‘Your Species Isn’t Known for Moving Quickly.’ Jon Stewart Roasts Mitch McConnell Over 9/11 Bill on The Late Show

It’s clear that Jon Stewart cares deeply about taking care of the brave men and women who were the first to arrive at the site of the World Trade Center attack on September 11th.

That’s why he went to Congress to try and convince them to fully fund the 9/11 Victim Compensation Fund, delivering an emotional and powerful speech to those in charge. So when Sen. Majority Leader Mitch McConnell went on Fox and said Stewart of being “bent out of shape” for asking Congress to fund the, er, Fund and pointed out that Congress is pretty busy right now, Stewart decided he had to respond. So he stopped by his friend Stephen Colbert’s The Late Show on Monday night to once again support the people he calls “the first heroes, and veterans, and victims of the great, trillions of dollars war on terror.”

“I feel like an a–hole,” the former host of The Daily Show said on the show. “I didn’t know that they were busy. I didn’t mean to interrupt them with their jobs.” Stewart then struck back at McConnell, for not fully funding the first responders medical fund. “You love the 9/11 community when they serve your political purposes,” said Stewart,

Stewart said he recognizes that McConnell is busy, but he also said the Senate Majority Leader that if he does ignore the 9/11 First Responders, there could be unintended consequences. “You could pass this thing as a standalone bill tomorrow,” Stewart said. “If you’re busy, I get it. But just understand, the next time we have a war, or you’re being robbed, or your house is on fire, and you make that desperate call for help, don’t get bent out of shape if they show up at the last minute with fewer people than you thought were going to pay attention and don’t actually put it out. Just sort of leave it there smoldering for another five years.”

“I’m sure they’ll put it out for good when they feel like getting around to it,” Stewart said in conclusion. “No offense.”


Entertainment – TIME

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Today in Movie Culture: ‘Men in Black: International’ Promotional Prank, ‘Late Night’ Director Commentary and More

Today in Movie Culture: ‘Men in Black: International’ Promotional Prank, ‘Late Night’ Director Commentary and More

Here are a bunch of little bites to satisfy your hunger for movie culture:

 

Promotional Prank of the Day:

To help promote the new Men in Black sequel, Men in Black: International, Sony partnered with Lexus for an effects-driven prank. Watch as hapless potential car buyers meet a Lexus dealer revealed to be an alien operating a human suit similar to the creatures seen in the hit sci-fi movie franchise:

 

Cosplay of the Day:

Don’t forget folks, when a…

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Mindy Kaling’s Late Night celebrates individuality in a cutthroat industry—an empowering message for humor writers like me

Mindy Kaling’s Late Night celebrates individuality in a cutthroat industry—an empowering message for humor writers like me


Mindy Kaling’s <em>Late Night</em> celebrates individuality in a cutthroat industry—an empowering message for humor writers like me

I write jokes for a living. Well, I also write food reviews, local features, and technical content about cloud computing (I’m fun), but my income these days is about 65 percent jokes. As a humor writer with the ultimate goal of working in late-night TV, I was eager to check out Late Night, Mindy Kaling’s new comedy about a veteran late-night host (Emma Thompson) and her scrappy new writer’s room hire (Kaling). The comedy industry is slowly becoming more inclusive, but Late Night–an industry film penned by a woman–is long overdue. It didn’t disappoint.

Thompson is at the center of Late Night as Katherine Newbury, an extremely British late-night veteran clad in the most exquisite suits I’ve ever seen. Katherine has built a career on her dry, erudite humor and her personal motto: “Excellence without compromise.” She has decades in the business, a sumptuous sitting room packed with Emmys, and one serious problem: Despite her sharp humor and obvious influence, Katherine has become irrelevant. That’s due to a few things, most notably her all-white, all-male writer’s room that looks like a caucus of the Harvard Lampoon’s most ardent boat shoe devotees. Early on, Katherine’s stage manager, Brad (Denis O’Hare), tactfully suggests that the room is less than inclusive. “I don’t think you think you hate women,” he says lightly.

Enter Kaling’s character: Molly Patel, a Pennsylvania chemical plant quality control manager whose comedy experience is limited to the occasional quip sprinkled into her factory loudspeaker announcements. Katherine demands that Brad hire a woman, and Molly is simply the first one to show up for the interview. She gets the job, a fact that infuriates Katherine’s bro-centric writing staff. “I wish I was a woman of color so I could get a job with zero qualifications,” moans one of the writers. It’s a little on the nose, but it’s a complaint I’ve heard before from white colleagues who would rather bash diverse hiring practices than put in the work to make themselves more competitive candidates.

