SXSW Film Review: ‘Bluebird’

As affectionate as a love letter but as substantial as an infomercial, Brian Loschiavo’s “Bluebird” may be of most interest to casual and/or newly converted country music fans who have occasionally wondered about the songwriters behind the songs. There’s a better than even-money chance that anyone who’s a loyal and longtime aficionado of the musical […]

Variety

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In Review: Spier & Mackay Sunglasses

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Spier & Mackay Sunglasses – $ 68

Spier & Mackay is moving and shaking. If diving into the shoe world wasn’t enough, now they’re breaking into sunglasses as well. And just like their suits, shirts, shoes, etc… their sunglasses are priced plenty fair, and feel/wear quite good out of the box. Especially the acetate/round lens options.

In Review: Spier & Mackay Sunglasses | Dappered.com

Tortoise with green lenses. Classic.

You learn a lot about a pair of sunglasses as soon as you pick them up and swing open the ear pieces. Are they rickety? Do the hinges or ear pads make funny noises when you lift them out of the box? Do the temples flop about? Do they sit on your face square, or do they list to the side? None of these issues arise with these Spier sunglasses.

In Review: Spier & Mackay Sunglasses | Dappered.com

Branding is on the inside, not outside, of the frames.

The round lens, acetate options are straight up beautiful. All edges round off perfectly. The plastic frames are nice and smooth. The tortoise shell pattern bright without being garish. And they’re super comfortable. Size is 49mm, which usually is a good size for small to medium sized faces, but I found that even my larger than average mug took to these pretty well.

In Review: Spier & Mackay Sunglasses | Dappered.com

The wire aviators. Lightweight without feeling disposable.

The aviators are a larger 57mm in size, but don’t seem to wear quite as large. Noticeably lighter in weight than the acetate shades, but not feather-weight and weak feeling like super-cheap shades. Nose pads are comfortable. Ear pieces are smooth. No loose plastic seams razoring into the tops of your ears here. Hinges are like the acetate option, and have a smooth operation and just enough tension so they aren’t flopping about.

In Review: Spier & Mackay Sunglasses | Dappered.com

Good hinges. And again, branding is on the inside.

No polarized options as of yet, but that’s actually preferable if you’re looking at screens outside (or, inside a cockpit if you happen to fly planes and stuff). The plastic/acetate round lens frames feel a bit more luxurious than the wire framed aviators. I can’t quite explain why, but both fill the oddly large gap between gas station throw-aways and crazy high end luxury brands. Nice work outta Spier & Mackay, once again.

In Review: Spier & Mackay Sunglasses | Dappered.com


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Netflix’s Turn Up Charlie: Season 1 Review

All eight episodes of Netflix’s Turn Up Charlie are now streaming on Netflix.

It’s not Turn Up Charlie’s fault, but it’s bittersweet that the new Netflix comedy – co-created by, and starring, Idris Elba – premiered the same week Netflix canceled One Day at a Time. Turn Up Charlie isn’t out to offend – certainly not by merely existing in the wake of a beloved, ground-breaking comedy getting the axe – but then again… Turn Up Charlie isn’t out to make waves of any kind. And that’s the overarching issue.

Big names, mediocre projects. More often than not, that’s Netflix’s M.O. Usually, it comes at us from the Original Movies side of the equation (Bird Box, Triple Frontier, Cloverfield Paradox, Bright, The Titan, etc), but TV is far from immune. So gone is a funny, important show that addressed today’s issues with insight and humor and arrived is a series where a guy is about to take a bite of his dinner but then immediately loses his appetite because the woman next to him simply mentions the idea of a woman on her period. It’s not even clinical talk – it’s like a flowery euphemism: “The Red Queen is coming to visit” or something. That’s all it takes for the dude to stop himself mid-fork-to-mouth. Hilarious, right? That’s Idris Elba’s Charlie, by the way.

Continue reading…

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BWW Review: Duncan Sheik, Steven Sater and Jessie Nelson’s ALICE BY HEART Turns Blitz-Ravaged London into Wonderland

According to this reviewer’s admittedly casual bit of Googling, the first Broadway production based on Lewis Carroll’s ‘Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland’ was playwright Alice Gerstenberg’s version, which opened at the Booth in 1915. But undoubtedly there were many other variations before then.
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Review: Jordan Peele’s Us Is Dazzling to Look At. But What Is It Trying to Say?

Writer-director Jordan Peele’s 2017 Get Out was a brash and intriguing debut, a picture that wrestled with the notion of whether or not America can ever be a post-racial society: Vital and spooky, it refused to hand over easy answers. With the ambitious home-invasion horror chiller Us, Peele goes even deeper into the conflicted territory of class and race and privilege; he also ponders the traits that make us most human. But this time, he’s got so many ideas he can barely corral them, let alone connect them. He overthinks himself into a corner, and we’re stuck there with him.

Lupita Nyong’o stars as Adelaide, who has overcome a traumatic childhood experience and now has a family of her own, including husband Gabe (Winston Duke) and two kids: graceful, well-adjusted Zora (Shahadi Wright Joseph) and the slightly more awkward Jason (Evan Alex), who wears a wolfman mask pushed up on his head as a kind of security blanket. We meet the comfortably middle-class Wilson family as they’re heading off on vacation to Santa Cruz, the site of Adelaide’s childhood ordeal. On their first night away, they look out and see a family of four, mute and stony echoes of themselves, standing in the driveway. From there, Peele unspools a story of “shadow” people, long forced to live underground but now streaming to the Earth’s surface to claim, violently, what they feel is rightfully theirs.

The effectiveness of Us may depend on how little you know about it going in, so the spoiler-averse may wish to stop reading here. But it’s impossible to address any of the movie’s larger ideas without giving away key plot points: Before long, that shadow family has infiltrated the house, and now that we can get a good look, we see that each of them is a not-quite-right replica of a Wilson, dressed in a red jumpsuit and wielding a pair of menacing-looking shears. At one point a terrified Adelaide asks the other mother, a twin of herself but with vacant, crazy eyes and a demented smile, “What are you people?” “We are Americans,” the lookalike responds, in a whispery growl.

That’s a bright, neon-lit Author’s Message if ever there was one, though the idea of using a group of sunlight-deprived semi-zombies as a metaphorical element in a parable about class complacency isn’t necessarily a bad one. Are you and your family doing great? Do you live in a nice place, drive an expensive car, and have plenty of food for everyone to eat? Be grateful for it. But be aware that there are others who, through no fault of their own, don’t live at the same comfort level—or are, in fact, barely surviving. (The Wilsons also have close friends, Josh and Kitty, played by Tim Heidecker and Elisabeth Moss, who have more money and nicer stuff than they do, a source of irritation for Gabe in particular, and another of the movie’s threads about class consciousness in America.) But Peele doesn’t always lay out his ideas clearly. Us isn’t always fun to watch; there are stretches where it’s plodding and dour. He’s overly fond of heavy-duty references, including Biblical ones: A creepy dude holds a sign that reads Jeremiah 11:11. (If you don’t know it outright, it’s the one that goes, “Therefore thus saith the Lord, Behold, I will bring evil upon them, which they shall not be able to escape; and though they shall cry unto me, I will not hearken unto them.”) The mood of Us is sometimes chilling, but even then, you’re not always sure what, exactly, is chilling you. Maybe it’s just the feeling of being trapped in an over-air-conditioned lecture hall, because there’s a strain of preachiness running through the whole thing.

