College Students Become ‘Grandkids on Demand’ with This Side-Gig App

The Papa app connects college students with senior citizens who need a little extra help in their day-to-day activities. Along the way, it provides companionship — and a steady side gig.

Since its 2016 launch, the Miami-based startup has operated in college hubs around Florida. But Founder and CEO Andrew Parker confirmed with The Penny Hoarder plans to expand to 10 other states in summer 2019.

Parker founded the company after his own grandfather was diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease. As his grandmother struggled to care for her husband — whom Parker called “Papa” — he hired a college student to help out.

The arrangement worked, and Parker realized the perfect match he had stumbled upon: tech-savvy college students who need a side income and seniors who need assistance with transportation to appointments, errands or hands-on iPhone lessons.

But there’s another tie that binds these two seemingly different groups: loneliness.

“The two loneliest generations are older adults and college-age individuals,” Parker says.

The research is on his side. According to a May 2019 study by Cigna, it’s not seniors who rank as the loneliest, rather Generation Z (ages 18 to 22). The study also notes one of the best ways to combat this epidemic is through “frequent meaningful in-person interactions.”

“By connecting these distinct generations, we are able to break down barriers and form real relationships,” Parker says. “Papa brings value to both sides of the platform.”

How the Papa App Helps Students Get Paid for Helping the Elderly

College students in one of the dozens of partner cities can apply to become a Papa Pal, which is essentially a “grandkid on demand” for seniors who need a helping hand or a friendly face.

These part-time positions are only available to college students. Beyond that, no specific experience is required, but students studying nursing, medicine or psychology get bonus points. (All college, university and technical school students in the approved areas are welcome to apply.)

Other requirements for Papa Pals include a reliable four-door car and appropriate car insurance. All applicants must be able to pass a thorough background check, and the approval process takes between two and 10 business days.

Papa Pals make between $ 11 and $ 12 an hour, and additional compensation is provided for gas and tolls. Pals who work 50 hours or more during the first month receive a $ 100 bonus. The app offers other weekly performance bonuses as well.

While the app is broadly focused on helping the elderly, the company provides guidance on what services Papa Pals can and can’t do.

Approved services include:

  • Transportation regarding doctor’s appointments, pharmacy visits, beach outings and general errands.
  • Chores such as light cleaning, organizing, laundry and meal prep.
  • Social activities like going to movies and restaurants.
  • Tech lessons about computers, social media and smartphones.
  • Help caring for pets.

Banned services include:

  • Grooming.
  • Bathing.
  • Bathroom assistance.
  • Drug administration.
  • Anything that makes the Papa Pal uncomfortable.

Seniors who book Papa Pals aren’t required to use the app. Though that is an option, they can also make reservations on the website or by calling Papa directly. It costs a flat $ 20 to book a Papa Pal for an hour. After that, the fees are calculated on a per-minute basis.

A $ 30-a-month membership allows seniors to interview prospective Pals and choose from a pool of students in their area. Otherwise, Papa pairs them automatically.

Founder Andrew Parker did not confirm every location included in the upcoming expansion. The app is currently offered in Florida, Illinois, Michigan, Missouri, Pennsylvania and Tennessee.

  • Florida: Boca Raton, Fort Lauderdale, Fort Myers, Jacksonville, Miami, Naples, Orlando, Port St. Lucie, Palm Beach, Sarasota, St. Petersburg, Tampa and Vero Beach areas.
  • Illinois: Chicago area.
  • Michigan: Grand Rapids, Kalamazoo and Lansing areas.
  • Missouri: Kansas City and St. Louis areas.
  • Pennsylvania: Harrisburg, Philadelphia and Pittsburgh areas.
  • Tennessee: Knoxville and Nashville areas.

Adam Hardy is a staff writer at The Penny Hoarder. He specializes in ways to make money that don’t involve stuffy corporate offices. Read his ​latest articles here, or say hi on Twitter @hardyjournalism.

This was originally published on The Penny Hoarder, which helps millions of readers worldwide earn and save money by sharing unique job opportunities, personal stories, freebies and more. The Inc. 5000 ranked The Penny Hoarder as the fastest-growing private media company in the U.S. in 2017.

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Pratt Students Help Honor Pyer Moss’ Kerby Jean-Raymond at Annual Fashion Show

NEW YORK — Pratt showcased the work of 17 designers Thursday night at Spring Studios, and honored Pyer Moss’ Kerby Jean-Raymond with the Pratt Fashion Visionary Award.
In an interview Friday, Moss said he hoped students would remember that “the process is supposed to be long and intense, and if they stay the course they will eventually reach the goal and the purpose that was assigned to them by the universe. As artists, we go through the ebbs and flows and sometimes we don’t survive them. I just want them to know that at some point it does get better.”
Jean-Raymond received the award from his mentor Dapper Dan, who can appreciate that sentiment. Over the past four years, the two men have had many conversations and “Sunday talks,” Jean-Raymond said, adding that Dan has always been someone who he could count on pre-Gucci. “We navigated through different fashion industries, but at the end, we ended up in the same place,” Jean-Raymond said.
In addition to researching his next collection for his show in September, the designer said he is working on a signature shoe for Reebok. With his contract with Reebok scheduled to run out this year, the designer said he is

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FIT Students Make Strong Statements in 2019 Future of Fashion Show

NEW YORK — Protection from both the elements and the news of the day was how one judge described many of the looks that paraded down the runway at the Fashion Institute of Technology’s 2019 Future of Fashion Runway show.
The show, held Thursday night at FIT, showcased some 99 looks from this year’s students graduating from the school’s Fashion Design BFA program.
In addition to featuring knitwear, sportswear, intimate apparel, special occasion and children’s wear on the runway, this year FIT introduced a Street Style and Athletics Capsule Collection that was presented at the end of the show.
The show, professionally produced by Jack Rich, is supported by a $ 2 million, multiyear gift from FIT alumnus Calvin Klein through the Calvin Klein Family Foundation, as well as the company he founded, Calvin Klein Inc. The show was also supported by Brother International Corp., which supplied FIT with more than $ 100,000 worth of sewing, embroidery and electronic cutting machine products.
The presentation was chockablock with craftsmanship and embellishments, including a chunky handknit coat, a hand-printed bomber jacket, a reflective puffer jacket, a “spaceman” sweater, a gray industrial felt dress, denim patchwork handknit coat, a black shearling bomber with parachute straps, a self-embroidered canvas “Overpopulation” coat,

