Infants later diagnosed with autism seldom initiate joint attention

A new study shows that infants who are later diagnosed with autism react adequately when others initiate joint attention, but seldom actively seek to establish such episodes themselves. This finding provides support for the view that children with autism have reduced social motivation already as infants.
Infant and Preschool Learning News — ScienceDaily

ENTERTAINMENT NEWS UPDATE:

Tyra Banks – Sports Illustrated 22 Years Later | The Daily Show

The Daily Show with Trevor Noah

SPECIAL NEWS BULLETIN:

http://www.acrx.org -As millions of Americans strive to deal with the economic downturn,loss of jobs,foreclosures,high cost of gas,and the rising cost of prescription drug cost. Charles Myrick ,the President of American Consultants Rx, announced the re-release of the American Consultants Rx community service project which consist of millions of free discount prescription cards being donated to thousands of not for profits,hospitals,schools,churches,etc. in an effort to assist the uninsured,under insured,and seniors deal with the high cost of prescription drugs.-American Consultants Rx -Pharmacy Discount Network News

BEST DEAL UPDATE BY AMERICAN CONSULTANTS RX:

Click today to request your free ACRX discount prescription card and save up to 80% off of your medicine!

SPECIAL DONATION REQUEST UPDATE:

Please help American Consultants Rx achieve it’s biggest goal yet of donating over 30 million discount prescription cards to over 50k organizations in an effort to assist millions of Americans in need. Please click here to donate today!

Later school start times significantly reduce teen driving accidents

A new study shows a significant decrease in teen driving accidents when school start is delayed. Researchers studied the impact of a 50-minute delay in high school start times in one of the largest school districts in the US.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

SPECIAL CHILDREN DEAL UPDATE:

Persistent low body weight in young kids increases risk for anorexia nervosa later, study finds

A new study has found that a persistent low body mass index (BMI) in children, starting as young as age 2 for boys and 4 for girls, may be a risk factor for the development of anorexia nervosa in adolescence.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

SPECIAL CHILDREN DEAL UPDATE:

Teens’ same-gender friendships key to later satisfaction in romantic relationships

A new longitudinal study sought to identify the factors in adolescence that best predicted who would and would not have a satisfying romantic life in their late 20s. The study found that the skills teens learn in friendships with peers of the same gender were the strongest predictors of later romantic satisfaction.
Parenting News — ScienceDaily

SPECIAL CHILDREN DEAL UPDATE:

Natural disaster affects children’s schooling years later

A new study looked at changes in children’s academic performance after major bushfires in Australia. The study concluded that children in regions affected significantly by bushfires demonstrated poorer academic outcomes in some subjects than children in regions that were less severely affected by the fires.
K-12 Education News — ScienceDaily

PARENT UPDATE:

Our one-of-a-kind bestselling personalized alphabet book makes learning the ABCs fun, especially when your child sees their face and hears their name throughout their very own book!

Three years later, India’s bankruptcy reform languishes in courts

When India introduced new bankruptcy resolution rules in 2016, government officials and investors said they expected debt-burdened state-owned banks to clear up some of their bad loans and create a dynamic market in restructured debt.


Reuters: Business News

SPECIAL DISCOUNT UPDATE!

Jos. A. Bank: Daily Deals From Jos. A. Bank – Get Up to 75% Off!

Youthful cognitive ability strongly predicts mental capacity later in life

Early adult general cognitive ability is a stronger predictor of cognitive function and reserve later in life than other factors, such as higher education, occupational complexity or engaging in late-life intellectual activities.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

SPECIAL CHILDREN DEAL UPDATE:

A hidden world in the NES ‘Legend of Zelda’ was just uncovered 30 years later

Legend of Zelda

One of the more remarkable things about the original Nintendo is that many of the console’s more popular games — from Super Mario Bros. 3 to Tecmo Bowl — are still playable and thoroughly enjoyable. Sure, the 8-bit graphics can’t hold a candle to what you’ll find on more modern-day consoles, but the wild success Nintendo saw with the NES Classic underscores just how much fun many of those older games are.