One thing that’s unquestionable: Peele is a dazzling visual stylist. (Peele’s cinematographer is Mike Gioulakis, who also shot David Robert Mitchell’s It Follows, as well as M. Night Shyamalan’s Split and Glass.) The movie’s opening, which details young Adelaide’s nightmare—it takes place in a ghoulish hall of mirrors on the Santa Cruz boardwalk—is a mini-horror masterpiece by itself, an evocation of the outright weirdness of childhood rather than its wonder: As the girl wanders away from her parents, in an almost trancelike state, she clutches a candied apple so shiny it’s like blood-red crystal ball—and puts us in a trance, too.

Yet the rest of Us is laden with metaphors, and they pile up so quickly that not even Peele can keep up with them. The movie repeatedly references Hands Across America, a 1986 benefit event in which some 6.5 million people joined hands along a route mapped out across the contiguous United States. (Many participants had donated $ 10 to reserve a space in the chain; the money was donated to local charities dedicated to fighting hunger and ending poverty.) In Us, the shadow people form a similar chain. But it’s hard to know what Peele is trying to say with that image. Are the semi-zombies of Us just less fortunate versions of us? Are they actually us and we don’t know it? Is their clumsy anger somehow superior to thought and reason? After all, it has unified them, while we aboveground humans are more divided than ever.

How, in the end, are we supposed to feel about these shadow people, for so long deprived of basic human rights—including daylight—that they have become murderous clones? Sometimes great movies are ambiguous, but ambiguity resulting from unclear thinking makes nothing great. It’s one thing for a movie to humble you by leaving you unsure about yourself and your place in the world; it’s another for it to leave you wondering what, exactly, a filmmaker is trying to use his formidable verbal and visual vocabulary to say.


Entertainment – TIME

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Anastasia Beverly Hills Launches Dipbrow Gel – Review With Photos

Anastasia Beverly Hills has announced that it’s launching Dipbrow Gel, its first new eyebrow product in three years — “a highly pigmented, waterproof eyebrow gel featuring a smudge-proof, long-lasting formula that adds volume to brows, creating the appearance of natural dimension and fullness.”
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Review: The 2019 Ford Ranger sets the bar for midsize trucks

The new Ranger is the midsize truck to beat. It offers great on-road performance, a comfortable cabin and the best hauling specs of any gas-powered, midsize truck.
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FDA Announces Sweeping Plan To Review Safety Of Surgical Staplers

The Food and Drug Administration announced a sweeping plan on Friday to review and address the safety of surgical staplers, including a new examination of seven years’ worth of hidden reports highlighted Thursday in a Kaiser Health News investigation.

In a letter sent to health care providers Friday, the FDA said it will convene an advisory meeting on the safety of the devices and signaled that it might reclassify surgical staplers to put them under tighter control. The agency also said it plans to issue proposed recommendations to companies that make the devices, which are used in countless surgeries.

The FDA also acknowledged in its letter that “we are aware that many more device malfunction reports during this time frame” were submitted as “summary reports,” which go to the FDA but are not included in the public database known as MAUDE (the Manufacturer and User Facility Device Experience). The agency said it “is conducting an analysis” of those summary reports and the results will be made available to the public.

The KHN investigation found that in 2016 alone nearly 10,000 surgical stapler malfunction reports flowed into the internal FDA database that few patient-safety experts who were contacted knew existed. The public database that year disclosed fewer than 100 injuries or malfunctions.

The secretive reports on staplers were part of a much broader FDA program, collectively called “alternative summary reporting.” Since the start of 2016, more than 1.1 million serious injury or malfunction reports went into the internal database instead of being disclosed in detail in MAUDE, which is widely used by doctors and researchers to track problems.

The FDA has said “about 100” devices have had special exemptions to report incidents that way but confirmed the identity of only a few devices to KHN. The agency said it revoked most of the reporting exemptions in 2017 as a new summary-reporting program took shape and asked device makers to file reports noting publicly that summary data was being submitted in addition to data that would be kept inside the agency.

After Dr. Douglas Kwazneski witnessed a surgical stapler malfunction, he surveyed leading surgeons and discovered that more than two-thirds had experienced a stapler malfunction, or knew a peer who did.(Kendra Stanley-Mills for KHN)

The news report highlighted the work of Dr. Douglas Kwazneski, who experienced a stapler malfunction then turned to FDA data and saw “there was nothing” — a surprise that at the time “seemed like a cover-up,” Kwazneski said.

Surgical staplers cut and seal blood vessels and tissue, often during minimally invasive surgeries. When the staplers fail to fire, patients have bled profusely and suffered dire injuries or death. The FDA said stapler malfunctions or misuse can lead to “bleeding, sepsis, tearing of internal tissues and organs, increased risk of cancer recurrence, and death.”

The FDA has granted reporting exemptions over the years for both surgical staplers and staples, agency records show.

Stapler maker Medtronic confirmed that its reporting exemption for surgical staples ended in mid-2017. FDA records show that its public reports of injuries and malfunctions soared, from about 1,000 in 2015 to 11,000 last year. Ethicon, which also makes staplers, said it has not used the reporting exemption.

In the agency’s Friday announcement, Dr. William Maisel, chief medical officer in the FDA’s Center for Devices and Radiological Health, said the agency’s review of stapler incidents is ongoing. “But we know these devices provide important benefits for patients undergoing surgery, so it’s important for us to continue to educate providers about the devices’ safety and risk.”

“Improving the safety of surgical staplers and implantable staples is a top priority for the FDA, and we believe our forthcoming draft guidance to industry and planned advisory committee meeting will advance those efforts,” Maisel said.

The agency’s announcement said that public reports of harm by staples and staplers show “that from January 1, 2011 to March 31, 2018, the FDA received more than 41,000 individual medical device reports for surgical staplers and staples for internal use, including 366 deaths, more than 9,000 serious injuries, and more than 32,000 malfunctions.”

The agency also said that changing the classification of surgical staplers could allow the agency to require “performance testing of various mechanical features” and special labeling.

Kaiser Health News

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Samsung Galaxy S10 review: Not an iPhone ‘killer’ but a real challenge

Samsung’s Galaxy S10, released Friday, could be the smartphone to give Apple a challenge — pushing some to jump ship. The South Korean giant’s newest flagship delivers supercharged performance for $ 899 — $ 100 less than iPhone XS — in a sharp package, proving once again that it is the Android phone to beat. With the…
Technology News & Reviews | New York Post

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Elon Musk asks Pentagon for his security clearance back during review of pot-smoking incident

Musk, who is also CEO of Tesla, refiled security form SF-86, the person said, following his apparent use of marijuana on a podcast last year, which the U.S. Air Force began looking into in September.
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In Review: The Banana Republic Arley Suede Boot

Banana Republic Arley Suede Work Boot – $ 106.80 ($ 178)

Note: Above price reflects a 40% off discount, which happens pretty often, considering Banana Republic’s frequent use of codes and promos. Cardmembers can knock an additional 10% off with the code BRCARD at checkout.

