It’s Here! See the First ’Toy Story 4’ Teaser Trailer

The world of Toy Story is getting all forked up! A new toy named Forky wreaks havoc in the first official teaser trailer for Toy Story 4, the next sequel to Pixar’s first feature film and the latest installment of the $ 2 billion franchise.

Toy Story 4
Still from Pixar’s newly released ’Toy Story 4’ teaser trailer.

The 90-second trailer, which the Disney animation company released on Monday, November 12, shows the characters dancing in a circle to the tune of Judy Collins’ folk song “Both Sides, Now.” Woody, Buzz Lightyear, and Jessie hang with Mr. and Mrs. Potato Head, Rex, Hamm, an Alien, Slinky Dog and Forky.

Toy Story 4
Still from Pixar’s newly released ’Toy Story 4’ teaser trailer.

 

But Forky, a spork decorated with pipe cleaners and googly eyes, isn’t happy-go-lucky like the rest of the characters in the teaser. “I don’t belong here!” he exclaims, breaking the circle and causing a pile-up collision of toys.

“Somebody get him before he pokes an eye out,” Woody says off-screen.

 

Toy Story 4
Still from Pixar’s newly released ’Toy Story 4’ teaser trailer.

In the YouTube description, Pixar offers a synopsis for the new movie: “Woody has always been confident about his place in the world and that his priority is taking care of his kid, whether that’s Andy or Bonnie. But when Bonnie adds a reluctant new toy called Forky to her room, a road trip adventure alongside old and new friends will show Woody how big the world can be for a toy.”

Toy Story 4 is directed by Josh Cooley, who also helmed the Pixar short Riley’s First Date?, and produced by Inside Out producers Jonas Rivera and Mark Nielsen. Hollywood newcomer Stephany Folsom was tapped to write the script after Parks & Recreation alum Rashida Jones and writing partner Will McCormack opted out of the project. (In a statement, the duo cited “creative and, more importantly, philosophical differences” with Pixar.)

Toy Story 4 is slated for theatrical release on June 21, 2019.

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The True Story Behind Outlaw King: What to Know About Scottish Independence Hero Robert the Bruce

Warning: Contains spoilers for the movie Outlaw King

Increasing anxiety about the U.K.’s preparations for leaving the European Union has some Scots talking about how, in a world of Brexit, they might be able to actually pull off independence.

And whenever talk of Scottish independence ramps up — not infrequently; a referendum on the topic failed in 2014 — people look for lessons in the story of the legendary king who led Scotland to independence in the 14th century: Robert I, also known as Robert the Bruce (Bruce being his family name). So it’s perhaps fitting that, amid the ongoing political turmoil, a dramatization of his story is in theaters and becomes available for streaming on Netflix on Friday. Outlaw King stars Chris Pine (and, yes, all of Chris Pine) and is based on a pivotal period in Scottish history.

The film begins with the English siege of the Scots’ Stirling Castle in 1304, as a Warwolf — a huge medieval trebuchet — lobs boulders at the stronghold, in a motion similar to “an overarm pitch,” explains one of the film’s historical advisors Tony Pollard, Professor of Conflict History & Archaeology at the University of Glasgow (who also served as historical advisor to the TV series Outlander). At that time, most of Scotland’s castles were already occupied by English garrisons, and the King of England, Edward I, was flexing his power as overlord of Scotland and demanding the Scottish elites give him their fealty.

A succession crisis in Scotland had empowered Edward I. There were no heirs to the Scottish throne left after the death of the King of Scots Alexander III in 1286, so the Scottish nobility put together a committee of guardians to keep the government running. After the death of the Queen of Scots Margaret, Maid of Norway, in 1290, the guardians asked Edward I to come serve as an independent arbitrator to evaluate claims to the Scottish throne. As a result, John Balliol became King of Scotland in 1292.

But his reign didn’t last long. After Balliol sought an alliance with France, England’s enemy back then, Edward I himself came back to invade Scotland and drive out Balliol in 1296.

Now the independent kingdom of Scotland was facing direct rule by the English crown. Hard up for cash after the invasion, having “stretched his resources to a breaking point,” Edward I tried to shake down the Scots — including seizing their wool, the country’s main export at the time, according to Dauvit Broun, a professor of Scottish History at the University of Glasgow, who wasn’t involved in the film.

