Beverley Callard slammed by Stan Collymore after claiming celebs make ‘mental health fashionable like a Gucci handbag’

FORMER footballer Stan Collymore has accused Coronation Street legend Beverley Callard of talking “crap” about mental health.

The former England striker hit out at actress Beverley over her fears that some celebs may play up their battles with depression.

PA:Press Association

Stan Collymore described comments made by Corrie star Beverley as ‘crap’[/caption]

She said this week that stars could flaunt the illness “like a Gucci handbag”.

Beverley, who has herself suffered from depression, was backed by Good Morning host Piers Morgan.

He tweeted: “She’ll be hammered for saying this but it’s 100% true.”

But football pundit Collymore, 47, who has also suffered from mental health problems, called on others to ignore the pair.

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Beverley fears that celebs may start flaunting their battles with mental illness ‘like a Gucci handbag’[/caption]

He wrote: “Don’t bite! Just keep advocating and using your voice to help others.

“Are Callard or Morgan trained MH specialists?

“No, so let them waffle crap and concentrate on what you can do to inform and help others.”

Beverley, 61, has played Liz McDonald in the soap for 30 years.

Rex Features

Beverley Callard has been open about her own mental health issues[/caption]

She is also an ambassador for mental health charity Mind.

She had to take two months off work in 2016 after breaking down in tears on the Corrie set over fears she did not measure up to her younger co-stars.

The actress felt like she was plunging into a “black hole”.

PA:Press Association

Football pundit Stan urged stars to be open about their mental health[/caption]

Mind praised Beverley for her openness, saying she had helped save lives by inspiring sufferers to seek help.

But she warned this week there was a danger it could “become fashionable” to claim to suffer from such conditions.

She told Best magazine: “We have to be careful that mental illness doesn’t become like a Gucci handbag.”

Actress Sophie Turner, 22, who plays Sansa Stark in Game Of Thrones, also hit out at the comment this week.


She tweeted that stars “have a platform to speak out about it and help get rid of the stigma of mental illness”.

Sophie added: “Please go ahead and shun them back into silence. T***.’’

But GMB host Piers, 53, replied: “Do you think abusing people helps their mental health, Ms Turner?

Maybe consider that question for your next virtue-signalling Twitter thesis on the subject?’’


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Hubert de Givenchy, George H.W. Bush, Kate Spade, Stan Lee in Their Own Words

Hindsight, foresight, oversight — depending on perspective, all may apply to words spoken by some of the more established cultural figures who died in the past year.
Over the years, WWD sat down with numerous designers, politicians and writers to reveal their ambitions and obstacles alike. Here are a few of the more memorable lines spoken by some who helped to define the world we live in.
Hubert de Givenchy
“Mine is one of the most beautiful professions in fashion: making others happy with an idea.”
“Balenciaga was my religion,” Givenchy said, explaining that he assembled more than 1,000 dresses for the collection of the Spanish designer’s creations. “Since I’m a believer, for me, there’s Balenciaga and the good Lord. Balenciaga had a sense of construction of clothes. He did things that were intelligent, which isn’t the case today. People are interested in glitz.”
“Fashion’s over. There are bags and shoes that are more and more ugly. That’s all. There are perfumes and everyone talks of luxury. But for me, luxury is, in part, to be well-dressed.”
Kate Spade on starting her own company over dinner with her husband in an Upper East Side Mexican restaurant: “Andy said, ‘Why don’t you do handbags? You love handbags,

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The Not-So-Funny True Comedy Story Behind the Movie Stan & Ollie

Laurel and Hardy fans who rewatch the legendary comedians’ 1934 take on Babes in Toyland every Christmas now have the opportunity to see them in another movie: the new biopic Stan & Ollie, starring Steve Coogan as Laurel and John C. Reilly as Hardy, out Friday.

The movie is a fictionalized take on the comedians’ British tour in 1953 and 1954. Their third such tour, it which would end up being their last tour together, due to the declining health of the duo TIME once described as “two of America’s few genuinely creative comedians.”

The funnymen were introduced to the public in the mid-1920s by Hollywood film and TV producer Hal Roach, who thought putting together a skinny Englishman and a rotund American would be comedic gold, says Simon Louvish, author of Stan and Ollie: The Roots of Comedy: The Double Life of Laurel and Hardy and a visiting lecturer at the London Film School. Laurel (born Arthur Stanley Jefferson in Ulverston, England) had been an understudy for Charlie Chaplin and a member of the London Comedians troupe run by Fred Karno, who is credited with having a role in launching Chaplin. Hardy was the son of an Atlanta politician, and studied law at the University of Georgia before he decided to pursue a career in singing.

