China clones ‘Sherlock Holmes’ police dog to cut training times: state media

Scientists in southwest China’s Yunnan province have cloned what they called the “Sherlock Holmes of police dogs” in a program they hope will help cut training times and costs for police dogs, state media reported on Wednesday.


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Calling all wannabe project managers: Learn Lean and Six Sigma with this online training

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Without a coach to call, direct, and execute plays, a football team is just a bunch of beefy dudes running chaotically after a leather spheroid. 

In a similar vein, corporate teams can struggle to achieve desired outcomes if they lack the planning, organization, and oversight of a skilled project manager. Such professionals are the oil that keeps a company’s engine running smoothly; they’re the reason why shit gets done, and done efficiently.

Lean and Six Sigma are a pair of methodologies that contributes to a project manager’s valuable ability to effectively lead a team — and they can both be learned via online courses. Read more…

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Floyd Mayweather Sr. Caught The Fade In Boxing Training Session [Video]

Floyd Mayweather Jr. v Tenshin Nasukawa Media Availability & Workout

Source: Ethan Miller / Getty

The father of Floyd Mayweather Jr. made his mark in boxing as both a professional fighter and most notably as a trainer. However, a training session didn’t go Floyd Sr.’s way recently and he caught a fade but appeared to be fine shortly after.

TMZ Sports reports:

Floyd Mayweather Sr. — a former pro boxer who became one of the top trainers in the world — was at his son’s TMT boxing gym in Vegas this week, where he decided to spar with one of the younger guys.

It started off great … with Floyd Sr. stickin’ and movin’ and throwing some pretty quick shots — but, when the other guy started to fight back, it didn’t go well for the old man.

Floyd took a few clean shots to the head — sending him flying backward … and ended with the elder Mayweather lying flat on his back with his feet up in the air.

Before the jokes fly, Floyd Sr. is 66 years old and probably in better shape than men half his age. Anyone can catch the hands and it was just his time.

Photo: Getty

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TITLE: Associate, Training & EducationREPORTS TO: VP, Training & EducationFLSA: Non-ExemptLOCATED: NYC – HQ JOB OVERVIEW: This full-time position supports the day-to-day operations of the Training & Education Department for the International Cosmetics & Perfumes (ICP) current …

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JPMorgan Chase Invests $6 Million for Tech Training D.C. Area’s Black Students

Black and minority students at five school districts in the Washington, D.C. region will be beneficiaries of a $ 6 million commitment by JPMorgan Chase to help train and equip youth to land well-paying tech jobs.

The money is coming from the banking giant’s “New Skills for Youth” program. It will support the development of new educational initiatives at Baltimore City Public Schools, DC Public Schools, Montgomery County Public Schools, Prince George’s County Public Schools, and Fairfax County Public Schools in partnership with Northern Virginia Community College.

The donation is part of a $ 350 million companywide investment by the New York-based company and nation’s largest bank in jobs and skills development globally.

The effort comes as more firms add tech jobs in the nation’s capital region. The growth is building higher demand for skilled IT workers and a need to fill the jobs. Take Amazon.

Last month the world’s largest online retailer picked New York City and Arlington, Virginia, for its second headquarters. The two areas will each get 25,000 lucrative tech jobs that Amazon is projected to bring.

While schools offer IT coursework, these courses are not always aligned with the skills, credentials, and work experiences employers demand, the bank reported. In 2017, only 3,000 individuals in the region obtained associate degrees and other sub-BA credentials in digital skills and technology but over 15,000 jobs needed those credentials. Demand for tech workers with less than a 4-year degree increased by 42% in the region between 2014 and 2017.

“We have a responsibility to build a better future for the region’s young people,” stated Jamie Dimon, chairman and CEO at JPMorgan Chase. “This investment is a good example of how the public and private sectors can work together to create the opportunity for more people and grow the local economy so that everyone benefits.”

The JPMorgan Chase philanthropic investment will help to launch 16 new and revised high-quality, demand-driven IT career pathways for thousands of area students in high school through college.

