Exclusive Podcast: LITTLE KNOWN FACTS with Ilana Levine and Marc Kudisch

BroadwayWorld has teamed up with Broadway alum Ilana Levine, who makes her entrance onto the podcast stage with her new show Little Known Facts. Ilana’s unique brand of celebrity interview, ‘Podcast Verite,’ is unfiltered, raw, honest and uniquely funny.
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Podcast: David Epstein on Roger Federer vs. Tiger Woods and Generalization vs. Specialization

On this week’s episode, David Epstein joins the podcast to discuss the opening chapter of his new book, Range, on Roger Federer and Tiger Woods. 

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Podcast: KHN’s ‘What The Health’: Still More ‘Medicare-For-All’

Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, a presidential candidate, unveiled the 2019 version of his “Medicare-for-all” bill this week. But even more than two decades after first proposing a single-payer plan for the U.S., Sanders still has not proposed a way to finance such a major undertaking.

Congress continued to pursue its examination of high prescription drug prices this week by calling to testify both insulin makers and the drug “middlemen” known as pharmacy benefit managers.

And Idaho is following Utah in trying to scale back an expansion of Medicaid under the Affordable Care Act approved by voters last November.

This week’s panelists are Julie Rovner of Kaiser Health News, Sarah Kliff of Vox.com, Margot Sanger-Katz of The New York Times and Paige Winfield Cunningham of The Washington Post.

Also, Rovner interviews Ceci Connolly, president and CEO of the Alliance of Community Health Plans.

Among the takeaways from this week’s podcast:

  • “Medicare-for-all” was in the spotlight again this week with the release of Sanders’ bill, which is co-sponsored by four of the five other Senate Democrats running for president. Still, neither Sanders nor any other candidates — or their proposals — focus on how to pay for it. Experts differ on how much expanding Medicare would cost. But, whether it’s moving around money already being spent or raising new taxes, expanding Medicare to more people would result in winners and losers, a key political factor going forward.
  • Both parties face internal divisions over health care, revolving around whether to create something new or stick with the status quo. Within the GOP, the split is between Republicans who point to years of unsuccessful efforts to repeal and maybe replace the ACA and want to move on to other things, and others — including some in the White House — who are continuing the push. Democrats’ division is between those who back House Speaker Nancy Pelosi’s call to strengthen and improve the ACA and those who back various efforts to create a Medicare-for-all system.
  • The GOP is playing both offense and defense on the ACA. Leaders say they want to be the party of health care and protect people with preexisting medical conditions, even as the Justice Department is officially backing a court ruling in Texas that would invalidate the entire law, including those protections.
  • There was lots of talk but little action on drug prices at hearings before Congress. Lawmakers heard from drug companies and pharmacy benefit managers, but are no closer to answering the question about what to do about high drug prices. While there may be incremental changes that can be adopted, few expect legislation that would fundamentally change business practices, intellectual property rights or the ability for Medicare to negotiate drug prices.
  • Action in the Utah and Idaho legislatures around Medicaid expansion show that even successful ballot initiatives to expand the program can be changed by lawmakers in ways voters may not have expected. In both state capitols, elected officials reduced the number of people eligible for expansion below what voters approved.

Plus, for extra credit, the panelists recommend their favorite health policy stories of the week they think you should read too:

Julie Rovner: The New York Times’ “Would ‘Medicare for All’ Save Billions or Cost Billions?” By Josh Katz, Kevin Quealy and Margot Sanger-Katz

Sarah Kliff: Politico’s “Public Option Hits a Wall in Blue States,” by Rachana Pradhan and Dan Goldberg

Margot Sanger-Katz: Politico’s “Obamacare Fight Obscures America’s Real Health Care Crisis: Money,” by Joanne Kenen

Paige Winfield Cunningham: STAT News’ “Amazon Alexa Is Now HIPAA-Compliant. Tech Giant Says Health Data Can Now Be Accessed Securely,” by Casey Ross

To hear all our podcasts, click here.

And subscribe to What the Health? on iTunesStitcher or Google Play.

Kaiser Health News

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For the Record, ‘Jemele Hill is Unbothered’ and Has a New Spotify Podcast

The ever evolving Jemele Hill is at an exciting point in her career. With 21 years in the game as a journalist, sports reporter, and activist (in her own right), she has learned to be unbothered and unapologetic. And she proves that each time she speaks or publishes her truth as a staff writer for The Atlantic.

Hill stopped by BLACK ENTERPRISE to give us an inside scoop on her new Spotify podcast, Jemele Hill Is Unbothered. During the our sit down, she talks all things career moves, securing the bag, and how to take a just stance no matter your industry or career level.

Hill’s partnership with Spotify is timely as the company seeks to amplify the voice of black women through podcasting initiatives.

“From a value alignment standpoint, that’s something I stand for–boosting the voices of young women of color—it’s something they stand for,” said Hill. “And I’m happy to be a part of a brand where we are very like-minded,”


Another exciting chapter on the horizon for Hill is marriage! During the interview she touched on living life by design and not by default.

“I’m very even-keeled but I need people in my life who can give me not just the balance and support and all of those other things. But can make sure that my spirit is taken care of. I found that, and I’m very lucky and fortunate to have found that in my fiancé! I’m looking forward to marriage and the things that come with it.”

For those who are looking to shake things up be it in their everyday life or career, Hill said you can be risky and strategic at the same time.

That is exactly what she did as she transitioned from ESPN to pursue her next chapter professionally.
And for anyone who thinks a closed door or a no is missed opportunity, she challenges you to change your perspective.

“Don’t focus on the opportunities you didn’t get. The only reason I say that is because a lot of times there’s a reason you didn’t get it. And by that I mean it’s not because of something that you didn’t do, but there’s something else around the corner.”

It’s fair to say having that mindset is one of the ways she stays unbothered. Jemele Hill Is Unbothered launches on Spotify on Apr 15. Be sure to tune in!