Of course, if we’re talking about some of the greatest NES games of all time, there’s no denying that the Legend of Zelda needs to be part of the discussion. The original Legend of Zelda — which was released all the way back in 1986 — was such an iconic hit that it would go on to spawn well more than a dozen offshoots across a number of different consoles.

Continue reading…

BGR Top Deals:

  1. Nest should be embarrassed that this $ 38 home cam is so much better than the $ 200 Nest Cam
  2. One-day sale: Dyson cordless vacuums weren’t even this cheap on Black Friday

Trending Right Now:

  1. Rare desert snowfall creates a surreal winter wonderland in Arizona
  2. Everything new coming to Netflix this week, and everything leaving (week of Jan. 6)
  3. A big mystery from the ‘Avengers: Infinity War’ post-credits scene was just solved

A hidden world in the NES ‘Legend of Zelda’ was just uncovered 30 years later originally appeared on BGR.com on Sun, 6 Jan 2019 at 14:07:51 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.


BGR

BEST DEAL UPDATE:

All Deals on HP, Dell and Lenovo!

Why Christmas Can’t Quit Trans-Siberian Orchestra, 20 Years Later

Daniel Knighton/Getty

In 1993, a man named Paul O’Neill got a call from Atlantic Records. At the time, O’Neill was pretty well known among New York music labels. He worked at a major management firm and he was producing a minorly successful metal group called Savatage (a combo of the words “avatar” and “savage”). But Savatage’s last album hadn’t done well, and the Atlantic exec had a proposal: O’Neill should start his own group. “I said I’d love to do it,” O’Neill said later in an interview with Arte Concert. But he had a condition. “I said I want to do a progressive metal band that does mostly rock operas…I want four guitar players, two drummers, a full symphony in the studio, but not a symphony on the road…and 24 lead singers.” He had another ask. The rock operas would, for the most part, all be about Christmas.

Thursday night, about 15,000 people crowded into the Nassau County Veterans Memorial Coliseum, to hear the fruits of O’Neill’s phone call: the progressive metal holiday-rock-opera-machine, Trans-Siberian Orchestra, or TSO.

It’s been 25 years since O’Neill first pitched his project, and 20 since the group first started touring, but TSO has spent almost all of that time, bewilderingly, as one of the biggest breadwinners in the music industry. The Christmas melody maker has put out four holiday rock operas, three non-holiday rock operas, a Christmas EP, and a Christmas compilation, four of which have debuted in the top 10 of the Billboard 200, four of which have gone platinum (two of them more than once), and all of which, collectively, have sold over 12 million records, grossing some $ 700 million in revenue. Since 1999, the band has played to over 15 million people, and many of them come back for more—in 2014, the Wall Street Journal reported that repeat customers comprise 50 percent of the audience.

Read more at The Daily Beast.

The Daily Beast — Entertainment

BEST DEAL UPDATE:

Why Christmas Can’t Quit Trans-Siberian Orchestra, 20 Years Later

Daniel Knighton/Getty

In 1993, a man named Paul O’Neill got a call from Atlantic Records. At the time, O’Neill was pretty well known among New York music labels. He worked at a major management firm and he was producing a minorly successful metal group called Savatage (a combo of the words “avatar” and “savage”). But Savatage’s last album hadn’t done well, and the Atlantic exec had a proposal: O’Neill should start his own group. “I said I’d love to do it,” O’Neill said later in an interview with Arte Concert. But he had a condition. “I said I want to do a progressive metal band that does mostly rock operas…I want four guitar players, two drummers, a full symphony in the studio, but not a symphony on the road…and 24 lead singers.” He had another ask. The rock operas would, for the most part, all be about Christmas.

Thursday night, about 15,000 people crowded into the Nassau County Veterans Memorial Coliseum, to hear the fruits of O’Neill’s phone call: the progressive metal holiday-rock-opera-machine, Trans-Siberian Orchestra, or TSO.