This initiative aims to:

  • Help more young people in the region, particularly underrepresented populations, achieving career and economic success, with 3,200 more students participating in career pathway programs that connect with careers in fields including computer science and cybersecurity.
  • Employers providing 2,200 internships for students in IT career pathways.
  • A new system that enables educators to use regional labor market data on an ongoing basis to ensure that career pathways are aligned with employer demand.

“We need to make it clear to young people—from Anacostia, Prince George’s County to Baltimore and Virginia—that they have a future in this region—and we are working together to do just that,” stated Peter Scher, head of Corporate Responsibility and chair of the Mid-Atlantic Region, JPMorgan Chase.

“Amazon’s HQ2 announcement reinforced that companies around the globe are competing for talent, and through this investment, we are working with our partners in the public and private sectors to expand access to opportunity for young people in Greater Washington—and boost the workforce by directly aligning education and training programs with the skills needed for open technology roles here.”

The post JPMorgan Chase Invests $ 6 Million for Tech Training D.C. Area’s Black Students appeared first on Black Enterprise.

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Teacher Training, Not Tear Gas

When American poet Emma Lazarus entreated the world to give us their tired, their poor, their huddled masses yearning to breathe free, I doubt she meant for these same people to inhale the noxious fumes of tear gas. That bedrock sentiment, etched into a plaque near the feet of lady Liberty, was trampled this week by our own troops when they fired choking tear gas across our southern border at families with children, denying them legal entry into our nation at the San Ysidro border crossing near San Diego.

We know these children. Nearly half of all migrants who sought entrance into the United States with their relatives over this past year were from Guatemala. Child Aid, the Portland-based literacy nonprofit I founded nearly two decades ago, works on the ground there, with kids just like those now gathering at our border.

Girls reading at the San Isidro school, Sololá, Guatemala. (Anna Watts)

I have seen close-up the realities that families in Guatemala face: extreme poverty, food insecurity and violence. Making their home country a safer, more prosperous nation where families can thrive is a key to staunching some of the flow of desperate people to our nation.

Now is the time to spend our money, time and know-how reaching people in great need with tried and true interventions—including educational resources for children in Guatemalan schools and homes. This approach is a smarter and more sustainable plan forward than spending billions of dollars building a wall or terrorizing immigrants. It’s also more humane.

When I first began working in Guatemala 23 years ago, I was told that our programs wouldn’t work because the teachers and school officials weren’t interested in making their classrooms vibrant places of learning. I was warned that parents didn’t value education for their children.

The opposite of all that is true. Principals open shuttered schools and teachers sacrifice vacation days to help us launch our Adventures in Reading program. Parents bring their children to school and ask us where they can find more books for their sons and daughters. Together with Child Aid, teachers, parents and community leaders have drastically improved the lives of more than 50,000 children to date.

First grade teacher Karen Liliana Gutierrez Gonzalez at the Maya Tz’utijil school in Santiago, Atitlán, Guatemala. (Anna Watts)

Those of us working in the international NGO field know that a well-designed, expertly executed program—be it literacy, medical care or environmental protection—are effective at pulling people out of poverty. And while some families are fleeing the oppressive poverty and violence, there is a groundswell of people in Guatemala who are staying and fighting for a more equitable and safe nation.

We saw evidence of this passion earlier this year when thousands of citizens from all walks of life took to the streets in protest of government corruption. We see more evidence in the community buy-in many small NGOs receive from parents, healthcare workers and community leaders.

Child Aid is part of that contingent, holding fast to the idea that education gives people—in our case, elementary-age children—the boost needed to one day advocate for themselves and their broader world.

Preschool teacher Maria Griselda Chavajay Peneleu with her students outside the Chacaya school near Santiago Atitlán, Guatemala. (Anna Watts)

As we rush headlong into the holiday season, watching families with children in diapers running scared from U.S. troops aiming tear gas at them shatters me. I know it breaks your heart, too. These are our children, our families. There is a demand for a better life that must be met for all our sakes.

Nancy Press is co-founder and CEO of Child Aid. She was trained as an anthropologist and is professor emerita at Oregon Health and Science University in Portland, Oregon.

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The post Teacher Training, Not Tear Gas appeared first on Ms. Magazine Blog.