The post For the Record, ‘Jemele Hill is Unbothered’ and Has a New Spotify Podcast appeared first on Black Enterprise.

Lifestyle | Black Enterprise

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Glenn Close, Cynthia Erivo and Patti LuPone To Join John Cameron Mitchell For New Podcast ANTHEM

From award-winning author and director John Cameron Mitchell Hedwig and the Angry Inch, Shrill Anthem is an edgy anthology series produced by TOPIC Missing Richard Simmons that tells a unique American story through a distinct musical voice.
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Podcast: KHN’s ‘What The Health’ The GOP’s Health Reform Whiplash

President Donald Trump last week insisted that Republicans would move this year to “repeal and replace” the Affordable Care Act. Or possibly not. Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell made it clear the GOP Senate did not plan to spend time on the effort as long as the House is controlled by Democrats. So, the president changed his tune. At least for the moment.

Meanwhile, states with legislatures and governors that oppose abortion are racing to pass abortion bans and get them to the Supreme Court, where, they hope, the new majority there will overturn or scale back the current right to abortion.

This week’s panelists are Julie Rovner of Kaiser Health News, Rebecca Adams of CQ Roll Call, Anna Edney of Bloomberg News and Alice Miranda Ollstein of Politico.

Also, Rovner interviews KHN’s Paula Andalo, who wrote the latest “Bill of the Month” feature about a very expensive knee brace.

If you have an exorbitant or inexplicable medical bill you’d like to submit for our series, you can do that here.

Among the takeaways from this week’s podcast:

  • Although Trump’s political base may support his actions to undermine the entire federal health law, Republican lawmakers are flummoxed. They are hesitant to take up the cause because Democrats used the issue so effectively against Republicans in last fall’s election. They also know that many Republicans like key provisions of the health law, such as its closing of the doughnut hole in the Medicare drug benefit, letting adult children stay on parents’ plans up to the age of 26 and protecting people with preexisting conditions.
  • The unveiling this week of a new Democratic health initiative — Medicare X — signals an increasing push by party moderates to move away from progressives’ call to dramatically reshape American health care with a “Medicare-for-all” system. Medicare X is a much smaller initiative that would allow some people to buy in to the Medicare system, but it would be rolled out gradually over a number of years.
  • In other ACA news, a federal judge struck down the administration’s regulations allowing small businesses to join association health plans, saying it was an end run to avoid the health law. Thousands of people could be affected by the decision, and Labor Secretary Alex Acosta said he will decide by the end of the May whether to appeal.
  • Anti-abortion activists in many states are pushing new laws to test whether the retirement last summer of Justice Anthony Kennedy has left the Supreme Court more willing to turn back the Roe v. Wade decision. Among the types of cases going forward are state laws that would ban abortions once a fetal heartbeat could be determined, which often happens about six weeks into a pregnancy or before many women even know they are pregnant.
  • Despite a stiff rejection last week by a federal judge who overturned the Trump administration’s permission for work requirements in the Medicaid expansion approved in Arkansas and Kentucky, federal officials said that Utah could go forward with a plan to start work requirements as part of a partial expansion. Supporters of the ACA insist that expansion should be for anyone earning up to 138% of the federal poverty level. But the issue is tough for Democrats, some of whom say a partial expansion is better than none.

Ask Us Anything!

Do you have a health policy question you’d like the panelists to answer? You can send it to whatthehealth@kff.org. Please include where you’re from and how to pronounce your name.

Plus, for extra credit, the panelists recommend their favorite health policy stories of the week they think you should read too:

Julie Rovner: Vox.com’s “The Doctor’s Strike That Nearly Killed Canada’s Medicare-for-All Plan, Explained,” by Sarah Kliff

Rebecca Adams: CQ Roll Call’s “Legal Challenges Are Threatening Trump Administration Changes to the ACA,” by Sandhya Raman

Anna Edney: The Baltimore Sun’s “Baltimore Mayor Pugh to Take Leave of Absence in Midst of ‘Healthy Holly’ Book Controversy” by Ian Duncan and Yvonne Wenger

Alice Miranda Ollstein: The New York Times’ “Rituals of Honor in Hospital Hallways,” by Dr. Tim Lahey

To hear all our podcasts, click here.

And subscribe to What the Health? on iTunesStitcher or Google Play.

Kaiser Health News

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Spotify Aims to Become ‘World’s Leading Audio Platform’ By Building Original Podcast Content

Earlier this week, Spotify announced that it has acquired Parcast, a “premier storytelling-driven” podcast studio that specializes in crime and mystery series. The news comes shortly after the music streaming services acquisitions of Gimlet and Anchor, two other podcast networks.

Spotify has offered the ability to stream podcasts via its app for a while now, but it’s purchasing of three podcast networks and studios means that some of this content will now be developed in-house. Parcast was founded in 2016 and has since become extremely popular, particularly with women, who make up 75% of its audience. Since Parcast launched three years ago it has already developed 18 original series, such as “Unsolved Murders”, “Cult”, “Serial Killers” and “Conspiracy”.

The three recent acquisitions highlight Spotify’s growing desire to move its business model beyond music streaming and instead provide a range of audio content for a wide variety of people. As the CEO Daniel Ek said in a recent blog-post: “I’m proud of what we’ve accomplished, but what I didn’t know when we launched to consumers in 2008 was that audio — not just music — would be the future of Spotify.”

Parcast’s proven success makes the deal between the two audio companies make sense for Spotify, as it provides little risk and potentially high reward. Over the years podcasts have become integral to millions of people’s daily routines and, as The New York Times points out, podcasts are also cheap to produce and can, therefore, bring in loyal subscribers to Spotify without relying on expensive music licensing rights.