That’s when Robert the Bruce decided that enough was enough. He declared himself King of Scotland.

But in order to rule, Robert had to eliminate the competition. Scottish nobles who backed Balliol had been keeping a government going in his name. To be king, Robert the Bruce would have to get rid of anyone who challenged his own claim to the crown. So in February of 1306 at the church of Greyfriars in Dumfries, Robert the Bruce met with John “The Red” Comyn, one of the most powerful nobles in Scotland, who had been spearheading the effort to establish a Balliol kingship. Comyn didn’t walk away from the meeting alive.

There’s debate about whether Robert the Bruce killed Comyn himself or whether accomplices did, but he’s thought to have been in on it — and in the film, he’s depicted as murdering John “The Red” Comyn himself, which is what many people think happened. Robert the Bruce and his wife Elizabeth de Burgh were inaugurated King and Queen of Scots at Scone shortly after. Not a lot is known about de Burgh, and later in the year she was taken prisoner in England.

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But, though the murder of John Comyn secured his power in one way, it also made Robert the Bruce — who by then called himself King Robert I — a toxic figure in Scottish society. Soon enough, he was forced to flee.

“The most powerful nobles of Scotland treat him as a terrorist,” says Broun. “Not only is Robert I trying to establish an independent Scotland, but [also] he’s facing a civil war.”

In June of 1306, he struggled to keep up with the English army in the Battle of Methven, depicted in the film. “He’s basically an outlaw and the English are trying to bring him to book,” says Pollard. “[Robert the Bruce] comes close to being captured and beaten.”

His time as a fugitive is a mystery to historians.

“Nobody knows where he went when he was fugitive, but it looks like he thought hard about strategy,” says Broun. “He stayed out of a battle until he knew he’d have a better chance of winning, and that was controversial because kings were meant to be military heroes. He resolved that every castle he took he would destroy because he reckoned that, for the King of England to win, he would need to garrison Scotland, and you can’t do that unless you’ve got castles. It’s a bit like taking a bomb and destroying Buckingham Palace. But Robert I took the view that if he was going to win, it was only going to be because he had the support of the people, so he didn’t need castles.”

The film aims to depict Robert I’s military genius by highlighting the guerrilla tactics he used to overthrow the superior military force that was Edward I’s English army. One aspect of that involved creating what Pollard calls a “human porcupine” of sorts, with hundreds of men in one big group holding nearly 20-foot-long spears straight out in front of them.

The Scots also had a home turf advantage in terms of navigating the boggy, marshy battlegrounds. “Bruce deliberately picks land where the strength of the English Army can’t be brought into play,” says Pollard. “The English are knights in armor on horses, and Scots were men on foot, who didn’t have much in the way of cavalry.”

Robert’s first victory as king came in May of 1307 at the Battle of Loudoun Hill, close to his longtime family stronghold of Carrick (now part of Ayrshire).

“It’s significant because it means that he’s no longer just a fugitive,” says Broun. “But he’s still only someone who controls a small region of Scotland, his home region, which is not very different from being a noble — except he claims to be king.”

So the most famous and most important battle in Robert the Bruce’s career came even later, after the period of time covered by the film.

It was the Battle of Bannockburn, in June of 1314 that really paved the way for Scottish independence. Edward I had actually died shortly after the battle of Loudoun Hill, but at Bannockburn, Robert I defeated his successor Edward II.

“The Battle of Bannockburn is really the conclusion of the civil war,” says Broun,”[and] shows everyone who isn’t an inveterate opponent of Robert I that he’s in charge, that he can defeat the King of England. The few nobles who are still swithering say, ‘Okay, the reality is Robert I is in charge.’”

Elizabeth de Burgh is said to have been returned to Robert I after the battle as part of a prisoner exchange. Scotland’s independence from England would be official until the two nations signed the Treaty of Edinburgh in March of 1328. Robert I died the following year but Scotland would remain independent until James VI of Scotland inherited the kingdom of England after the death of Elizabeth I in 1603 and became James I of England. Oliver Cromwell conquered Scotland completely in 1650, and the Scottish and English parliaments merged in May of 1707.

And yet Robert the Bruce’s reputation as a national hero endured.