It’s been 25 years since O’Neill first pitched his project, and 20 since the group first started touring, but TSO has spent almost all of that time, bewilderingly, as one of the biggest breadwinners in the music industry. The Christmas melody maker has put out four holiday rock operas, three non-holiday rock operas, a Christmas EP, and a Christmas compilation, four of which have debuted in the top 10 of the Billboard 200, four of which have gone platinum (two of them more than once), and all of which, collectively, have sold over 12 million records, grossing some $ 700 million in revenue. Since 1999, the band has played to over 15 million people, and many of them come back for more—in 2014, the Wall Street Journal reported that repeat customers comprise 50 percent of the audience.

Read more at The Daily Beast.

The Daily Beast Latest Articles

SPECIAL NEWS BULLETIN:

http://www.acrx.org -As millions of Americans strive to deal with the economic downturn,loss of jobs,foreclosures,high cost of gas,and the rising cost of prescription drug cost. Charles Myrick ,the President of American Consultants Rx, announced the re-release of the American Consultants Rx community service project which consist of millions of free discount prescription cards being donated to thousands of not for profits,hospitals,schools,churches,etc. in an effort to assist the uninsured,under insured,and seniors deal with the high cost of prescription drugs.-American Consultants Rx -Pharmacy Discount Network News

CHARITY UPDATE:

Click today to request your free ACRX discount prescription card and save up to 80% off of your medicine!

SPECIAL DONATION REQUEST UPDATE:

Please help American Consultants Rx achieve it’s biggest goal yet of donating over 30 million discount prescription cards to over 50k organizations in an effort to assist millions of Americans in need. Please click here to donate today!

Balangiga bells returned to Philippines by US more than a century later

Three war-trophy church bells seized by U.S. troops more than a century ago were returned to the Philippines Tuesday morning. Two of the Bells of Balangiga, pictured, were at F.E. Warren Air Force Base in Cheyenne, Wyoming, and the third was with the U.S. Army in South Korea.
FOX News

SPECIAL NEWS BULLETIN:

http://www.acrx.org -As millions of Americans strive to deal with the economic downturn,loss of jobs,foreclosures,high cost of gas,and the rising cost of prescription drug cost. Charles Myrick ,the President of American Consultants Rx, announced the re-release of the American Consultants Rx community service project which consist of millions of free discount prescription cards being donated to thousands of not for profits,hospitals,schools,churches,etc. in an effort to assist the uninsured,under insured,and seniors deal with the high cost of prescription drugs.-American Consultants Rx -Pharmacy Discount Network News

BEST DEAL UPDATE BY AMERICAN CONSULTANTS RX:

<

Click today to request your free ACRX discount prescription card and save up to 80% off of your medicine!

SPECIAL DONATION REQUEST UPDATE:

Please help American Consultants Rx achieve it’s biggest goal yet of donating over 30 million discount prescription cards to over 50k organizations in an effort to assist millions of Americans in need. Please click here to donate today!

#MeToo One Year Later: Has Your Workplace Culture Changed?

About 10 years ago, Tarana Burke launched the Me Too movement—an anti-sexual assault initiative launched to support survivors of sexual abuse, assault, and harassment. For a while, the movement quietly persisted  But in 2017, multiple sexual assault and harassment allegations against Hollywood producer Harvey Weinstein reignited the #MeToo movement and sparked chaos, conversation, and change across workplaces around the world.

To gain some insight into how the #MeToo movement has changed workplace culture, we interviewed Sarah Morgan, the senior human resources director for SafeStreetsUSA and founder of BuzzARooney L.L.C., a Human Resources Management, and leadership consulting company.

As an HR professional, how has #MeToo impacted workplace culture? 

In a way that didn’t exist before, the #MeToo movement created more awareness about the spectrum of sexual harassment in the workplace. We used to think these incidents were uncommon and happened infrequently. #MeToo flipped these misconceptions on their head and showed sexual harassment as commonplace and rampant, which it’s been for a long time. I have yet to meet a woman who does not have at least one #MeToo story from their career, from early professional women to women nearing retirement. The #MeToo movement no longer allowed companies to pretend like sexual harassment were someone else’s problem that happened in an isolated vacuum. #MeToo let the world know that sexual harassment in the workplace happens to all of us in one form or another.