And this is where the real incentive lies: as Owen Grover, the chief executive of Pocket Casts, a podcast app, said: “I don’t think Spotify woke up one day and realized that audio storytelling has some incredible emotional place in the life of their brand. Strategically, if they can get their users to listen to podcasts in place of music, it improves their margins.”

The move also highlights the growing competition between Apple and Spotify as they battle for top spot in the audio streaming business. Apple has so far provided the main international platform for podcasts, but Spotify’s recent expansion shows that it believes it can challenge Apple for this title. Spotify has also recently announced that it aims to spend $ 500 million on podcast-related deals over the next couple of years, so expect the competition to heat up.

The post Spotify Aims to Become ‘World’s Leading Audio Platform’ By Building Original Podcast Content appeared first on lovebscott – celebrity news.

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Podcast: Rowan Ricardo Phillips on the Year of Tennis That Captivated Him

On this week’s episode, host Jon Wertheim talks with poet and author Rowan Ricardo Phillips about his new book, The Circuit: A Tennis Odyssey.

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Podcast: KHN’s ‘What The Health?’ “Medicare-For-All” For Dummies

Republicans are still in charge of the White House and the Senate, but the “Medicare-for-all” debate is in full swing. Democrats of every stripe are pledging support for a number of variations on the theme of expanding health coverage to all Americans.

This week, KHN’s “What the Health?” podcast takes a deep dive into the often-confusing Medicare-for-all debate, including its history, prospects and terminology.

This week’s panelists are Julie Rovner of Kaiser Health News, Joanne Kenen of Politico, Paige Winfield Cunningham of The Washington Post and Rebecca Adams of CQ Roll Call.

Among the takeaways from this week’s podcast:

  • Medicare-for-all is a new rallying cry for progressives, but the current Medicare program has big limitations. It does not cover most long-term care expenses, and includes no coverage of hearing, dental, vision or foot care. Medicare also includes no stop-loss or catastrophic care limit that protects beneficiaries from massive bills.
  • Though recent comments by Sen. Kamala Harris on eliminating private insurance with a move to Medicare-for-all stirred controversy, private insurance is indeed involved in many aspects of the government program. Private companies provide the Medicare Advantage plans used by more than a third of beneficiaries, the Medicare drug plans and much of the bill processing for the entire program.
  • Many consumers — and politicians — are confused by the terms being thrown around in the current debate about Medicare-for-all. The plan offered by Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) and some of his supporters would be a “single-payer” system, in which the government would be in charge of paying for all health care — although doctors, hospitals and other health care providers would remain private. Others often use the term Medicare-for-all to mean a much less drastic change to the U.S. health care system, such as a “public option” that would offer specific groups of people — perhaps those over age 50 or consumers purchasing coverage on the insurance marketplaces — the opportunity to buy into Medicare coverage.
  • Sanders’ vision of Medicare-for-all is based on Canada’s system. But even there, hospitals and doctors are private businesses, drugs are not covered everywhere, and benefits vary among the provinces.
  • The health care industry is nearly united in opposing the talk of moving to a Medicare-for-all program because of concerns about disruption to the system and less pay. Currently, Medicare reimbursements are about 40 percent lower than private insurance.

If you want to know more about the next big health policy debate, here are some articles to get you started:

Vox’s “Private Health Insurance Exists in Europe and Canada. Here’s How It Works,” by Sarah Kliff

The Washington Post’s “How Democrats Could Lose on Health Care in 2020,” by Ronald A. Klain

The American Prospect’s “The Pleasant Illusions of the Medicare-for-All Debate,” by Paul Starr

The Week’s “Why Do Democrats Think Expanding ObamaCare Would Be Easier Than Passing Medicare-for-All?” by Jeff Spross

Vox’s “How to Build a Medicare-for-All Plan, Explained By Somebody Who’s Thought About It for 20 Years,” by Dylan Scott

The New York Times’ “The Best Health Care System in the World: Which One Would You Pick?” By Aaron E. Carroll and Austin Frakt

The Nation’s “Medicare-for-All Isn’t the Solution for Universal Health Care,” by Joshua Holland

The New York Times’ “’Don’t Get Too Excited’ About Medicare for All,” by Elisabeth Rosenthal and Shefali Luthra

Plus, for extra credit, the panelists recommend their favorite health policy stories of the week they think you should read too.

Julie Rovner: Yahoo News’ “What Trump Got Wrong About ‘Right to Try,’” by Kadia Tubman

Joanne Kenen: STAT News’ “The Modern Tragedy of Fake Cancer Cures,” by Matthew Herper

Rebecca Adams: The Texas Tribune’s “Thousands of Texans Were Shocked By Surprise Medical Bills. Their Requests for Help Overwhelmed the State,” by Jay Root and Shannon Najmabadi

Paige Winfield Cunningham: STAT News’ “The ‘Big Pharma’ Candidate? As He Runs for President, Cory Booker Looks to Shake His Reputation for Drug Industry Coziness,” by Lev Facher

To hear all our podcasts, click here.

And subscribe to What the Health? on iTunesStitcher or Google Play.

Kaiser Health News

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Podcast: Pam Shriver’s Outside-the-Box Proposal for the USTA

On this week’s episode, host Jon Wertheim talks with Pam Shriver about the latest tennis news and an out-of-the-box proposal for the USTA to bolster American tennis.

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Podcast: KHN’s ‘What The Health?’ A ‘Healthy’ State Of The Union

Health policy played a surprisingly robust role in President Donald Trump’s 2019 State of the Union address.

The president laid out an ambitious set of health goals in his speech Tuesday to Congress and the nation, including reining in drug prices, ending the transmission of HIV in the U.S. during the next decade and dedicating more resources to fighting childhood cancer.

Meanwhile, in Utah and Idaho, two of the states where voters last fall approved expansion of the Medicaid health program, Republican legislatures are trying to scale back those plans.