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Attention training improves intelligence and functioning of children’s brain

Being able to voluntarily regulate our attention is crucial for mental processes such as intelligence and learning in children. With this in mind, researchers have carried out a study in which they evaluated the influence of a computer-based attention-training intervention on intelligence scores and brain functioning on a group of pre-school age children.
Child Development News — ScienceDaily

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Interview: ‘Creed II’ Director Steven Caple Jr. Talks ‘Rocky’ Movies, Training Montages and More ‘Creed’ Sequels

Interview: 'Creed II' Director Steven Caple Jr. Talks 'Rocky' Movies, Training Montages and More 'Creed' Sequels

 

Before Ryan Coogler directed the original Creed and Steven Caple Jr. followed up with Creed II, the two filmmakers attended USC together as film students. Coogler was a senior when Caple Jr. was a freshman, and they formed a bond that would eventually act as a catalyst for Caple Jr. — who had only directed one feature film previously, 2016's The Land — to lead the Creed sequel.

In Creed II, Caple Jr. builds off Coogler's rich, character-driven film with a story that…

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Sarah Brightman Returns from Space Training for New Album and Tour: ‘I Needed to Earth Myself’

Sarah Brightman is making an astronomical landing with her fifteenth studio album Hymn.

After spending months in Russia training for a trip to outer space that she postponed in 2015, Brightman, 58, opened up to PEOPLE exclusively about the creation of her newest album and the planning stages of her tour.

“I needed to earth myself,” says the soprano singer. “I said I would like to do an album of songs which are full of light, full of hope. Songs that remind me of when I felt safe and familiar with things in my childhood when I sang in my church.”

“If I don’t use and I don’t convey my feelings through it, I feel depleted,” she added. “I don’t function very well and that’s the beauty of having a gift like a voice. You sort of know what to do. You know what direction to take, you know that you want to communicate through it.”

Brightman, who shot to fame after star-turning roles on Broadway musicals Cats and Phantom of the Opera, linked up with producer Frank Peterson for the album-creating process. What came out of two-and-a-half years of planning and recording was the dynamic, choir-filled album, Hymn, out on Nov. 9.

“ is about looking into the good in things because I do believe that good prevails always,” she said, adding that the word “positivity” would describe her album.

“I did experience huge amounts when I was in the space program that actually how precious everything really is on this beautiful planet and how precious that is,” she added.

Now, the “Time to Say Goodbye” vocalist is ready to take Hymn on the road later this fall for a tour that’s “going to be quite beautiful.”

“I have a lot of energy. I tend to before I go on these tours, I become more energetic,” she says. “You create a power for yourself which will protect you because when you go on tour you’re dealing with the hardship of jet lag and moving around continually.”

The “Angel of Music” singer says her set on tour will be divided into two halves. The first will feature a more retrospective aspect to Brightman’s music, which will look like “somebody who is going to the ballet or the opera.” The second will be a bit more modern and feature most of the songs off Hymn.

“I’m wearing all these amazing runway gowns, which I’ve made a little more theatrical by adding things to them. Stones, crystals, all sorts of stuff,” she says. “I’ve got a big choir behind me. Up really high. I’ve got an orchestra on one side, a band on the other side and myself in the middle.”

Brightman’s album is filled with collaborations with artists like French tenor Vincent Niclo on single “Sogni” and Japanese composer Yoshiki on the emotional “Miracle.”

“ is a really interesting guy and we got along very well,” she said. “It was a very interesting collaboration with Japan’s most famous rockstar writing a beautiful contemporary classical piece.”

Along with the collaborations, Brightman’s album jumps from classical and cinematic music to pop rhythms in a cohesive album threaded by its spiritual nature. The album also takes fans back to one of her most famous classics “Time to Say Goodbye” with Andrea Bocelli, which she recreates in a touching English rendition.

“I wrote the lyrics for it but they were very much inspired from the original Italian lyrics when translated,” she said. “It’s quite a grand song, it’s almost like an opera song, but I wanted to do this in a very intimate way.”

Fans can purchase tickets for “Hymn: Sarah Brightman in Concert” through her website.


PEOPLE.com

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While Training to Defend His Heavyweight Title, Daniel Cormier Moonlights as a High School Coach

Ahead of UFC 230, Daniel Cormier discusses how he balances life as a world-famous fighter and a high school wrestling coach. 

 

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