About the Author: Adam Terry is a thirtysomething Technical Trainer in the heating and manufacturing industry. He enjoys bourbon, boots, raw selvedge denim, and working on maintaining his dad bod. He’s excitedly nervous about welcoming his first child.

What is a pirate’s favorite work boot? The Banana Republic ARRRRLEY of course!

Sorry, I’m still workshopping some of my “dad jokes” as we prepare to welcome our first child in May. Along with building the nursery furniture, painting the walls fifty shades of grey, and hiding all of the bourbon, I’ve also been doing a little KonMari tidying up throughout my closet. After downsizing and getting rid of some of my rarely worn shoes, I realized that I needed a slightly more rugged version of a business casual chukka boot. When the chance to test drive the Banana Republic Arley suede “work boot” came along, I jumped at it.

In Review: The Banana Republic Arley Suede Boot | Dappered.com

Details

  • Brand: Banana Republic
  • Style: “Work Boot”
  • Last: BR
  • Construction: Bondwelted/cemented
  • Leather: Lightweight suede in tan
  • Lining: Half pigskin, half breathable fabric
  • Sole: Rubber lugs, similar to a Vibram 430
  • Details: Six brass-colored eyelets, tonal brown cotton laces, and integral pull tabs
  • Made in: China
  • Price: $ 178 USD

Ordering/Delivery

This pair was ordered on a Monday and was delivered by Wednesday evening. Most retailers that offer free basic shipping take an eternity to actually ship and deliver the goods. So when these arrived earlier than an Amazon Prime order that was placed on the same day, I was very
impressed. Great job, Gap, Inc.!

In Review: The Banana Republic Arley Suede Boot | Dappered.com

Packaging

Arriving in the standard dark grey Banana Republic boot box, the Arley’s arrived in great condition and stuffed with tons of paper to help keep their shape. No spare laces or fancy flannel shoe bags, though, if that matters to you.

First Impressions / Build Quality

After removing the boots from the box, you’ll first notice how soft and supple the suede is. Unlike really cheap suede that almost feels like a fabric rather than leather, this suede has a lovely, buttery smooth texture. The particular shade of tan is perfectly neutral and should pair well with other earthy tones, especially blues and greens. Imagine these being worn with a light blue Oxford cloth button down shirt tucked into a pair of tapered olive chinos. Simple, but great!

In Review: The Banana Republic Arley Suede Boot | Dappered.com

Comfort is always subjective, but the non-removable OrthoLite insoles feel very squishy and comfortable. The open-cell foam material should breathe pretty well, too. Similar foam-type insoles won’t typically last as long as leather and cork insoles, but hey, you’re not investing Red Wing money here. There’s no real arch support to speak of, but they don’t feel paper flat either.

In Review: The Banana Republic Arley Suede Boot | Dappered.com

The slip-resistant rubber soles are decently thick and have a nice low-profile lug pattern to them for added grip. They look very similar to the heavy duty Vibram 430 rubber soles that adorn other work and hiking boots. You should have no problem with grip in most land and weather conditions, minus those 100-year floods and Polar Vortices. Do note that these soles are Bondwelted (cemented), not stitched.

Fit and Sizing

Banana Republic doesn’t disclose what last/form that these boots are crafted around, but they run slightly narrow and have a rounded toe and tapered heel. They fit very similarly to my Clark’s Originals Desert Boots, which isn’t a bad thing. One minor complaint – these wear like a work boot/chukka boot hybrid. They’re a hair too short (and too thin) to have any real ankle support. The opening also tends to bow outwards when walking, but that shouldn’t be a deal-breaker. Odds are you won’t be doing any heavy manual labor in these anyways.

In Review: The Banana Republic Arley Suede Boot | Dappered.com

Sizing down to a 10 US (UK 9, EU 44) gave me the best fit out of the box. They fit very well with no noticeable heel slip or pinching. I would recommend sizing down a half-size from Brannock.

For reference, I am a 10.5 D/E on a Brannock device and usually take a 10D in most dress shoes, including Alden’s Barrie last. I take a 10.5E in Allen Edmonds 65 last, as that last runs narrow and I have slightly high arches. I also take an 11 in most Adidas or Nike sneakers.

In Review: The Banana Republic Arley Suede Boot | Dappered.com

Final Thoughts

Based on my personal experiences and expectations at this price point, I highly recommend the Banana Republic Arley suede boots. If you’re in the market for something significantly dressier than a pair of Timberlands and can snag these during one of the semi-regular 40% off sales, you’re getting a real bang for your style bucks.


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Mollie’s Motel and Diner: Oxfordshire – hotel review

This bid to revive UK roadside stays – by the Soho House chain – offers a smart take on the classic US motel but with swish rooms and quality food

The words “motel and diner” conjure up many images – US highways, neon, palm trees, Edward Hopper, cherry pie and coffee refills – but rarely rural Oxfordshire. Yet here I am, turning off an A road near the pretty village of Buckland at a big red sign for Mollie’s Motel & Diner.

The location is not the only unusual thing about Mollie’s. It may be next to a BP garage but the reception area’s glass cabinets filled with Hershey’s chocolate and popcorn, shelves of design books, objets d’art and plants, and Scandi-style chairs feel a million miles from a petrol forecourt. If I had booked via the app, as the billboards advise, I could have gone straight to the room using my phone as a key. Instead, I wait at check-in behind families with accents as crisp as their shirts, who look like they’ve just popped over from the nearest Cotswolds village.

Continue reading…
Travel | The Guardian

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Discovery Review: Saru’s Predator Race Revealed

Full spoilers follow for this episode.

Escaping the interminable May storyline of recent weeks like a starship going to warp to avoid being sucked into a black hole, Star Trek: Discovery gets its groove back in “The Sound of Thunder.” The episode sees Saru returning to his homeworld to finally confront the nasty predator species that haunts his kind… and the systemic oppression of the Kelpiens that is a classic Trek metaphor, and one that can be parsed on several different layers.

Along the way, the mystery of the Red Angel continues to develop… slowly to be sure. But it does feel like some headway is made in this department this week which helps us start to figure out what the creature (is it even a creature?) just might be all about. Seemingly benevolent, is the Red Angel also… a time traveler?

Continue reading…

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Review Roundup: Did Critics Feel Welcomed to the Rock in the UK Premiere of COME FROM AWAY?