This week’s panelists for KHN’s “What the Health?” are Julie Rovner of Kaiser Health News, Anna Edney of Bloomberg News, Margot Sanger-Katz of The New York Times and Alice Ollstein of Politico.

Among the takeaways from this week’s podcast:

  • The Trump administration is proposing to change the drug rebates in Medicare so that consumers purchasing the medicines get more of the savings and the middlemen negotiating the deals get less. But that effort could lead to increased insurance premiums — a consequence that could have significant political repercussions.
  • Trump’s pledge to end HIV transmissions in 10 years was a bit of a surprise since the disease had not been much of a priority in earlier moves by the administration.
  • The efforts to restrict Medicaid expansion approved by voters in Utah and Idaho show the limitations of referendums and could impact a move to get a Medicaid expansion question on the Florida ballot.
  • An intriguing study this week showed that medications to treat cardiac problems saved Medicare money. The results were surprising because generally public health officials suggest that prevention is important to improve health but doesn’t necessarily save money.

Also this week, Rovner interviews KHN senior correspondent Phil Galewitz, who investigated and wrote the latest “Bill of the Month” feature for Kaiser Health News and NPR. It’s about a man with a minor problem — fainting after a flu shot — and a major bill. You can read the story here.

If you have a medical bill you would like NPR and KHN to investigate, you can submit it here.

Plus, for extra credit, the panelists recommend their favorite health policy stories of the week they think you should read too:

Julie Rovner: NPR’s “Texans Can Appeal Surprise Medical Bills, But the Process Can Be Draining,” by Ashley Lopez

Margot Sanger-Katz: The Los Angeles Times’ “In Rush to Revamp Medicaid, Trump Officials Bend Rules That Protect Patients,” by Noam N. Levey

Anna Edney: Bloomberg News’ “Ketamine Could Be the Key to Reversing America’s Rising Suicide Rate,” by Cynthia Koons and Robert Langreth

Alice Ollstein: The Washington Post’s “’It Will Take Off Like a Wildfire’: The Unique Dangers of the Washington State Measles Outbreak,” by Lena H. Sun and Maureen O’Hagan

To hear all our podcasts, click here.

And subscribe to What the Health? on iTunesStitcher or Google Play.

Kaiser Health News

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Podcast: KHN’s ‘What The Health?’ Live From D.C.: A Look Ahead At Health Policy In 2019

(From left) Tom Miller, Kimberly Leonard, Anna Edney, Joanne Kenen and Julie Rovner(Lynne Shallcross/KHN)

The 2020 presidential campaign has begun and health is a big part of it, with Democratic candidates pledging their support for “Medicare-for-all” and many of its variations.

Meanwhile, Republicans and Democrats are both promising to do something about drug prices and “surprise” medical bills. But whether they can translate that agreement on the broad problem to a detailed solution remains to be seen.

This week’s panelists for KHN’s “What the Health?” are Julie Rovner of Kaiser Health News, Joanne Kenen of Politico, Anna Edney of Bloomberg News and Kimberly Leonard of The Washington Examiner. Joining the panel for this week’s live show was Tom Miller of the American Enterprise Institute.

Among the takeaways from this week’s podcast:

  • The early jockeying among Democrats running for president is likely to overshadow any efforts to make changes to the Affordable Care Act or help stabilize its insurance marketplaces.
  • Legislative remedies for the ACA marketplaces are expected to hit the same roadblock that senators found in 2017: demands by conservatives that plans operating in those insurance exchanges be banned from offering abortion coverage.
  • Although the general idea of expanding Medicare garners high public support, if Democrats agree on a plan to push forward, it could be expected to meet strong opposition from the health care industry.
  • Republicans and Democrats have expressed interest in moving legislation to help lower drug prices. One area where they could find common ground might be revisions to the patent laws to help spur more lower-cost generic drugs.
  • Both parties also say they are concerned about surprise bills that patients receive after receiving medical care. Still, there is no consensus on how to approach the problem, and industry stakeholders are split on what remedies the country should take.

The panelists also discussed Anna Edney’s series on the dangers of generic drugs. You can read her stories here, here and here.

To hear all our podcasts, click here.

And subscribe to What the Health? on iTunesStitcher or Google Play.

Kaiser Health News

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Podcast: KHN’s ‘What The Health?’ ‘Medicare-For-All’? More? Some?

Democrats have officially launched their debate over “Medicare-for-all,” with lots of ideas on how to expand health insurance coverage (and lower costs) for Americans. Chances of any bill becoming law in the next two years are extremely slim, with Republicans still in control of the Senate and White House. But the debate is important in the run-up to the 2020 presidential primaries for Democrats.

Meanwhile, the Trump administration continues to give states the ability to add work requirements to their expanded Medicaid programs — Arizona is the latest. And it is reportedly considering ways to allow states more flexibility in exchange for limited Medicaid funding.

This week’s panelists for KHN’s “What the Health?” are Julie Rovner of Kaiser Health News, Stephanie Armour of The Wall Street Journal, Paige Winfield Cunningham of The Washington Post and Alice Ollstein of Politico.

A note for interested listeners: On Jan. 31, the podcast will tape before a live audience at the Kaiser Family Foundation in downtown Washington, D.C. If you would like to attend, you can register here.

