This $40 app can help you build a website without writing a single line of code

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If you’re a creative with an impressive portfolio or a business owner selling a medley of high-demand products, but you don’t have a legitimate website to show for it — do you really exist?

In our increasingly digital world, it’s almost a requirement that you have a functioning website to establish your existence and publicize your goods and services to the rest of humanity. But the concept of building a website sounds time-consuming, expensive, and simply put: hard.

But platforms like Page Builder Pro are popping up to offer a fuss-free and cost-effective way to assemble the site of your dreams without any sleepless nights. If you’ve never written a line of code in your life or find website-building platforms like Squarespace too costly, you’ll like the fact that you can build a site with Page Builder for under $ 40. Read more…

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What Not to Include in Your Website Disclaimer

A website disclaimer is a legal notice, generally found in
the footer of webpages, that helps limit any liabilities that could result from
the contents of the site.

For instance, if your website provides instructions to users
about how to erect and dismantle a basic scaffold, your website disclaimer can
be used to advise your visitors that they are using this information at their
own risk.

In this post, we cover four things that you should not
include in your website disclaimer.

1. Leave Certain Disclosures Out of Your Disclaimer

The purpose of a disclaimer is to help avoid potential legal
battles involving the contents of your website. You use it to outline the risks
of using your site (or the information on your site), what is or isn’t
guaranteed, any uncertainties, and more. It is not where you make all kinds of
disclosures about your site, unless it directly applies to something you cannot
warrant.

For instance, let’s say you are a middle-aged woman running
a site that provides legal information but is not a law firm. For this type of
site, there’s no legal reason to tell users you’re a 45-year-old woman, but you
may face some legal troubles if you neglect to tell users that your site’s
legal information was not written by a law firm.

There is a limit to how much you should or shouldn’t
disclose in your disclaimer, and a good rule of thumb is to include anything
that, if not disclosed, could become an issue in a courtroom and leave the rest
out.  

2. Don’t Include Your Company Fees

A website disclaimer is no place for your company’s fees,
and a pricing page or an agreement is the best place to advise your clients of
the costs associated with your service.

For example, if you’re a freelance writer and you charge your
clients fees for additional services (like formatting documents or uploading
content to a content management system), you shouldn’t include this information
in your disclaimer—even if it applies to all your clients.

Instead, you should put details about your services, including costs, in the Consulting Agreement you sign with clients before taking on a new project.

3. Avoid Blanket Confidentiality Clauses

Perhaps the purpose of your website is to find clients so
you may conduct business that involves confidential information. Or you need to
collect confidential information in order to provide a service to your clients.
Whatever the case may be, a website disclaimer is not the place to include a
catch-all confidentiality clause or agreement.

Confidentiality is better handled case-by-case using a Confidentiality Agreement or a confidentiality clause in another agreement (like a Service Agreement) so that the terms are adequately captured and applies to the circumstance that requires confidentiality.

4. A Lot of Generic Text

There are no standard clauses for disclaimers, which means you have to skillfully draft (or have someone else draft) a statement that applies to your website and that will protect you from liabilities specific to your circumstances. Copying a generic disclaimer from another site is not recommended and can sometimes land you in hot water if you use statements that do not apply to your site or are too ambiguous. Instead, consider the potential issues that could arise from people using your website and create a statement that applies to your situation.

Writing Your Website Disclaimer

A disclaimer helps limit liability for your website. It
should be reserved to outline the risks associated with your site or things you
cannot guarantee. Remember, a website disclaimer should not include information
such as company fees or confidentiality clauses, as it’s better to address
these terms elsewhere.

The post What Not to Include in Your Website Disclaimer appeared first on LawDepot Blog.

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The publisher of a neo-Nazi website said white nationalism was a winner in the midterm elections, while others cheered Trump as their champion

• Police investigate Wisconsin high schoolers posed in apparent Nazi salute


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We Heart: The Website That Keeps Your Voter Registration Straight

Voter suppression laws across the U.S. make it harder to vote—and often leave people of color, people with disabilities, students and senior citizens bearing the brunt of new burdens at the ballot box. And while there isn’t an app that can change the hours your polling place is open or remind you of the intricacies of a complicated voter ID law, a new website can help you make sure that your voter registration is safe.

Voters unfairly purged from the rolls are losing their chance to be heard. A new website helps them safeguard against just that. (ClatieK / Creative Commons)

States often permit officials to purge names from the voter rolls after years of inactivity, or in case of death or relocation, but many voters in recent years have found that they were unfairly purged—and when they turned up to the polls, they were swiftly turned away.

With voting rights more under attack than ever, it’s important that everyone stay vigilant to ensure that their registrations remain active. That’s where Don’t Get Purged comes in—a new website that checks the voter rolls in your state so that you can be sure you’re all set for election day.

The way it works is simple: Users go to dontgetpurged.org and enter their name, address, date of birth and email. The system then searches through the voting rolls to find that user’s registration file. If a user finds out that they are no longer registered, the site can help them re-registered before election day; if it turns out a user’s registration checks out, they can breathe a sigh of relief and figure out which shirt looks best with their “I Voted” sticker.

The upcoming elections are the most important in our lifetime. Play it safe: go to dontgetpurged.org today to make sure your registration is active. Potential voters are encouraged to check back more than once to make sure they are still eligible to vote, too—so make sure to register, resist and repeat.

Miranda Martin is a feminist writer and activist and an editorial intern at Ms. She has written for a variety of publications and been published by The Unedit and Project Consent. Miranda recently graduated from University of Wisconsin La Crosse with a major in Interpersonal Communications and a double minor in Creative Writing and Women, Gender and Sexuality Studies. She loves to travel, read, exercise and daydream about the fall of the patriarchy.

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The post We Heart: The Website That Keeps Your Voter Registration Straight appeared first on Ms. Magazine Blog.

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