Telling the remarkable true story of 7,000 stranded air passengers during the wake of 911, and the small town in Newfoundland that welcomed them, will beJenna BoydBeulah and others,Nathanael CampbellBob and others,Clive CarterClaude and others,Mary DohertyBonnie and others,Robert HandsNick, Doug and others,Helen HobsonDiane and others,Jonathan Andrew HumeKevin J, Ali and others,Harry MorrisonOz and others,Emma SalvoJanice and others,David ShannonKevin T, Garth and others,Cat SimmonsHannah and others andRachel TuckerBeverley, Annette and others withMark Dugdale,Bob Harms,Kiara Jay,Kirsty Malpass,Tania Mathurin,Alexander McMorran,Brandon Lee SearsandJennifer Tierney.
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BWW Review: Yael Farber Sets A Strindberg Classic in Post-Apartheid South Africa in MIES JULIE

You can pass laws, spread the wealth and educate the masses all you want, but perhaps the quickest way to dissolve the barriers between established classes is simply through giving in to raw passion.
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Berlin Film Festival Review: Fatih Akin Loses His Touch with Brutal, Punishing The Golden Glove

Of all the movies playing in competition here at the 69th Berlin Film Festival—officially known as the Berlinale—Fatih Akin’s The Golden Glove was the one with the most potential to make a splash Stateside.

That was until people actually saw it.

Akin, born in Germany and of Turkish heritage, is one of the most respected and just plain liked filmmakers in Germany. American audiences may be most familiar with his marvelous 2004 breakout film Head-On (its German title is Gegen die Wand, translating roughly to “Against the Wall”), in which an emotionally troubled young woman from a repressive Turkish family (Sibel Kikilli) talks her way into a platonic marriage with a decrepit fortyish rogue who has drunk a little too deeply from the trough of rock’n’roll (Birol Ünel). It’s a gorgeous, vital film about displacement and belonging, both in the country where you live and with the person in bed next to you.

Akin has made other movies since then, of course: The most recent was the thoughtful crime thriller In the Fade (2017), which won that year’s Golden Globe for best foreign-language film. But nothing has captivated American audiences as Head On did. And now, with The Golden Glove, Akin pushes that potential audience even further away. Adapted from a novel by Heinz Strunk, a best-seller in Germany, The Golden Glove tells the story of real-life killer Fritz Honka (played by the young German actor Jonas Dassler, in heavy prosthetic makeup) who murdered—and dismembered—at least four women in Hamburg in the early 1970s. Akin doesn’t downplay the grisly details, and even though much of the horrific violence takes place just off-screen, there’s nothing discreet about it: The sound of a hacksaw carving its way through a woman’s neck doesn’t leave much to the imagination. Not even the guy who’s doing the deed wants to hear it; he interrupts the task at hand to slap a record on the hi-fi, though it’s not clear if the schmaltzy ballad he’s playing is designed to muffle the sound or turn the event into a kind of sick celebration.

Honka is a hardcore weirdo who hangs out at the bar, in Hamburg’s red light district, that gives the movie its title. This is a place where forgotten, broken people show up to obliterate not just their memories, but their lives. Some are pathetic and sad; others are downright mean. Honka, a hunched loner with a lazy eye and meaty, molten features, drinks, drinks and drinks some more. Booze fires up both his sex drive and his thirst for sadism. The movie opens with a half-glimpsed corpse lying on a dingy, rumpled bed—this is Honka’s first victim, her stockings constricting her chubby legs like sausage casings. After folding the body up and stuffing it into a garbage bag, he begins dragging it down the stairs of his attic flat—its head bumps along each stair with a muffled clunk, like a bowling ball wrapped in a scrap of cloth.

That’s before the first dismemberment—and at this point, we’re barely 10 minutes into the movie. The Golden Glove is a turnoff the minute it starts: The dim beige color palette, the recurring bludgeoning and blood-splattering, the way Akin observes Honka’s first grunting, aggravated act of body disposal (he acts as if the corpse has done him an inconvenience). Sometimes Akin’s tone is jaunty, particularly when he’s observing the Golden Glove’s patrons: In an early scene, the weatherbeaten bartender wears a shirt with a bunch of little shirts printed on it, one of those kitsch-classic 1970s numbers that reads like a little joke.

But the relentlessness of The Golden Glove is exhausting. Where has Akin gone? He’s not a passive observer—even here, he’s alive to everything he’s showing us, and you can almost read his brain vibrations on the screen. It’s not that he’s stopped thinking. But his movie is heartless, and tinged a rotten green with misogyny. Honka’s victims were older women, over 50, with faces that might once have been pretty but are now marred by broken teeth and sunken, dispirited eyes. You get the sense Akin is sympathetic, in theory at least, to these women—he’s too sensitive a filmmaker not to be. He takes pains to show how one of Honka’s almost-victims, the exceptionally sad-eyed Gerda (Margarete Tiesel), is so lacking in self-esteem that she can’t see anything abnormal in the way Honka verbally berates her. (Verbal berating is another one of this charmer’s skills.) And no matter how intense and repugnant The Golden Glove may be, it’s nowhere close to the destructive sadism of Lars von Trier’s The House That Jack Built—Akin’s film at least feels as if it were made by a human being, albeit a misguided one.

Even so, Akin is unsparing in the way he films these women’s bodies, with all their lumps, bumps and bulges. The film’s visual and spiritual ugliness is relentless and punishing, and Dassler’s performance is grim in its believability: With his shifty eyes, smudgy aviator glasses and swollen gums, Honka is the kind of guy you’d take great pains to avoid on the street. It’s impossible to feel anything for him, or to understand him, which is as it should be—he’s a monster. But then, do you really want to watch a whole movie about him?

The Golden Glove is, in the most basic sense, well constructed. It’s also the kind of movie you may end up wishing you’d never seen. Even hardcore Akin devotees should proceed with caution, and be ready for disillusionment. The craftsmanship is there. But Akin’s judgment has gone AWOL, and with it, his heart.


Entertainment – TIME

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Review: 2019 London Art Fair

artrepublic looks at the standout work at this year’s Fair.

Kicking off the 2019 art scene, the 31st edition of the London Art Fair took over the Business Design centre in Islington in mid January. Filled from top to bottom with an impressive labyrinthine display of artwork, it was easy to get lost in a good way. Ranging from Sculptures to Portraiture, contemporary art to early twentieth-century pieces, there was something for everyone.

A seasoned buyer would feel very at home amongst the Henry Moore and Dali sculptures. Alongside the exuberant display of fine art from some of the most critically-acclaimed artists of the twentieth century such as Sir Anthony Caro and Ben Nicholson, the London Art Fair offers the opportunity for prospective collectors to get advice from curators as to how and where to start in collecting art.

Above all, it offers an exploration into bite-sized versions of some of the most prestigious and celebrated galleries in the UK and worldwide. At first an overwhelming spectacle, typical gallery-goers will not be used to the sheer volume of art all under one roof. Navigating the maze of white walls can seem daunting but incredibly rewarding after stumbling upon excellence, which is frequent and often.

artrepublic were thrilled to see the prominent print focus in this year’s London Art Fair. The contemporary print artists stood to serve as refreshing palette-cleansers amongst the swathes of fine art and sculpture. A breath of fresh air, a playful nudge or a satirical wink, these prints offer it all.

David Shrigley was a headliner for the London Art Fair this year. Combining stylistic childlike innocence with an often mundane or unassuming subject, to produce a piece that is fun and engaging. He celebrates the nuances of everyday life the with the intimacy of the imperfections in his work. There’s an openness to his work that emphasises his accessibility, making his works very desirable to own. His piece ‘My Rampage Is Over’ was exhibited featuring a huge blue elephant. A naive delight, evoking memories of childhood bedtime stories; of letting your own imagination run wild.