Together, as TIME put it, they became Laurel — “slim, sad-eyed master mime” and “the brain behind the gags and the on-screen butt of them all” — and Hardy, “the master of mime and the bowler-bouncing doubletake” and “the withering glare.” They made dozens of silent film shorts in the late 1920s, such as Duck Soup, and began doing talkie shorts in 1929 and feature-length talkie films in the mid-’30s. Their seamless transition from silent to sound pictures was notable, winning them recognition as “virtually the only silent comedy stars to repeat their phenomenal success in talkies, probably because their miming spoke louder than words.” And the hard work that Laurel & Hardy put into lugging a piano up a staircase in The Music Box clearly hit the right note with the Academy, as the film won a 1932 Oscar.

And their popularity went even deeper than their talent. They rose to fame at a period in history when Americans needed a good laugh. “During the Great Depression, people are so desperate, and they need comedy,” says Louvish. “Here are two bums wandering about. They come from nowhere. They have no money. They’re always trying to do the right thing, but get into a fine mess. They take failure and make it into something you can laugh about.

Their relatability was a key part of what made them funny. They were “interested more, as Hardy once said, in ‘human appeal’ than in ‘straight clownish antics.’” Describing what made them special in 1965, TIME noted that “they were lovable caricatures of the dolt in Everyman, a bow and fiddle striking delightfully dissonant chords in a mad world. Witless innocence was their hallmark.”

But when their health was failing, they had trouble being funny.

Stan & Ollie is based on that point in their career, during the post-war period.

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While filming the movie originally entitled Atoll K in 1950 (later released as Utopia in 1954), Hardy’s general health worsened, exacerbated by his obesity, and Stan Laurel’s pre-existing diabetes was worsened by prostate issues and colitis. And yet they continued to tour.

“They embraced these demanding tours which were quite physically exhausting,” says Louvish. The film depicts the period as one of intense disagreement between the two; when asked whether they had a notable falling out, Louvish, who has not seen the film, says that if they argued in real life it was probably less because they didn’t like each other anymore and more because they were running on fumes. “They were both very ill in their later years,” says Louvish.

Even then, Laurel and Hardy never lost their commitment to self-deprecating humor, as opposed to put-downs. At an appearance in Newcastle, England, in 1952, they “looked down their noses at the modern generation,” TIME reported. “Present-day comedians, particularly those in America, gain laughs at the expense of someone else’s discomfort. Insult gags are a crudity we avoid,” they said.

And yet, they were determined to keep performing. “They had run out of stuff, yet they’re trying to do material and buoyed up by the fact that people love them,” says Louvish. “They can’t make more movies, yet they want to continue until death.”

Montifraulo Collection—Getty ImagesStan Laurel (left) and Oliver Hardy (right) shortly after performing at the Empire theater in Nottingham, England, in Aug. 1953 during their U.K. tour.

It wasn’t just for their own benefit, though. Their British tours came during the difficult period of post-war shortages in the late 1940s and early 1950s, and the laughter they provided was able to serve the same purpose it had served during the Great Depression.

And yet the recognition they received was more honorary than monetary. “The two men did not own their films, and thus did not reap any income from reruns,” TIME reported in 1967. “During their last years—Ollie died at 65 in 1957, Stan at 74 in 1965—neither was independently wealthy.” When Laurel received an Honorary Academy Award for “creative pioneering in the field of comedy” in 1961, he was too ill to accept it himself.

“They made us laugh because in them we kind of saw ourselves – ridiculous, frustrated, up to our necks in trouble, but nevertheless ourselves,” Danny Kaye said, accepting the award on his behalf. “Oliver Hardy delicately tipped his derby hat with his pudgy little fingers and left us a little while back. But the thin, sad-faced one, the one from whose fertile mind sprang many of the universally humorous notions that have been borrowed so freely by the comedians who have followed is still with us.”

Indeed, Jonathan Winters, Dick Cavett, Dick Van Dyke and Soupy Sales were all members of Sons of the Desert, a Laurel and Hardy appreciation society founded by fans in 1965. In light of the biopic, it’s recently been fielding an increased number of membership inquiries from young people. Before he died, Laurel had some parting advice to such fans, advising them to “have a hell of a lot of fun,” and avoid taking themselves too seriously — even when things get tough.