“He was reduced to being a fugitive and yet managed to restore Scotland as a fully-functioning independent kingdom. This makes his achievement even more remarkable,” Broun says. “He had to improvise constantly and had to work really hard to be king, as opposed to being born into it and not having to struggle for it.”


Entertainment – TIME

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‘Nutcracker and the Four Realms’ destroys a classic story

Thinking of shaking up your holiday tradition this year and heading to the “Nutcracker” movie instead of the ballet? Don’t tear up those Tchaikovsky tickets just yet, because Disney’s new riff sleighs the beloved tale. “The Nutcracker and the Four Realms” warps little Clara’s (Mackenzie Foy) journey to the magical land of sugar plum fairies…
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Students get rights to film Stephen King story for $1

They must have been thrilled. A group of Canadian film students bought the rights to adapt a short story by master of suspense Stephen King for a steal — just $ 1, the Boston Globe reports. Students at the Blaenau Gwent Film Academy, in Tredegar, Wales, dropped a buck on the rights to the multi-million-dollar author’s…
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The fascinating story behind the explosive success of Candy Crush — MashTalk

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What does “time well spent” mean for games like Candy Crush?

If you own a smartphone, chances are you know Candy Crush and maybe even the game’s latest incarnation, Candy Crush Friends Saga. What you may not know is the story behind the franchise: How an Italian entrepreneur put all his cash on the line as a co-founder of King, the company behind the game, in the early 2000s, with an idea of how to re-invent gaming for the online world.

That person is Riccardo Zacconi. He’s guided the company through the many phases of online gaming (desktop, Facebook, mobile, and more), taking King public and eventually selling it to gaming giant Activision Blizzard in 2015. In this episode of MashTalk, Zacconi talks about that journey, his thoughts on Mark Zuckerberg, and what the future holds for mobile gaming now that people are starting to question all the time they’re spending on their devices playing games like, well, Candy Crush. Read more…

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The True Story Behind the Movie Can You Ever Forgive Me?

For a collector, the price of a celebrity letter is as much determined by its content as the name signed on the end. The juiciest letters, the ones that offer some hint of Ernest Hemingway or Dorothy Parker’s inner lives, fetch the highest prices. For Lee Israel, a celebrity biographer by trade and the subject of Melissa McCarthy’s new movie Can You Ever Forgive Me?, the best way to acquire such letters was to buy an old typewriter, do a bit of research and bang one out herself.

Israel had been a moderately successful celebrity biographer through the 70s and 80s, writing books about actor Tallulah Bankhead and journalist Dorothy Kilgallen. But in the late 80s, Israel’s career went into decline and she began selling forged letters of dead writers and actors in order to get by. She was eventually brought to trial by the FBI and sentenced to six months under house arrest and five years probation, but not before she had forged more than 400 letters, some of which remain in circulation to this day.

Can You Ever Forgive Me?, which comes out Oct. 19, is based on Israel’s memoir of the same name. Directed by Marielle Heller (The Diary of a Teenage Girl) and starring McCarthy as Israel, the film tells the story of her transformation from writer to forger after her career as a biographer goes into a tailspin.

Here’s what the movie gets right and what it doesn’t.

Fact: Israel had a former girlfriend named Elaine

Israel, portrayed in the movie as a depressed misanthrope with a drinking problem, refers again and again to what seems to be her one real human connection in the past — her relationship with her (ex) girlfriend Elaine (played by Anna Deavere Smith). Near the end of the movie, Israel and Elaine meet again, and it becomes apparent that Elaine has moved on even if Israel, who had pushed her away in the first place, has not. Like many of the movie’s characters, Elaine is a real person. In her memoir, Israel describes falling in love with “a brilliant, beautiful bartender named Elaine, a lapsed Catholic who now observed only Bloomsday and St Patrick’s — the first with solemnity, the latter with wretched excess.”

Fact: Israel had published a poorly received biography of Estée Lauder

Israel’s published Estée Lauder: Beyond the Magic in 1985. The book ended up contributing to the collapse of Israel’s career as a biographer. Lauder herself had offered to pay Israel not to write the biography, and when the author refused, Lauder published her own memoir, which undercut the sales of Israel’s book. Rushed out to beat Lauder’s book to market, Israel’s biography was poorly reviewed — in the The New York Times Book Review, Marylin Bender wrote that Beyond the Magic “comes off as a cut rate job.”