Another print heavyweight who exhibited boldly this year at the London Art Fair was the Connor Brothers. Their style is instantly recognisable, with their iconic use of vintage photography with modern type. The Connor Brothers have definitely cemented their position within the print space of the London art scene, notoriously popular and effortlessly cool. Most recently they have issued a series of book covers using a selection of their prints. Elevating the smutty form of the pulp novel, their works of art subvert the previously derogatory gender roles. As opposed to the women on these novels only serving to titillate or be murdered they are remastered as untouchable, graceful, almost statuesque. A contemporary twist on a classic.

Kicking off the 2019 art scene, the 31st edition of the London Art Fair took over the Business Design centre in Islington in mid January. Filled from top to bottom with an impressive labyrinthine display of artwork, it was easy to get lost in a good way. Ranging from Sculptures to Portraiture, contemporary art to early twentieth-century pieces, there was something for everyone.   A seasoned buyer would feel very at home amongst the Henry Moore and Dali sculptures. Alongside the exuberant display of fine art from some of the most critically-acclaimed artists of the twentieth century such as Sir Anthony Caro and Ben Nicholson, the London Art Fair offers the opportunity for prospective collectors to get advice from curators as to how and where to start in collecting art.   Above all, it offers an exploration into bite-sized versions of some of the most prestigious and celebrated galleries in the UK and worldwide. At first an overwhelming spectacle, typical gallery-goers will not be used to the sheer volume of art all under one roof. Navigating the maze of white walls can seem daunting but incredibly rewarding after stumbling upon excellence, which is frequent and often.   artrepublic were thrilled to see the prominent print focus in this year’s London Art Fair. The contemporary print artists stood to serve as refreshing palette-cleansers amongst the swathes of fine art and sculpture. A breath of fresh air, a playful nudge or a satirical wink, these prints offer it all.   David Shrigley was a headliner for the London Art Fair this year. Combining stylistic childlike innocence with an often mundane or unassuming subject, to produce a piece that is fun and engaging. He celebrates the nuances of everyday life the with the intimacy of the imperfections in his work. There’s an openness to his work that emphasises his accessibility, making his works very desirable to own. His piece ‘My Rampage Is Over’ was exhibited featuring a huge blue elephant. A naive delight, evoking memories of childhood bedtime stories; of letting your own imagination run wild.   Another print heavyweight who exhibited boldly this year at the London Art Fair was the Connor Brothers. Their style is instantly recognisable, with their iconic use of vintage photography with modern type. The Connor Brothers have definitely cemented their position within the print space of the London art scene, notoriously popular and effortlessly cool. Most recently they have issued a series of book covers using a selection of their prints. Elevating the smutty form of the pulp novel, their works of art subvert the previously derogatory gender roles. As opposed to the women on these novels only serving to titillate or be murdered they are remastered as untouchable, graceful, almost statuesque. A contemporary twist on a classic.  The almost-serious and almost-sensitive work of Charming Baker was another to look out for this year. Often contradictory, pulling the viewer across the emotional spectrum with his work. Disarmingly playful imagery besets an often melancholic backdrop, or is victim to violent scribbles. The resulting composition is a juxtaposition of innocence and darkness, provoking an eerie sense of nostalgia.  A master at combining texture with form, there is a distinctive layering within Baker’s work that enables him to effortlessly discuss themes such as joy, love, death and despair. The style that he has established is one of timeless eccentricity, beautifully thought provoking.   If you’d like to view any of the sensational prints by Shrigley, The Connor Brothers or Baker please visit the artrepublic gallery in Brighton.

The almost-serious and almost-sensitive work of Charming Baker was another to look out for this year. Often contradictory, pulling the viewer across the emotional spectrum with his work. Disarmingly playful imagery besets an often melancholic backdrop, or is victim to violent scribbles. The resulting composition is a juxtaposition of innocence and darkness, provoking an eerie sense of nostalgia.  A master at combining texture with form, there is a distinctive layering within Baker’s work that enables him to effortlessly discuss themes such as joy, love, death and despair. The style that he has established is one of timeless eccentricity, beautifully thought provoking.

 

If you’d like to view any of the sensational prints by David Shrigley, The Connor Brothers or Charming Baker please visit the artrepublic gallery in Brighton, call +44 (0)1273 724829 or email brighton@artrepublic.com.

For more news stories and events visit our Brighton Gallery page

 

The post Review: 2019 London Art Fair appeared first on artrepublic blog.

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BWW Album Review: UNBREAKABLE (Original Cast Recording) is Stirring and Evocative

Broadway composer Andrew Lippa has written a poignant song cycle with UNBREAKABLE, which was premiered by The San Francisco’s Gay Men’s Chorus at Nourse Theater in San Francisco, CA on June 22-23, 2018. This week Ghostlight Records released UNBREAKABLE Original Cast Recording, allowing listeners a chance to go inside the Nourse Theater to experience the powerfully moving cycle live and for themselves.
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Review Roundup: Critics Weigh in on Cate Blanchett in WHEN WE HAVE SUFFICIENTLY TORTURED EACH OTHER

The National Theatre’s When We Have Sufficiently Tortured Each Other, a new play by Martin Crimp is now on stage. It is directed by Katie Mitchell, with a cast including Cate Blanchett, who makes her National Theatre debut alongside Stephen Dillane returning to the National Theatre for the first time since The Coast of Utopia in 2002.
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The Castle Inn, West Lulworth, Dorset – hotel review

This traditional inn close to Lulworth Cove has played the renovation game, revamping 12 boutique-hotel bedrooms and high-end pub grub

A couple walk into a bar … and ask for a room. We wonder if the joke is on us when we arrive at the Castle Inn in West Lulworth because the door marked “hotel entrance” is locked. So we trundle our bags into the pub, which is heaving with happy customers on a Saturday afternoon. Eventually, we manage to tell the barmaid we’re here to check in and are steered away towards a tiny reception desk.

Not the slick welcome of a smart hotel, then, but the Castle Inn – once a free house known for muddy dogs and real cider – is now steering a tricky course between country pub and boutique hotel.

Continue reading…
Travel | The Guardian

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In Review: The Nodus Avalon Automatic Dive Watch

Nodus Avalon Diver – $ 625 – $ 650

This thing ticks a ton of boxes. Produced by a micro brand in LA using Seiko guts, the Nodus Avalon is a 300m water resistant, automatic diver, with a really good looking cushion case, and an attention to small details that you’d expect in 300m divers much, much pricier.

In Review: The Nodus Avalon Automatic Dive Watch | Dappered.com

43.5mm cushion case but wears smaller. Bezel width is 42mm. Lugs are 20mm.

I can’t even recall how I first heard about the brand. I know Huckberry has carried them in the past, but the Avalon diver is a new addition to their lineup and hasn’t been on Huckberry as of yet. That said, ordering from Nodus direct was easy. And I was super impressed when my new purchase showed up.