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Wisconsin college students create 3D-printed legs for cat

OAK CREEK, Wis. — A tabby cat has new back legs, with the help of some University of Wisconsin-Madison students and a 3D printer. Community Cat shelter vice president Sarah Close says Chicago Animal Care and Control found the stray with infected legs last September and turned him over to the Whitewater, Wisconsin-based shelter. A…
Technology News & Reviews | New York Post

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Finnish school students outperform US students on ‘fake news’ digital literacy tasks

A recent study revealed students at an international school in Finland significantly outperformed US students on tasks which measure digital literacy in social media and online news. The researchers suggest this may be due to the Finnish and International Baccalaureate curricula’s different way of facilitating students’ critical thinking skills compared to the US system and curriculum.
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How Students Are Turning Their Fashion Degrees Into a Wealth of Opportunities

There can be comfort in preparing for a career with a linear path to success. But if your aspirations happen to be in fashion, expect the road ahead to come with twists, turns and likely an unexpected detour (or five). Such has been the case for some of the most prominent figures in fashion; see: …

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Hurricane Maria’s Legacy: Thousands Of Puerto Rican Students Show PTSD Symptoms

Food shortages, damaged homes, fear of death, loved ones leaving. The cumulative stresses of Hurricane Maria contributed to thousands of schoolchildren developing symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder, or PTSD, in Puerto Rico, according to a study published Friday.

The study in JAMA Network Open found that 7.2% of the students reported “clinically significant” symptoms of PTSD. More girls tended to show signs of PTSD than boys.

Researchers surveyed 96,108 public school students five to nine months after the 2017 hurricane. The cohort included youth in third through 12th grades across different regions of the island.

The Puerto Rico Department of Education — which partnered with the Medical University of South Carolina for this study — is using the data to target areas with the greatest need for mental health services, the study said.

Maria, which struck the island as a Category 4 hurricane in September 2017, killed an estimated 2,975 people within the American commonwealth. Residents struggled to access clean water and some remained without electricity nearly a year after the storm.

It had dramatic effects on the students. Nearly 46% said their home was damaged. More than 32% experienced shortages of food and water. And roughly 58% reported they had a friend or family member leave the island. The effects did not vary based on where the students lived or their families’ income.

Rosaura Orengo-Aguayo, a clinical psychologist at the Medical University of South Carolina and the study’s lead author, said the findings show the breadth and indiscriminate nature of the devastation.

“That just speaks to how big Maria was, how destructive Maria was island-wide,” she said. “And it didn’t matter what your income was or your location was on the island — you were affected.”

Similar problems have been reported among children in other parts of the Caribbean also affected by hurricanes in 2017.

Congress is at a stalemate in passing an aid bill that would send more resources to Puerto Rico and other areas affected by natural disasters. President Donald Trump has expressed his reluctance to provide more money to the island.

The trauma caused by a natural disaster can manifest itself in a variety of ways, said Frank Zenere, district coordinator of the crisis management program at Miami-Dade County Public Schools, who was not associated with the study. Family units can break down through divorce or domestic violence, he said. Young children can revert to thumb-sucking or wetting the bed. Teens sometimes try to exert control by acting out or turning to drugs to self-medicate.

To be sure, Zenere said, most people who survive a natural disaster do not develop long-term mental health conditions.

“They’re distressed by it. It has impact on their life — yes,” said Zenere, who helped coordinate mental health efforts in Puerto Rico in Maria’s aftermath. “But the great majority are not going to develop psychiatric illness.”

Zenere said the differences by gender found among students reporting symptoms of PTSD align with existing literature — boys are more likely to act out, while girls are most likely to show depression and anxiety.

The study’s authors said the loss and disruption caused by Maria contributed about 20% toward the youth’s symptoms of PTSD. While the researchers did not measure what other circumstances played a role, Orengo-Aguayo said, other “protective factors” — like eventually securing basic needs and community support — influence resiliency.

Notably, Orengo-Aguayo said, the level of PTSD symptoms reported in the study is lower than what was expected. Some studies show up to a third of children will develop chronic symptoms after surviving a natural disaster, the authors wrote.

Familial ties or the fact that the study was conducted several months after the storm could have played a role in the children’s resilience, she said. Or the children might still be attuned to trying to survive.

“What we might be seeing is that children at that stage were still focused on getting access to basic needs,” she said.

Regan Stewart, a clinical psychologist at the Medical University of South Carolina and a study co-author, said the team has secured two grants from the federal Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration to continue work on the island for at least three more years. It plans to use telehealth to expand access to mental health services and train school staff and mental health professionals on trauma-focused interventions.

However, public schools in Puerto Rico are burdened by economic constraints. The island — already facing a budget crisis — closed 300 schools over the past two years due to a lack of enrollment exacerbated by Hurricane Maria.

Zenere said school staff members are among those who need to be cared for first, “because they’re going to be the glue that keeps it together for that classroom of 20 children or so.”

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College Students: Here’s Your Cheat Sheet to Budgeting 101

As if writing papers and studying for exams weren’t enough, there’s one more thing college students should  add to their workloads: budgeting.

A budget is the system that tracks what money comes in and what money goes out. It can keep you from getting in the red, spending more cash than you have available.

And let’s face it, once your parents are no longer in charge of keeping you alive from day to day, money becomes pretty important. That mini-fridge isn’t going to restock itself.

You don’t want cluelessness about money management to cause you to struggle to meet basic needs — or get you kicked out of school for coming up short on tuition payments.