Fact: Israel began selling letters in order to pay for treatment for her sick cat

In the film, Israel takes her cat to the vet, but is short on cash to pay the bill. In her memoir, Israel also claims that she was unable to pay the vet bills for her cat Doris. While researching an article at the Library for the Performing Arts at Lincoln Center, Israel says she stole three letters by Fanny Brice and sold them for $ 40 each. She claimed she felt no guilt for the theft; the letters “were from the realm of the dead. Doris and I were alive.”

Fact: Dealers began to get suspicious of Israel’s letters because they dealt too explicitly with Noël Coward’s homosexuality

In the film, the net begins to close on Israel when a dealer grows suspicious of her Noël Coward letters. In real life, one of Coward’s friends who was also a collector noticed that some of the playwright’s letters that Israel had sold referenced his sexual orientation. While alive, Coward had been extremely discreet about his private life. Many dealers began refusing to buy Israel’s letters after the fakes were exposed.

Fact: After dealers began to catch on to Israel’s embellishments and forgeries, she began stealing real letters

In both the film and the memoir, Israel decides to go into outright theft after her fakes are exposed. “I was going to take a crook’s tour of major university libraries,” she wrote, “replicate some valuable letters in their various collections, and then replace the McCoy with forged copies.”

Fact: A dealer demanded Israel give him money in order for him to not testify against her

In the film, a slimy rare books dealer tells Israel that he was approached by the FBI and demands $ 5,000 to buy his silence. In her memoir, Israel writes that dealer Alan Weiner really did ask for the money. Promising to pay him, she later sold him stolen letters, effectively making him buy his own silence.

Fiction: Israel destroyed the evidence of her crimes after being served with a subpoena that forbid her from doing so

In the film, Israel is served with a subpoena that explicitly forbids her from destroying evidence related to the forgery case. She immediately goes home and destroys all the evidence she can find. According to her account, Israel was only confronted on the street by a pair of FBI agents, which prompted her to go home and dispose of her research materials and typewriters. Of course, it might be fair to take this particular detail of Israel’s recollection with a grain of salt.

Fiction: Israel befriends Jack Hock at a bar after first meeting him at a book party several years earlier

The film fictionalizes much of Israel’s friendship with Jack Hock, a likable grifter played by Richard E. Grant. She befriends Hock at a bar shortly before beginning her forging escapades. In real life, the two had been longtime friends until Israel found out that Hock, who had been shopping one of her books in order to make a movie adaptation, had forged her name on an option extension.

Fiction: Jack Hock was homeless

The film strongly implies that Hock is homeless, or something close to it. But in her memoir, Israel describes staying at Hock’s “well-appointed Mitchell-Lama apartment.” After they begin stealing and selling letters together, Hock moved into an apartment on West 72nd Street.

Fact: Israel caught Hock trying to steal from her

In the film, Hock tries to swindle Israel out of her share of their ill-got earnings. This episode played out in real life remarkably similarly to the way it does in the film. Hock, claiming to have sold a collection of stolen letters for $ 1500, gave Israel $ 750. When she asked to see the rest of the money, it was revealed that he had actually been paid $ 2,000 for the letters. After the incident, Israel began accompanying Hock to their sales and waiting to meet him nearby when the deal was completed.


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American Horror Story: Apocalypse Goes Home: Sarah Paulson Talks Directing the Return to the Murder House

American Horror Story: Apocalypse, Sarah PaulsonTonight, American Horror Story is going home.
At the end of last week’s episode, we saw Cordelia (Sarah Paulson) send Madison (Emma Roberts) and Behold (Billy Porter) off on a…

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5 Must-See Anime for Fans of ‘American Horror Story’

Ryan Murphy’s American Horror Story has filled our nights with paranormal activities. From a house haunted by the corrupt spirits of its victims to a coven of witches seeking to become supreme, fans can’t get enough of its ingenuity. But if you’re an anime fan, you’re in luck —  there are countless shows and movies like the American anthology series. So here are five anime to watch if you like American Horror Story.

Midori (Mr. Arashi’s Amazing Freak Show)


anime to watch if you like American Horror Story Midori or Mr. Arashi's Amazing Freak Show

Starting off our list is Midori, one of the most disturbing movies in anime history. The film centers around a young girl named Midori who, after selling paper flowers to go on a school trip, finds her ailing mother dead. With no one to help her, she turns to a circus run by the creepy Mr. Arashi.