In Review: The Nodus Avalon Automatic Dive Watch | Dappered.com

Assembled in LA with a Miyota heart beating inside.

Assembled in Los Angeles and running off a dateless, hacking, handwinding, Miyota 9039, the Nodus Avalon leans on a 42mm bezel / 43.5mm case width 1970s style cushion case that looks and feels great on the wrist. It wears smaller than the 43.5mm case diameter, and owners with average sized wrists should be plenty happy with how it looks and wears.

Nodus Watches

The full range of colors. Stainless or Matte Ceramic Bezels (+$ 25) available on each.

Lug width is 20mm, and the bracelet looks and feels great. No rickety feel here. Solid, but comfortable. That Miyota movement is one of the thinner automatics out there, so Nodus was able to cut down on the bulk, while still making a substantial feeling diver.

In Review: The Nodus Avalon Automatic Dive Watch | Dappered.com

300m water resistance and a double domed sapphire crystal is greatly appreciated.

The crown is set at 4’oclock which… I mean, some of us just love a crown that’s not at 3 o’clock. I don’t know why, but it looks all kinds of right. That crown is also secure, yet not a pain in the ass to operate. It’s obvously a screw down at 300m of water resistance, and it threads easily, cinches great, and won’t rip up your fingers if you need to unscrew it and reset the time.

In Review: The Nodus Avalon Automatic Dive Watch | Dappered.com

Lume is impressive. This was taken in a small shadow behind a couch.

Lume is incredible, as shown above. There is a greenish tint to the indices and hands that doesn’t quite come across as intense on their site, but the performance of that glow-in-the-darkness really is something. 300m water resistance means it’s built to take quite a bit, and you can get in a lake and thrash about and not worry about it. Which is nice. Sometimes one needs to take a break and… thrash about in a lake.

In Review: The Nodus Avalon Automatic Dive Watch | Dappered.com

Knurled grip stations on the bezel. Brushed case and bezel with some polished edges.

The orange accents on the seconds hand and the AVALON model name at six o’clock are smart choices. The font of the brand and the logo itself are sporty but refined. The knurling on the 120 click unidirectional bezel is as functional as it is great looking.

In Review: The Nodus Avalon Automatic Dive Watch | Dappered.com

Solid caseback. Terrific grip and action on the screw down crown which helps when it’s wet…
as demonstrated above with the water droplet hanging off the crown.

It is, quite frankly, a hell of a watch. Sometimes micro brands make weird looking stuff. Or watches that don’t feel as solid as they look in the promotional materials. That’s not the case with the Nodus Avalon. It is solid, it is handsome as hell, and it should find a prominent place in many a fella’s watch rotation.

Even if that rotation consists of just one watch. The Avalon could handle that job too.


Dappered Style Mail

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Concert Review: Kacey Musgraves, America’s Next Superstar, Lights Up New York’s Beacon Theatre

The cheering was so loud that Kacey Musgraves turned to her band with her mouth agape. She’d been baiting the crowd good-naturedly, talking about how loud the Philadelphia audience had been the night before. But when the house lights at New York’s Beacon Theatre went up mid-show for a “let’s get a look at you” […]

Variety

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Broadway Review: ‘True West’ With Ethan Hawke, Paul Dano

Austin (Paul Dano) is the mild brother, a Hollywood screenwriter holed up in his mother’s house and pecking away at a screenplay.  Lee (Ethan Hawke) is the wild brother, a desert rat and sometime thief with more exciting, if improbable, stories to tell. More alike than either one of them would admit, they attack each […]

Variety

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Supreme Court will review gun restrictions for first time in nearly a decade

The justices next term will consider if a New York City law that forbids licensed handgun owners from taking their weapons outside the city is too tough.
Politics

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http://www.acrx.org -As millions of Americans strive to deal with the economic downturn,loss of jobs,foreclosures,high cost of gas,and the rising cost of prescription drug cost. Charles Myrick ,the President of American Consultants Rx, announced the re-release of the American Consultants Rx community service project which consist of millions of free discount prescription cards being donated to thousands of not for profits,hospitals,schools,churches,etc. in an effort to assist the uninsured,under insured,and seniors deal with the high cost of prescription drugs.-American Consultants Rx -Pharmacy Discount Network News

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Edit and Review Your Wardrobe Basics

Wardrobe basics are items like panties, bras, camisoles, socks, sleepwear, loungewear, hosiery and thermals. If you’re not a sporty and athletic person like me and don’t have a lot of gear, yoga outfits are wardrobe basics too. 

Wardrobe basics are NOT to be confused with wardrobe essentials, which are the simple items that are essential to your particular style.

When I help clients to edit and review their closets, they often think they’re done after we’ve gone through clothing, footwear and accessories. Not so fast! We have to hit wardrobe basics. Some clients are reluctant, but we eventually edit and review that component of their styles, and add important items to a shopping list. It’s always a great feeling when it’s done.

You might not enjoy wearing them or purchasing them, but wardrobe basics are workhorses, and therefore deserve your attention and a portion of your budget. Tackle each of the categories a drawer, bin, or pile at a time, and make a list of what’s missing. Arrange the items you’re keeping neatly back into their storage spaces, and find better storage solutions if you need to. The process is fast, effective, and satisfying.

Underwear and Shapewear

Go through your pile of panties and bras and pass on the items that are worn, ripped, unflattering, pilling, stretched out, don’t fit, or uncomfortable. Do the same for shapewear and camisoles. Take special note of white camisoles and thermals that are stained and greyed.

This is especially important with weight loss or gain when you’ll need to adjust the size and fit of undies. People tend to forget that knickers and bras are an important foundation of one’s style.

Socks and Hosiery

Go through the lot and pass on worn, ripped, ill-fitting, and uncomfortable socks and hosiery. Pass on socks, knee-highs, and footies that have been single for years.

Sleepwear and Loungewear

Attack that forever growing pile of “demoted to sleeping” tees because you don’t need twenty of them. Do the same for sweatpants, sweatshirts and leggings. Check for worn-out fleece and flannel PJs. Check for holes in cotton pyjama sets. Sew on buttons that are missing, and pass on knits that have shrunk or stretched out. Assess your sleepwear capsule and whether you feel good and comfortable wearing it. If not, evolve your sleepwear style.

If you wear loungewear, make sure you look and feel good in it. Can you answer the front door, or nip out into the garden quickly wearing it and not feel embarrassed? Ask the same questions about your PJs and robe. It’s not the best solution to wear ruined, worn, ill-fitting and un-fab clothing around the house just because you don’t want to pass it on. Feel good in your at-home style too.

Workout Wear

Attack that forever growing pile of old tees you’ve decided are good enough to work out in. They might be, but again, you probably don’t need more than seven if you work out daily. Attack that forever growing pile of free tees that you’ve accumulated from completing a sporting event, participating at a work function, or contributing to a charity. Keep the ones that are sentimental in a box out of the way, or take a photo of the important tees and store the sentimental ones digitally.

Check through the rest of your workout wear and make sure it’s dead right for your needs. Many of my clients wear 20% of their workout wear 80% of the time. Pass on the malfunctioning lot and duplicate the winners.