“Don’t sit around and tear comedy apart. It is like a fine watch, and you’ll never get it together again,” he said. “And don’t ask me why people laugh—that is the mystery of it all.”


Entertainment – TIME

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Why Joan Lee is Such an Important Part of the Stan Lee Story

When Stan Lee died on November 12, 2018, the world mourned the loss of an icon; a figurehead of popular culture. Lee’s contribution to Marvel has had an unprecedented global influence, and it is difficult to imagine the current climate without Stan Lee, Jack Kirby, and Steve Ditko in the picture, pioneers of the pop-culture world we have come to love. Although Stan became the ‘face’ of modern Marvel because of his film cameos, the Marvel universe — cinematic or otherwise — would have been a very different place if it wasn’t for one key influence. The person who would encourage and support Lee, propelling him to massive success: his wife, Joan Lee. Joan was a writer, voice-over actor, and half of one of comics’ most famous unions for over 50 years.

The Lee Origin Story 


Stan Lee Cameo Thor Ragnarok
Stan Lee in his Thor: Ragnarok cameo.

During the 1960s, Stan, at this time an established writer at Marvel, was employed to write stories he felt lacked emotional core. He was tired of their violence and bravado and believed they lacked character nuance and relatability. He wanted to create something richer, something with a stronger backbone of humility and humanity; traits that would come to define Marvel characters and legacy. On the verge of quitting the business, Joan said the words that became a catalyst for change and set her husband’s path on a different trajectory.

“Why don’t you write one the way you want to write it?” she said. “You’re going to quit anyway, so if he [Stan’s boss] fires you, who cares? But get it out of your system.”

These words marked the turning point in Stan’s career; they gave him the fire to write a story in his vision, not the way he was expected, with characters who were heroic and powerful, relatable yet flawed. He created a family of outsiders who would bicker and fight amongst themselves. The comic he wrote was Fantastic Four (1961). Stan may have written the comic, but Joan Lee had changed the game.

Mother Marvel

The Lee union has always been respected and held with affection by fans. She may be primarily viewed as a guiding force — ‘Mother Marvel’ to many — but the vivacious Joan Lee was a successful woman in her own right before she met and married Lee in 1947.

Born in Newcastle-Upon-Tyne in 1922, Joan Boocock quickly established a modelling career in her late teens. However, she strove for more and yearned to escape the cold of the North of England in search of adventure and better times. In 1943, at the age of 21, she married Sanford Dorf Weiss, an American serviceman she had known for 24 hours. Joan had acquired the new life she craved but not the great love story.

“In many aspects, it was a great marriage,” Joan once conceded. “But after living with him a year I was finding him sort of boring…”

Never one to follow convention, the day she divorced Weiss was also the day she married Stan, the two services taking place in adjacent rooms in the same building. They married after dating for two weeks, on December 5, 1947, a union that lasted until Joan’s death 69 years later. In one interview, she described her husband as “the best looking, nicest man I’ve ever known”.

The Real Mary Jane Watson 


Mary Jane in the recent PS4 Spider-Man game.

Joan and Stan’s meeting was not a conventional one. It could have even been written by Mr Lee himself.

Stan once described how he “wanted to get married,” after the war.

“I wanted to live with a girl, I was tired of living with sergeants,” he said.

Having established a reputation as something of a womaniser during his youth, he had arranged to meet — at his friend’s suggestion — “a gorgeous redhead” model in New York on a blind date. However, it was Joan, another flame-haired beauty (albeit a married one) who opened the door instead. He was immediately besotted with this girl from Northern England, informing his friend: “I have drawn that girl’s face a thousand times, I am going to marry her”. Six weeks later, they were married in Reno, Nevada, by the same judge who would preside over Joan’s divorce.

Joan’s “comic-book face” (Stan would always say she had the perfect face for comic books), has been rumoured to have influenced various characters, but never more so than Mary Jane Watson, the beautiful red-haired girl-next-door adored by Peter Parker. MJ was created in Joan’s vision, inspired by Stan’s very first meeting with the woman who would soon become his wife on New York’s Madison Avenue.

Stan’s Personal Superhero

Joan would appear in a number of Stan’s projects, both live-action and animated. Her most significant roles occurred during the 1990s, when she appeared in two animated Marvel shows. She voiced Miss Forbes in Fantastic Four as well as Spider-Man’s Madame Web. Then, of course, there was the obligatory Lee cameo in X-Men: Apocalypse.