Molly fumbles her way into the room on her first day, dreamily quoting Yeats and toting boxes of cupcakes for her waspy coworkers–even sitting on an overturned trash can instead of asking for a chair. Despite her earnest nature, which Katherine describes as “hard to be around,” Molly quickly proves that she’s more than a diversity hire. With no one willing to teach her the rules of the room, Molly makes her own, injecting her own ideas into the tired, murky world of late-night. Molly’s perspective becomes even more valuable when network CEO Caroline Morton (Amy Ryan) announces her plan to replace Katherine with truly heinous dude comic Daniel Tennant (Ike Barinholtz). Faced with losing her show, Katherine accepts Molly’s advice to ditch her uppity tone and meet her audience on their level.

Like Molly, I’ve also been described as uncomfortably earnest.

I’m unmistakably Midwestern, with a penchant for consuming baked goods and “sneaking past” people who are in my way. However, that’s where my similarities with Molly end. I may be accommodating to a fault, but I’m also pretty gross. I write jokes about yeast infections and salami; I torment my partner with songs about butts. As a kid, I was often described as “too much,” wearing underpants on my head to get laughs at sleepovers. (If you didn’t wear underpants on your head at slumber parties you’re legally not allowed to submit late-night packets.)

Though I’ve found solace in the comedy community, I’m still occasionally besieged by anxiety when I think about my chosen field. I didn’t attend an Ivy League school, and despite increased diversity in the industry, things are still looking pretty rough. That’s why Late Night is such a delight. Yes, this industry is still incredibly nebulous, with social and professional norms that are sometimes impossible to interpret. Yes, writer’s rooms are still largely dominated by the Harvard Boat Shoe Coalition. But doors are opening. Some of my favorite writers–Ariel Dumas (The Late Show With Stephen Colbert), Karen Chee (Late Night with Seth Meyers) and Jaboukie Young-White (The Daily Show) to name a few–are skirting traditional joke formats and emphasizing kindness and vulnerability in the industry, making way for a whole new wave of diverse writers with unique stories to tell.

The rise of these writers affirms the core message of Late Night: The industry is craving diversity and authenticity.

While the film certainly speaks to the challenges of working in a white male-dominated field, it comes across less as a scrappy women’s story and more as a testament to individuality. By the end of the film, Katherine discovers that her motto–“excellence without compromise”–needs some reshaping. This is, of course, because excellence looks a little different for everyone, and the only way to make truly powerful satire—satire capable of telling important stories and tackling traditional power structures—is to include diverse perspectives. Whether that comes from a Pennsylvania chemical plant worker or a reformed underpants hat model like me, new perspectives move the industry forward.

And let’s be honest: If Emma Thompson can go from snaggletoothed childcare professional to fabulous platinum-coiffed late-night host, anything’s possible.

The post Mindy Kaling’s <em>Late Night</em> celebrates individuality in a cutthroat industry—an empowering message for humor writers like me appeared first on HelloGiggles.

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Late Night’s Guide for Celebrating Asian Pacific American Heritage Month

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Review: Late Night Is a Pitch-Perfect Workplace Comedy

Comedy, the genre that’s easiest to underestimate, can be a tunnel into practically everything. We may make distinctions between dumb comedies and smart comedies, but the best ones prick the skin at least a little, injecting an energy rush that dilutes any self-pity or self-congratulation we may be carrying around in us. Had a crap day? Buster Keaton is having a worse one. Afraid to fall in love? Barbara Stanwyck and Henry Fonda are having a hard time with that one, too. Feeling stupid? Jim Carrey and Jeff Daniels are definitely dumber. Good comedies are the stuff of everyday life, and for most of us, the bulk of everyday life is work.

In Late Night—directed by Nisha Ganatra and written by Mindy Kaling, who also co-stars in the film—Emma Thompson plays Katherine, the brittle, uncompromising host of a long-running late-night show that’s running aground, at least in part because Katherine herself is out of touch: Her jokes are too frosty and erudite, and her taste in guests runs to serious types like historian Doris Kearns Goodwin, while her competitors are cleaning up by putting Kevin Hart on a Slip’n’Slide. Perhaps it doesn’t help that her writers are all white dudes; she instructs her right-hand man (a gloriously persnickety Denis O’Hare) to hire a woman, fast. The beneficiary—or the victim, depending on how you see it—is Kaling’s effervescently optimistic Molly Patel, a lifelong stand-up comedy devotee who has miraculously made her way from toiling at a chemical plant in Pennsylvania to gaining a coveted spot in the writers’ room. The men who have long had their butts planted there resent her; when she shows up on her first day, beaming and armed with cupcakes for everyone, their derision hangs in the air like invisible cigar smoke.