If you’re very sporty and have a lot of specialized sports gear, take the time to go through what you hike, bike, swim, ski, canoe, paddle board, snowboard and belly dance in, and make sure it’s functional, fabulous, and makes you happy.

I edited and reviewed my wardrobe basics a couple of weekends ago. Editing items and neatening up the content of drawers makes my toes tingle. I could do it all day! I passed on some cute but dreadfully ill-fitting socks, old bras, and polyester camisoles that look great but feel awful. I revamped my sleepwear and loungewear last year and feel good in it. My yoga capsule is extremely small but very functional so I’m not adding to it. I ordered some new bras and knee-highs and I’m set for a while.

Over to you. How edited are your wardrobe basics? Do they need to be replenished? I’ll be starting a basics editing & reviewing challenge on our forum soon, which might help with the motivation to get it done.


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Film Review: ‘Storm Boy’

Colin Thiele’s 1963 children’s novel about a boy and his beloved pelican receives tender and touching treatment in its second film adaptation. Adding a contemporary wrap-around story to the 1950s-set tale, and wringing well-judged changes to Henri Safran’s much-loved 1976 film, this version of “Storm Boy,” directed by excellent Aussie small-screen helmer Shawn Seet, has […]

Variety

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Film Review: ‘The Kid Who Would Be King’

A likable enough, Amblin-esque update to the classic Arthurian legend, “The Kid Who Would Be King” is hardly the first time a group of adolescents have saved England from supernatural harm in a Joe Cornish movie. That said, much of the attitude and originality that drew fans to the irreverent writer-director’s inner-city alien-invasion debut “Attack […]

Variety

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GM Dave Gettleman: OBJ part of Giants’ plans, Eli Manning still under review

EAST RUTHERFORD, N.J. — The New York Giants made it clear that wide receiver Odell Beckham Jr. is part of their current plans, while quarterback Eli Manning’s future remains uncertain. General manager Dave Gettleman on Wednesday declined to commit to Manning for next season, despite being complimentary of his ability and statistics this season. Manning, who turns 38 on Thursday, has one year remaining on his contract and is set to count $ 23.2 million against the salary cap in 2019. "I’m committed to making the best decision in the interest of the New York Football Giants," Gettleman said when asked if Manning would return for his 16th season. "We’re in the evaluation process. OK, I know that you guys want answers now, but very frankly I didn’t come in [New Year’s Day]. I’m going to do what I do, which is get in my office and watch film. … My commitment is to make this team the best team it can be. And if that happens to have Eli playing…
ABC News: Sports

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Year In Review: Our Top Wear-it-To-Work Recommendations in 2018

wear-it-to-work recommendations in 2018

Every weekday here at Corporette®, I offer one suggestion for an item that I would wear to work. Sometimes readers love the item, and wow do you guys hate it sometimes. Sometimes *I* love it, sometimes it was just the best I could find given the restraints (for those who haven’t noticed, Monday and Tuesday tend to be pricier items, Wednesday is in the $ 100-$ 150 price range, Thursday is in the $ 50-$ 100 price range, and Friday is in the “under $ 50” range.) Still, as the end of the year approaches I thought I’d look back over the past year and choose my personal favorites from the things I recommended… each picture is from one month, starting with January in the upper left-hand corner. Please note that anything marked with an asterisk is still available! (Oh: and please feel free to use this post as an open thread today!)

What were your favorite things you bought to wear to work in 2018, ladies? Did we include your favorites from our recommendations for what to wear to work in today’s roundup?what to wear to work in 2017 - favorite work outfit recommendations

wear-it-to-work recommendations in 2018 work outfits

Above: January / February / March

wear-it-to-work recommendations 2018 business casual

Above:  April*  / May* / June* (the orangeish dress is on major sale, the red top has a TON of colors down to $ 22, and the sweater jacket has colors on sale as well!)

wear-it-to-work recommendations 2018 conservative office

Above: July / August* /  September* (the gray dress is on major sale, and the pink blazer has other colors down to $ 55)

wear-it-to-work recommendations 2018 lawyer fashion

Above: October* / November* / December* (all still available and lots of sizes left!)

 

If you’re curious, here are links to the similar roundups from 201720162015201420132012, and 2010.

The post Year In Review: Our Top Wear-it-To-Work Recommendations in 2018 appeared first on Corporette.com.

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Film Review: ‘Holmes & Watson’

Judging by the conspicuous lack of fanfare awaiting “Step Brothers” co-stars Will Ferrell and John C. Reilly’s third feature pairing, the fact that critics weren’t invited, and the faint odor of horse manure emanating from the theater on Christmas morning, one doesn’t need to be a master detective to deduce that “Holmes & Watson” is […]

Variety

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Critic’s Pick: ‘Destroyer’ Review: A Very Good Nicole Kidman Plays a Very Bad Woman

In the latest from Karyn Kusama (“Girlfight”), a corrupt female cop searches for a killer and possible redemption in the land of sunshine and noir.
NYT > Arts

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Get the best rate — Your Rate. The best deal, plus all the benefits you love when you book directly with IHG.

In Review – The Made in the USA Korchmar Twain Leather Weekender

Korchmar Twain Leather Weekender – $ 530 ($ 605)

About the author: Dave I. has been a Dappered reader for several years. His interest in fashion started with shoes and expanded to encompass watches, suits, and general men’s style. When not thinking about his next purchase he can be found enjoying a pint of locally brewed craft beer.

The search for the perfect weekender bag is a bit like looking for the perfect pair of shoes. Everyone has their own opinion on what constitutes said item, everyone has their own requirements for said item, and finding said item can be at times extremely challenging. This is the situation I found myself in when looking for a weekender bag.  With my requirements set, it was a matter of trolling the interwebs until I found exactly what I was looking for.

In Review - The Korchmar Twain Leather Weekender | Dappered.com

The Bag

Enter the Korchmar Twain Leather Weekender. With Dimensions of 22″ x 10″ x 14″ this Made in the USA bag is perfect for an airplane carry-on or for throwing in the trunk of a car for a quick weekend getaway. The interior of bag is lined with signature 6.4 oz yarn dyed twill and contains three interior pockets, handy for stuffing charging cables, sunglasses, travel guides, or anything that might get lost at the bottom of a travel bag. The exterior is made of full grain American leather finished with natural oils and waxes, and complimented with brass clamp down ends to allow for expansion and increased interior capacity. Overall the bag looks and feels good. However, with a retail price of $ 605.00 USD this is definitely on the spendy side.

In Review - The Korchmar Twain Leather Weekender | Dappered.com

While Traveling

I recently had the opportunity to take the bag on a five day business trip. Granted five days is a little longer than a weekend, but the Twain proved to be the perfect bag for the job as I needed a bag to fit in the airline overhead bin since I did not want to check any bags. For the trip I took with me two pairs of shoes, two pairs of pants, a set of clothes for the gym, three business shirts, toiletries, underwear and socks. The Twain managed to pack all of it efficiently and with style.