Because of #MeToo, many of my clients and colleagues have reached out to me for guidance on how to update their orientation and annual training for employees and managers. Men seem afraid of saying or doing something that will be misconstrued as harassment or discrimination. Women seem more hyper-aware as events occur and more willing to speak up than in the past. These are both good things. We cannot eradicate harassment and discrimination without awareness and active participation from men, especially those in positions of authority and influence, which equals power. We also need women who are both willing to come forward with the stories of their experiences and willing to believe and support other women who choose to speak up.

In my work environment, I ensured our workplace harassment training for both employees and managers were very comprehensive, so we didn’t have to change much of our current practices because of #MeToo.

Why might women be afraid to speak up about harassment at work?

Women are afraid to speak up because they do not think they’ll be believed, and they do not trust action will be taken to stop the issue and/or to protect them from retaliation after the issue is reported.

As much as HR tries to protect confidentiality, it is not uncommon for word to get out and become office gossip when a claim is filed. The same victim shaming that happens to women who are victims of sexual assault happens to women who are victims of sexual harassment in the workplace. What you wore and how you behaved and what you did/didn’t do and how you could have avoided or prevented the incident(s) all impact how you’re viewed and judged both by the company and by your peers. No woman wants to go through all of that just to keep getting a check at a job that’s only paying her $ 0.50 – 0.85 for every white male $ 1. Many women choose not to report and instead they just seek work elsewhere. Once they are out of the environment, only a fraction of women report the issue or file a lawsuit.

Can you explain HR’s role in handling employee harassment claims?

HR is responsible for educating employees and managers about what is and what is not harassment in the workplace as well as the actions one should take when they are a victim or a witness to harassment in the workplace.

When an issue is brought to our attention, HR is responsible for conducting a thorough investigation to either substantiate or refute the claimant’s version of the events. During an investigation, HR will speak with and get written statements from witnesses, and review evidence, such as timesheets, emails, video and phone recordings, chat and text messages, social media messages, etc. After everything has been reviewed, HR will make recommendations for corrective action; this includes discipline up to termination and sometimes additional training for other employees who need remedial or refresher instruction. Corrective action may also include changes in schedule, supervisor, or work area to limit interactions between the parties going forward.

It is a difficult role to balance because what the complainant wants does not always match what is in the best interest of the company.

We have to balance the needs and rights of everyone involved, not just the complainant. Sometimes this means a form of corrective action other than termination for the person accused of harassment where the evidence or the severity of the issue does not support termination. HR often feels between a rock and hard place because of this.

Many HR professionals find we are unsupported by other members of management in our recommendations to have zero tolerance toward sexual harassment. I’ve been in this place at several times in my career; I can say it is awful to feel incapable of bringing some measure of justice to a person who already feels powerless. I am glad for the #MeToo movement because it makes companies think more critically about their decisions and the implications. #MeToo is forcing companies to live up to the values they espouse surrounding fairness and equity and inclusive workplaces that are free from harassment and bullying.

When we are focused on cultivating safe spaces where employees can be both creative and accountable, companies thrive and flourish and don’t fear the #MeToo movement as a threat to success.

The post #MeToo One Year Later: Has Your Workplace Culture Changed? appeared first on Black Enterprise.

Career | Black Enterprise

EMPLOYMENT UPDATE:

18 years later, Bring It On still teaches us about cultural appropriation

18 years later, Bring It On still teaches us about cultural appropriation


18 years later, <em>Bring It On</em> still teaches us about cultural appropriation

It seems unlikely that an early 2000s movie centered on the world of competitive high school cheerleading could teach a valuable, timeless lesson about cultural appropriation, but Bring It On does. Between witty dialogue and catchy cheers, the 2000 film provides an astute critique of white supremacy and colonization. Namely, it shows us how a privileged group of upper-class white students can easily infiltrate a largely Black inner city high school, steal their creative wealth, and benefit from it by passing it off as their own.

