provides new evidence for the origin of the language family, pointing to Sino-Tibetan originating with north Chinese millet farmers around 7,200 years ago.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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Learning language: New insights into how brain functions

When it comes to learning a language, the left side of the brain has traditionally been considered the hub of language processing. But new research shows the right brain plays a critical early role in helping learners identify the basic sounds associated with a language. That could help find new teaching methods to better improve student success in picking up a foreign language.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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Master the world’s most popular programming language online for under $40

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In an industry where the spotlight is always focused on shiny new things, it’s basically unprecedented that a two-decade-old programming language like JavaScript is still thriving. If JavaScript were a person, it could now buy alcohol, rent a car, and blow money on slot machines in Vegas.

The backbone of over 95% of ALL websites, it’s considered to be the world’s most popular programming language. But even with its ubiquity, JavaScript also remains the most misunderstood language, too. Novice coders usually mistake it for Java, or relegate it to a mere scripting language rather than a full-blown programming language. Little do they know that JavaScript is also used for databases, servers, animations, visual effects, and a whole lot more. Read more…

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Body language: The Russian science keeping North Korea’s dead leaders looking fresh

Perhaps none of the communist legacies shared by Vietnam and North Korea highlighted during Kim Jong Un’s “goodwill visit” to Hanoi is stranger than the embalmed leaders on display in their capital cities, and the secretive team of Russian technicians that keeps the aging bodies looking ageless.


Reuters: Science News

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Brain responses to language in toddlers with Autism linked to altered gene expression

Scientists have identified a previously unknown, large-scale association between molecular gene expression activity in blood leukocyte cells and altered neural responses to speech in toddlers with autism as measured with functional magnetic resonance imaging.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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Kevin Durant fined $25K for directing inappropriate language at fan

Golden State Warriors forward Kevin Durant was fined $ 25,000 by the NBA on Tuesday for directing inappropriate language toward a fan during a game in Dallas. According to the league, the exchange occurred during the first quarter of the Warriors’ 112-109 loss to the  Mavericks on Saturday. The incident capped a turbulent week for Durant, one that saw an angry, late-game exchange with Draymond Green carry into the Warriors locker room last Monday night in Los Angeles.  Some witnesses described the closed-door exchange as one of the most intense of this Warriors era, and Green was ultimately issued a one-game suspension for "conduct detrimental to the team."  Durant has since shut down talk of the incident, telling reporters, "Don’t ask me about that again," after being asked on Friday where his and Green’s relationship stood. Losers of three in a row, the Warriors (12-6) next play Wednesday at home against the  …
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Sign language reveals the hidden logical structure, and limitations, of spoken language

Sign languages can help reveal hidden aspects of the logical structure of spoken language, but they also highlight its limitations because speech lacks the rich iconic resources that sign language uses on top of its sophisticated grammar.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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Developing instruments to detect language problems earlier

Using the Computerized Comprehension Task, the team measured concepts by asking children to touch images on a touch-sensitive screen that represented words they were learning. The team used a measure of vocabulary that focused on stable concepts, finding that it was superior to prior measures in predicting children’s general language ability at age 3. The team also identified individual children at risk for language problems a full two years earlier than prior studies.
Infant and Preschool Learning News — ScienceDaily

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Prince Harry Double Hand Holding With Meghan Markle Shows ‘True Love’ — Body Language Expert Explains

Prince Harry recently used both of his hands to hold wife Meghan Markle’s hand, and a body language expert EXCLUSIVELY told us why it means he absolutely adores her.

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Feet Don’t Lie! An Expert’s Tips on Reading Body Language

One look at how people are standing and Linda Clemons can tell the type of work they’d be best at and the outlook they typically bring to what they do. She can scan a room and spot the risk-taker, the decision maker, the most likely to be biased or to succeed.

Fake it til’ you make it? Not around Clemons. She can call out a crafty liar, even if they don’t utter a word.

The CEO of Indianapolis-based Sisterpreneur Inc., is a body language expert, certified in undercover surveillance tactics she uses to benefit clients from Southwest Airlines, Nestlé, and Major League Baseball to U.S. Customs and the FBI.

reading body language

Body language expert Linda Clemons

Petite and unassuming, she also consults with lawyers on jury selection and Fortune 500 clients seeking competitive advantages for their sales teams.

The ability to seamlessly blend into a room is a job requirement, but hand Clemons a mic and she transforms into her own version of Beyoncé’s alter ego Sasha Fierce. Entertaining and on-point in her ability to connect with audiences of all ages and backgrounds, she will have you in stitches, even as she goes about the very serious work of schooling you on the nonverbal cues that are the most telling, and useful.

Here are her top three tips on reading body language:

Feet don’t lie. The eyes may be the window to the soul but, in non-verbal communication, the most illuminating cues happen south of the face. Feet, for example, point in the direction that we really want to go. Have you ever been in a networking situation and you’re in a circle and all of a sudden someone’s foot turns out even though they seem engaged? Says Clemons: “They’re ready to get up out of there.”

Even in silence, the mouth says a lot. Biting a bottom lip or pressing the mouth together is a sure signal of holding back. Clemons explains, “It’s what you automatically do in a meeting when somebody says something and you think to yourself, `That is absolutely cray-cray.’ Then you’re asked what you think and your first response is lip compression.”

Mastering eye contact is tricky. Yes, eye contact matters and “Don’t be the first to look down,” says Clemons, “because that signifies defeat or submissiveness.” Her secret for winning at the steady-gaze game? Rather than look directly into the eyes, look slightly above the brow line. It’s easier to hold that gaze and not look away, but the effect is the same.

The post Feet Don’t Lie! An Expert’s Tips on Reading Body Language appeared first on Black Enterprise.

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Latin may help students bridge their native language with English

Researchers found that in teaching English learners — students who aren’t fluent in English and often come from homes where a language other than English is spoken — the Latin roots of words helped them problem solve the meaning of unfamiliar words.
Infant and Preschool Learning News — ScienceDaily

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