But if Molly has a tough enough time breaking into the bro circle, she has even less luck with Katherine, who doesn’t like any of her writers to begin with. Suddenly desperate to revitalize her show, she crashes one of their meetings. Not knowing any of their names, even though many of them have been in her employ for years, she assigns them numbers. When Molly eagerly offers some accurate criticism of what’s wrong with the show, Katherine accepts her candor with cool approval—then berates her for not having an immediate solution for the problems she’s pinpointed. Before long, Molly is crying at work—under her desk, no less—a terrifically unfunny thing in either a movie or in real life. Maybe most women have done it at one time or another, but the more hardened among us make sure no one sees it.

As Molly weeps under her desk, she lashes out at her officemate and fellow writer, Burditt (Max Casella, delightfully world-weary): She deserves this job and will not be marginalized by the white patriarchy or anyone else. He stops her short: The point isn’t whether she’s deserving or not, it’s that she’s there to produce material. “You’re a writer,” he tells her, “so write.”

There’s nothing fancy about that advice, but its hard-nosed straightforwardness is part of what makes Late Night work so well. Even if getting the job is hard enough—as it is for a woman of color like Molly, or, for that matter, like Kaling—once you’ve landed it, the only way forward is to prove your worth. Kaling has written a film that argues for diversity in the workplace and against giving in to relentless self-victimization, which is not only uninteresting but also self-defeating. That’s not to say victimization isn’t real. Workplaces can be oppressive: Molly is, at first, undermined both by her boss and her co-workers. One of the latter, Hugh Dancy’s Charlie, tries, almost successfully, to wheedle her into bed; another, Reid Scott’s Tom, the show’s head monologue writer, feels threatened and tries to block her best ideas.

But if the guys Molly works with are jerks, they’re not villains. There’s a difference, and Late Night gets that. What’s more, Kaling hasn’t written this film to be about Kaling, or even, really about Molly: It’s mostly about Katherine, and that’s what makes Late Night feel so generous-spirited. (Kaling has said that she wrote the role specifically for Thompson, without having a clue as to whether the actress would be interested in it or not.) Who should feel sorry for a highly successful past-middle-aged white woman like Katherine? No one—not even Katherine. But Late Night is hip to the reality that women working in comedy have always been swimming upstream: Katherine fought to get where she is, but somewhere along the way, she lost the plot. No wonder she feels lost, and if her prickly self-confidence has always served her well, its magic has stopped working

This is a great role for Thompson, and she shoulders it like a caryatid on killer stems. If Katherine is a hellion at work, she’s not much of a bargain at home, either. Her husband, played by the always superb John Lithgow, is a former NYU professor sidelined by Parkinson’s; he tries to stand by her, but sometimes she’s moving too fast for him. Even after Katherine undergoes the transformation the plot requires of her, she’s still not wholly likable. But her reserve—and it’s more than just the fact that she’s British—is part of what’s compelling about her. She’s cool, like fire—you want to get closer, even if you’re scared to. And she’s dazzling with a punchline. Molly, once she figures out how to key into Katherine’s intermingled strengths and vulnerabilities, devises a woman-on-the-street routine for her—she stops people of color on the street and quizzes them, with exaggerated earnestness, about the indignities they face. When one guy notes that he still has difficulty getting a cab, she hails one for him, even though he protests that he doesn’t need it. “That’s what white saviors do!” she says with exquisite radiance, addressing the air around her, spreading her magnanimous overkill like dandelion seed.

Katherine, whether cutting down her employees or her guests—she humiliates a ditzy YouTube sensation known as Mimi Mismatch, who then turns on her in righteous and not wholly unjustified fury—can be terrible to behold and wonderful to watch. If she’s a cartoon of the worst boss you’ve ever had, she’s also a crystallization of the most demanding, the one who summons the best from you, like Leopold Stokowski coaxing mad perfection from all those flutes and strings and woodwinds. Nisha Ganatra has directed a lot of TV and a few previous movie features, and she keeps Late Night moving at a clip; it has the wiggy energy of a workplace that might sometimes drive you crazy, but is never boring. This is a great workplace comedy about the ways in which people who seem to be holding you back can also, sometimes, be the ones pushing you forward. Crawling under your desk gets you nowhere. It also means you miss all the fun.


Entertainment – TIME

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Exclusive, Amusing ‘Late Night’ Clip: I Do a Little Stand Up

Exclusive, Amusing 'Late Night' Clip: I Do a Little Stand Up

We've all had dreams about doing great, seemingly unattainable things that we truly want to accomplish in our lives. In Late Night, Molly Patel (Mindy Kaling) gets the rare opportunity to live out her dreams. But nobody said it would be easy.