Starring Kirsten Dunst and Gabrielle Union, the movie focuses on newly appointed cheer captain Torrance Shipman (Dunst) on her quest to win another National Championship for her high school cheer team, the Rancho Carne Toros. However, her idealistic dream is quickly shattered: She discovers that the former captain, Missy aka “Big Red,” has been unabashedly stealing the team’s routines from their inner city rivals, the East Compton Clovers. The identity of the Toros has been built upon the physical and creative labor of the Clovers, who are entirely composed of women of color—mainly Black girls.

Torrance displays surface-level remorse for the injustice committed by Big Red, but the captain of the Clovers, Isis (Union), refuses to make her team a charity case. In an act that is representative of the white savior mindset, Torrance presents Isis with a large check to cover the Clovers’ competition fee at Nationals. Isis rejects Torrance’s financial compensation, asking if it’s “hush money.” Wanting to maintain the respect of her team, Isis lets Torrance know that her forgiveness can’t be easily bought, thus rejecting the idea that monetary amends alone is enough to fix the problem of cultural appropriation.

Bring It On tackles cultural appropriation without heavy-handed condemnation of Torrance, but it doesn’t exactly paint her as a guilt-free victim either.

It would be wrong to say that Torrance’s crime is being a white, well-off, blonde woman. Rather, her complicity makes her an agent of cultural appropriation. For example, when Torrance initially informs the team that Big Red stole their cheer routines from the Clovers, they all vote to keep the routine. At first, Torrance sides with her peers instead of exercising her power to make things right. She understands that Big Red’s actions were unjust, but she won’t go against the status quo of her overwhelmingly white team.

When discussing cultural appropriation in real life, (white) people often use their ignorance as an excuse, calling their actions “cultural exchange” and dismissing the very real consequences of intellectual theft. In the film, Torrance uses her ignorance of Big Red’s transgressions, along with her own inherent sense of entitlement, as justifiable reasons to initially forge ahead with the stolen routine. Unfortunately for her, this decision spectacularly backfires.

In the context of the film, Big Red’s consistent swiping of routines and cheers means that the legacy of the Toros is built upon a fragile lie. This is painfully apparent when Isis and members of the Clovers attend a football game at Rancho Carne. While the Toros perform a routine on the field that was stolen from the Clovers, Isis and her team members simultaneously perform it from the bleachers. Torrance is mortified, and it is this public calling out that persuades the Toros to change up their routine for Regionals—not the acknowledged weight of their actions.

The Toros’ initial dismissal of their cultural theft is identical to the dismissal we see time and time again in our collective cultural landscape.

The line between cultural exchange and cultural appropriation can be incredibly blurred, as pointed out by actress Amandla Stenberg in her 2015 viral video, “Don’t Cash Crop My Cornrows.” But Bring It On suggests that cultural exchange becomes cultural appropriation when the colonizer erases the origins of the work in question. However, let’s be clear: Intentions are a non-factor.

To say that the Toros innocently “borrowed” the Clovers’ routines would be a vast understatement. Borrowing implies a transaction founded upon mutual consent between parties with similar social standings—and that’s not what happens in Bring It On, or in the many instances of cultural appropriation we see in the real world everyday.

Since Bring It On‘s theatrical release 18 years ago, the theft of the Clovers’ work still mirrors the cultural appropriation we regularly see in mainstream media—especially in the fashion industry.

Styles that originate from Black culture are dismissed as low-brow, yet praised when worn by white women. In 2014, Marie Claire crowned Kendall Jenner as an innovator for wearing “bold braids” (aka cornrows), and then, four years later in 2018, Vogue styled the white model in an afro hairstyle that Black women are shamed for. Kim Kardashian has been accused of cultural appropriation more than once, wearing cornrows multiple times and inaccurately calling them “Bo Derek” braids. Similarly, designers such as Marc Jacobs have faced immense criticism for styling non-Black runway models’ hair into dreadlocks. As a response to the backlash, Jacobs took to Instagram to issue a defensive and tone deaf answer, commenting “funny how you don’t criticize women of colour for straightening their hair.” As if white women face discrimination for having straight hair the way Black women routinely face discrimination for wearing their hair in natural styles.