Starting a budget isn’t something to delay until you graduate and begin your first full-time, professional gig. Though budgeting for college students may be a little different from how your future self will manage money, developing smart financial habits now is the best move to make.

Consider Your Income in School

Budgeting involves tracking your income and expenses. Let’s focus on the income first.

Part of the tradeoff of a college education is sacrificing a few income-earning years to earn a degree. This means many students have limited money coming in. Still, you’ve got to work with what you’ve got.

Take Inventory of All Income Sources

Take a moment to think about all the money you have coming in. This could include:

  • Wages from a part-time job
  • Money from a side gig, like tutoring
  • A resident assistant stipend
  • Student loan, scholarship or grant
  • Money from a 529 plan
  • Money from a traditional savings account
  • Allowance from parents

Evaluate the Frequency of Income Disbursements

You may have a combination of income sources — and how you get paid from one may differ from how you get paid from another. It’s important to take into account how often you get paid from these various sources.

For example, if you have a student loan or scholarship, your school will receive the funding first to cover your tuition and fees and then issue you a check at the start of the semester for any money left over.

You’ll want to make that money last. When creating a monthly budget, take the overall amount and divide it by the number of months you want those funds to cover in order to come up with your monthly income.

If you have a part-time job, on the other hand, you might get paid every week or every other week. Add up how much you earn from the paychecks you get each month.

Now, you may have income that comes more irregularly — tips from a server job, random side gig income or money your parents send you from time to time. If this is income you rely on, you’ll want to figure out the average amount coming from these sources every month. Tally up the total over the past few months and then divide that by the number of months to get your average.

In months that you receive more money than average, set the extra aside — creating what’s called a sinking fund. During lean months where you bring in less, you can pull from your sinking fund to cover expenses.

Talk to Your Parents About Expected Financial Contributions

If your parents are providing financial support for you in school, it’s important to be on the same page with them about those contributions. You want to know if they’ll be sending you money on a regular basis, giving you a certain amount only at the beginning of the semester or just making themselves available to bail you out in an emergency.

Not all parents are able to (or choose to) financially support their college-aged children. Being an adult means shouldering the responsibility of providing for yourself, so any parental aid should be met with gratitude.

Plan On How You’ll Spend Money On and Off Campus

Close-up of hipster woman attending college holding books, notebooks and pens

The next step is listing all your anticipated expenses. Don’t forget to include what you plan to add to your savings.

Spending Categories for College Students

Begin by brainstorming all your relevant spending and savings categories. Your expenditures could include:

  • Tuition and fees
  • Books
  • School supplies
  • Housing (campus housing or off-campus rent)
  • Food (college meal plan or groceries)
  • Restaurants and bars
  • Entertainment
  • Personal expenses
  • Clothing
  • Utilities
  • Laundry
  • Transportation
  • Cell phone bill
  • Internet bill
  • Insurance (auto, renters and/or medical)
  • Credit card bill
  • Emergency fund
  • Short-term savings
  • Long-term savings

Estimating Your Anticipated Spending

If you’ve been in college for a few months or more, you can review your past bank statements or go through receipts to get a baseline idea of how much you normally spend in each category. You can create your budget based on those amounts, making any necessary adjustments (like cutting back on middle-of-the-night pizza deliveries).

However, if you’re brand new to school, you probably have no clue what you’re likely to spend. To give you an idea, the College Board has estimated undergrad budgets which break down the average expected costs for students during the 2018-2019 school year, depending on the type of school.

  • A student commuting to a local two-year college:

    • $ 3,660 on tuition
    • $ 8,660 on room and board
    • $ 1,440 on books
    • $ 1,800 on transportation
    • $ 2,370 on other expenses
  • An in-state student living on campus at a four-year public college:

    • $ 10,230 on tuition
    • $ 11,140 on room and board
    • $ 1,240 on books
    • $ 1,160 on transportation
    • $ 2,120 on other expenses
  • An out-of-state student living on campus at a four-year public college:

    • $ 26,290 on tuition
    • $ 11,140 on room and board
    • $ 1,240 on books
    • $ 1,160 on transportation
    • $ 2,120 on other expenses
  • A student living on campus at a four-year private college:

    • $ 35,830 on tuition
    • $ 12,680 on room and board
    • $ 1,240 on books
    • $ 1,050 on transportation
    • $ 1,700 on other expenses

Of course, your expenses will vary based on where you attend college, what city you live in, what financial aid you qualify for and other circumstances unique to you. Check with your college’s financial aid office for information about estimated costs.

If you live off campus, pay special attention to what you’ll have to shell out for rent — and start roommate shopping. According to Apartment List, the national median cost of rent in February 2019 was $ 946 a month for a one-bedroom and $ 1,174 a month for a two-bedroom. Split that two-bedroom cost with a roommate, and you’d be paying $ 587 per month.

You also gotta eat. If you choose not to sign up for one of your school’s meal plan options, you need to budget for groceries. According to the United States Department of Agriculture, an adult between 19 and 50 can expect to spend between $ 165.80 and $ 369 per month on food depending on how thrifty or how liberal they are with their grocery budget.

Use Saving Tactics to Lower Your Costs

These cost estimates are here to give you an idea of how much you might spend, but there are dozens of ways you can reduce your expenses.

You can buy used textbooks from former students, use public transportation, attend free events for entertainment (college campuses have them all the time) and show your college ID any place that offers student discounts.

Check out our post on how to save money in college for detailed advice on how to save on tuition, books, housing, food, transportation, entertainment and more.

Find a Budgeting Method That Works for You

Now that you’re aware of your monthly income and expenses, it’s time to choose a budgeting style. Below are three popular approaches.

Zero-Based Budgeting

Zero-based budgeting is a precise budgeting method where your total income equals your total expenses (including savings). In other words, your budget should balance out to $ 0 at the end of the month.

That doesn’t mean you need to spend every dollar you get your hands on. Remember, it’s important to put money in a savings account to fund that spring break trip or a new laptop or to build up an emergency fund. With a zero-based budget, you just want to have a plan for every dollar.