We get a sampling of Molly's dreams in our exclusive clip from the fresh new comedy. A devoted fan of a groundbreaking, late-night television show hosted by Katherine Newbury (Emma Thompson), Molly has somehow managed to snag an interview with…

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T.I. Honors Late Sister Precious Chapman With New Scholarship Fund

Sister 2 Sister Ladies Night

Source: Thaddaeus McAdams / Getty

Earlier this year T.I.‘s sister Antoinette “Precious” Harris Chapman passed away and now the rapper is honoring her legacy with a new scholarship program. Partnering with VH1 and the United Negro College Fund, T.I. announced the Precious Chapman Scholarship Fund during the annual Dear Mama: A Love Letter To Mama ceremony.

“My sister Precious was a single mother, who worked to make life better for her children and everyone she encountered,” he said, according to the Atlanta Journal Constitution. “In the spirit of that, we are awarding a deserving student a scholarship in my sister’s name.” The site reports that this year’s $ 25,000 prize went to Tierani Scott, who is a single mother and junior at Philander Smith College in Little Rock, Arkansas.

May Precious rest in peace.

Photo: Getty

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Judge Denies Petition By Prince Heirs To Limit Bank’s Power Over Late Singer’s Estate

A Minnesota judge has denied a request by Prince’s heirs to limit Comerica Bank & Trust powers over the administration of the late singer’s estate.

As we previously reported, three years after the death of music icon at age 57, his massive estate, believed to be worth hundreds of millions, remains in limbo as it is “still unsettled, still not officially valued and still not disbursed to the heirs, his six siblings,” USA Today writes.

Prince’s heirs — Tyka Nelson, his full sister, and his half-siblings, Norrine Nelson, Sharon Nelson, John Nelson, Alfred Jackson and Omarr Baker — claim administrators have spent $ 45 million on probate-related administrative expenses, including $ 10 million in legal fees. They also claim the estate still owes $ 31 million in unpaid taxes that continues to collect interest.

The siblings are trying to take more control over the estate so they filed a petition earlier this month to limit the power of Comerica Bank & Trust. But Judge Kevin Eide ruled that the heirs presented “little or no specificity” and until they come up with some “viable alternative” the Comerica arrangement will stay in place, Billboard reports.

“While the Court certainly appreciates the Heirs’ concerns with respect to preserving estate assets, minimizing estate exposes and planning for distributions, those concerns are more effectively addressed through discourse and mediation,” Eide ruled.

The judge said while he understands that the heirs want to reduce expenses, their motions have the rick of “significantly increasing Estate expenses.”

He said reducing Comerica’s power would “create a vacuum of uncertainty” and “may result in the loss of entertainment deal opportunities, which are necessary to raise needed funds to pay estate taxes and lead to the distribution of funds to the Heirs.”

He also noted that Comerica agreed to reduce its monthly compensation from $ 125,000 to $ 110,00 (not including expenses).

The judge also ordered the bank to keep the heirs informed of the exact amount of the outstanding tax liability.

A statement from Sharon Nelson reads: “We are continued to be dismayed and disappointed in the Judge Eide partially to Comerica and their advisors who have done a poor job managing this estate.”

[ione_media_gallery id=”9178″ overlay=”true”]

HEAD BACK TO THE BLACKAMERICAWEB.COM HOMEPAGE

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Do You Prefer to Stay Late at the Office — or Work From Home?

a woman in a red hoodie works in a dark office at a computer

Here’s an interesting little question for you: When do you stay late at work, and when do you choose to leave and work from home instead? How much of it is driven by office culture, by the kind of work in front of you (e.g., voluminous docs), or by a specific situation at work or at home (pet needs to get walked, kids won’t leave you in peace to work), and how much of it is just preference?

I’ve always preferred to stay late at work when possible, and I’ve written over at CorporetteMoms about how even now I struggle with the fact that family dinnertime bumps up against my naturally productive time. Even in my magazine journalism days, I was often the last one at work; the only reason I got paid at all at my first magazine internship in NYC was because I was working late and the publisher happened to notice I was still there. I also have distinct memories, when I was out of school and employed at Family Circle, of using the office typewriter (!) to type law school applications when the rest of the office was dark and quiet around me. Looking back, that probably wasn’t the smartest thing from a safety perspective, but at the time it felt totally safe.

