Great places to see wildlife in the UK: readers’ travel tips

Wildlife can thrive in city centres, as well as in reserves, wild moors and remote islands; you just need to know what to look out for, say our tipsters

Cuckoos, kingfishers, water voles, marsh harriers, seals and fantastic views from the coffee shop: inside the M25! Take a bow, Rainham RSPB reserve. A two-mile walk around the reserve (which is only a 20-minute stroll from Purfleet station) yields rich rewards, and even spectacular views of Eurostar trains. Spring is particularly noisy, with warblers of all sorts, and winter, with large flocks of lapwings and a gazillion ducks, is spectacular. There are also rare bearded tits, comfortable hides, simple walking, kids’ events and a great coffee shop with a small playground. The Thames views are wonderful: the sun filling the cafeteria, which has huge windows over the reserve and the river with basking seals, makes one forget the nearby big smoke.
rspb.org.uk
Dan

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Travel | The Guardian

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Some of the Top Things Readers Bought Recently…

collage of items bought for work April 2019As per reader requests, we’ve started rounding up some of the top things readers have bought recently — so here are some of the most-purchased items from April 2019! See the whole series here. 

Pictured at top: blazer / cardigan/ dress / pink heels / beige heels

This post contains affiliate links and Corporette® may earn commissions for purchases made through links in this post. Thank you so much for your support! For more details see here, including lots of details about privacy and the analytics.  

Clothes for Work Bought in April 2019

Pictured: NIC+ZOE Wonderstretch Straight Leg Pants

Pictured: Karen Kane Cascade Faux Wrap Dress

Pictured: Maggy London Scallop Sheath Dress

Pictured: Leith Pleated Surplice Dress (only lucky sizes left, but this skirt is similar)

Pictured: Gibson x Hi Sugarplum! Palm Springs Festival Maxi Dress (Regular, Petite, and Plus)

Pictured: Halogen® Long Linen Blend Cardigan (Regular, Petite and Plus Sizes)

Pictured: Caslon® Ballet Neck Cotton & Modal Knit Elbow Sleeve Tee (Regular, Petite & Plus Sizes)

Pictured: Madewell Texture & Thread Wrap Top

Pictured: Whisper Cotton V-Neck Pocket Tee 

 

Pictured: NIC+ZOE Day to Night Top (Regular, Petite & Plus Sizes)

Pictured: BP. Linen Blend Camisole Top (Regular and Plus Sizes)

Pictured: Gibson Cozy Ribbed Cardigan (Regular & Petite)

Pictured: Gibson Notch Collar Cotton Blend Blazer (Regular, Petite & Plus Sizes)

Pictured: Topshop Chuck On Blazer

 

Pictured: Boden Addlestone Blazer

Pictured: Graceful Expectations Cap Sleeve 

Pictured: Everlane Silk Blouses

Pictured: Everlane Pima Stretch Midsleeve

Pictured: Loft Stretch Cotton Clean Cami

Accessories for Work Bought in April 2019

Pictured: DKNY Light Opaque Control Top Tights (2 for $ 25)

Pictured: Giorgio Armani Luminous Silk Foundation

Pictured: NARS Blush

Pictured: Trotters Kari Pointy Toe Pump (Women)

Pictured: Nine West Eugene Pointy Toe Pump (Women)

Pictured: Everlane Day Heel

Pictured: Rothy’s The Point
((Need a $ 20-off code? Try this one.)

Pictured: Malena Driving Loafer (Women)

Pictured: Target Laser Cut Tote Handbag

 

 

The post Some of the Top Things Readers Bought Recently… appeared first on Corporette.com.

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Speech recognition technology is not a solution for poor readers

Could artificial intelligence be a solution for people who cannot read well (functional illiterates) or those who cannot read at all (complete illiterates)? According to psycholinguists, speech technology should never replace learning how to read. Researchers argue that literacy leads to a better understanding of speech because good readers are good at predicting words.
Literacy News — ScienceDaily

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Canal and river boat holidays in Europe: readers’ travel tips

From navigating quiet forest rivers in Germany to chugging along France’s canals fuelled by cheese and wine, our tipsters explore idyllic waterways

