Studies lend support to ‘grandmother hypothesis,’ but there are limits

Humans are unusual in that women go through menopause and stop reproducing long before reaching the end of their life expectancy. One theory holds that this aspect of human life history may be explained by the evolutionary benefits associated with the role of grandmothers in helping their grandchildren. Now, two studies add to evidence for this so-called ‘grandmother hypothesis.’ However, they also show that there are limits.
Parenting News — ScienceDaily

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Rocking motion improves sleep and memory, studies in mice and people show

Two new studies, one conducted in young adults and the other in mice, add to evidence for the broad benefits of a rocking motion during sleep. In fact, the studies in people show that rocking not only leads to better sleep, but it also boosts memory consolidation during sleep.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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Studies Say This Will Actually Make You Work Out (And You’ll Get Paid!)

It’s so hard to make yourself exercise consistently. So many mornings, so many evenings, the last thing you want to do is hit the gym or ride an exercise bike.

That’s why so few of us do it. Only about half of all Americans get enough exercise to see any health benefits from it, according to the federal Centers for Disease Control.

Since we’re so short on willpower, what can motivate us to work out?

Try cold, hard cash.

Cash money.

Dollar, dollar bills, y’all.

Money is a surprisingly effective way to make yourself exercise, according to a bunch of recent studies.

Research Backs It Up

Researchers keep finding that financial incentives lead people to exercise more regularly:

  • A study published in The Lancet Diabetes and Endocrinology medical journal found that people walked more steps per week when given a financial incentive. The study included 800 office workers in Singapore. People tended to walk 30 minutes more per day if they were awarded $ 30 whenever they walked at least 70,000 steps per week.
  • In a study in the journal Translational Behavioral Medicine, researchers from Stanford University and the University of Michigan tracked 12,000 people insured by Blue Care Network, which allows obese policyholders to choose between exercising or paying 20% more in premiums. Researchers found that 97% of them managed to take at least 5,000 steps per day.
  • In a yearlong weight-loss study, researchers at the Mayo Clinic found that participants who were shooting for a small monthly payout (just $ 20) lost more weight than those who weren’t.

Getting Paid to Lose Weight

We know a way to make this work for you. If you’re looking for some monetary inspiration, there are some apps you could check out.

We like one called HealthyWage, which will pay you to accomplish your weight-loss goals.

Enter how much weight you’d like to lose (10 to 150 pounds) in its calculator, how long you’ll take (six to 18 months) and how much you want to bet ($ 20 to $ 150 per month).

Each month, you pay your promised amount into the program. In return, HealthyWage provides support through expert advice and weight-tracking tools.

If you stick to your goal and lose the weight you say you’re going to, the company pays you. It’s as simple as that.

If you don’t hit your goal, your money goes to support HealthyWage, including prizes for others who achieve their goals.

Teresa Suarez bet $ 125 per month she would lose 60 pounds in six months. She lost 68 pounds — and made over $ 2,400.

Mike Brassfield (mike@thepennyhoarder.com) is a senior writer at The Penny Hoarder. He hates working out, but he likes money.

This was originally published on The Penny Hoarder, which helps millions of readers worldwide earn and save money by sharing unique job opportunities, personal stories, freebies and more. The Inc. 5000 ranked The Penny Hoarder as the fastest-growing private media company in the U.S. in 2017.

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5 Questions With a Clinical Psychologist Who Studies Social Factors That Affect Health

What motivates you?

What bothers us is often what motivates us. And it bothers me that scientific knowledge often does not inform the care people receive. A new area called “implementation science” is devoted to ensuring that evidence-informed interventions are implemented to benefit those in need.

Read Dr. Lewis’ latest paper published on JAMA Psych.

Specifically, I’m focused on improving mental and behavioral health care by integrating evidence-based practices such as cognitive behavioral therapy into community settings. My new paper in JAMA Psychiatry discusses how to advance the integration of measurement-based care into behavioral health treatment.

What first got you interested in implementation science?

While working on a study in graduate school, I found CBT worked for many young people. But at that time, cognitive behavioral therapy was largely unavailable outside of research trials. Implementation science promised to bring evidence-based care into practice. So, I decided to focus on this new field, even though no one at my university, including my mentor, was expert in this type of work.

Kayne Mettert, Caitlin Dorsey, Lewis, and Elena Navarro (L-R) all moved together to work at the Kaiser Permanente Health Research Institute in Seattle from Indiana University in Bloomington.

Kayne Mettert, Caitlin Dorsey, Lewis, and Elena Navarro (L-R) all moved together to work at the Kaiser Permanente Health Research Institute in Seattle from Indiana University in Bloomington.

Which projects have excited you most?

My work with Wolverine Human Services — residential treatment centers housing teens throughout Michigan — made the impossible, possible. It was the first time, to my knowledge, that frontline staff received training to deliver cognitive behavioral therapy with fidelity. Through our five years of systematic, tailored implementation with the Beck Institute for Cognitive Behavior Therapy, Wolverine was transformed. They’ve trained most of the staff in cognitive behavioral therapy and embedded onsite coaches to ensure the program is sustainable.

Now, I’m leading an implementation evaluation of a new member of the primary care team in Kaiser Permanente Washington clinics designed to connect patients with community resources. Specifically, we’re evaluating the impact of community resource specialists on patients’ experience and care teams’ ability to work at the top of their license.

I serve on the steering committee of Kaiser Permanente’s Social Needs Network for Evaluation and Translation group. We bring experts together and support them to think about how best to address social risk, build capacity and conduct pragmatic evaluations. Kaiser Permanente is at the cutting edge in terms of investing in care for the whole person and their community. Very few organizations have that vision — and the infrastructure to support this work.

What makes Kaiser Permanente a good place to do implementation science?

Kaiser Permanente is willing to invest in implementing evidence-based care. Being embedded in a delivery system affords the opportunity to contribute to the science and the practice of implementation.

Lewis, PhD, an associate investigator at the Kaiser Permanente Washington Health Research Institute, after keynoting the Global Evidence and Implementation Summit 2018 in Melbourne, Australia.

Lewis after keynoting the Global Evidence and Implementation Summit 2018 in Melbourne, Australia.

What keeps you going outside of work?

What I do most outside of work is to spend time with my 2-year-old son River. I’m an avid cyclist. I love to bike to work and bike River to school, the grocery store, you name it.

Our family is very musical, and we play music every day. I like to sing — but don’t ask me to. River and my husband Eric play all the things: We have five guitars (including River’s guitalele), a piano, drums and many other instruments. We don’t watch TV shows as a family — we watch live music videos together.

I’m proud to say River now requests Pearl Jam, a Seattle-born band that recently raised $ 12 million to address homelessness in our local communities. I have family nearby in British Columbia, where I was born and raised — and those are two reasons why Seattle is a great place for us to be.

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Studies highlight lasting effects of early life stress on the genome, gut, and brain

Excessive stress during fetal development or early childhood can have long-term consequences for the brain, from increasing the likelihood of brain disorders and affecting an individual’s response to stress as an adult to changing the nutrients a mother may pass on to her babies in the womb. The new research suggests novel approaches to combat the effects of such stress, such as inhibiting stress hormone production or ‘resetting’ populations of immune cells in the brain.
Parenting News — ScienceDaily

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Shaniqwa Jarvis Teams With X-Girl to Drop Capsule Collection at Social Studies NY

STREET-SMART FASHION: The streetwear brand X-Girl has lined up portrait photographer Shaniqwa Jarvis for its latest collaboration.
Compact to the degree that only three items are offered, the styles are available through Sunday at Social Studies NY, a multipurpose space and pop-up. To help spread the word about the collaboration, photographer Chandler Kennedy shot the painter and model Monica Hernandez wearing the assortment. A “Mini Me” crewneck sweatshirt retails for $ 95, the $ 50 “Too Many Rich People in NY” T-shirt and the $ 50 “Less, Less, Less” tote bag, which was hand-dyed by Jarvis, are up-for-grabs.
Jarvis, who has shot for Gap, Supreme, Riposte and others, dove into the capsule collection sector last year for the launch of her Baque Creative Press-published book. Started by musician Kim Gordon and stylist Daisy von Furth in 1994, the X-Girl brand has renewed its focus on New York, and is on the lookout for new talent and creatives that align with the brand. The company has more than 100 stores in Japan and has loyalists like Chloë Sevigny and Sofia Coppola. Early on, the Lafayette Street-rooted label rallied young feminists and that ethos remains.
Housed in Milk Studios, Social Studies NY builds from the success of last year’s Social

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A First Look at Virgil Abloh’s Limited Social Studies New York T-Shirt Design

During this weekend’s eagerly-awaited Social Studies event, attendees will have the chance to meet with some of the biggest names in the youth culture, customize a variety of garments and listen to exclusive talks between creatives. They’ll also have the opportunity to grab exclusive merch, including this duo of Virgil Abloh-designed T-shirts. Emblazoned with “STUYVESANT LEADER PHYSICAL ED.” verbiage, the red/yellow and black/white shirts juxtapose the collegiate text on the front with the logos of every single event contributor on the rear, making for a crowded, yet communal, design.

All proceeds of the $ 100 USD shirt will go to Casita Maria, a Bronx-based youth charity. Guests will be able to grab their choice of tee at the event this weekend, November 16-18.

Most recently, Abloh got into hot water over his work on Serena Williams’ GQ cover.

Click here to view full gallery at HYPEBEAST




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