Among the takeaways from this week’s podcast:

  • Democratic lawmakers overwhelmingly support efforts to get the entire population covered by insurance. And while many of them say they support “Medicare-for-all,” they often have different views on what that system entails.
  • The full “Medicare-for-all” system being promoted by Sen. Bernie Sanders (I-Vt.) and some others would jettison the private insurance market, and many centrist lawmakers and the health care industry are likely to fight it.
  • Arkansas is the first state to put into use the work requirements that the Trump administration has approved for the Medicaid program. So far, 18,000 people — many of whom are working — have been kicked out of Medicaid coverage because they have not properly reported their work or other activities that allow them to maintain the federal-state insurance.
  • The administration is reportedly considering offering states the option to take their Medicaid money in a block grant, a proposal advanced by Republican members of Congress during the debate to repeal the Affordable Care Act. But states have been hesitant so far to move in this direction.
  • The administration’s rules for insurers operating on the health law’s marketplaces in 2020 will continue to allow them to load many of the cost increases they seek onto silver plans. The cost of those plans are used to determine subsidy levels, so many customers discovered that their subsidies grew and that they could buy non-silver plans for less money out-of-pocket.
  • A new Gallup poll finds that the number of people who are uninsured is growing, reaching the highest point since 2014, just before the ACA’s marketplaces opened. This could likely be a talking point in the 2020 campaign.

Plus, for extra credit, the panelists recommend their favorite health policy stories of the week they think you should read too:

Julie Rovner: The Washington Post’s “Suicides Among Veterinarians Become a Growing Problem,” by David Leffler

Stephanie Armour: Politico’s “’I’m Trying Not to Die Right Now’: Why Opioid-Addicted Patients Are Still Searching for Help,” by Brianna Ehley and Rachel Roubein

Paige Winfield Cunningham: The Washington Post’s “Anonymous ‘Ghost Ship’ Is Among Groups Flooding Drug Pricing Debate,” by Christopher Rowland and Jeff Stein

Alice Ollstein: The Washington Post’s “They Went to Mexico for Surgery. They Came Back With a Deadly Superbug,” by Lena H. Sun

Kaiser Health News

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Podcast: David Yazbek Talks THE BAND’S VISIT, TOOTSIE & More with Gilbert Gottfried!

David Yazbek, the Tony Award-winning composer of THE BAND’S VISIT and composer of the upcoming musical TOOTISIE, was just interviewed on this week’s episode of Gilbert Gottfried’s podcast, ‘Gilbert Gottfried’s Amazing Colossal Podcast’Click here to listen to the full episode
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Podcast: KHN’s ‘What The Health?’ Drug Prices Are Rising Again. Is Someone Going To Do Something About It?

Many drugmakers have announced price increases with the start of the new year. The new Congress wants to do something about that. And even though both Republicans and Democrats want to address the politically potent issue of drug prices, it is unclear what they might be able to agree on.

Battle lines are forming between the House and Senate on the matter of abortion. The House is led by abortion-rights supporters and, since the election, the Senate has become slightly more against abortion.

And even though the majority of the Department of Health and Human Services remains unaffected by the partial government shutdown, the lapse of funding for other agencies is having spillover effects on health programs.

This week’s panelists for KHN’s “What the Health?” are Julie Rovner of Kaiser Health News, Joanne Kenen of Politico, Margot Sanger-Katz of The New York Times and Alice Ollstein of Politico.

Among the takeaways from this week’s podcast:

  • The biggest conflict among Republicans and Democrats on the drug issue centers on the GOP’s reluctance to give the government a role in directly negotiating prices. Adding to the pressure is the clear indication that the issue will be front and center in the 2020 campaign.
  • Some states, such as California, are looking to find ways to bring down drug costs on their own. California Gov. Gavin Newsom, a Democrat, has proposed that the state have direct negotiations with drugmakers. Such efforts could mean cutting off consumers’ access to some drugs, if manufacturers don’t agree to a price the state likes, and that is a painful choice for officials and patients.
  • When House committee assignments were released this week, women were appointed to lead many of the key panels that have a hand in health policy, including the chairman and top Republican on the Appropriations Committee and two Energy and Commerce subcommittees.
  • The House Democratic Caucus now has more liberal members and fewer conservatives, so the party’s efforts to roll back restrictions on abortion are likely to be more robust. That could also trigger some big battles with Republicans through the legislative session.
  • Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) is putting a bill on the Senate floor that would make permanent the Hyde Amendment — which bars federal funding of abortions in nearly all circumstances. But it seems unlikely that bill could be passed by the Senate, where it needs 60 votes, and even some Republicans are believed to oppose it.

Plus, for extra credit, the panelists recommend their favorite health policy stories of the week they think you should read too:

Julie Rovner: Bloomberg News’ “This JPMorgan Health Conference Is So Packed Attendees Are Meeting in the Bathroom,” by Kristen V Brown

Joanne Kenen: The New York Times’ “The Strange Marketplace for Diabetes Test Strips,” by Ted Alcorn

Margot Sanger-Katz: Kaiser Health News’ “Patients Turn To GoFundMe When Money And Hope Run Out,” by Mark Zdechlik

Alice Ollstein: The Washington Post’s “Federal Officials Launch Audit of D.C. Government’s Opioid Grant Spending,” by Peter Jamison

Kaiser Health News

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Exclusive Podcast: Go ‘Behind the Curtain’ with Lee Roy Reams Remembering the Legends we Lost in 2018

This year we lost so many legends from Marin Mazzie to Gary Beach, Neil Simon to William Goldman, Rick McKay to Craig Zadan. We end our year celebrating their life and legacy with a legend who called many of these artists friends, colleagues, and companions the incomparable Lee Roy Reams.
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IGN UK Podcast #464: The Games Awards Got Got

Anyone who’s anyone in games media were at The Games Awards in LA this week.

Except us.

But fear not, we got in early this morning and watched all the trailers because we’re professionals, and so we could go through them all on this week’s podcast.

We’ve also been playing a brilliant game called  Don’t Get Got, and there’s a brief Coverwatch update, which let’s face it – that’s why you’re here.

Remember, if you want to get in touch with the podcast, please do: ign_ukfeedback@ign.com

IGN UK Podcast #464: The Games Awards Got Got

Podcast: Mary Carillo Looks Ahead to 2019 Season, New Davis Cup Format

On this week’s episode, host Jon Wertheim talks with Mary Carillo about various tennis topics, including Davis Cup, the 2019 season and more.