In Review - The Korchmar Twain Leather Weekender | Dappered.com

The Twain fit perfectly in the overhead compartment of both flights.  On the flight out, overhead compartment space was at a premium as the overhead bins were not very deep. The Twain fit snugly in the overhead bin length wise, with not much room to spare. The return flight had a more traditional overhead bin, with the Twain fitting in width wise and having room to spare.

Only Issues

There are only two issues with the bag – beside the price – and the gripes are minor.

  • Snug Strap: The first issue deals with the leather strap that buttons the carrying straps together. The fit is snug. To button up the carrying straps, both straps need to be placed at a certain angle for the buttons to close.  This might be because the bag is new and the leather hasn’t been worked in yet, but it did take a little bit of pulling and manipulating to get straps buttoned up together.
  • Stiff Leather: The second issue likely ties into the first. Because the bag is new, the leather is extremely stiff. There is no flexibility and the leather shows every little scuff. Over time, this will likely change as the bag gets worked in. It’s concerning to see scrapes and nicks on an expensive bag, but with leather that is the nature of the beast.

In Review - The Korchmar Twain Leather Weekender | Dappered.com

Final Thoughts

Having successfully completed one trip with the Twain, I can easily see more trips where the bag will prove its worth. At $ 605.00 USD this bag is not for everyone. However both when checking in to the hotel, and when getting dropped off at the airport, the porters handling the bag commented on how nice it was. Now this may be because they were looking for a tip. Or it could be because they genuinely felt it was a nice bag. Personally, I prefer to think it was the latter.

Editors Note: At post time, an alternate version, the “Lux Twain”, made from full grain American aniline leather, is costlier at retail ($ 645) yet is marked down to $ 495. That’s less that the regular Twain version reviewed in this post. As far as we can tell, the only difference is that the Lux version is aniline leather, whereas the non-Lux version is not. Looks like the sale is set to expire tomorrow, 12/20/18.


Dappered Style Mail

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Briefing Room: Shutdown looms, Senate report on Russian meddling, Trump to review Green Beret’s case

ABC News

SPECIAL NEWS BULLETIN:

http://www.acrx.org -As millions of Americans strive to deal with the economic downturn,loss of jobs,foreclosures,high cost of gas,and the rising cost of prescription drug cost. Charles Myrick ,the President of American Consultants Rx, announced the re-release of the American Consultants Rx community service project which consist of millions of free discount prescription cards being donated to thousands of not for profits,hospitals,schools,churches,etc. in an effort to assist the uninsured,under insured,and seniors deal with the high cost of prescription drugs.-American Consultants Rx -Pharmacy Discount Network News

CHARITY UPDATE:

Click today to request your free ACRX discount prescription card and save up to 80% off of your medicine!

SPECIAL DONATION REQUEST UPDATE:

Please help American Consultants Rx achieve it’s biggest goal yet of donating over 30 million discount prescription cards to over 50k organizations in an effort to assist millions of Americans in need. Please click here to donate today!

Film Review: ‘Nona’

Twenty years and 12 features down the line, it’s still hard to peg the directorial sensibility of Michael Polish, with or without the presence of brother Mark as frequent co-writer and actor. His output has been all over the place, from early Lynchian quirkfests to the very middle-of-the-road inspirational dramedy “The Astronaut Farmer,” not to […]

Variety

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Review: how artrepublic Brighton celebrated its 25th anniversary year

From local events and big-name exhibitions to taking art onto Brighton’s streets, here are artrepublic’s highlights of 2018.

Typically, as we head towards the end of a year we start to look back at all the things we’ve seen, done and accomplished over the past 12 months. What were the highs and the lows? What do we want more or less of, and what exciting plans and experiences can we carry with us into the sparkling new year? For artrepublic, this has been a truly special and spectacular year.

Our 25th anniversary year has offered up almost too many gems to mention. Early in 2018 we launched our brand-new gallery area, doubling the wall space at our Bond Street location to bring you even more of the art and artists that you love. And, with that space came a whole new events calendar, featuring monthly activities for kids hosted by our artists, evenings of edition screen printing with The Private Press (and a few more of our artists), and even some live real-life storytelling with Spark. We had a fair few parties too, with bubbles flowing to celebrate exclusive print launches, including an exclusive launch with Mark Vessey, where we were treated to a spin on the desks from legendary Brighton DJ & producer, Fatboy Slim. There were also solo exhibitions from the likes of Bruce McLean, collective showcases – taking in everything from abstraction to our Modern Masters – and even an album launch for  drum & bass legend, Friction. And that was just inside the four walls of the gallery itself.

Out in Brighton, beyond the gallery doors, our annual Art Yard Sale had people queuing round the block in the blazing sunshine, all waiting to get their hands on original art, at great prices, direct from the artists themselves. Some of the newest additions to the artrepublic family were there, right alongside some of the gallery’s veterans (not in terms of physical age, but in terms of long-held creative friendships) and, wandering among them all, was the host of our freshly-launched podcast, Art-related Nonsense, collecting stories from some of the best in the art business to share with you all. Check the first series out on iTunes.

Elsewhere on Brighton’s streets, a little later in the year, the gallery was represented in the Martlets Snail Trail with a design created for us specially by Eelus. Unlike that snail (who was very much rooted to the spot), for us this year has sped by.

The artrepublic Snail by Eelus 

We’re so grateful to be able to share all this with the art lovers out there – each of you has brought something to the artrepublic story in 2018, a big thank you to you all and we look forward to seeing you at plenty more of the gallery’s events, openings and occasions in the year to come. From everyone at artrepublic Brighton, season’s greetings and we wish you a very Happy New Year.

For more news stories and events visit our Brighton Gallery page

The post Review: how artrepublic Brighton celebrated its 25th anniversary year appeared first on artrepublic blog.

artrepublic blog

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BWW Review: 1976 Satire Becomes 2018 Reality in Ivo van Hove and Lee Hall’s Striking Adaptation of NETWORK

The audience loudly booed at the end of last Saturday night’s preview performance of the new Broadway offering based on Paddy Chayefsky’s Oscar-winning screenplay for the 1976 film classic Network. Seriously, the great majority of viewers at the Belasco Theatre angrily booed what they were seeing onstage, a good many of them yelling out profanity-laced objections. Undoubtedly, playwright Lee Hall and director Ivo van Hove must have been delighted.
BroadwayWorld.com Featured Content

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Big Bash Boom Review

Bobble-headed players, flaming pitches and bowlers throwing actual pies: Big Bash Boom is certainly cricket like you’ve never seen it before. Yet although this NBA Jam-inspired take on Australia’s favourite summer sport is a personality-packed blast to play, its anaemic feature set and premium price makes it a weaker value proposition alongside developer Big Ant’s more robust release, Ashes Cricket.

Featuring the fully licenced teams, squads and stadia from the 2018/19 BBL and WBBL competitions, Big Bash Boom is a turbocharged take on Twenty20 cricket that strips the minutiae out of the sport to make it as fast-paced as possible. LBW appeals and fielding are automated, while varying pitch and weather conditions are done away with entirely, and although some of the sports’ subtleties remain – you still need to know the difference between bowling an off cutter and an outswinger, for example – it’s otherwise cricket as a Cornetto; no boring bits.

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