Percentage-Based Budgeting

U.S. Senator Elizabeth Warren and her daughter Amelia Warren Tyagi popularized the 50/30/20 budget in their book “All Your Worth: The Ultimate Lifetime Money Plan.” This method is a prime example of percentage-based budgeting. 50/30/20 budgeters spend 50% of their income on essentials (like housing and food), 30% on discretionary personal spending (AKA all the fun stuff) and 20% on financial goals (like saving).

As a college student, you might want to tweak the ratios a bit. Maybe 70% of your income goes to essentials and you allocate 15% for financial goals and another 15% toward personal spending.

A percentage-based budget makes sure you cover the necessary basics without sacrificing saving and having some fun. You don’t have to track every dollar, as long as you make sure to stay within the spending limits for each of the three categories — needs, wants and goals.

Cash Envelope System

A woman budgeting with the cash envelopes method

The cash envelope system is a way to help you stick to your budget by restricting your spending on variable expenses. Even with a budget in college, it might be tempting to spend too much on football tickets or Uber Eats or alcohol.

Here’s how this system works:

  1. Determine spending limits for your variable expenses, like food and entertainment. (Pay fixed costs, like rent or your phone bill, the way you normally would. Don’t include those expenses in this system.)
  2. Stuff cash in labeled envelopes to match those spending limits.
  3. Only use the cash envelopes when you’re out shopping.
  4. Once an envelope is empty, no more spending in that category until it’s time to replenish the envelopes.

If carrying around a ton of cash when you’re rooming with a relative stranger makes you nervous, you can digitize the system with apps like Mvelopes or Goodbudget.

Alternatively, you can use gift cards in place of cash envelopes. For example, if your grocery budget is $ 200 a month, you could put that money on a gift card from your local grocery chain or from a superstore chain such as Walmart or Target. Then you’d just use that card for all your grocery shopping for the month.

You could get gift cards for movie theaters, clothing stores or restaurants to cover various areas of your budget. Just make sure you don’t have to pay a service fee to purchase or maintain the gift card. You’ll also want to know if your card expires.

Four Tips to Mastering Your College Budget

Anyone just starting a budget will need some time to adjust to a new money management system. There may be a lot of trial and error in your first couple of months. That’s totally fine.

Here are some tips to going from Budgeting 101 to doctorate-level smarts.  

1. Be Flexible

A budget guides your financial life, but don’t treat it as if it’s set-in-stone. Every student’s budget is bound to change.

Some months may come with more expenses — like at the beginning of the semester when you have classes to pay for and books to purchase. Moving to a new apartment or having your roommate drop out of school mid-semester could shake up your cost of living.

The summer months might be flush with extra income if you land a paid internship or seasonal job — or you could find yourself struggling to pay for summer courses that your financial aid package didn’t cover.

All this is to say, as a student, you’re likely going to need to regularly adjust your budget.

2. Don’t Skip Out on Saving

When you’re making a limited amount of money in college, you might be tempted to forgo saving. Don’t.

Money in an emergency fund will reduce the financial panic when unexpected expenses pop up and help you cover anticipated items like books at the beginning of the semester or a plane ticket home for the holidays.

Factor saving into your budget. Even a small amount each month is better than nothing.

3. Embrace Budgeting Tools

Afraid you’ll flub your budget? There are various tools to help.

If you’re a fan of spreadsheets, you can access budgeting spreadsheets online for free from sites like Spreadsheet123 or Smartsheet.

Microsoft Excel also has budgeting templates specifically for college students. (Fun fact: College students can get Excel and other Microsoft Office software for free with a valid school email address.)

If you’d rather track your money with an app, some of our favorite budgeting apps include Mint, EveryDollar and You Need a Budget.

Students who find themselves indulging in too much online shopping might benefit from downloading Icebox, a free Google Chrome extension that puts a self-imposed freeze on online purchases.

4. Treat Credit Cards Responsibly

Thanks to legislation protecting young adults from credit card marketing, you shouldn’t be bombarded with credit card offers at every school function. Still, you may have considered opening a credit card account if you don’t have one already.

Having a credit card in college can be a positive thing if you’re responsible about your spending.  Only use the card for items you can afford to pay off fully and on time each month. This will help you establish a positive credit score.

Having good credit plays an important role in renting an apartment, getting an auto loan, buying a house and sometimes even getting a job.

One component of your credit score is the length of your credit history. Opening a credit account in college and using it responsibly will give you an advantage compared to if you waited. However, it’s important to note that you must have a cosigner sign off on your credit card application if you’re under 21 and have limited income.

The Importance of Budgeting for College Students

While creating and sticking to a budget might be an extra task added onto an already busy workload, creating good money management habits now can set you up for a great financial future.

If you’re stuck paying back student loans after graduation, you’ll have a handle on how to manage your money to get on a successful debt repayment plan ASAP. You’ll graduate not only ready to start your career but with the know-how to make the most of all the money you’ll earn.

Nicole Dow is a senior writer at The Penny Hoarder.

This was originally published on The Penny Hoarder, which helps millions of readers worldwide earn and save money by sharing unique job opportunities, personal stories, freebies and more. The Inc. 5000 ranked The Penny Hoarder as the fastest-growing private media company in the U.S. in 2017.

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Warren’s massive $640 billion student loan cancellation questioned over fairness to students who paid off their debts

Democrat Elizabeth Warren’s plan to cancel existing student loan debt for millions of Americans is facing questions whether it’s fair to use taxpayers’ money to pay off someone else’s agreed commitments and if the people who paid off their student debts would be penalized for meticulous financial planning.
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Howard Students Feel Disrespected By Residents Who Think The Campus Should Be Moved

There has been a lot of discussion via social media about the disrespect that Howard University students feel from some of the surrounding residents. Complaints of people using the campus as a dog park or picnic area by those who don’t attend the University or understand the importance of it. Shocking right? But this is unfortunately true. Fox5 was live on campus and spoke to some of the students and residents.