Winning tip: Burgundy Canal, France
This waterway winds past chateaux and vineyards that will tempt you to stop everywhere. Pick up a barge at Chagny and follow the canal south – stock up with cheese, bread and wine for lunch as many locks close from noon to 2pm. Waking to dawn sunlight on the water and sitting on deck with a glass of Chablis (but not necessarily at dawn!) are pleasures we quickly got used to.
Several companies rent boats at Chagny from about €1,300 a week and sleeping 10, including Locaboat and Happy Charter
Nigel

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Travel | The Guardian

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20 great agriturismos and farm stays in Europe: readers’ tips

The agriturismo movement started in Italy but readers have had breaks on working farms from France to Iceland and Croatia to Crete

This country is dotted with amazing organic farm stays but we love Pri Plajerju in the Trenta valley. There’s something pure and timeless about Slovenia and this farm. It has self-catering apartments, but we sleep in the hayloft – it’s incredibly good value. The hay beds are warm and cosy and it’s magical after a day walking the Soča trail. The mountain scenery is mind-blowing; you can help feed the animals in the morning, and the home-cooked food is fresh, filling and always served with a smile. It almost makes me want to move to the country.
Apartments from €70, barn beds €15pp, eko-plajer.com
Jo

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Travel | The Guardian

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Some of the Top Things Readers Bought Recently…

Our last roundup of the top things readers have bought recently was pretty popular, so … here are some of the most-purchased items from March 2019!

This post contains affiliate links and Corporette® may earn commissions for purchases made through links in this post. Thank you so much for your support! For more details see here, including lots of details about privacy and the analytics.  

Shoes for Work Bought in March 2019

Pictured above: CC Corso Como® ‘Del’ Pump (on sale! $ 69)

 

Pictured above: Marc Fisher LTD ‘Zala’ Pump (on sale! $ 79–$ 159)

Pictured above: Sam Edelman Hazel Pointy Toe Pump ($ 119–$ 139)

Pictured above: Michael Michael Kors Dorothy Flex Pump ($ 99)

Pictured above: SARTO by Franco Sarto Candid Genuine Calf Hair Pump (on sale! $ 49) 

Pictured above: Cole Haan Tali Grand Bow Wedge 65 (on sale! $ 108)

Pictured above: Rothy’s Washable Flats 
(Need a $ 20-off code? Try this one.)

Clothes for Work Bought in March 2019

Pictured above: Nic+Zoe Wonderstretch Straight Leg Pants (Regular & Petite) (on sale! $ 94–$ 128) 

Pictured above: Caslon® Ballet Neck Cotton & Modal Knit Elbow Sleeve Tee (Regular & Petite) ($ 29)

 

Pictured above: NYDJ Stretch Knit Trousers (Regular & Petite) (on sale! $ 61–$ 119)

 

Pictured above: Liverpool Knit Boyfriend Blazer ($ 98)

Pictured above: Vince Camuto Rumple Fabric Blouse ($ 74)

Pictured above: Leith Button Detail Wrap Top ($ 69)

Pictured above: Gibson V-Neck Shell (Regular & Petite) ($ 49)

Pictured above: Vince Camuto Sleeveless Rumple Blouse (on sale! $ 41–$ 69; now plus sizes only)

 

Pictured above: Vince Camuto Asymmetrical Hem Scuba Crepe Dress (Regular & Petite) ($ 138)

Pictured above: J.Crew Sophie Wrap Sweater Blazer (Regular & Plus Size) ($ 158)

Pictured above: Tailored by Rebecca Taylor Clean Suiting Blazer ($ 395)

Pictured above: Tailored by Rebecca Taylor Clean Suiting Trousers ($ 275)

Pictured above: Pleated V-Neck Mixed Media Top (on sale! $ 12.99–$ 17.99)

Pictured above: Everlane Clean Silk Boatneck ($ 98)

Pictured above: Boden Peggy Top (on sale! $ 60–$ 80)

Pictured above: Alfani Shawl-Collar Knit Blazer
(Now sold out — try this one from Soft Joie at Nordstrom instead.)

Pictured above: Express Mid Rise Skinny Rainbow Stripe Ponte Pants
(Now sold out — try these from Aviator Nation at Nordstrom instead.)

Pictured above: MM.LaFleur Merritt Jardigan ($ 225)

The post Some of the Top Things Readers Bought Recently… appeared first on Corporette.com.