Although she is best known for steering the canon, in more ways than we will ever know, Joan was also active behind the scenes, both at Marvel and in her own right. In 1987, she wrote The Pleasure Palace, a novel about a man building the world’s most luxurious ocean liner while romancing several women at the same time. Three more unpublished novels were found among her possessions when she died from stroke-related complications on July 16, 2017.

Despite her husband claiming she had no interest in comics, there is more than a touch of the Starks in this synopsis of Joan’s playboy character, a slight inflection of Howard and Tony. Had Tony Stark really been influenced by Howard Hughes as Stan claimed, or had the seed been planted by Joan’s, at that time, unpublished idea? The movie director Kevin Smith once referred to her as “Stan’s personal superhero” and “Marvel Muse” but Joan was infinitely more than a muse, and who knows how much of an influence her unseen work had as she silently, privately, inspired Stan towards ‘Excelsior’?

‘Spider-Verse’ Producers Want Marvel to Reboot the Film in 2038

 

The post Why Joan Lee is Such an Important Part of the Stan Lee Story appeared first on FANDOM.

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Interview: ‘Into the Spider-Verse’ Producers Phil Lord and Chris Miller Talk Spider-Man, Stan Lee and Reinventing the Comic Book Movie

Interview: 'Into the Spider-Verse' Producers Phil Lord and Chris Miller Talk Spider-Man, Stan Lee and Reinventing the Comic Book Movie

It is unlike any Spider-Man movie before, and it is on the verge of redefining the way animated movies are made. Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse swings into theaters on December 14, and with it comes a super-inventive and visually stunning story that introduces a new Spider-Man of color in Miles Morales (Shameik Moore), along with a smattering of other Spidey characters born out of the character's deep-rooted comics history. 

Into the Spider-Verse is essentially about a young kid…

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Comic book legends, fans mourn the death of Stan Lee

Comic book icon Stan Lee died Monday after a career of bringing heroes to life.

He was 95.

Lee, responsible for legendary characters including Spider-Man, Black Panther, Iron Man, Thor and the Fantastic Four, was memorialized by those who lived through his superheroes and the superheroes he made…

/entertainment – New York Daily News

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Stan Lee, the man who brought superheroes to life, dies at 95

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These Are Some of the Most Beloved Heroes and Villains You’d Never Know Without Stan Lee

In the wake of reports that Stan Lee passed away at the age of 95 on Monday, fans are mourning the loss of the legendary Marvel Comics creator.

Lee, who made cameos in a number of the Marvel Cinematic Universe movies, is credited with creating some of the most popular comic book superheroes and villains of all time, including Spider-Man, the X-Men and the Incredible Hulk.

“I think everybody loves things that are bigger than life. … I think of them as fairy tales for grown-ups,” he told The Associated Press in a 2006 interview. “We all grew up with giants and ogres and witches. Well, you get a little bit older and you’re too old to read fairy tales. But I don’t think you ever outgrow your love for those kind of things, things that are bigger than life and magical and very imaginative.”

The true origin stories of some superheroes aren’t always clear. But without Stan Lee, the world of heroes and villains would be a lot smaller.

Here are some of the most beloved heroes and villains you’d never know if it wasn’t for Stan Lee.

Heroes created by Stan Lee

• Ant-Man
• Ancient One
• Avengers
• Beast
• Black Panther
• Black Widow
• Captain Marvel
• Cyclops
• Daredevil
• Doctor Strange
• Fantastic Four
• Groot
• Hawkeye
• Hulk
• Human Torch
• Iceman
• Invisible Woman
• Iron Man
• Jean Grey
• Mister Fantastic
• Nick Fury
• Professor X
• Quicksilver
• Scarlet Witch
• Spider-Man
• Thing
• Thor
• Wasp
• X-Men

Villains created by Stan Lee

• Doctor Doom
• Doctor Octopus
• Green Goblin
• Kaecilius
• Kingpin
• Loki
• Magneto
• Sandman
• Vulture
• Whiplash


Entertainment – TIME

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Comic Book Legend Stan Lee, 95, Passes Away

Comic Book Legend Stan Lee, 95, Passes Away

Comic book writer, editor and publisher Stan Lee has passed away, according to The Hollywood Reporter and multiple other sources. He was 95 years old.

It would be impossible to underestimate Lee's influence upon multiple generations of comic book readers and creators, as well as movie lovers and filmmakers. He has left a lasting mark on popular culture, thanks to the textured and beloved characters he created and/or developed, including Spider-Man, Black Panther, The Fantastic Four,…

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