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TV’s Take on the Hit Podcast Dirty John Is a Dirty Shame

True crime never goes out of style, but only in recent years has it become such a highbrow form. By embedding interrogations of identity, psychology and institutional corruption in real mysteries, the makers of Serial, The Jinx and Making a Murderer unleashed a deluge of tawdry tales with redeeming social value — or at least a veneer of it. But Dirty John, last year’s hit podcast about a California con artist written and hosted by Los Angeles Times writer Christopher Goffard, always felt different. A gripping work of nonfiction storytelling laced with chilling archival audio, it was framed more as domestic noir than as an inquiry into any larger issue.

A better TV adaptation might have excavated the story’s ample subtext about romance, faith and the failure of law enforcement to protect women from dangerous partners. But Bravo’s Dirty John, premiering on Nov. 25, leans into the salaciousness, splitting the difference between soap opera and crime re-enactments in the hysterical style of America’s Most Wanted. Directed by Jeff Reiner (The Affair), from a script by Desperate Housewives alum Alexandra Cunningham, it may be a conscious attempt at camp. But the show doesn’t even succeed at that; its incompetence isn’t entertaining.

The great Connie Britton, whose participation in this project is mystifying, plays heroine Debra Newell, a wealthy, well-preserved, churchgoing Southern California interior designer pushing 60. Though she’s been divorced four times, Debbie is still seeking her soul mate — and she finds him, or so she thinks, in hunky anesthesiologist John Meehan (Eric Bana). Fresh off a streak of bad dates, she overlooks some strange behavior on his part and shrugs off the suspicions of her daughters, Veronica (Juno Temple) and Terra (Julia Garner). As John works to isolate Debbie from her family, they dig into his murky past. The picture of a double life that emerges, bit by bit, would turn Don Draper’s whiskey-fortified blood to ice.

But this isn’t Mad Men. Goffard’s story incorporates so many elements poorly suited to a visual medium — phone calls, correspondence, the reporter’s own reflections — that they seem to overwhelm the script, which often awkwardly copies and pastes exchanges from the source material. A heated email becomes a ridiculous confrontation. Flowery phrases lifted from Goffard’s narration issue from the mouths of characters who aren’t poets.

Cunningham could’ve expanded the podcast’s intriguing but limited psychological portraits of Debbie and John. Instead, she flattens every character: Terra’s babyish utterances defy belief; Veronica is a spoiled brat; John is pure evil. Forced to imitate Newell’s high-pitched purr, even Britton does little to complicate a heroine defined by gullibility. Blandly luxurious sets and scenes that feel rushed bolster the impression that no one involved in this production wanted to spend a second longer on it than necessary.

All true-crime stories have to contend with the perennial criticism that the genre is exploitative. The best ones justify their existence by raising awareness of injustice or even, like Errol Morris’ 1988 film The Thin Blue Line, ensuring that justice is served. The worst mine real people’s pain for profit.

Goffard evidently had enough compassion for his subjects to eschew full-on schlockiness. If the creative forces behind Bravo’s Dirty John had felt the same obligation, they might have ended up with a decent show. What they’ve made instead fails as TV, sure — but it also fails the women whose lives have been affected by predatory men.


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Podcast: KHN’s ‘What The Health?’ Doctors, Guns And Lame Ducks

Election Day was Nov. 6, but results remain undetermined in some races at the state and federal levels. Nonetheless, it is already clear that the election could have major implications for health policy in 2019.

The current Congress is back in Washington for a lame-duck session, and while the budget for the Department of Health and Human Services is set for the fiscal year that began Oct. 1, other health bills, including ones addressing AIDS and bioterrorism, are on the to-do list.

This week’s panelists for KHN’s “What the Health?” are Julie Rovner of Kaiser Health News, Rebecca Adams of CQ Roll Call, Kimberly Leonard of the Washington Examiner and Alice Ollstein of Politico.

Among the takeaways from this week’s podcast:

  • With the political divide between a Republican Senate and a Democratic House, getting legislation passed in the next Congress may prove hard. But bipartisan support could arise for bills to protect consumers from surprise medical bills and, perhaps, to control some drug prices.
  • The House will likely spend much of its time exercising oversight responsibilities, including possible probes of the Trump administration’s policies on separating immigrant children from their parents, changes in health law rules for contraception coverage, changes in Medicaid and the administration’s decision not to defend the Affordable Care Act in a key court case.
  • Among the issues on state ballots this month was a constitutional amendment in Alabama that makes it state policy to “recognize and support the sanctity of unborn life and the rights of unborn children.” Although abortion opponents hail such “personhood” measures, they have been defeated in other states because they could impinge on infertility treatments, such as in vitro fertilization. It’s not clear whether the Alabama measure will be challenged in court because of that.
  • On the ballot in Oregon and Washington were industry-backed measures that would stop localities from instituting soda taxes. The effort failed in Oregon and passed in Washington.
  • During Congress’ current lame-duck session, members will be looking to pass an appropriations bill for parts of the government. Although HHS already got its appropriations bill, other health measures — such as the renewal of the PEPFAR global HIV initiative, grants for states on bioterrorism and pandemic planning, and changes to Medicare’s doughnut hole funding — could be added.
  • A tweet by the National Rifle Association urging doctors to keep out of the gun control debate and “stay in their lane” has provoked a furor from doctors, who say they must deal with the ramifications of a flawed policy.

Plus, for extra credit, the panelists recommend their favorite health stories of the week they think you should read, too:

Julie Rovner: The New York Times’ “When Hospitals Merge to Save Money, Patients Often Pay More,” by Reed Abelson

Rebecca Adams: The New York Times’ “Something Happened to U.S. Drug Costs in the 1990s,” by Austin Frakt

Kimberly Leonard: Harper’s Magazine’s “Discovery, Interrupted: How World War I Delayed a Treatment For Diabetes and Derailed One Man’s Chance at Immortality,” by Jeffrey Friedman

Alice Ollstein: The Incidental Economist‘s “The Trump Administration Targets the Contraception Mandate,” by Nicholas Bagley

To hear all our podcasts, click here.