“They’re in part of D.C. So they have to work within DC. If they don’t want to be in DC,

then move the campus.”

So People were outraged by this mans comments and even more disgusted by his disregard for Howard’s history and importance to our community. Many are saying this would never happen at a PWI (Predominantly White Institution) like Georgetown or American University, why should this Historically Black University be moved?!

Below are of the responses via @angieangeam social media.

 

So where do we go from here? How do we establish the boundaries? The conversation on gentrification is continuing but let’s all remember the dogs have nothing to do with this.

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How college students can end up in vicious cycle of substance abuse, poor academics, stress

One negative behavior such as substance abuse or heavy alcohol drinking can lead college students toward a vicious cycle of poor lifestyle choices, lack of sleep, mental distress and low grades, according to new research.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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LeBron James’ I Promise Academy Students Scored Incredibly High Showing Major Progress

I Promise School Grand Opening Celebration With LeBron James

Source: Jason Miller / Getty

A year after its opening, the students at LeBron James’ I Promise Academy have made a complete turnaround academically.

Last year, the students scored extremely low on their state exams, putting them in the lowest percentile.  Fast forward to now and the third grade students’ test scores have jumped to the ninth percentile while the fourth graders are now in the 16th. Ninety percent of the students that met their academic goals exceeded 70 percent of students nationwide. The test scores for the I Promise Academy improved at a higher rate than 99 out of 100 schools nationally.

“These kids are doing an unbelievable job, better than we all expected,” James told The New York Times. “When we first started, people knew I was opening a school for kids. Now people are going to really understand the lack of education they had before they came to our school. People are going to finally understand what goes on behind our doors.”

The excitement comes from their test scores from the Measures of Academic Progress assessment.

When James started this school he was praised for giving back to his community and focusing on education however no one knew what to expect and some doubted the school would be deemed good. The students who fill the third and fourth grade classrooms were already labeled as some of the worst students in Akron. Thankfully,  the school and students defied the odds and have exceeded expectations so far.

 

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College students busted for making $900K in iPhone fraud scheme: Feds

The two Chinese students were lying about refunds.
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Countries that help working class students get into university have happier citizens

A study has shown that ‘inclusive’ educational policies that help working class students access higher education, such as delaying streaming children according to their ability until they are older, lowering the cost of private education, and increasing the intake of universities so that more students can attend all act to reduce the ‘happiness gap’ between the rich and poor.
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A professor and his students turned an observatory into a giant R2-D2, and it’s amazing

r2-d2 observatory

People who study science day in and day out usually have some fondness for science fiction, and Professor Hubert Zitt is no exception. Zitt, who lectures at Germany’s University of Kaiserslautern, happens to be a huge fan of Star Trek and Star Wars, and when he looked at the Zweibrücken Observatory he clearly saw what it resembled.

The dull, grey observatory served an important purpose for scientists, but it was also a bit drab looking. So, with the help of painter Klaus Ruffing and some of Zitt’s own students, the tall dome got an extreme makeover and now it sports some serious Star Wars flair.

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Parkland community grapples with trauma after apparent suicides of two students

After the apparent suicides of two students, Parkland is reckoning with the trauma carried by survivors and family members of last year’s mass shooting.


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Over 2,000 NYC Students To Go Behind the Scenes At KING KONG On Broadway

On Thursday, March 28 leading NYC arts education nonprofit Inside Broadway and the groundbreaking Broadway production of KING KONG will present a special Creating the Magic program offering an exclusive, behind-the-scenes look at Broadway featuring the KING KONG cast amp production crew.
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1 in 3 students with ADHD receive no school interventions

One in three students with ADHD received no school-based interventions and two of three received no classroom management, researchers found in the largest study of children and teens with ADHD ever conducted. At least one in five students with ADHD who experience significant academic and social impairment – those most in need of services – received no school intervention. The gap was particularly evident for adolescents and youth from non-English-speaking and/or lower income families.
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Singing for science: How the arts can help students who struggle most

Incorporating the arts — rapping, dancing, drawing — into science lessons can help low-achieving students retain more knowledge and possibly help students of all ability levels be more creative in their learning, finds a new study.
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Five Saudi Students Accused of Rape, Murder, Hit and Runs, Have Fled Oregon Before Trial

Multnomah County Sheriff’s Department

New legislation introduced by Oregon senators aims to punish Saudi Arabia following shocking allegations that the kingdom has whisked as many as five young men facing criminal charges ranging from rape to murder out of the country from that state alone.

Speaking publicly for the first time on Thursday, the parents of Fallon Smart, a 15-year-old victim of a hit and run by Saudi student Abdulrahman Sameer Noorah in 2016, said they were horrified to learn their daughter’s alleged assailant had disappeared two weeks before his trial with the help of the Saudi government. Noorah was charged with manslaughter, felony hit-and-run, and reckless driving in the teen’s death. He faced a minimum prison sentence of ten years.

Federal investigators confirmed to the Oregonian/Oregon Live that a private lawyer hired by the Saudi consulate posted $ 100,000 of a $ 1 million bail for the 21-year-old and apparently arranged for a dark SUV to pick him up shortly after he left jail. His severed electronic bracelet was found at a nearby gravel yard. Authorities believe he was given a forged passport, since his was sequestered by Oregon authorities, and flown back to Saudi Arabia on a private jet. He was seen back in his home country a week after he disappeared.

Read more at The Daily Beast.

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Giving high school students the tools to question classic literature

Generations of students have read Shakespeare and Hemingway for high school literature class. Assigning these texts without questioning issues of race or gender may exclude students and make them feel their voices are not valued, says a researcher.
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Meet The Fashion Students Defying China’s Rejection of #MeToo

Photo Illustration by Elizabeth Brockway/The Daily Beast

Near the end of 2017, as #MeToo began to morph from a Twitter moment to a cultural reckoning in the United States, a Chinese student named Puzhen Zhou sat in her gender studies class at Parsons School of Design and thought of home.