The circus’ acts include snake women, people getting eaten by ants, and performers twisting and turning into impossible shapes. But instead living a joyous life with the circus people, she’s assaulted and forced to perform horrifying acts on stage, like biting a chicken’s eye out. Thankfully, things start to look up for Midori when the magician, Masamitsu “The Bottled Wonder,” brings her under his wing. Is Midori’s luck about to change? Or are things too good to be true?

From bizarre acts that would make you sick to your stomach to humorous scenes, Midori is an ero-guro (erotic grotesque) film that American Horror Story fans will love.

Kagewani


anime to watch if you like American Horror Story Kagewani

One way to boost website traffic is to post about things that people are naturally curious about, like cryptid sightings. And that’s the plan that a video blogger concocts. But things become too real when an actual monster kills his entire crew.

Elsewhere, on a school campus, a sandworm creature is hunting down a group of students, killing them one by one. And more of these attacks take place all over the country.

Sousuke Banba, a researcher with a profound interest in unidentified mysterious animals, explores these events. Soon enough, he gets a break with the word “Kagewani.” The mysterious word leads him to find various connections between a pharmaceutical company and the strange animal attacks.

Did you love the suspense of Asylum or Roanoke? Then don’t waste any time and watch Kagewani. Its picturesque style of animation and use of dark colors brings the creepy factor of American Horror Story. Since it’s shorter than the standard length, it quickly gets to the point with several jump scares and other freaky surprises.

Devilman: Crybaby


anime to watch if you like American Horror Story Devilman Crybaby

There are a lot of things that go bump in the night, including creatures of the netherworld, who feast on the living. The only way to defeat these monsters is to use their own power against them. Akira Fudo, a sensitive and caring young man, gets dragged by his best friend, Ryo Asuka, to fight these creatures, thus becoming a Devilman.

This brings him to the seedy underworld of demons where only bloodshed and death exists. Even so, Akira’s new abilities awaken an insatiable and primal part of him, while also giving him a lean yet sturdy physique. Now, he and Ryo must destroy the demons that bring harm to humanity and their loved ones.

As one of the best anime to premiere on Netflix, Devilman Crybaby gives a new spin to the horror genre, much like American Horror Story. Its new style yet colorful animation and awesome soundtrack featuring catchy Japanese rap tunes are only a few of the reasons to turn on Netflix and give the series a try.

Memories


anime to watch if you like American Horror Story Memories

In the sci-fi horror movie Memories, three seemingly unrelated stories come together to reveal the true narrative. This is a similar approach to how all the seasons of American Horror Story are related, but each brings its unique take to the genre.

The first story, Magnetic Rose, takes place in outer space where two space engineers find a mansion, revealing the tragic fate of a renowned opera singer. However, hallucinations start to take over and they must do everything they can to retain their sanity.

Back on earth, in Stink Bomb, a lab technician accidentally takes several pills that enhance his flatulence to a lethal degree, killing everyone around him. Now, he must take refuge in his company’s headquarters all the way in Tokyo. But, with military forces after him will the lab tech be able to hold it in?

Lastly, in Cannon Fodder, there’s a boy who wants to become an artillery officer in a fortress city. The young boy spends his days dreaming of firing a cannon for the sake of the fatherland.

Kakurenbo: Hide & Seek


anime to watch if you like American Horror Story Kakurenbo

An innocent kids’ game ventures into the horror territory in the short anime film Kakurenbo: Hide & Seek. The movie centers around a group of kids playing the Japanese version of hide and seek, Otokoyo. But, instead of playing in a safe location near adults, they venture into the abandoned ruins of a Kowloon-like city. Rumor has it that a demon appears and takes away children who dare to play the game. To make matters more spooky, some kids have indeed disappeared.

Even though Kakurenbo: Hide & Seek doesn’t have the bloodfest of Hotel or the intricate storyline of Asylum, the movie does deliver a bucket load of suspense and creativity that American Horror Story is known for. From its animation that comes to life thanks to cell shading to its tense mood and easy-to-follow plot, the movie builds up the suspense factor without not much storytelling.

At less than half an hour long, Kakurenbo: Hide & Seek makes for a great horror snack between AHS episodes.

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