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10 of the best city B&Bs in Europe: readers’ travel tips

After wolfing down breakfast at these comfy B&Bs, our tipsters were ready to explore the town – often with top recommendations from their hosts

Outside the city centre but only 20 minutes or so by bus, this B&B is beautifully furnished and great value. One of the best reasons to stay here is Yolande, the friendly owner, who couldn’t do enough for us. She recommended great restaurants and gave us tips on what to see in Bordeaux. Her incredible breakfast spread, complete with homemade jam, was the best breakfast I’ve had in France, and that’s saying something. Bordeaux is a fantastic city – a cleaner, friendlier and warmer version of Paris.
Doubles from €80, laferrade.com
Helena

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Travel | The Guardian

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Readers beware: I was scammed by a ticket scalper — don’t make my mistake

Readers: I was cheated out of a couple hundred dollars recently by a ticket broker and I wanted to share the experience with you. What can you learn from this? Even Dear John can get stung when he isn’t at his best and isn’t paying full attention. Here’s what happened. I was buying a ticket…
Business | New York Post

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20 of the best pubs in Ireland: readers’ tips

To celebrate St Patrick’s Day, readers salute the idyllic locations, great music, bonhomie and creamy stout of the island’s brilliant pubs

On a good night, the Tin Pub on the Sheep’s Head peninsula is a dangerous place. The name comes from the sheets of corrugated iron holding it together around a concrete floor and a small wooden bar that serves Murphy’s and a cocktail called Cormac on the Beach, named after the red-headed barman. The garden runs down to the sea and a view to the hills of the Mizen. That good night can be a few men playing guitars and then some singing starts, and suddenly it is an early morning walk home.
On Facebook
Ralph

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Travel | The Guardian

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Some of the Top Things Readers Bought Recently…

Readers were asking recently for a round-up of some of the top things that l;l’readers have bought recently… these were some of the most-purchased items from January 2019!

This post contains affiliate links and Corporette® may earn commissions for purchases made through links in this post. Thank you so much for your support! For more details see here, including lots of details about privacy and the analytics.  

And now for some of the top clothes for work and play that were bought in January 2019…

Clothes for Work Bought in January 2019

Pictured above: Vince Camuto Ponte Ankle Pants (Regular, Petite & Plus) ($ 75-$ 99)

Pictured above: KUT from the Kloth Diana Stretch Corduroy Skinny Pants (Regular, Petite & Plus) (cords sold out but lots of jeans $ 39-$ 98)

The post Some of the Top Things Readers Bought Recently… appeared first on Corporette.com.

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10 of the best activity holidays worldwide: readers’ travel tips

Kayaking, cycling, running and hiking from the Andes to Iran … Our tipsters aren’t content with a book and deckchair

For climbing and scrambling with a twist head to Le Bourg-d’Oisans in the French Alps south-east of Grenoble. Stay in one of the many campsites (Le Château de Rochetaillée is excellent) before finding La Montagne Sports shop in town who will kit you out for €10 per day with everything you need for the area’s seven spectacular via ferrata routes. On another day, head an hour’s drive west to Alpes du Grand Serre and experience the thrill of scrambling, climbing and traversing along rock, over a raging river and coming out at the top into a beautiful alpine meadow with rosy cheeks and a spring in your tired step. If you enjoyed this, head next to Cascade de la Fare in Vaujany, just half an hour north of Le Bourg. This is a step up and includes two long bridges over a ravine and an ascent to a waterfall with sensational views.
Karen Abell

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Travel | The Guardian

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10 life-changing retreats worldwide: readers’ travel tips

In havens from Inverness to India, readers have discovered their better selves through yoga, meditation and writing courses

Dhanakosa, on the banks of beautiful Loch Voil, near Balquhidder in central Scotland, is truly a place to stop, breathe, unwind and take stock. Amid the glorious scenery, you eat delicious, healthy vegetarian meals (and can even take a recipe book home), do yoga, hill walk, learn to meditate or reinvigorate your practice and your life. It’s the perfect place to come if you just want some time out to reset yourself. I’ve come here for the weekend and for a week. They operate on the Buddhist principle of Dana or generosity. You pay the deposit of £75 (for a week) or £50 (weekend) and then from a suggested scale (from £285 to £445 for a week). It’s a magical place.
dhanakosa.com
Carolann

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Travel | The Guardian

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Readers’ best travel discoveries of 2018: your top tips

What an adventurous lot you are! Your 2018 highlights include mountain treks, centuries-old communities and exotic wildlife. Read on for 2019 inspiration …

The highlight of our fabulous week in Mull in June was our accommodation. A mile along a coastal path, Rubha nan Gall lighthouse cottage is off grid, but apart from not being able to use a hair dryer, you wouldn’t know it. The four en suite double bedrooms were furnished to a high standard and the kitchen well-equipped. The views past the lighthouse to the Ardnamurchan peninsula, not to mention the dolphin we saw just offshore, made this one of our favourite places ever.
Sleeps six, £158 a night, airbnb.co.uk
Mary Bythell

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Travel | The Guardian

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Readers’ travel photography competition: December winners

Our final selection of the year ranges from New York cops to Venice shops, camel fairs to penguins. Scroll to see the winner – chosen by Mick Ryan of fotoVUE – who receives a £200 voucher for an i-escape holiday property. The overall 2018 prize is a trip to Greenland with Wild Photography Holidays

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Travel | The Guardian

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Best vegan restaurants in the UK: readers’ travel tips

With influences ranging from Van Gogh to Asia, these vegan venues serve up arty as well as delicious food – on beaches, buses … and in an underpass

Bundobust is fast becoming a Leeds institution for food lovers of all persuasions. Everything is veggie, and a large proportion of the menu is vegan, with an easy vegan sharing menu for two a great way in. From the okra fries dusted in black salt and mango powder (genius) to the chole dal and masala dosa, its south Indian street food, craft beer and Asian-inspired cocktails are a winning combo. With dishes from £4-6.50 it’s also easy on the wallet, so you can try a bit of everything.
bundobust.com
Laura King

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Travel | The Guardian

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Independent cinemas in the UK: readers’ travel tips

Over 1,500 of you recommended indie picture houses. Here are the top 10 – in stations, warehouses and rural villages

Campbeltown Picture House on the Kintyre peninsula is amazing. Recently refurbished, it has retained all of its original charm (it has been a functioning cinema since 1913) but is now a welcoming, contemporary space offering two screens and a cafe. Screen 1 will blow you away with its atmospheric ceiling and half-timbered “wee house” features. It shows all the latest releases, great classics and streamed live theatre. It is a fantastic cultural hub in a remote, rural area and testament to the relentless hard work of the volunteers who fund-raised to get the refurbishment project off the ground.
Adult from £7, campbeltownpicturehouse.co.uk
Emma Macalister Hall

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Travel | The Guardian

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Spooky places to visit in the UK this Halloween: readers’ travel tips

Serious history collides with fond imaginings in our tipsters’ tales of the unexplained, from a Spanish Armada wreck to a snuffling ghost pooch

Windhouse, on Yell, is probably Shetland’s most haunted house. Last year, two 13th-century skeletons were uncovered at this 18th-century ruin, which is reputedly haunted by a lady in silk, a man in a top hat, a servant girl and a dog. There are reports of skeletal remains of a woman, man and child found in separate incidents between the 1880s and 1900s, as well as the story of the shipwrecked sailor who spent a night in the house one Christmas and had to fight off a monster with an axe. The house can be visited for free anytime – and if you’re feeling brave, the gatehouse is now run as a camping pod by Shetland Amenity Trust (£12pp, sleeps 8, Mar-Oct).
Charlotte

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Travel | The Guardian

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Readers And Tweeters: Are Millennials Killing The Primary Care Doctor?

Letters to the Editor is a periodic feature. We welcome all comments and will publish a selection. We edit for length and clarity and require full names.


Health Care Wasted On The Young

I feel Sandra Boodman’s thesis is inadequate without a historical comparison to how young people accessed health care five, 10 or 20 years ago (“Spurred By Convenience, Millennials Often Spurn The ‘Family Doctor’ Model,” Oct. 9). As a family medicine doctor practicing for 33 years, my experience is that healthy young people use medical services only for urgent care and pregnancy until they develop chronic conditions. And, as a society in general, we have become more demanding about receiving services “now.”

Why should medical care not change as our expectations change? Certainly we have the technological ability to provide a portable health record one could take from site to site to improve continuity. We also have the ability to have a single electronic medical record or shared information hub so one’s health info can be accessed by any provider anywhere.

However, demanding “now” care at any convenient site does not allow one provider to get to know a person in a way to better inform them of how that individual’s situation (emotional-social-economic) impacts their health. So, convenience has its price.

— Dr. Kevin Walsh, Ellensburg, Wash.


Family physician Ajoy Kumar of Florida led a lively debate on Twitter and, in a series of tweets, emphasized how important it is to build doctor-patient relationships early because “nobody is young and healthy forever.”

— Dr. Ajoy Kumar, St. Petersburg, Fla.


It’s not so much the new generation as it is the age group. I didn’t have a primary care physician from the time I entered university until I was 42. I also only went to the doctor when I had a particular problem to deal with. Even back then (25-30 years ago), a $ 200 deductible meant I could pay for insurance but could not afford to use it for anything other than a dire emergency. Of course, back then almost everything was traditional indemnity, so we all paid full-freight unless you were covered by one of the nascent HMOs (which often controlled costs by denying care).

— Brenda F. Bell, North Plainfield, N.J.


Another primary care doctor bemoaned the trend as part of a larger move away from generalized medicine:

— Dr. Holly Mitchell, Amarillo, Texas


As long as we are talking about new models for medicine, here’s a plea for “human-centered design thinking”:

— Julie Schilz, Northglenn, Colo.


Laryngitis On The Campaign Trail?

It isn’t surprising that health care is a priority issue for voters (“Health Care Tops Guns, Economy As Voters’ Top Iissue,” Oct. 18). After all, the chief cause of personal bankruptcy is medical bills. Nor is it surprising that voters have not heard much about health care from midterm election candidates, who know the future success or failure of the health system and their political futures depend on how they respond to voters’ top concerns. It is much safer for our political leaders to leave the administration of the health system to the insurance companies.

But, so far, private insurers have shown they are more concerned with shareholders’ concerns than patients’. The result is a fragmented, impersonal health system overrun by multiple insurance plans, each with different copays, deductibles and insurance panels — where doctors are held captive by insurers’ regulations. If we vote people into office because we believe they will respond to our needs, why are so many of them so quiet on health care?

— Dr. Edward Volpintesta, Bethel, Conn.


Metrics Show Medicaid Is True To Its Mission

Both Medicaid enrollees and taxpayers see real results from Medicaid health plans — despite contrary claims (“As Billions In Tax Dollars Flow To Private Medicaid Plans, Who’s Minding The Store?” Oct. 19). Medicaid plans are held to high standards by the states, improving health, quality and savings for millions of Americans, including children, veterans, seniors and people with disabilities.

Medicaid plans run many programs to improve patient health — driving quality, coordinating care, and helping patients stay compliant with treatment. The vast majority of every Medicaid dollar pays for care, while Medicaid plan profit margins average less than 2 percent.

Medicaid plans report metrics that are made public. Results show that insurance providers saved states about $ 7 billion in 2016 alone — helping states realize the highest value for their Medicaid investment. Research shows that Medicaid enrollees have access to care that is similar to those who have coverage through their jobs, and are satisfied with their coverage.

Medicaid serves nearly 75 million Americans. Insurance providers know that Medicaid must work for those who rely on it — and the hardworking taxpayers who pay for it. We are committed to working together to ensure that Medicaid is effective, affordable and accountable.

— Matt Eyles, president and CEO of America’s Health Insurance Plans (AHIP), Washington, D.C.


A tweeter reading the same story noted the outsize level of Medicaid oversight compared with that of corporate America.

— Fran Quigley, Indianapolis


Imagine No Big Pharma

I know that we are all supposed to think the pharmaceutical industry is the savior of our country and that without them life itself would not be possible. What if we instead began to think of them as just the manufacturers of medication? What if we did our own drug research (maybe researching medication to treat millions instead of medication to make millions) and collected bids from every drug manufacturer for production only? What if we used tax dollars to pay for the manufacturing of the medications, and patients had to pay only a token pharmacy fee? I wonder what that would look like.

— Dr. David Herring, Staunton, Va.


Unamusing Cartoon

The publication by Kaiser Health News of a Nick Anderson cartoon with the caption “Inadequate Mental Health Services” above a picture of a prescription bottle reading “RX for Violence” from which bullets spill forth, is both surprising and deeply disappointing (‘Alternative Treatment’? Oct. 18).

How easy it is to imply that gun violence, indeed violence of any type, is largely attributable to untreated or undertreated, mental health conditions. But the facts, which I and millions of readers have come to expect from KHN, say otherwise. Mass shootings, the thought of which this cartoon invokes, account for less than 1 percent of gun violence, and for which mental health is a factor in but a small minority of cases. And while suicides are in fact increasing, and 85% of completed suicides involve guns, this too is only a small fraction (about 2%) of gun violence in the U.S.

It would be expected that KHN editors would be familiar with the oft-cited statistic that only about 4% of all violence may be attributed to people with serious mental illness, and the fact people with mental health conditions are far more likely to fall victim to violence than to perpetuate it against others.

As a trusted source of factual news, it is shocking that Kaiser would perpetuate and reinforce the erroneous, albeit widely held belief, that mental illness (treated or not) equates to gun violence.

— Debbie Plotnick, vice president for mental health and systems advocacy, Mental Health America, Alexandria, Va. 


I appreciate the perspective that inadequate mental health services can lead to negative consequences for the individual and, ultimately, for society. However, the implied connection between mental illness and violence is unfairly stigmatizing and not supported by evidence. In addition, the use of a prescription bottle seems to suggest that medication is the prescription for “adequate mental health services,” which vastly oversimplifies the need for a range of services that should be included in an effective, comprehensive system of care. I hope that you will consider removing this cartoon from your website, as it is harmful to engaging and truly supporting people with mental health needs.

— Jenifer Urff, Northampton, Mass.


A Call For Deeper Reporting

I was disappointed by Phil Galewitz’s reporting on the negative aspects of Medicare Advantage HMOs (“Medicare Advantage Plans Shift Their Financial Risk To Doctors,” Oct. 8), although it was nice that he quoted me and that you incorporated “risk shifting” into the headline. Galewitz cites a Health Affairs report but should have mentioned years of reports by the Government Accountability Office and the Medicare Advisory Payment Commission detailing overpayments and risk analysis and overpayments. There is a big dark side to Medicare Advantage plans that patients/consumers do not understand. They think it’s all about “free” care. It is hard to sue these HMOs for medical malpractice and failure to coordinate and manage care — which is what they promise to do. Medicare Advantage needs more critical reporting.

—Dr. Brant S. Mittler, San Antonio, Texas


For a Georgia reader, the story raised more questions:

— Colleen Mahaney, Woodstock, Ga.


On Shooting Down Sky-High Bills …

We in Montana were frustrated in our process to address the balance billing issues for air ambulance, with little success (“Will Congress Bring Sky-High Air Ambulance Bills Down To Earth?” Sept. 27). But the issue arises from insurance companies inserting a coverage cap in the policy, stacking deductibles for in- and out-of-network carriers. Much about this issue is aimed at air companies. They are solely responsible for their charge practices. But insurers also share the responsibility for their decisions to put those who are insured at risk as they seek to constrain premiums by policy design.

— Bob Olsen, Helena, Mont.


… And Missing The Mark?

The Oct. 19 Facebook Live broadcast (“Facebook Live: What About Those Sky-High Air Ambulance Bills?”) failed to note critical facts and provided misinformation. Alarmingly, this may cause patients to question whether they should board an air medical flight even when their physicians or first responder requests the transport based on patient need. We’d like to set the record straight.

1. Insurance Coverage

FACT: Dr. Naveed Kahn’s insurer’s payment was far lower than the actual bill, and air medical services, like all health care providers, are required by federal law to “balance bill” the patient the remainder. Dr. Kahn’s insurance company failed to adequately cover his bill.

[Editor’s note: KHN’s coverage did not focus on the mechanics of “balance billing,” but rather the prohibitive amount of the original bill.]

2. State Regulation

FACT: States can and do regulate air ambulances. Court decisions and Department of Transportation opinions have reaffirmed states’ authority to regulate all medical aspects of air medical transportation. This includes standards and coordination of patient care, including protocols controlling which air medical operator is called to a scene. Air medical operators never self-dispatch; they are called by trained first responders and medical personnel, operating under state authority.

3. Medicare Fee Schedule

FACT: The implementation of the Medicare Fee schedule did not increase rates for air ambulance services; it changed the way air ambulances are reimbursed, increasing the rates for some and dramatically decreasing the rates for others. While the data demonstrates the industry has grown over the last 37 years, according to “An Economic Analysis of the U.S. Rotary Wing Air Medical Transport Industry”, 22 of those growth years occurred before the implementation of the Medicare Fee Schedule.

Industry growth, over a 30-year period, reflects growth in demand for air medical transport services in response to continued closures of rural hospitals and trauma centers. Air ambulances are filling that gap — more aircraft means better coverage and better outcomes.

— Carter Johnson, SOAR (Save Our Air Medical Resources) Campaign, Washington, D.C.

Kaiser Health News

BEST DEAL UPDATE:

The $12 fast wireless charger our readers love is back in stock on Amazon

Fast Wireless Charger For iPhone XS

We have covered the Yootech Fast Wireless Charger a few different times here in the BGR Deals section and it inevitably sells out every time. The reason is pretty obvious: fast wireless chargers can easily cost between $ 30 and $ 50 — heck, Google’s new charger costs $ 80! — but the Yootech model is only $ 12. If you have a phone that supports fast wireless charging, definitely pick one up while they’re still in stock.

Yootech Wireless Charger Qi-Certified 7.5W Wireless Charging Compatible iPhone XS MAX/XR/XS/X/8…: $ 11.99

Here’s what you need to know from the product page:

  • 【5W, 7.5W and 10 W WIRELESS CHARGING MODELS】 5W model *Using 5V,2A adapter is for Any Qi-enabled devices like iPhone X/8/8 plus Samsung Galaxy S9/S9 Plus and other Qi-enabled phones; 7.5W model *Using QC2.0/QC3.0 adapter (9V,1.67A) is ONLY compatible with iPhone 8/ iPhone 8 plus/iPhone X so far. 10 W model *Using QC2.0/QC3.0 adapter(9V,1.67A) is ONLY for Samsung Galaxy S8/ S8plus/S7/S7 edge/S6 edge plus/Note 5 series devices so far. Please use the most appropriate adapters for best results.
  • 【INTELLIGENT PROTECT TECHNOLOGY】Exclusive Multifunctional Intelligent Protect Technology provides temperature control, surge protection, short-circuit prevention, and more. 0.43in thickness design plus intelligent Temperature control system ensure cooler but more efficient charging. To get better experience, we would like you to take off the phone case and use our recommended adapters (NOT INCLUDED) and cables.
  • 【IMPORTNAT NOTICE】 PLEASE NOTE THAT CHARGING WITH PHONE CASE (ESPECIALLY over 4mm ONE) MAY INFLUENCE THE CHARGING SPEED OR EVEN RESULT IN CHARGING INTERMITTENTLY OR DISCONTINUED. Basically Yootech wireless charger works with Rubber/Plastic/TPU Cases etc.;MUST be within 4mm thin.【IF INDICATOR LIGHT KEEPS BLINKING】Please check phone’s back(or case) is not attached with any iron, metal,coins,IC Cards,bank cards, magnetic absorbers and other metal objects in the charging detective area.
  • 【SLEEP-FRIENDLY】Yootech smart indicator design is for your enjoying life more. GREEN LED indicator will light up for 3 seconds if power source is connected, while LED light will turn on for 16 seconds if recognizes your phone well (Please site your phone at the center of the pad correctly). Entering charging model, light turns off and keeps the whole charging process SLEEP-FRIENDLY.
  • 【PACKAGE & WARRANTY】You will get 1 x Qi Wireless Charger Pad, 1 x 3.3ft Micro USB Cable, 1 x User Manner. Hassle free 18 months money back/replacement warranty with 12-hour response service is friendly offered. At Yootech, ZERO Risk purchase guarantee is for every customer’s smiles.

BGR Top Deals:

  1. Amazon sale drops Alexa-enabled smart LED bulbs as low as $ 10, today only
  2. Add wireless charging to your old iPhone for $ 17 instead of spending $ 1,000 to upgrade

Trending Right Now:

  1. Now there’s something wrong with NASA’s Chandra spacecraft, too
  2. Apple’s next-gen iPad Pro models may be the thinnest we’ve ever seen
  3. No kitchen is complete without this $ 60 vacuum sealer that’ll save you hundreds each year

The $ 12 fast wireless charger our readers love is back in stock on Amazon originally appeared on BGR.com on Mon, 15 Oct 2018 at 09:00:24 EDT. Please see our terms for use of feeds.


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All Deals on HP, Dell and Lenovo!