And subscribe to What the Health? on iTunesStitcher or Google Play.

Kaiser Health News

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Podcast: KHN’s ‘What The Health?’ Split Decision On Health Care

Voters on Election Day gave control of the U.S. House to the Democrats but kept the U.S. Senate Republican. That will mean Republicans will no longer be able to pursue partisan changes to the Affordable Care Act or Medicare. But it also may mean that not much else will get done that does not have broad bipartisan support.

Then the day after the election, the Trump administration issued rules aimed at pleasing its anti-abortion backers. One would make it easier for employers to exclude birth control as a benefit in their insurance plans. The other would require health plans on the ACA exchanges that offer abortion as a covered service to bill consumers separately for that coverage.

This week’s panelists for KHN’s “What the Health?” are Julie Rovner of Kaiser Health News, Rebecca Adams of CQ Roll Call, Margot Sanger-Katz of The New York Times and Joanne Kenen of Politico.

Among the takeaways from this week’s podcast:

  • The Trump administration’s new contraception coverage rule comes after an earlier, stricter regulation was blocked by federal courts.
  • The insurance bills that the Trump administration is now requiring marketplace plans to send to customers for abortion coverage will be for such a small amount of money that they could become a nuisance and may persuade insurers to give up on the benefit.
  • House Democrats, when they take control in January, say they want to move legislation that will allow Medicare to negotiate drug prices. But fiscal experts say that may not have a big impact on costs unless federal officials are willing to limit the number of drugs that Medicare covers.
  • It appears that both Democrats and Republicans in Congress are interested in doing something to protect consumers from surprise medical bills. The issue, however, may fall to the back of the line given all the more pressing issues that Congress will face.
  • One of the big winners Tuesday was Medicaid. Three states approved expanding their programs, and in several other states new governors are interested in advancing legislation that would expand Medicaid.

Plus, for extra credit, the panelists recommend their favorite health stories of the week they think you should read, too:

Julie Rovner: Kaiser Health News’ “Hello? It’s I, Robot, And Have I Got An Insurance Plan For You!” by Barbara Feder Ostrov

Margot Sanger-Katz: Stat News’ “Life Span Has Little to Do With Genes, Analysis of Large Ancestry Database Shows,” by Sharon Begley

Joanne Kenen: The Washington Post’s “How Science Fared in the Midterm Elections,” by Ben Guarino and Sarah Kaplan

Rebecca Adams: The New Yorker’s “Why Doctors Hate Their Computers,” by Atul Gawande

To hear all our podcasts, click here.

And subscribe to What the Health? on iTunesStitcher or Google Play.

Kaiser Health News

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Black Enterprise Unveils New Money Podcast, “Your Money, Your Life”

Kicking off this month is a new personal finance podcast, Your Money, Your Life sponsored by Prudential. Black Enterprise’s own Alfred Edmond Jr. hosts this special series with a lineup of great guests including The Breakfast Club’s Angela Yee; DeForest B. Soaries Jr., founder of the dfree Financial Freedom Movement; Tiffany “The Budgetnista” Aliche; and Jacquette M. Timmons, president & CEO of Sterling Investment Management. The show will cover money topics ranging from how to control your debt to our psychological relationship with our finance. A can’t miss!

Podcast Page: https://www.blackenterprise.com/yourmoneyyourlife/

Go straight to: EPISODE 1

 

 

The post Black Enterprise Unveils New Money Podcast, “Your Money, Your Life” appeared first on Black Enterprise.

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Black Enterprise Unveils New Money Podcast, “Your Money, Your Life”

Kicking off this month is a new personal finance podcast, Your Money, Your Life sponsored by Prudential. Black Enterprise’s own Alfred Edmond Jr. hosts this special series with a lineup of great guests including The Breakfast Club’s Angela Yee; DeForest B. Soaries Jr., founder of the dfree Financial Freedom Movement; Tiffany “The Budgetnista” Aliche; and Jacquette M. Timmons, president & CEO of Sterling Investment Management. The show will cover money topics ranging from how to control your debt to our psychological relationship with our finance. A can’t miss!

Podcast Page: https://www.blackenterprise.com/yourmoneyyourlife/

Go straight to: EPISODE 1

 

 

The post Black Enterprise Unveils New Money Podcast, “Your Money, Your Life” appeared first on Black Enterprise.

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Podcast: KHN’s ‘What The Health?’ Open Enrollment And A Midterm Preview

Nov. 1 marks the start of Open Enrollment for people buying their own coverage for 2019 in most states. Despite the turmoil surrounding the Affordable Care Act, most consumers will have more choices and mostly flat — and in some cases lower — premiums.

What will happen to the health law going forward, however, will depend largely on what happens in the midterm elections Tuesday. Important health decisions will result not just from which party controls the U.S. House and Senate, but who wins governorships and comes to control state legislatures as well.

This week’s panelists for KHN’s “What the Health?” are Julie Rovner of Kaiser Health News, Anna Edney of Bloomberg News, Margot Sanger-Katz of The New York Times and Joanne Kenen of Politico.