A November 2018 Twitter thread by writer Wanna Thompson revealed the numerous white women influencers pose as Black women online with the help of makeup, hairstyles, clothing, and Instagram filters—taking profitable content creation opportunities from the actual Black women who originate these styles.

I’m also reminded of a rather obvious example of Black cultural appropriation involving the white Australian rapper Iggy Azalea. Azalea’s image is undeniably crafted on a shallow caricature of Blackness, from her “blaccent” to her lyrics that aim to project the aesthetics and backstory of an Atlanta trap star, rather than a blond, white woman from a small, working-class town in Australia. When responding to criticism, Azalea has used her proximity to Blackness (i.e. her ex-fiance, Nick Young) as a get-out-of-jail-free card. Like the Toros, Azalea’s success is directly connected to a whitewashed iteration of Black ingenuity.

These instances are not harmless borrowing; they are an exercise in commodification and theft of Black culture in order to repackage it into something palpable and profitable for the white mainstream.

Part of the charm of Bring It On lies in the fact that the Clovers beat the odds; they not only defy expectations of making it to Nationals, but they dominate. Despite their considerable effort, the Toros place second at Nationals, while the Clovers claim first place. Ultimately, the film decides that Torrance, and by extension, the Toros, will not be rewarded for their well-intentioned but delayed attempts at reparations. The film’s conclusion provides a sense of relief that seems rarely witnessed in the real world. If only such outcomes were commonplace in everyday life.

The post 18 years later, <em>Bring It On</em> still teaches us about cultural appropriation appeared first on HelloGiggles.

HelloGiggles

BEST DEAL UPDATE:

Her kidney donation now could save her granddaughter’s life later

When Meghann Adams learned that she was pregnant in early 2015, she was ecstatic. Starting a family with her husband, Chris, had not been easy, but she was carrying twins. They were to be named Delly and Aubrey.


CNN.com – RSS Channel – Health

BEST DEAL UPDATE:

Click today to request your free ACRX discount prescription card and save up to 80% off of your medicine!

SPECIAL DONATION REQUEST UPDATE:

Please help American Consultants Rx achieve it’s biggest goal yet of donating over 30 million discount prescription cards to over 50k organizations in an effort to assist millions of Americans in need. Please click here to donate today!

Shepard’s murder haunts Wyoming 20 years later

Associated Press

SPECIAL NEWS BULLETIN:

http://www.acrx.org -As millions of Americans strive to deal with the economic downturn,loss of jobs,foreclosures,high cost of gas,and the rising cost of prescription drug cost. Charles Myrick ,the President of American Consultants Rx, announced the re-release of the American Consultants Rx community service project which consist of millions of free discount prescription cards being donated to thousands of not for profits,hospitals,schools,churches,etc. in an effort to assist the uninsured,under insured,and seniors deal with the high cost of prescription drugs.-American Consultants Rx -Pharmacy Discount Network News

CHARITY UPDATE:

Click today to request your free ACRX discount prescription card and save up to 80% off of your medicine!

SPECIAL DONATION REQUEST UPDATE:

Please help American Consultants Rx achieve it’s biggest goal yet of donating over 30 million discount prescription cards to over 50k organizations in an effort to assist millions of Americans in need. Please click here to donate today!

Promise fulfilled 25 years later with TV film “My Dinner with Herve”

Sacha Gervasi brings the memoirs of Herve Villechaize to life, as he promised the diminutive ‘Fantasy Island’ actor 25 years ago, with a film about his life. Rough Cut – no reporter narration.


Reuters Video: Entertainment

BEST DEAL UPDATE:

Shop eBags’ Winter Sale & Clearance Event – Up to 75%* Off Your Favorite Brands!

Fathers’ postnatal hormone levels predict later caregiving

Dads whose cortisol levels were elevated while they held their newborns on the day of their birth — either skin-to-skin or clothed — were more likely to be involved with indirect care and play with their infants in the first months of their lives.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

SPECIAL CHILDREN DEAL UPDATE: