The Incredible Saga of Tracy Edwards: A Real-Life Female Superhero Who Sailed Around the World

Sony Pictures Classics

In 1989, the first-ever all-female team entered the Whitbread Race to sail around the world. Everyone, from the (male) sailors who scoffed at their efforts to the (male) journalists who took bets on how far they’d make it, was convinced that they would never finish. But the Maiden team, led by the indefatigable Tracy Edwards, not only completed the race but won two legs of it.

On paper, the story of the Maiden yacht reads like documentary catnip. On screen, reanimated through old media clips and exclusive on-board footage, salty shots of the ship pummeling the water and a deck full of women the moment when they realize that they’ve taken the lead, it somehow manages to exceed expectations. Alex Holmes’ Maiden is fun to watch on so many different levels, whether it’s witnessing world-class athletes push their bodies past what even they thought possible or listening to a bunch of old men admit, on the record, that they were wrong to ridicule and underestimate them. At 22, Tracy Edwards decided to put together an all-female crew to sail around the world. Thirty years later, she’s a delight as chief narrator, insightfully and humorously ushering viewers along through the stages of that historic journey.

While the bulk of the film focuses on the race, with all of its built-in drama and visual majesty, we start by getting to know Edwards. It takes a special kind of twentysomething to dedicate her entire life to a project that no one thinks she is capable of, and Edwards is certainly that. Rebellious, stubborn, and adventurous, the teenage Edwards took her school expulsion as an opportunity to travel around the world. By chance, she was offered a position working on a charter yacht. As she became increasingly involved in the sailing world, Edwards learned about the Whitbread Round the World Race, and liked the sound of it. She convinced an entrant to take her on as a cook during the 1985-1986 race. Of the 230 crew members taking part in the race, only four were women.

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The Incredible Saga of Tracy Edwards: A Real-Life Female Superhero Who Sailed Around the World

Sony Pictures Classics

In 1989, the first-ever all-female team entered the Whitbread Race to sail around the world. Everyone, from the (male) sailors who scoffed at their efforts to the (male) journalists who took bets on how far they’d make it, was convinced that they would never finish. But the Maiden team, led by the indefatigable Tracy Edwards, not only completed the race but won two legs of it.

On paper, the story of the Maiden yacht reads like documentary catnip. On screen, reanimated through old media clips and exclusive on-board footage, salty shots of the ship pummeling the water and a deck full of women the moment when they realize that they’ve taken the lead, it somehow manages to exceed expectations. Alex Holmes’ Maiden is fun to watch on so many different levels, whether it’s witnessing world-class athletes push their bodies past what even they thought possible or listening to a bunch of old men admit, on the record, that they were wrong to ridicule and underestimate them. At 22, Tracy Edwards decided to put together an all-female crew to sail around the world. Thirty years later, she’s a delight as chief narrator, insightfully and humorously ushering viewers along through the stages of that historic journey.

While the bulk of the film focuses on the race, with all of its built-in drama and visual majesty, we start by getting to know Edwards. It takes a special kind of twentysomething to dedicate her entire life to a project that no one thinks she is capable of, and Edwards is certainly that. Rebellious, stubborn, and adventurous, the teenage Edwards took her school expulsion as an opportunity to travel around the world. By chance, she was offered a position working on a charter yacht. As she became increasingly involved in the sailing world, Edwards learned about the Whitbread Round the World Race, and liked the sound of it. She convinced an entrant to take her on as a cook during the 1985-1986 race. Of the 230 crew members taking part in the race, only four were women.

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New film’s love story recalls tragic tale of a real-life ‘Fault in Our Stars’ couple

Dave Prager intends to watch the new movie “Five Feet Apart” hidden away in a corner of the theater where no one can watch him cry.


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Next 3 Incredible Real-Life Stories That Inspired Movies: ‘Tolkien,’ ‘Rocketman,’ ‘Ford vs. Ferrari’

Next 3 Incredible Real-Life Stories That Inspired Movies: 'Tolkien,' 'Rocketman,' 'Ford vs. Ferrari'

The true story behind Fighting With My Family is as surprising as it is compelling. Raised in a wrestling family, Saraya "Paige" Bevis (Florence Pugh) left behind her family and friends in England so she could gain big-time success in America.

The film opened in limited release over the weekend and will expand into more theaters later this week. Here are three more incredible real-life stories that inspired upcoming movies.

Tolkien

As a young man, writer J.R.R….

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Cosplaying Supervillain Roger Stone Meets Robert Mueller’s Real-Life Feds

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They were two ways Roger Stone’s morning arrest could have played out.

The first scenario is the one Roger rehearsed in his mind a hundred times; his attorney would have been notified well in advance, giving America’s number one parody cartoon supervillain time to assemble some typically foppish confection: perhaps a purple morning coat, spats, hand-tooled lemur-skin calf boots, a jaunty top hat, a monocle, and an exotic cravat tied in a knot typically used only in vigorous German fesselspiele games. He would stride toward the waiting federales with a louche swagger, his bejeweled walking stick in hand. He would smile for the assembled cameras and toss off some bon mot that communicated both searing contempt and breezy insouciance.

Instead, a second, real-world scenario obtained. A frowzy, shocked Roger Stone woke to the sound of “FBI, WARRANT! OPEN THE DOOR!” in the predawn hours. The FBI may not be getting paid, by that didn’t stop them from rolling hard on Stone’s lair, arresting him, and booking him into the Broward County jail. Stern but polite FBI agents arrested Stone on seven counts of lying to Congress and Special Counsel Robert Mueller.  

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http://www.acrx.org -As millions of Americans strive to deal with the economic downturn,loss of jobs,foreclosures,high cost of gas,and the rising cost of prescription drug cost. Charles Myrick ,the President of American Consultants Rx, announced the re-release of the American Consultants Rx community service project which consist of millions of free discount prescription cards being donated to thousands of not for profits,hospitals,schools,churches,etc. in an effort to assist the uninsured,under insured,and seniors deal with the high cost of prescription drugs.-American Consultants Rx -Pharmacy Discount Network News

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“Becoming Michelle Obama”: 7 Real-Life Moments to Which Every Black Woman Can Relate

There were two big revelations from First Lady Michelle Obama’s new memoir, Becoming Michelle Obama (Crown; $ 19.48). First, is her revealing her miscarriage. The second is her daughters, Sasha and Malia, were conceived by IVF (in-vitro fertilization).

It’s this candor that makes Michelle Obama so beloved and such an inspiring figure particularly for women of color. Throughout the book, Obama shares insights of a life of pomp and circumstance as a first lady, yet one also filled with the everyday worries, anxieties, and self-doubts of so many women who hold it down as mothers and working professionals face. Obama’s balancing acts are just as commonplace and practical as many women charged with managing both worlds and realities.

From her new memoir, here are seven ‘real-life’ moments Obama shares to which so many black women can relate:

Her husband’s great idea didn’t seem so great to her as a wife – which speaks to the pragmatism of many black women.

When the opportunity arose for Barack Obama to run for Illinois Senate, she “didn’t think it was a great idea,” and thought her affable husband would “get eaten alive” by the political world. “But maybe I can do some good,” he said with a “bemused shrug.”

Barack Obama, perhaps as many wives and partners complain, was reluctant to try couples’ counseling after his entry into politics began to take a toll on their marriage.

“He was accustomed to throwing his mind at complicated problems and reasoning them out on his own…[]..Sitting down in front of a stranger struck him as uncomfortable, if not a tad dramatic.”

She felt uncomfortable in unfamiliar surroundings as a black woman.

In the book Obama writes Washington was confusing “with its decorous traditions and sober real-regard, its whiteness and maleness, its ladies having lunch off to one side.”

She wasn’t an instant cheerleader for her partners ambitions, but rather, a cautious pessimist.

Black women often show reserved caution toward loved ones’ ambitions, knowing how hard the world is on people of color. She thought Obama would not win the presidency. “Barack was a black man in America, after all. I didn’t really think he could win.”

As do many women, she placed blame on herself, even when not actually warranted.

For instance, she blamed herself for the ‘First time in my adult lifetime, I’m really proud of my country’ controversy. “In trying to speak casually, I’d forgotten how weighted each little phrase could be. Unwittingly, I’d given the haters a fourteen-word feast.”

She, as so many black women, had to deal with the “angry, black woman” stereotype.

“I was female, black, and strong, which to certain people, maintaining a certain mind-set, translated only to ‘angry.’..[]…I was now starting to actually feel a bit angry, which then made me feel worse, as if I were fulfilling some prophecy laid out for me by haters…”

She needed to stay connected with her sisterhood tribe.

On occasional retreats with her old girlfriends from her Chicago hood: “They gave me a lift anytime I felt down or frustrated or had les access to Barack. They grounded me when I felt the pressures of being judged, having everything from my nail-polish color to the size of my hips dissected and discussed publicly.”

 

 

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How the stars of ‘Bohemian Rhapsody’ channeled the real-life members of Queen

Fantasy became the real life for the stars of “Bohemian Rhapsody.” And it was “magnifico!”

Not only were the actors who portray the four members of Queen in the long-awaited biopic tasked with physically transforming into the rock icons and learning everything they could about their personalities…

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Classic Cartoon Characters and Their Real-Life Inspirations

Voiced by Jean Vander Pyl, the Jetsons’ robot maid was based on Shirley Booth’s performance of a wise-cracking maid on the 1960s sitcom Hazel. Hazel called her boss “Mr. B,” so Rosie called George Jetson “Mr. J.”

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