Among the takeaways from this week’s podcast:

  • With changes in the ACA marketplace for 2019, it will be very important for consumers to look at the variety of options. Those earning less than 200 percent of the federal poverty level (just under $ 24,300 for an individual) are likely well served by silver plans on the federal health law’s exchanges. But the choices for benefits and prices are much more complicated for people earning more than that.
  • People who don’t get insurance through work or the government and earn too much to qualify for premium subsidies under the health law might be tempted to try the new, less-expensive short-term plans being touted by the Trump administration. But they should be cautious and consider two major downsides: The plans likely won’t cover preexisting conditions, and the benefits will be skimpier than those of ACA plans. For example, many short-term plans are expected not to cover mental health and maternity services or prescription drugs.
  • Federal officials announced Wednesday that Wisconsin could implement work requirements for some Medicaid enrollees. They also said, however, that the state could not begin drug testing for the enrollees.
  • If Democrats take control of the House or Senate, it’s possible that they could work with President Donald Trump on some specific issues, especially efforts to bring down drug prices or consumer protections against surprise medical bills.
  • Perhaps the biggest change that could come from the election results is an increase in the number of states that expand Medicaid under a provision of the ACA. Seventeen states have not taken that step, but several deep-red states in the West have the question on their ballots, and the outcomes from governors’ races in other states could also lead to expansion.

Rovner also interviews Barbara Feder Ostrov, who wrote the latest “Bill of the Month” feature for Kaiser Health News and NPR. It’s about a California college professor whose skin rash led to a $ 48,000 bill for allergy skin testing. You can read the story here.

If you have a medical bill you would like NPR and KHN to investigate, you can submit it here.

Plus, for extra credit, the panelists recommend their favorite health stories of the week they think you should read, too:

Julie Rovner: The Washington Post and Kaiser Health News’ “For The Disabled, A Doctor’s Visit Can Be Literally An Obstacle Course — And The Laws Can’t Help,” by Rachel Bluth.

Anna Edney: Bloomberg Businessweek’s “Your DNA Is Out There. Do You Want Law Enforcement Using It?” by Drake Bennett and Kristen V Brown.

Margot Sanger-Katz: The Federalist’s “How An Obscure Regulatory Change Could Transform American Health Insurance,” by Christopher Jacobs.

Joanne Kenen: The Atlantic’s “The Harder, Better, Faster, Stronger Language Of Dieting,” by Amanda Mull.

To hear all our podcasts, click here.

And subscribe to What the Health? on iTunesStitcher or Google Play.

Kaiser Health News

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Podcast: WTA CEO Steve Simon on New TV Rights Deal, Year-End Championships and More

On this week’s episode, WTA CEO Steve Simon addresses the new Tennis Channel TV deal and discusses top storylines as the Tour nears the end of the season.

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A Podcast Network Putting the Spotlight on Women Who Amassed Millions

After two years of hosting Switch, Pivot or Quit, a widely popular podcast, Ahyiana Angel gained two valuable insights that inspired her to launch Mayzie Media, a podcast network for women.

I realized male-led shows dominated the podcast charts and the news headlines,” said Angel. “I also noticed a trend on social media with women asking their communities for podcast recommendations with a female lead or host. They were very vocal about being tired of the same dude style talk and content dominating the space and as a result controlling our narratives. Oftentimes, new podcasts have a hard time breaking through to the masses because the discovery of new programs is challenging. My logic was to create a hub where those who want podcasts produced with their interests in mind can have a sole location for discovery and entertainment.”

With a focus on providing podcasts in the categories of inspiration and self-care; society and culture; and business, Mayzie Maydie has a refreshing line-up of programming.

A Milli, the first podcast to launch under the network, takes listeners behind the scenes with women who have amassed a minimum of 1 million in funding, sales, subscribers, net worth, etc. in business. These are dynamic women who collectively have more than $ 60 million in annual revenue, 5 million in social followers, and have amassed more than $ 116 million in funding. Special guests include Janice Bryant Howroyd, founder and CEO of The ACT-1 Group with a reported net worth of $ 420 million; Lindsey Andrews, co-founder of Minibar Delivery, the direct-to-consumer wine, beer, and liquor delivery service with $ 5 million in funding; Myleik Teele, founder and chief experience officer of beauty subscription brand curlBOX; and Sabena Suri, co-founder and CSO of BOXFOX a premier gift-giving company.

Book’d is the next show set to launch. This podcast features authors of new releases in self-help, personal development, and more. The authors are not only talking about their book projects but also sharing their writing process and personal stories as well.

Beyond spotlighting the entrepreneurial process, sales. and success metrics, Mayzie Media is looking to make an impact from having uncomfortable conversations. “I want to make it easy for women to explore programming which speaks to the issues they are discussing on ladies night like: “how the hell did I get ghosted” or “how do I navigate being a new mom after maternity leave,” says Angel. “I also want to highlight the stories that need to be told like the accounts of women who have suffered due to the disturbing practice of sex trafficking, and addressing common themes that come up as professionals: managing money, getting the promotion you deserve, or navigating a micro-manager. I like to say Mayzie Media is a digital brunch date with your girls: fun, fulfilling, and empowering.”

Even major networks such as Spotify are embracing the power of women as podcast listeners and consumers. Recently, the music streaming service announced an initiative to amplify female voices of color through the power of podcast.

“With 18,000 women applying to the Spotify Sound Up Bootcamp I think it was a clear message that we can show up in large numbers, we want to be heard, we have ideas, and we are ready to make our presence felt in podcasting. The response to the boot camp also showed that if you speak to us we will show up,  shine, and glow up. It also proves my gut feeling that the interest is there but the mainstream opportunities are not plentiful. Spotify also launched a very similar program in the UK and I would like to think that it was in response to the overwhelming interest that women showed in the States. I’m excited at the idea of all 18,000 aspiring creators having a network to rally behind them like Mayzie Media,” said Angel.

Advertising spending in podcasting is forecast to grow from $ 326 million in 2018 to $ 534 million in 2020. With 61% of podcast listeners reportedly buying something they heard about on a podcast ad, it’s no mystery that major players in the podcast industry are cutting larger checks for female talent and signing breakout talent to other media related deals as a result of podcasting. Ultimately, there is significant revenue potential in pairing the influence of women with podcasting.

The post A Podcast Network Putting the Spotlight on Women Who Amassed Millions appeared first on Black Enterprise.

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