“We were having class at Parsons, which is a liberal school, and people were asking my opinion on [feminism],” Zhou told The Daily Beast. “In my country, we can’t even talk about feminism or victimization. People who are actual victims get overlooked.”

Stateside, stories of sexual harassment and assault were going viral. “Shitty men” from varying industries were exposed. Women’s Marches were held. Celebrities wore black dresses on red carpets in solidarity with survivors. Tarana Burke, the activist who started #MeToo, sat front row at Fashion Week.

Read more at The Daily Beast.

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White math teachers treat students differently in predominantly black schools

White math teachers in predominantly black middle schools are more likely to respond negatively to students’ behavioral or academic issues – and this may have long-term negative consequences for student performance, according to a new study that highlights the need to recruit more black teachers. The study, published recently in Harvard Educational Review, observed video data collected from 2009-2011 of 25 mathematics classrooms in middle schools that were either predominantly white or black.
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Top Scholarships For African-American Students 2019

The new year has settled in, and most students are already back to their normal school routine. Also, many are realizing that the summer is fast approaching and that its time to start thinking about applying for scholarships for the upcoming 2019/2020 college season.

Here are the top scholarships programs for African-American students to apply for in 2019:

#1 – Spike Lee’s Malcolm X Scholarship For Exceptional Courage: The Malcolm X Scholarship for “Exceptional Courage” is directed towards undergraduate students, who are enrolled at one of the UNCF Institutions. The scholarship was developed by Spike Lee to increase the awareness about the life and contributions of Malcolm X within society. Learn more at

#2 – Derrick Rose Scholars Program: Passionate about embodying a legacy that will empower the next generation to pursue greatness; NBA star Derrick Rose has launched a scholarship program called the Rose Scholars. The program is open to high school sophomore, junior + senior students who are civically minded and have an instinct to lead. Learn more at

#3 – Scholarships From Beyonce’s BeyGOOD Foundation and Jay-Z’s Shawn Carter FoundationWhile on their OTR II Tour, Beyoncé and Jay-Z (through BeyGOOD and the Shawn Carter Foundation) announced a new scholarship program to award exceptional senior high school students with financial needs. Each recipient will receive a scholarship award of $ 100K to put toward their college enrollment, and the award will serve as a dedicated university-based fund for each selected student throughout the duration of their enrollment.

#4 – National Hook-up of Black Women Scholarships: National Hook-up of Black Women (NHBW) Scholarships are available to graduating high school seniors who plan to enroll in an accredited college or university in the fall after graduation. Two different scholarships are available.

#5 – Ron Brown Scholarship Program: The Ron Brown Scholarship honors the legacy of Ronald H. Brown through a selective scholarship program that advances higher education for community-minded and intellectually gifted African-Americans. The program competitively awards scholars four-year $ 40,000 scholarships ($ 10,000 each year).

#6 – Kia Motors America/ United Negro College Fund Scholarship: United Negro College Fund (UNCF) has partnered with Kia Motors America to provide need-based scholarship opportunities. Applicants must have a minimum cumulative grade point average of 3.0 on a 4.0 scale, must be a Junior or Senior enrolled full-time at a UNCF member institution, and have completed a FAFSA and demonstrate an unmet financial need as verified by your college/university.

#7 – NBNA Scholarship Program For Black Nurses: National Black Nurses Association (NBNA) is committed to excellence in education and conducts continuing education programs for nurses and allied health professionals throughout the year. The association provides annual scholarships for students. Scholarships provide funding for continuing education.

#8 – Jesse Jackson’s PUSH Excel Scholarship Program: The PUSH Excel Scholarship Program was created to assist young people who are qualified but lack the financial resources to attend college. The goal of the program is to develop servant leadership potential in the scholarship students and encourage a spirit of social justice and social change.

#9 – Jill Scott’s Blues Babe Foundation Scholarship Program: Grammy Award-winning singer/songwriter and poet Jill Scott has an organization called the Blues Babe Foundation. Based in North Philadelphia, the program offers financial support and mentoring for students across the country that have shown the aptitude and commitment to their education, but whose families may not have the resources to ensure completion of their undergraduate degrees.

#10 – Boeing/ Thurgood Marshall College Fund HBCU Scholarship Program: This program provides an unparalleled career opportunity and scholarship for outstanding students attending Boeing HBCU priority schools. High performing students currently in their sophomore year, with a minimum GPA of 3.3 are encouraged to apply.

#11 – Jackie Robinson Foundation Scholarship Program: The Jackie Robinson Foundation (JRF) Scholarship program addresses the financial needs of college students and provides extensive, hands-on mentoring and support services. Once chosen from a national, selective application process, Jackie Robinson Foundation Scholars receive a generous four-year grant to attend the undergraduate school of their choice and enroll in JRF’s celebrated “42 Strategies for Success Curriculum”.

#12 – Apple’s HBCU Scholarship Program: The Thurgood Marshall College Fund (TMCF) in partnership with Apple is proud to present the Apple HBCU Scholars Program. Applications are open to outstanding students attending HBCUs with a minimum 3.0 GPA, and are currently working towards a degree in an undergraduate, Masters, or Ph.D. program.

For more 2019 scholarship programs, visit www.BlackScholarships.org


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Students in ‘MAGA’ hats mock Native American after rally

Videos show youths, possibly from a Kentucky diocese’s all-male high school.
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US judge orders North Korea to pay $500 million in student’s death

A federal judge has ordered North Korea to pay more than $ 500 million in a wrongful death suit filed by the parents of Otto Warmbier, an American college student who died shortly after being released from that country.
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JPMorgan Chase Invests $6 Million for Tech Training D.C. Area’s Black Students

Black and minority students at five school districts in the Washington, D.C. region will be beneficiaries of a $ 6 million commitment by JPMorgan Chase to help train and equip youth to land well-paying tech jobs.

The money is coming from the banking giant’s “New Skills for Youth” program. It will support the development of new educational initiatives at Baltimore City Public Schools, DC Public Schools, Montgomery County Public Schools, Prince George’s County Public Schools, and Fairfax County Public Schools in partnership with Northern Virginia Community College.

The donation is part of a $ 350 million companywide investment by the New York-based company and nation’s largest bank in jobs and skills development globally.

The effort comes as more firms add tech jobs in the nation’s capital region. The growth is building higher demand for skilled IT workers and a need to fill the jobs. Take Amazon.

Last month the world’s largest online retailer picked New York City and Arlington, Virginia, for its second headquarters. The two areas will each get 25,000 lucrative tech jobs that Amazon is projected to bring.

While schools offer IT coursework, these courses are not always aligned with the skills, credentials, and work experiences employers demand, the bank reported. In 2017, only 3,000 individuals in the region obtained associate degrees and other sub-BA credentials in digital skills and technology but over 15,000 jobs needed those credentials. Demand for tech workers with less than a 4-year degree increased by 42% in the region between 2014 and 2017.

“We have a responsibility to build a better future for the region’s young people,” stated Jamie Dimon, chairman and CEO at JPMorgan Chase. “This investment is a good example of how the public and private sectors can work together to create the opportunity for more people and grow the local economy so that everyone benefits.”

The JPMorgan Chase philanthropic investment will help to launch 16 new and revised high-quality, demand-driven IT career pathways for thousands of area students in high school through college.

This initiative aims to:

  • Help more young people in the region, particularly underrepresented populations, achieving career and economic success, with 3,200 more students participating in career pathway programs that connect with careers in fields including computer science and cybersecurity.
  • Employers providing 2,200 internships for students in IT career pathways.
  • A new system that enables educators to use regional labor market data on an ongoing basis to ensure that career pathways are aligned with employer demand.

“We need to make it clear to young people—from Anacostia, Prince George’s County to Baltimore and Virginia—that they have a future in this region—and we are working together to do just that,” stated Peter Scher, head of Corporate Responsibility and chair of the Mid-Atlantic Region, JPMorgan Chase.

“Amazon’s HQ2 announcement reinforced that companies around the globe are competing for talent, and through this investment, we are working with our partners in the public and private sectors to expand access to opportunity for young people in Greater Washington—and boost the workforce by directly aligning education and training programs with the skills needed for open technology roles here.”

The post JPMorgan Chase Invests $ 6 Million for Tech Training D.C. Area’s Black Students appeared first on Black Enterprise.

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The more pressing crisis facing higher education is not student debt but graduation rates, says Arizona State University President Michael Crow.
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More STEM Learning Access for Underrepresented Students

REDMOND, Wash. — Kaiser Permanente today announced that it has joined with Washington STEM to support smart, scalable solutions that lead to opportunities for those students most underserved and underrepresented in STEM fields. Washington’s students — particularly students of color, girls and young women, and students from low-income and rural communities — need access to more STEM learning to ensure they have the skills they need to succeed at high-demand careers and continue growing Washington’s economy. Kaiser Permanente’s 2-year, $ 1.2 million partnership will help fund STEM programs in schools across the state.

“We take pride in joining with Washington STEM to support direct efforts creating equal access to education pathways that will help more than half a million students prepare for the jobs of the future,” said Susan Mullaney, president of Kaiser Permanente Washington.  “A prescription for health includes access to education and career-track jobs, both of which are as critical to the health of a community as exercise, healthy eating and staying active.”

The new investment will build on active partnerships with Washington STEM’s regional networks and dozens of school systems throughout the regions, including the largest systems in the state — Seattle, Spokane and Tacoma.

Kaiser Permanente’s investment in Washington STEM programs will fund an expansion of existing programs in schools throughout the state. The two organizations are supporting smarter, sustainable solutions and look forward to achieving a greater impact together.

“Through our partnership with Kaiser Permanente, we’ll be able to accelerate and expand our impact across the state. Kaiser Permanente shares our belief that our health care and other fast-growing industries will be even more innovative when their workforces reflect the diversity of Washington state,” said Caroline King, CEO of Washington STEM. “It starts with ensuring our earliest learners have fun with math and moves to supporting students year over year to be inspired and prepared to lead in the game-changing STEM careers of today and tomorrow.”

The partnership between Kaiser Permanente and Washington STEM will have real, on-the-ground near-term impacts:

  • Tracking 641 more students to earn credentials and be ready to thrive in STEM careers by age 26.
  • Serving an additional 16,028 children ages 0-8 in Early STEM.
  • Equipping more than 600 additional early educators and parents/family members to support early math learning, especially for children of color and children from low-income communities.
  • Exposing 500,000 students across 45 local school districts in King, Snohomish, Spokane and Pierce counties to high-demand career pathways.

“It is imperative that our schools provide every student with a well-rounded education that affords her or him many options for a successful future,” said Damien Pattenaude, Ed.D, superintendent of Renton School District and Washington STEM board member.  “There are many pathways for success for our students who enter STEM fields. With partners like Washington STEM and Kaiser Permanente, we can continue to ensure there is equity in preparing every student for access and opportunity in choosing those pathways.”


About Washington STEM
Washington STEM is a statewide nonprofit advancing excellence, equity, and innovation in science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) education. For more information, go to www.washingtonstem.org.

About Kaiser Permanente
Kaiser Permanente and the Kaiser Foundation Health Plan of Washington are committed to helping shape the future of health care. We are recognized as one of America’s leading health care providers and not-for-profit health plans. Founded in 1945, Kaiser Permanente has a mission to provide high-quality, affordable health care services and to improve the health of our members and the communities we serve. We currently serve more than 12.2 million members in eight states and the District of Columbia. Care for members and patients is focused on their total health and guided by their personal Permanente Medical Group physicians, specialists and team of caregivers. Our expert and caring medical teams are empowered and supported by industry-leading technology advances and tools for health promotion, disease prevention, state-of-the-art care delivery and world-class chronic disease management. Kaiser Permanente is dedicated to care innovations, clinical research, health education and the support of community health. For more information, go to: kp.org/share.

 

 

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How Juul’s plan to teach students about vaping went up in smoke

The leading maker of e-cigarettes, Juul Labs, attempted to roll out an anti-vaping curriculum in schools earlier this year, offering school districts thousands of dollars and new technologies to implement it, according to documents and emails obtained by CNN.


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Students get rights to film Stephen King story for $1

They must have been thrilled. A group of Canadian film students bought the rights to adapt a short story by master of suspense Stephen King for a steal — just $ 1, the Boston Globe reports. Students at the Blaenau Gwent Film Academy, in Tredegar, Wales, dropped a buck on the rights to the multi-million-dollar author’s…
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Attending the ‘best’ high school may yield benefits and risks for students

Parents often go to great lengths to ensure that their children attend top schools, surrounded by high-achieving peers who often come from advantaged backgrounds. But data collected from individuals over a span of 50 years suggests that these aspects of selective schools aren’t uniformly beneficial to students’ educational and professional outcomes in the following decades.
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Students Across California Want Abortion Care on Campus—And They’re Not Done Fighting for It

California Governor Jerry Brown last week vetoed a popular measure that would have expanded abortion access for college students across the state.

Nearly three years ago, students at the University of California in Berkeley began fighting for better access to abortion on campus. The student government ultimately passed a resolution endorsing their call for on-campus medication abortion access, but administrators then failed to act on their demands—so students turned to local lawmakers. 

California’s College Student Right to Access Act, known in the legislature as SB 320, was written by three reproductive justice activists from UC Berkeley. The measure, introduced by state Senator Connie Leyva, passed through the state legislature with overwhelming support. A group of donors even came forward willing to fund its mandate: on-campus medication abortion access for all public college students in the Golden State intending to terminate a pregnancy in the first 10 weeks.

But the fierce and proactive attempt to expand women’s reproductive rights was stopped in its tracks by one man who deemed it inconsequential: Last Monday, Jerry Brown vetoed the act, calling it “not necessary.”

But just because Governor Brown was never in need of abortion care on campus doesn’t mean no one else is. More than 500 students in the UC and California State University systems seek out abortions monthly, and these students would have a much easier time getting the care they need if their university health centers had the means to offer it. Many students have to travel far distances to get to appointments, and, for a medical abortion, usually need to make it to at least two appointments.

Costs go up with every additional hurdle put in front of women seeking abortions—which was the case fo Jessy Rosales, who opened up to Huffington Post about her own off-campus abortion at 20: 

Jessy Rosales was a 20-year-old student at the University of California, Riverside, when she got pregnant. She had used protection and was not ready to become a mom, so she went to her campus health center to ask about the abortion pill—actually a combination of two medications that can safely end a pregnancy.

She left with a list of recommended providers. But the first clinic she called told her it did not perform abortions. And the second was a crisis pregnancy center—a facility that seeks to dissuade women from having abortions.

“I’m a first-generation student. For a large majority of my life, my parents didn’t have health insurance, so I didn’t really know what I was doing trying to navigate through the medical system,” Rosales, now 22, recalled in a conversation with HuffPost.

Finally, more than two months after her positive pregnancy test, she went to a nearby Planned Parenthood health center, where she was able to get an in-clinic abortion. It cost her roughly $ 400—a lot of money for a student supporting herself with part-time work and federal loans—and she was told she was too far along to be a candidate for the abortion pill at that point. (It must be taken before 10 weeks of gestation.)

“Had they provided abortion medication on my campus, I would have been able to get the care I needed when I needed it,” Rosales said.

Two-thirds of UC students and one-third of CSU students don’t own a car; 62 percent of them also live 30 minutes or more from a clinic. Often, these clinics are not open on the weekend, which only adds to their burden. 

Going through with a legal and time-sensitive medical procedure shouldn’t take that much work. Seizing an opportunity to ease the process of managing an unwanted pregnancy is far from “not necessary” for the students who must arrange transportation, cover costs, miss class or skip work to make it possible to access the care they need.

“Governor Jerry Brown, on his own, determined what was a legitimate burden in accessing abortion and neglected the experiences of countless students who explained the obstacles and burdens they faced when making a reproductive health decision as a California public university student,” Adiba Khan, one of the students who led the fight for SB 320, told Ms. “To get elected, he has expressed he is ‘pro-choice,’ but then when given the chance to expand access, to what he has repetitively claimed he believes is a right, he vetoes it. This is the behavior of a coward. He has disappointed thousands of students and denied them better agency over their futures.”

Students from across California joined in Khan’s frustration, taking to social media to slam Brown for his decision after news broke that he was vetoing the legislation.

Advocates and activists from across the country also weighed in, showing solidarity with the students who made SB 320 possible and calling on Brown and other lawmakers to do better by the women they serve.

“At its core, SB 320 affirmed the constitutional right of college students to access abortion care promptly and without delay,” Senator Leyva wrote in a statement. “As the Trump Administration continues to unravel many of the critical health care protections and services for women, legislation such as this is urgently needed to make sure that Californians are able to access the full range of reproductive care regardless of where they may live.”

She also vowed to continue fighting. “In the months and years ahead,” she declared, “I will continue fighting to make sure that college students have access to medication abortion on college campuses. I am hopeful that our incoming Legislature and Governor will agree that the right to choose isn’t just a slogan, but rather a commitment to improving true access to abortion for students across California.”

Miranda Martin is a feminist writer and activist and an editorial intern at Ms. She has written for a variety of publications and been published by The Unedit and Project Consent. Miranda recently graduated from University of Wisconsin La Crosse with a major in Interpersonal Communications and a double minor in Creative Writing and Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies. She loves to travel, read, exercise and daydream about the fall of the patriarchy.

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The post Students Across California Want Abortion Care on Campus—And They’re Not Done Fighting for It appeared first on Ms. Magazine Blog.

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Latin may help students bridge their native language with English

Researchers found that in teaching English learners — students who aren’t fluent in English and often come from homes where a language other than English is spoken — the Latin roots of words helped them problem solve the meaning of unfamiliar words.
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