{related: comfortable workwear for late nights}

At my BigLaw office, there was absolutely a culture where we were encouraged to stay late — frequent meetings at 5:00 p.m., or phone calls from the partner(s) or senior associates at 6:00 or 7:00 — but I suspect that because of my preference and availability I maybe got more of those calls and teammates than others. (Let’s also just say I was not a “show up at 7:00 a.m.” kind of employee, either.) I distinctly remember another associate my age and year who had kids in daycare and a wife who was a doctor — he was very vocal and clear to everyone about having firm deadlines to leave the office. That said, at the time and place I was practicing, there were often voluminous documents we had to go through and reference, sometimes corralled into binders, sometimes in boxes, and sometimes via proprietary software we had to use on site — so the work also lent itself to being physically in the office to do it. When I brought work home it was usually focused editing work for memos or briefs, and when I did work from home it tended to be in the wee hours of the morning, like 3:00 a.m.–9:00 a.m. (presumably after getting three or four hours of sleep after coming home late the night before).

{related: 5 tips for surviving the day after an all-nighter}

When I switched to my nonprofit, the culture was very different — everyone had some modicum of work-life balance, with commitments with friends and family, sometimes even making plans to meet when it was still light outside. Whoa. So “staying late” changed from “staying until you’re about to pass out at your desk but need to go home to shower and get a REM cycle anyway” became “staying until 7:00 unless something drastic and crazy is happening.” 

Readers, how about you — what is your preference when it comes to staying late at work, or coming into the office on the weekend or early in the morning? How has your preference changed through different jobs, offices, and general life position (e.g., 20s, 30s)? (Do you recognize a “naturally productive time”?)

{related: what clothes are too casual for a weekend in the office}

Stock photo via Stencil.

The post Do You Prefer to Stay Late at the Office — or Work From Home? appeared first on Corporette.com.

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Trump attacks McCain again, saying he didn’t get a ‘thank you’ for approving late senator’s funeral

“I didn’t get a thank you. That’s okay. We sent him on the way. But I wasn’t a fan of John McCain,” Trump said at an event in Ohio, even as Republican senators rose to McCain’s defense.
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VIDEO: Jason Danieley Talks Half Marathon Run in Honor of Late Wife, Marin Mazzie

As BroadwayWorld previously reported, Jason Danieley will be honoring his late wife Marin Mazzie by running in the Cancer Support Community’s 2019 United Airlines NYC Half Marathon. Danieley chatted with ABC 7 recently about the run.
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Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s tenacity helps me understand my late grandmother’s courage

Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s tenacity helps me understand my late grandmother’s courage


Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s tenacity helps me understand my late grandmother’s courage

March 15th is Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s birthday. To celebrate the Supreme Court Justice and feminist icon, HG contributor Alli Hoff Kosik reflects on how RBG’s trailblazing path reminds her of her late grandmother.

If you’ve seen the movie On the Basis of Sex, then you probably already know which scene prompted me to break down in tears. It wasn’t the scene when Armie Hammer, in the role of Ruth’s husband, Marty Ginsburg, is diagnosed with cancer at an age that feels inexplicably young. It wasn’t the scene in which the triumphant Ruth Bader Ginsburg herself delivers the brilliant legal argument that started turning the tides on sex discrimination (in spite of all the sex discrimination she encountered along the way).

It was the scene when  RBG marches gracefully and intently marches up the steps of the Supreme Court. She’s not wearing her black legal robes or her lacy collar., but something about her manner, that graceful intention, reminded me so much of grandmother. I sat in my movie theater seat and cried. My best friend put her hand on my shoulder.

We lost my grandmother Eleanor Patricia Cummins—for the purposes of this essay, can I call her EPC?—on September 20th, 2018, which also happened to be my birthday. I know many people can say they shared a “special relationship” with a grandparent, and I echo that for my Nana. For seven of my childhood and teen years, she lived with me and my mom. Nana did a lot of the things that moms do. She drove me to cheerleading practice and sat in the bleachers during games. She read my stories in the school newspaper. She critiqued said school newspaper in great detail when I eventually became editor in chief. Sometimes she commented that I should maybe gain or lose weight. She took me to Europe to celebrate my high school graduation and bought me my wedding dress when I got married in 2016.

I’m not going to go into the specifics of EPC’s death because, honestly, it’s all too upsetting, but suffice it to say that it was sudden. One day she was here—calling me at literally 7 a.m. to ask me about my new puppy—and the next she wasn’t. A few weeks after that terrible day, I was helping my mom clean out Nana’s house and I found a box of letters that she’d received from my grandfather in the ’50s; he was a law student and she was an undergrad. If we’re being honest, their marriage didn’t end up being so great and eventually ended—but the romance within these letters wasn’t really the point  for me (though they are kind of romantic).

I’d always known that EPC was brilliant and accomplished. I knew that she had fought against male-enforced boundaries for most of her life in order to achieve the professional life in education that she wanted. But reading the letters reintroduced me to her journey from an earlier entry point, reminding me of all that she’d done and all that she’d conquered. They helped me grieve for her, and eased the pain of such a sudden loss.

After watching On the Basis of Sex, my Nana’s life story has become even clearer to me. I saw the parallels between two extraordinary women of the same generation.

Ruth Bader Ginsburg speaking at law university
Pat Greenhouse/The Boston Globe via Getty Images

These women had to find ways to break out of the limitations imposed on them by men.

My Nana’s father told her that she couldn’t go to college—despite the fact that she was at the top of her class and her family had the financial means for her to go. She understood that her brother would be allowed, but that she would have to fight for it. Nana recalled sitting at the foot of the stairs in her childhood home, crying and yelling for her right to get an education, too.

Ultimately, my grandmother got there—just like RBG got to Harvard Law School, and then to a professorship at Rutgers, and then to courtrooms where she would speak on sex discrimination cases. In the end, she would, of course, become the Supreme Court justice we all know and love. My grandmother became a Spanish teacher (at an all boy’s Catholic high school—she was Jewish!) and a respected school administrator who was loved—and, yes, sometimes feared—by her students.

These women were both born brilliant and curious. I’ve always said that my Nana was the smartest person I’ve ever known. Even in her retirement, she successfully completed the New York Times crossword puzzle every single week. She is still the only person who could ever truly engage in a conversation with my husband about his work—a highly technical job at a bank that I still don’t fully understand, even after six years. And I don’t need to explain to you how smart RBG is. I would have loved to have seen them go toe-to-toe in an intellectual conversation. Two wise and well-read women with so much to say about the world.

These women were put in positions—like so many other women before and after them—to choose between work and family. While this tightrope act is common Instagram caption fodder today, it was straight-up pioneering in the ’60s and ’70s. When RBG and her daughter argued relentlessly in On the Basis of Sex, it reminded me of stories my mom has shared about growing up with my Nana as her mother. When women of their generation opted to lead with their smart, ambitious, busy selves, they ran the risk of looking more than just overwhelmed. They ran the risk of looking mean or dismissive or negligent. And the result of the tension that society placed upon them was probably not so easy to deal with at home.

Ruth Bader Ginsburg
Michael Kovac/Getty Images

These women were complicated, even at times difficult. My mom likes to joke that EPC was “a force of nature.” I imagine that RBG’s family would say the same about her, since I can pretty much deduce that it’s an apt description based on what I’ve seen of the Supreme Court Justice in the media. For both of them, being headstrong and driven was surely key to success in work and academia—but perhaps a complicating factor in some personal relationships.

RBG and EPC also share a love of culture, the arts, reading, and exercise. I never witnessed my Nana work free weights quite like RBG in those beloved training videos, but she took long walks every day, quite literally jogged her way around the house every morning, and hiked in foreign countries a few times each year, up until just a few months before she died.

Like the legacy that Ruth Bader Ginsburg leaves on women everywhere, my grandmother has left my family with a legacy of intelligence, focus, confidence, and grace—even when things aren’t going so well.

Both women inspire me to embrace my femininity and my power, to be giving and tough. As we celebrate RBG’s birthday, and as I reflect on my Nana’s life and mourn her loss, I’m grateful for their ferocity in the battles they fought so that I wouldn’t have to.

The post Ruth Bader Ginsburg’s tenacity helps me understand my late grandmother’s courage appeared first on HelloGiggles.

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Economy at ‘very real risk’ of falling into recession in late 2020, UCLA forecast says

There's "a very real risk" the national economy will skid into a recession in late 2020 after the current expansion that began a decade ago, the UCLA Anderson Forecast announced Wednesday.
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The Epiphany Bradley Cooper Had in His Late 20s | SuperSoul Sunday | Oprah Winfrey Network

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They had abortions late in their pregnancies. These are their stories

Strangers have called them monsters, trolled them on social media and said their living children should be taken away. Their darkest moments are judged and politicized by figures who know nothing about them. They feel like involuntary pawns in an ugly, vicious game they didn’t ask to play.


