Scientists gave mice infrared vision, but could they do the same for humans?

infrared vision

Mice are already masters of lurking in the shadows, well out of sight of prying human eyes, but researchers in the U.S. and China just turned a few of them into serious superheroes. The mice, which are normally equipped with eyes capable only of seeing visible light, like us humans, have instead been given the ability to see near infrared light, effectively allowing them to see in the dark.

By injecting specially designed nanoparticles directly into the eyes of the mice, the animals exhibited the ability to see near infrared light. Even more remarkable, the vision augmentation doesn’t appear to have negatively affected the daylight vision of the mice.

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Scientists gave mice infrared vision, but could they do the same for humans? originally appeared on BGR.com on Sun, 3 Mar 2019 at 14:08:10 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.


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