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Too little, too late on R. Kelly… and other commentary

From the right: Sherrod Brown Is Biden’s Biggest Worry Watch out for Ohio Sen. Sherrod Brown: He’s already planning trips to the early 2020 primary states. If he runs, warns The Washington Examiner’s Philip Klein, he would present “the most direct threat” to Joe Biden’s potential candidacy. Like Biden, Brown appeals to working-class voters, having…
Opinion | New York Post

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Jacqueline Devine, wife of late Post editor, dies at 87

Jacqueline Devine, wife of late New York Post editor Frank Devine, died in Sydney, Australia, on Dec. 13 at age 87. She is survived by daughters Miranda, Rosalind and Alexandra, and eight grandchildren. Frank Devine, a distinguished foreign correspondent in New York, London and ­Tokyo, edited Rupert Murdoch’s Chicago Sun-Times before moving to New York…
Media | New York Post

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Seth Meyers Presents Late Night’s “Baby, It’s Cold Outside 2018”

Late Night with Seth Meyers

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James Harden’s clutch 3 late in OT leads Rockets past Warriors

OAKLAND, Calif. — James Harden hit a contested 3-pointer with a second left in overtime and finished with his second triple-double of the week and fifth straight 40-point game, rallying the Houston Rockets past the Golden State Warriors 135-134 in a thriller between Western Conference powers Thursday night for their sixth straight victory. Kevin Durant’s…
Sports | New York Post

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Trina Braxton Posts a Tribute to Late Husband Gabe Solis: ‘We Grieve His Unexpected Departure’ [Photo]

Trina Braxton is speaking out for the first time since ex-husband Gabe Solis passed away due to cancer.

According to Trina, news of Gabe’s passing leaked before those closest to him knew and some of his family found out via social media — for which she apologizes.

“Unfortunately, someone leaked the story before we could make everyone aware of his passing, and I apologize to those friends and family members for finding out through social outlets.”

Take a look:

 

View this post on Instagram

 

On December 20, 2018, a chapter permanently closed for my sons and I. For over 16 years, Gabe Solis was an essential part of our lives. Like all families, there are good and bad moments that are endured, but those moments, good or bad still made us who we are in the present. Unfortunately, someone leaked the story before we could make everyone aware of his passing, and I apologize to those friends and family members for finding out through social outlets. I also apologize directly to the Solis Family. I do humbly ask for your prayers for our families, but my greatest request is that when you are posting comments, remember Gabe’s passing is a loss for our family. He was a father to my boys, a son, brother, and friend to many and I would appreciate privacy and respect as we grieve his unexpected departure. @gabe_solis1234 I miss you, my dear friend.

A post shared by Trina Braxton (@trinabraxton1) on

The post Trina Braxton Posts a Tribute to Late Husband Gabe Solis: ‘We Grieve His Unexpected Departure’ [Photo] appeared first on lovebscott – celebrity news.

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Nattie Neidhart’s Eulogy For Late Father Jim “The Anvil” Neidhart Will Move You to Tears

Nattie Neidhart, Total Divas 810Saying goodbye is hard to do.
On Wednesday’s season finale of Total Divas, Nattie Neidhart and her family laid Jim “The Anvil” Neidhart to rest. According to the Total Divas…

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The late great author Louis L’Amour lives on in this new book

Louis L’Amour began writing “No Traveller Returns” in 1938. This week, 30 years after the author’s death, the novel — his first — will be published, thanks to his son, Beau L’Amour, who took the unfinished manuscript his father had left behind and wrote the rest of it. It’s part of a larger Louis L’Amour…
Entertainment | New York Post

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Black Friday watch deals that you need to buy now before it’s too late

Where to find the best Black Friday deals for watches

black friday watch deals

Black Friday 2018 is almost upon us, and as ever, we predict it opshopo be the biggest online shopping weekend of the year in the UK. And with just 3 days to navigate those jaw-dropping Black Friday watches discounts (just in time for Christmas), we thought we’d make life that little bit easier for you with our guide to the best black Friday watch deals, and what to look for while you’re there.

When is Black Friday 2018?

Black Friday falls on the day following Thanksgiving Day in the United States (which is the fourth Thursday of November). Here the UK, Black Friday 2018 will fall on 23rd November (which is a Friday) so you still have time to bookmark the shops you want to visit and pick out the deals you’re going to go after.

Henry London Stratford Chronograph Bracelet Watch, 50% off at Wolf & Badger

black friday watch deals

We love a good chunky metal mesh watch and this piece from Henry London is absolutely dreamy. With an emerald clock face and a vintage aesthetic, it’s going for 50% off at Wolf & Badger right now.

Priced at £83, originally £165

Shop now

Radley Ladies Heart Dog Charm Leather Strap Watch, almost half off at QVC

black friday watch deals

This maroon watch has us thinking tonally this season, with a monochrome clock face and black details.

Priced at £42.98, originally £80

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Ted Baker BOWISA Bow Detail Leather Watch, £35+ off

black friday watch deals

Audrey Hepburn, eat your heart out. This minimal black watch will go with every outfit and the little bow cuff on the strap is the sweetest touch.

Priced at £87.50, originally £125

Shop now

Ted Baker CASKIA Square Dial Watch, £40+ off 

black friday watch deals

This utterly classic watch comes with a charming mesh strap and a square face. It’s also rose gold, plus it has cute little rose gold accents on the clock face if you just can’t get enough.

Shop now

What is Black Friday?

Black Friday is a day when shoppers can take advantage of *huge* discounts from various retailers, across all departments (why it’s called Black Friday varies a bit, some believe it dates back to the 60s, when the shopping phenomenon began, where so many people turned up to shop that it caused gridlock, others think it’s because it takes stores’ bank balances from the red to the black).

Because watches can be a bit pricey, we don’t often treat ourselves, but Black Friday is a great time to do so as prices are slashed across board. It’s also a great time to stock up on Christmas presents for your family. Just saying.

Black Friday watch deals at Michael Kors

Who doesn’t love a Michael Kors watch, especially if it’s a classic rose gold boyfriend design. For Black Friday, you can get discounts on all Michael Kors watches, be it gold tone, silver tone or leather bracelet styles. We’re a bit obsessed with the new season plum tones.

If you can’t find the watch you want on the Michael Kors site, don’t worry, because jewellers like H.Samuel, who stock the brand, are offering discounts too. If you’re interested in more high end fashion, it’s worth taking a look at our edit of the best Black Friday designer deals as well.

Shop our edit of the best Black Friday watches below.

Shop Now 

Black Friday watch deals if rose gold is your thing

Let’s be real, it’s still all about rose gold this season, isn’t it? And Michael Kors isn’t the only one to offer sleek rose gold designs. If you check out ASOS, you’ll find a host of pretty and statement watches, and a lot of other high street brands like Oasis, Topshop (which is offering amazing Topshop Black Friday deals across the board) and Next also have some great options too.

Scroll down for our edit of the best rose gold watches.

Black Friday watch deals that are best for fitness

After a fitness watch to track your steps and general health? Black Friday is a great time (no pun intended) to grab yourself a fitness tracker. You can get the popular Fitbit at a discount on various sites, like Argos and Amazon.

Curry‘s also usually does flash discounts on other fitness trackers too, like Jawbone, Garmin, Withings, Polar, so it’s worth checking the site out too.

For Apple watches, you’re of course best off going to the actual Apple website, though the discounts aren’t usually mind-blowing, more like a gift card with purchase situation. But, if your heart is set on Apple, that’s better than nothing, right?

Scroll down to shop our edit of the best Black Friday fitness tracker deals.

Black Friday Timex watches

Tired of relying on your iPhone for the time? Timex offer a range of beautiful watches ranging from work-appropriate classics to chic stacking-friendly fashion accessories to their adorable new Peanuts collection, featuring the likes of Snoopy and Linus. They’ll be offering 20% off everything on their website and it’ll all kick off November 24.

Urban Outfitters Black Friday Deals

Want to beat the Black Friday rush? Urban Outfitters is actually going to be having a pre-Black Friday sale on Wednesday, 22 November for just 24 hours where you’ll be able to score 40% off selected products. If you’re a UO Rewards member, you’ll also be eligible for free shipping.

UO’s also getting involved with the main shopping holiday and will be back with deals in full force from 23-26 November, with up to 50% off specific lines. The offer runs until midnight on the Sunday and shipping costs are going to drop to just £1, so now’s the time to buy that massive coat you’ve been dreaming of. On Cyber Monday, 27 November, they’ll also be offering 20% off select lines.

The post Black Friday watch deals that you need to buy now before it’s too late appeared first on Marie Claire.

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Sessions realized too late that Whitaker was auditioning for his job

When things were particularly bad between President Donald Trump and Jeff Sessions, the attorney general’s chief of staff, Matt Whitaker, would attend White House meetings in his place.


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http://www.acrx.org -As millions of Americans strive to deal with the economic downturn,loss of jobs,foreclosures,high cost of gas,and the rising cost of prescription drug cost. Charles Myrick ,the President of American Consultants Rx, announced the re-release of the American Consultants Rx community service project which consist of millions of free discount prescription cards being donated to thousands of not for profits,hospitals,schools,churches,etc. in an effort to assist the uninsured,under insured,and seniors deal with the high cost of prescription drugs.-American Consultants Rx -Pharmacy Discount Network News

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Mercedes-Benz sent recall notices too late: feds

Federal regulators are investigating Mercedes-Benz over whether it was too slow to mail out notices for a recall of 1.4 million cars in 2017. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration sent the German carmaker a 14-page letter asking it to explain why customers weren’t informed of the recall within the federally mandated time period. The…
Business | New York Post

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