Harvard’s Hasty Pudding theater club casts 6 women after 175 years of all-male shows

There was nothing hasty about this decision.

It took nearly two centuries, but Harvard’s Hasty Pudding Theatricals has cast six female students for its 2019 show after using only males since its first show in 1844.

That means the production’s 12-member cast will feature an even number of men and…

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More Women Accuse ‘Most Eligible Bachelor’ Doctor of Rape the Day After He’s Charged

Orange County District Attorney

The Orange County District Attorney’s office has received multiple calls from women accusing a Newport Beach surgeon and reality-TV star of sexual assault, one day after announcing a first set of charges against him.

The new allegations came after District Attorney Tony Rackauckas announced in a press conference on Tuesday morning that the surgeon and his girlfriend face charges for allegedly drugging and forcing themselves on two women.

A spokesperson told The Daily Beast that the district attorney’s office was still working to confirm the exact number of new allegations, but that they had received “many” phone calls since yesterday.

Read more at The Daily Beast.

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http://www.acrx.org -As millions of Americans strive to deal with the economic downturn,loss of jobs,foreclosures,high cost of gas,and the rising cost of prescription drug cost. Charles Myrick ,the President of American Consultants Rx, announced the re-release of the American Consultants Rx community service project which consist of millions of free discount prescription cards being donated to thousands of not for profits,hospitals,schools,churches,etc. in an effort to assist the uninsured,under insured,and seniors deal with the high cost of prescription drugs.-American Consultants Rx -Pharmacy Discount Network News

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Surgeon and his girlfriend accused of drugging, raping women

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http://www.acrx.org -As millions of Americans strive to deal with the economic downturn,loss of jobs,foreclosures,high cost of gas,and the rising cost of prescription drug cost. Charles Myrick ,the President of American Consultants Rx, announced the re-release of the American Consultants Rx community service project which consist of millions of free discount prescription cards being donated to thousands of not for profits,hospitals,schools,churches,etc. in an effort to assist the uninsured,under insured,and seniors deal with the high cost of prescription drugs.-American Consultants Rx -Pharmacy Discount Network News

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Women who experienced higher levels of trauma gave birth to significantly smaller male babies

Researchers have found significantly lower birth weights in male infants — an average decrease of 38 grams, or approximately 1.3 ounces — born to women who had been exposed to trauma at some point in their lives and who secreted higher levels of cortisol, a hormone related to stress, in late pregnancy.
Infant and Preschool Learning News — ScienceDaily

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Meet the hidden women behind London Fashion Week

Here’s how fashion week actually happens…

REX

Another London fashion week has been and gone, seeing bad traffic, excellent celebrity spotting and a lot of well-dressed people frequent the city.

Burberry, Victoria Beckham, Erdem, Christopher Kane and Roksanda highlighted the weekend, with Kendall Jenner and Winne Harlow being among those walking the runway.

But it’s not just models, designers and influencers that make London fashion week. What about the hidden women that are actually making it happen?

From fashion illustrators and street style photographers to backstage managers, DJs and make up artists, we spoke to the women behind LFW to find out what really goes on…

Jessica Bird

Job title: Fashion Illustrator

What my job entails at fashion week: Lots and lots of drawing. Capturing backstage activity and key looks from shows, live drawing, interpreting the collections from 3D to 2D essentially.

This LFW I have been… In residency each evening at the London EDITION hotel drawing guests and LFW goers, capturing their looks in 15 minute pastel portraits. I’m also SHOWstudio’s collection artist for London for this season so I have been illustrating shows live from their studio during the day.

What I wear on the job at LFW: I feel like my wardrobe has started to reflect my work – I play with colour a lot as I do in my illustrations, my wardrobe is very bright, quite fun, lots of fluorescent colours. This week I’ve been wearing a few of my favourite pieces from Roksanda – with my trusty artists apron over the top of course!

Three essentials in my LFW bag: Pastels, sketchpad and paint markers.

My most stressful part of fashion week: Trying to keep up with all the shows, there’s just so many looks I want to capture!

My most exciting fashion week experience: Being asked to cover LFW for Showstudio for sure. It’d been a dream of mine since I started illustrating so I’m feeling very grateful to have been asked!

Fashion week work snack: Popcorn!

Top LFW tip: COFFEE!

Samantha Qureshi

Job title: NARS UK Senior Makeup Artist

What my job entails at fashion week: As a makeup artist ambassador for NARS, my job behind the scenes entails various missions: assisting the lead makeup artists backstage is one of those, making sure my hands become the extension of their creative vision without a fail and I am also in charge of doing VIP makeup sessions during Fashion Weeks seasons.

This LFW I have been… Part of the most beautiful shows from New York to London so far. Rodarte was a dream and the exquisite pop art inspired makeup by James Kaliardos and beautiful flowery hair composition by Odile Gilbert, was part of one of the most inspirational moments of my career. I had the privilege to assist Lucia Pieroni during her makeup test at Christopher Kane’s studio in London, I loved to see how she creates and works the skin and how she really connects with Christopher Kane’s vision of beauty. All the shows always feel really special to me. As a creative person I feed my artistry juice with all the artists surrounding me, fashion designers, makeup artists, hairdressers, nail technicians, models are a huge part of my artistry growth.

What I wear on the job at LFW: All black, neutral and chic, comfortable clothes. Backstage, it’s always speed, you have to be ready to run, be on your knees, and be 100% effective and dynamic. I keep my makeup very glowy and lightweight with a lot of NARS Skincare. Our new Climax Mascara and the Radiant Creamy concealers are my bests products to wear when working on shows.. Orgasm lip balm this season and go!

Three essentials in my LFW bag: I make sure all my NARS skincare set is ready – radiant Creamy can do it all without fail, and my precious brushes which I never live without.

My most stressful part of fashion week: Time keeping, sometimes we have to wait for a while for the models to come from other shows, and when they arrive, hair, nails, and makeup teams become one big team making sure in the last minutes before the line-up, every model looks fabulous and ready to go on the catwalk.

My weirdest fashion week experience: The day we used just a concealer on a show was not the most satisfying feeling being a makeup artist. It also shows how being an artist is so subjective and I appreciated the reflection and inspiration behind it… but my brushes stayed clean!

Fashion week work snack: In my bag I always carry a protein and cereal bar, a banana and plenty of water. (Take away coffee isn’t an option…)

Top LFW tip: No coffee on an eyeliner/bold lips look day. Unless you have a really steady hand… Lucky you!

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orange works.

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Yossy Akinsanya

Job title: Street style photographer

What my job entails at fashion week: This fashion week I’ve taken to the main venues being used for shows and have captured every kind of outfit you can think of from designer to conceptual to on trend.

This LFW I have been… Running from venue to venue trying to find the most interesting and eye-stopping outfits out there. I’ve lost count of exactly how many people’s Instagrams I’ve asked for after taking their picture.

What I wear on the job at LFW: As it’s fashion week I do try and dress up a little bit myself but bring an element of comfort as I’m doing a lot of running around so I’ve been wearing dresses paired with vans, so pretty much girly but comfortable.

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models after the @burberry show, part one.

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Three essentials in my LFW bag: A power bank for sure because my phone is always in my hand whether it’s for directions, taking usernames, checking the fashion week schedule or snapping the experience. Water because it is a long day and you will find yourself feeling dehydrated if you don’t. Lastly, business cards. I made the mistake of not having any ready but after working it I’ve come to realise how much everyone uses them and how helpful they can be for building contacts and getting your name out there.

My most stressful part of fashion week: I think trying to feel like you’ve covered everything and getting to places on time definitely.

My weirdest fashion week experience: I got stopped myself along with my friend who was doing photography and we were interviewed on our outfits and being black girls in fashion which was cool!

Fashion week work snack: Energy bars, they fit anywhere, taste good and are quick to eat.

Top LFW tip: Always do a schedule for your day the night before – times, locations and shows. You need to be prepared on the day.

london fashion week careers

Cathie Carday

Job title: Showcaller/Backstage Manager

What my job entails at fashion week: Ensuring the show goes smoothly, making sure any backstage requirements are met, setting up and breaking down the backstage area, and liasing with the show director, technical team and security to identify and solve any problems that arise. I’m also the go-to person for the designer and stylist to keep to schedule and ensuring everyone can do their job within the given timescale. I take care of the models and inform them of choreography and creating model line ups before and during shows, provide model lists for hair, make up and dressing teams. And as a showcaller I work with the sound and lighting team and cue the sound, lighting and models when we go to show.

This LFW I have been… Working primarily as backstage manager in the BFC main show space but have worked on Steven Tai, Johnstons of Elgin and Mark Fast as a showcaller this season.

What I wear on the job at LFW: I need to be I invisible but not insignificant – the standard ‘uniform’ in event world is smart blacks but it is fashion so think utility chic – a jump suit with a designer pair of trainers is working well this season!

london fashion week careers

Three essentials in my LFW bag: A bum bag, a clipboard and Paracetamol/ lipstick.

My most stressful part of fashion week: The most stressful moment is when the alarm rings at 4am for a 5am call!

My most exciting fashion week experience: Richard Quinn last season – our special guest was the Queen !!!

Fashion week work snack: Bounce balls!

Top LFW tip: Be fabulous, fierce and feminine!

The post Meet the hidden women behind London Fashion Week appeared first on Marie Claire.

Marie Claire

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Women are wearing absolutely nothing under their jackets

Forgot something? That’s what some bystanders were wondering when they saw fearless fashion vixens at last week’s ready-to-wear shows rocking the latest look: an open jacket worn over bare breasts. That’s right — no top and no bra, just unfettered boobage. “Everybody is pushing the limits nowadays and figuring out a cool, unique way to…
Fashion News, Photos, and Video | New York Post

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http://www.acrx.org -As millions of Americans strive to deal with the economic downturn,loss of jobs,foreclosures,high cost of gas,and the rising cost of prescription drug cost. Charles Myrick ,the President of American Consultants Rx, announced the re-release of the American Consultants Rx community service project which consist of millions of free discount prescription cards being donated to thousands of not for profits,hospitals,schools,churches,etc. in an effort to assist the uninsured,under insured,and seniors deal with the high cost of prescription drugs.-American Consultants Rx -Pharmacy Discount Network News

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‘Murphy Brown’ Cast On How The Series Empowered Young Women, Broke Glass Ceiling & More | PeopleTV

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http://www.acrx.org -As millions of Americans strive to deal with the economic downturn,loss of jobs,foreclosures,high cost of gas,and the rising cost of prescription drug cost. Charles Myrick ,the President of American Consultants Rx, announced the re-release of the American Consultants Rx community service project which consist of millions of free discount prescription cards being donated to thousands of not for profits,hospitals,schools,churches,etc. in an effort to assist the uninsured,under insured,and seniors deal with the high cost of prescription drugs.-American Consultants Rx -Pharmacy Discount Network News

CHARITY UPDATE:

Click today to request your free ACRX discount prescription card and save up to 80% off of your medicine!

SPECIAL DONATION REQUEST UPDATE:

Please help American Consultants Rx achieve it’s biggest goal yet of donating over 30 million discount prescription cards to over 50k organizations in an effort to assist millions of Americans in need. Please click here to donate today!

Miss America Says Transgender Women Should Be Allowed To Compete

Nia Imani Franklin, representing New York state, was crowned the 98th Miss America in Atlantic City on September 9. The 25-year-old is the ninth Black woman to win the pageant. The North Carolina native is making the media rounds and opened up about the ban against transgender women competing in the competition.

According to Advocate.com, “One of the competition’s official rules is that you have to be a ‘natural born woman’ to compete, therefore eliminating transgender women and non-binary women.” In an interview on The Clay Cane Show on Sirius XM Urban View, Cane asked Franklin, “Do you think trans women should be allowed to compete?”

Franklin responded, “That’s something I haven’t given a lot of thought to. I could see the organization may be going into a different direction in the future, but at this time our goal is just to focus on women who want to further their education.”

She continued, “If trans women want to compete I think they should be able to — that’s not something I think we are really putting too much emphasis on as far as, ‘Are you trans? Check this box’ when you compete. When I competed, in my application, there was nothing that asked me if I was a trans woman or not, so we’re definitely not discriminating.”

Cane did confirm there is currently a ban on transgender women, but Franklin said it was her opinion that trans women should be able to compete. Click here to hear Nia Imani Franklin in her own words.

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Our 30th birthday panel of trailblazers set out the future for women

Here’s everything you need to know…

Robert Chadwick

This month marks Marie Claire‘s 30th birthday, a milestone that we are celebrating with a special commemorative October issue featuring none other than Jodie Whittaker, the first ever woman to take on the role of Doctor Who.

‘It’s no coincidence that our 30th birthday October issue cover star is Jodie Whittaker, the first female Dr Who in the show’s 50 year history,’ our editor Trish Halpin announced as she opened our Marie Claire 30th birthday breakfast on the future of women this morning at The Clock Library and Gym, in Marylebone. ‘I think that it demonstrates just how much can change, and an awful lot has changed in the 30 years since Marie Claire was launched.’

Robert Chadwick

‘But we all know that there is so much more that needs to be done to really get to a position of gender equality and to ensure that the voices of women of every creed, colour and age are really truly being heard,’ she continued, going on to introduce a powerhouse female panel to speak on the future for women in work, technology, diversity and sustainability.

Female guests networked over fresh fruit, granola and plenty of caffeine  – hearing the expert insights on the future of women from the panel, and taking away invaluable advice.

These are the most inspirational takeaways from the Marie Claire 30th birthday breakfast, with thanks Carol Bagnald from Black on Silver for making it all possible:

The future of work and women

(Jo Swinson CBE and MP for East Dunbartonshire)

‘Thinking about what’s happened in the workplace in the last 30 years, we have made progress for the position of women,’ explained Jo Swinson MP. ‘We’ve seen a lot of legislative progress – in the 1970s the ladies at the Ford plant campaigned for equal pay which ultimately became legislation in the equal pay act, yet we still don’t have that as a reality over 40 years later. We won new protections for women in terms of maternity leave, and yet still today we have 54,000 women a year in this country losing their jobs because of pregnancy and maternity discrimination. It’s illegal, it’s been illegal for years and yet it still happens.’

‘Yes, there are more women at the top,’ she continued. ‘The number of women in parliament has gone from 3% to 30% so there is progress, but when I was 21 I didn’t think we’d still be having this discussion 20 years later, and it doesn’t feel like progress has been as quick as it should have been.’

What can we do?

Well according to Jo, there are three things that everybody can do to make change.

‘The first is to just sit at the table. Sheryl Sandberg once said that and it really resonated with me. How often have we gone to a meeting and women have sat around at the sidelines or not felt like they could contribute? So sit at the table – you are there on your own merit, and make sure you say something even if you’re scared inside. The second is to amplify the voices of other women. In Obama’s first term, the women in his cabinet decided to praise and amplify each other’s points in order to get them the credit they deserved – something we can all follow. And finally, break the mould – think about how you can challenge stereotypes and have an impact on what young boys and girls will see.’

The future of technology and women

(Anne-Marie Imafidon – co-founder of Stemettes)

‘If we had more women involved in the creation of technology, it would be more altruistic,’ Anne-Marie explained, going on to use the new FitBit period tracker as an example.

‘They put out this feature and it limited a period to ten days which is an interesting restriction to put on something like period tracking,’ she continued. ‘It just goes to show that there should have been more women in the room. We need to make sure that we are there.’

What can we do?

‘We all know the three Rs – reading, writing and arithmetic, but there are now four,’ Anne-Marie explained to the room. ‘We need to re-digital. Digital literacy is something we all need to make sure we’re clued up on. Rather than being just a consumer, we should look to be creators, get ourselves in that room and take control.’

The future of diversity and women

(Ella Hammad – Authentically Ella and Civil/ Tunnel engineer)

‘When I started in construction there were only a few women, and fewer women of colour, and even fewer women that were muslim,’ Ella explained during the panel discussion. ‘There were a lot of things about diversity that really resonated with me. I am treated differently – and not just because I’m a woman, also because I wear a headscarf.’

What can we do?

‘We need to encourage younger girls to get into engineering, and something that I definitely want to encourage is for those young girls to find the role models that I didn’t have when I was growing up,’ Ella explained. ‘My mother was my role model but she wasn’t an engineer, and when I got into engineering, if I had a role model that looked like me, I would have had a clearer idea which path I should take and I’d feel more comfortable and a lot more confident. It is difficult to talk about an issue that you are facing to someone who doesn’t look like you and doesn’t understand it.’

She continued: ‘But we shouldn’t just be trying to raise the number of women in engineering and construction. We need to shatter the misconception that our intellectual abilities are defined by the way we look and the fashion we choose to wear.’

The future of sustainability and women

(Amy Powney – Creative Director of Mother of Pearl)

‘There is a huge campaign going on at the moment with increasing numbers of women wearing t-shirts saying “I’m a feminist”, but I don’t think anyone is actually thinking about the woman that manufactured that t-shirt,’ Amy explained. ‘She probably had no maternity rights and didn’t get paid enough money, and we’re just walking around wearing them flippantly and throwing those t-shirts in the bin at the end of the trend, not thinking about the women earlier in the journey.’

What can we do?

‘It’s not just about us,’ Amy Powney explained. ‘We obviously have issues that we need to deal with here but there are huge problems out there that are bigger than our problems that need addressing. We need to talk about the women in the supply chain and think about them too.’

Amy continued: ‘We are a fast-fashion nation who are consuming clothes very rapidly and throwing them into the bin. We have got circulatory issues, we have got synthetic fibre issues – we are basically killing the world through fashion, and as the women that we are, we need to make choices that can ensure that we look great and save the planet at the same time.’

Robert Chadwick

Discussing these topics – writing about them, tweeting about them and addressing them in forums like this – is what is really going to push the agenda and make change,’ Trish explained to the room, encouraging us all to keep the conversation going.

Feeling inspired? Come along to our next event and experience the first hand empowerment yourself.

With special thanks again to The Clock, Carol Bagnald and Black & Silver.

The post Our 30th birthday panel of trailblazers set out the future for women appeared first on Marie Claire.

Marie Claire

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Ex-NBA Player Jason Maxiell Admits To Cheating On His Wife Their Entire Relationship And Sleeping With 341 Women [Video]

If you watched Basketball Wives, you’re familiar with the struggles Brandi and Jason Maxiell have been through in their marriage. Brandi talked about her husband cheating on her on the show but no one knew the extent until the couple aired out all of their dirty laundry with life coach Iyanla Vanzant recently, not even Brandi.

In the scene above, Jason admits to cheating on Brandi throughout their entire 17-year relationship. Brandi was aware of that, but what she didn’t know is that Jason has slept with over 50 different women during their eight year marriage.

Jason has slept with 341 women in his life, but denies that he is a sex addict.

Brandi is understandably shaken up by the revelation of 50 women. She thought that number was closer to eight women and Jason appeared emotionless as his wife held back tears.

Iyanla asked Brandi why she would stay with a man with such reckless disregard for their union. Brandi quickly answers it’s because she said “I do.”

Will Jason and Brandi be able to save their marriage? Should they even try? Let us know in the comments.

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Viola Davis On How ‘Widows’ Portrays Its Strong Women | TIFF 2018 | PeopleTV

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http://www.acrx.org -As millions of Americans strive to deal with the economic downturn,loss of jobs,foreclosures,high cost of gas,and the rising cost of prescription drug cost. Charles Myrick ,the President of American Consultants Rx, announced the re-release of the American Consultants Rx community service project which consist of millions of free discount prescription cards being donated to thousands of not for profits,hospitals,schools,churches,etc. in an effort to assist the uninsured,under insured,and seniors deal with the high cost of prescription drugs.-American Consultants Rx -Pharmacy Discount Network News

CHARITY UPDATE:

Click today to request your free ACRX discount prescription card and save up to 80% off of your medicine!

SPECIAL DONATION REQUEST UPDATE:

Please help American Consultants Rx achieve it’s biggest goal yet of donating over 30 million discount prescription cards to over 50k organizations in an effort to assist millions of Americans in need. Please click here to donate today!

Can Women Trust Online Medical Care?

Social media isn’t just for sharing cat videos and pictures of puppies. According to a 2012 report from PwC’s Health Research Institute, one-third of consumers are using Facebook, Twitter, and other social media sights to “seek medical information, discuss symptoms and express their opinions about doctors, drugs and health insurers….” …

The post Can Women Trust Online Medical Care? appeared first on Women's Health.

Women’s Health

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Black women in America have been braiding their hair since there…

Black women in America have been braiding their hair since there have been Black women in America. And during most of that time, the look was derided or ignored by mainstream culture. Watch our documentary, “Braided: An American Hair Story”

Lupita Nyong’o, Young M.A, Ayana Bird, Lacy Redway, Vernon François and more talk about braids and black hair culture in America.

http://elle.tumblr.com/

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Women who want to start businesses should steer clear of these six mistakes

Advice from successful CEOs on how women can win at starting their own business. 
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Click today to request your free ACRX discount prescription card and save up to 80% off off of your medicine!

SPECIAL DONATION REQUEST UPDATE:

Please help American Consultants Rx achieve it’s biggest goal yet of donating over 30 million discount prescription cards to over 50k organizations in an effort to assist millions of Americans in need. Please click here to donate today!

Lebron James Unveils New Nike Sneaker Inspired By Black Women

(Photo by ChinaFotoPress)

NBA superstar LeBron James debuted his latest Nike collaboration Tuesday night, revealing that they were inspired and designed by African American women, Black Enterprise reports.

According to the outlet, the sneakers were unveiled at Harlem’s Fashion Row (HFR) style awards and fashion show, an annual event that celebrates people of color in fashion and empowers minority designers with a platform to showcase their collections during New York Fashion Week. This year, the event was sponsored by Nike.

“I believe that African American women are the most powerful in the world,” said James at the gala while accepting Harlem’s Fashion Row’s “Icon 360 Award” for his style and philanthropy. “Why I believe they are the most powerful women in the world is because I had the example of my mother every single day.”

The Los Angeles Laker credits his wife, mother and daughter as a source of inspiration behind his 16th sneaker, the HFR x LeBron 16, titled “The Strongest.”

Instagram Photo

“Being the son, husband, and father of strong African American women, I felt like this was something I wanted to do for them and for all the strong women out there who are succeeding despite what might be stacked against them,” he said in a statement.

via BlackEnterprise.com:

HFR founder Brandice Daniels, who created the New York City-based fashion collective in 2007, recruited three black designers for the project: Kimberly Goldson, Felisha Noel, and Undra Celeste Duncan. Together, Daniels and the trio of designers learned how to design a performance shoe at Nike World HQ, according to Nike News. They also worked closely with Nike global basketball footwear designer Meline Khatachourian and James’ longtime footwear designer Jason Petrie throughout the design process.

“The partnership with Nike came about because a great girlfriend, who I had met years ago, introduced me to [Nike’s team,]” Daniels told Black Enterprise. “Relationships are everything.”

James closed his acceptance speech by noting that he “stands with Nike” after the company faced backlash from their latest Just Do It ad campaign featuring Colin Kaepernick.

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Are Women Choosing Unnecessary Double Mastectomy?

Treatments for breast cancer have made dramatic advancements in the last 20 years. Survival rates are increasing and therapies now offer women more options for breast conservation and reconstruction. A diagnosis of breast cancer does not automatically mean a double mastectomy. But many women are opting for this procedure despite research showing …

The post Are Women Choosing Unnecessary Double Mastectomy? appeared first on Women's Health.

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LeBron James Unveils New Nike Sneaker Designed by 3 Black Women

NBA superstar LeBron James debuted his latest Nike collaboration Tuesday night, revealing that they were inspired and designed by African American women. The sneakers were unveiled at Harlem’s Fashion Row (HFR) style awards and fashion show, an annual event that celebrates people of color in fashion and empowers minority designers with a platform to showcase their collections during New York Fashion Week. This year, the event was sponsored by Nike and held at the illustrious Capitale in lower Manhattan.

HFR x LeBron 16

From L-to-R: Kimberly Goldson, Fe Noel, Brandice Daniels, LeBron James, Zhuri James, and Undra Celeste (Photo courtesy of Armand Consulting PR/HFR)

“African American Women are the Most Powerful”

“I believe that African American women are the most powerful in the world,” said James at the gala while accepting Harlem’s Fashion Row’s “Icon 360 Award” for his style and philanthropy. “Why I believe they are the most powerful women in the world is because I had the example of my mother every single day.”

Along with his mother, the Los Angeles Laker credits his wife and daughter as a source of inspiration behind his 16th sneaker, the HFR x LeBron 16, titled “The Strongest.” “Being the son, husband, and father of strong African American women, I felt like this was something I wanted to do for them and for all the strong women out there who are succeeding despite what might be stacked against them,” he said in a statement.

Nike Harlem's Fashion Row

LeBron James and his daughter Zhuri James (Photo courtesy of Armand Consulting PR/HFR)

James and Nike tapped Harlem’s Fashion Row to design the HFR x LeBron 16, making it the very first LeBron signature shoe to be reimagined by female designers. HFR founder Brandice Daniels, who created the New York City-based fashion collective in 2007, recruited three black designers for the project: Kimberly Goldson, Felisha Noel, and Undra Celeste Duncan. Together, Daniels and the trio of designers learned how to design a performance shoe at Nike World HQ, according to Nike News. They also worked closely with Nike global basketball footwear designer Meline Khatachourian and James’ longtime footwear designer Jason Petrie throughout the design process.

“The partnership with Nike came about because a great girlfriend, who I had met years ago, introduced me to [Nike’s team,]” Daniels told Black Enterprise. “Relationships are everything.”

HFR x LeBron 16 Nike

HFR x LeBron 16 sneaker (Photo courtesy of Armand Consulting PR/HFR)

Daniels also praised James for using his influence to make positive community contributions. “He’s absolutely a style influencer,” she told BE. “And what I love is that he is using his influence and his platform to bring so many other people along for the ride.

James, a philanthropist and entrepreneur, also talked about the other ways he is using his powerful platform to make an impact beyond the court. “Less than a month ago, I was able to go back home and build a school,” he said at the gala, referencing his newly opened I Promise School in Akron, Ohio. “What I stand for and what I do just comes straight from my heart.”

“I Stand with Nike”

James closed his acceptance speech by reaffirming his alignment with Nike, which is experiencing backlash and a drop in stock due to its new marketing campaign featuring former NFL star Colin Kaepernick. “I stand with Nike all day, every day.”


The HFR x LeBron 16 will be released Sept. 7 exclusively on SNKRS in North America and on nike.com.

 


Editor’s Note: This story has been updated.

The post LeBron James Unveils New Nike Sneaker Designed by 3 Black Women appeared first on Black Enterprise.

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The Ms. Q&A: Brooke Baldwin is Telling the Stories of American Women Running for Office

The second season of “American Woman” is available in its entirety on CNN’s digital platforms and CNNgo apps beginning today. New installments will drop every Wednesday.

“I’m just a big fan of women,” Brooke Baldwin tells Ms. by phone from CNN’s New York City studio. “I believe in empowering women.”

Viewers are used to seeing Baldwin, who hosts CNN’s Newsroom every weekday, in the anchor chair. But this past summer, Baldwin took to the campaign trail—interviewing candidates from across the aisle, including Gina Ortiz Jones, who is running to represent the 23rd Congressional district in Texas, and Stacey Abrams, who would be the first African American woman elected governor in the history of Georgia—and the country.

Ahead of the premiere of the second installment of her “American Woman” series, Baldwin talked to Ms. about the importance of equal representation, telling women’s stories and following the advice of Gloria Steinem.

Baldwin with Georgia Gubernatorial candidate Stacey Abrams.

How sure were you when you started planning season two that it would focus on the election?

It’s a good question. Out of the gate we did season one, and that was more famous women celebrities, Hollywood, music, film. We all put our heads together after that, and were like, you know what, we should feature who I like to call “extraordinary ordinary women”—women that ladies can relate to and, because it’s CNN and we’re covering so much politics, it’s the story everyday.

We started thinking ahead of time—if I may toot my own horn, months ago—realizing that one of the stories this fall will be all of the women on the ballot. Not to mention, I actually bumped into Gloria Steinem—Ms. magazine shout out!—I bumped into her at an event where I was presenting and we started talking about it and, you know when Gloria Steinem says “this is a story,” you listen.

#MeToo is a cultural force and we’re also seeing all this research about how it’s changing the way candidates are campaigning. How much did #MeToo come up in your conversations?

It didn’t overtly, but I think it’s all part of the greater arc of what’s happening with women in this country. Off the top of my head, none of [the women] really name-checked the president, but in the wake of November 2016 realized “we have everything to lose.” And I think it was a combination of the election, a lot of them had wanted history to be made that November, and realizing—look, if not her, why not me?

You know the Shirley Chisolm quote [“if they don’t give you a seat at the table, bring a folding chair”] kept coming up. Just like the first Black woman in Congress, if you don’t have a seat at the table, bring a folding chair. Something snapped in an amazing way this year for women, where these women, in particular, weren’t just bitching about politics at the dinner table. They are actually running for office.

We saw that a lot in the series’ first episode, where you travel to Alabama to  interview Audri Scott Williams, who is running for Congress; Jamirah Moore, candidate for probate judge; and Cara McClure, a formerly homeless single mother who is running for a spot as Public Service Commissioner. 

That episode is so special to me, I think, number one, because I’m from the South. I remember going as a kid to the 16th Street Baptist Church and learning the story about those four little girls. This was a town known as “Bombingham.”

We roll up to this church, knowing the history. And just to have these grown women, you know, running for office, in whatever capacity, in the state of Alabama, and thinking about the girls who lost their lives back in ‘63—my goodness, how far we’ve come—and to hear one of the women how she used to have to duck on her way back from church because the KKK was maybe pulling over her dad’s car…

It’s so important as we talk about this wave of women—that we remember what we have overcome to get to where we are today.

Balwin stands with Scott Williams, Moore, and McClure in front of the 16th Street Baptist Church in Birmingham, AL.

Did you ever think you would be reporting about seeing this many women on ballots across the country?

I am a glass-half-full kind of gal, and I believe that we women have a lot to say and a lot to give, and so I have always been hopeful that we would see a tide turn and we would see more women, both from the left and from the right, on the ballot—because it matters. We have different things to offer. It’s a more well-rounded Congress, or state [government], to have equal representation, and we are so not there yet.

I was talking to  a Republican woman in Congress who was just like, “this is ridiculous.” They know that the representation isn’t there, and we’re moving in the right direction, and I think, given, you know, everyone was talking about the year of the woman last year, with #MeToo, and it just makes sense that—given the election, given the march, given how women feel emboldened—it makes sense that these women are not just helping people run, but are running themselves.

Baldwin talks with Idaho Gubernatorial candidate Paulette Jordan

Was there anything that surprised you during the course of filming?

Let me talk about Christina Hagan—because I’ve covered far too many shootings, and I was at the March For Our Lives, and the CNN crew is walking into this woman’s home, and her ad was “I got an AR-15 for Mother’s Day.”

First of all, I am grateful to her for opening her door to us—because she could have said no, like others have, and we had a very open conversation. I wanted to understand where she was coming from as a mother on guns, because she’s in the episode with Lucy McBath [a Congressional candidate whose 17-year-old son, Jordan Davies, was fatally shot in 2012] so I wanted to hear from both of them.

Once the conversation left guns, and it got on to being a Republican woman, it was an incredible a-ha moment, hearing her talk about the smoke-filled rooms of older white men and how it is still such an uphill climb for Republican women—in a very different way from Democrats. Republican women don’t have the apparatus like Democratic women do, with EMILY’S List. She was telling stories of being at events and people turning to her and asking when the candidate would get there.

I think people who are watching who may have a preconceived notion of how they may feel about her—because of her stance, say, on guns—and may walk away appreciating her fight a little bit more to be a woman and a Republican.

You mentioned Shirley Chisholm’s quote about pulling up a folding chair was something that really rang true. Can you talk about a time when you pulled up a folding chair in your personal or professional life?

I would say this series. Most of my bosses are male, and this is obviously a series called “American Woman.” And I have a platform every day at CNN, but this particular series is female-centric—and I, in starting this whole thing, went to my male bosses and got some yeses, got some pushback and I just believed in the purpose of this is so strong for me that the fight was worth it. I felt so strongly that this series needed to exist, that this series needs to grow, that I made sure I brought my folding chair to make it happen.

Last year, you told Ms. that one of your prerequisites for the women you interviewed was “how are you reaching back and helping?” Did that prerequisite stay with you this year? Did it change?

I think implicit in all these women is service. I knew going in this—to be in a position of service, to want to run to serve others—I knew they would be women who want to give back and do give back in their communities. You know, I just hope people watching they realize they don’t have to run, that it could be city council, that it could be school board, it could be the mayor. I just hope that the service and the heart and everything about these women helps inspire other women to do something.

ms-headshotLauren Young is a Ms. contributor. She has a Master’s Degree in European and Russian Studies from Yale University and a Bachelor’s Degree in Government and Russian Civilization from Smith College. Follow her on @thatlaurenyoung.

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5 Most Resilient Women in Video Games

Throughout gaming history, there have been women who display an inner strength — a dignity and a will that won’t back down to adversity and won’t buckle under pressure. They can bounce back from the most painful of events and still keep their heads on straight. This is about the strength of the mind and will of the spirit. Here are five of the most resilient women in gaming.

Jade — Mortal Kombat


Jade in Mortal Kombat(2011)

Since its release in 1992, Mortal Kombat has been entertaining players of all ages. The creators Ed Boon and John Tobias have created characters that connect to the players, like Jade. The best friend of series staple, Kitana, and General of the Edenian Army, Jade is someone who not only values loyalty but practices what she preaches.

When Kitana escaped from Outworld, Jade and Reptile had orders to retrieve her. Jade has to bring her best friend back alive and unharmed. But Reptile’s orders are to kill Kitana on the spot. After learning this, Jade makes the decision to stick by her friend, no matter what. She thwarts Reptile’s attempt on the princess’ life without hesitation. At the time, Jade’s duties as one of Shao Kahn’s soldiers hung over her head. Yet she chose her lifelong friend Kitana over her orders as a mercenary of Shao Kahn.

Kasumi — Dead or Alive


Kasumi in Dead of Alive 5

Dead or Alive has been a staple in the arcade style fighting genre since it first came out in 1996. Its story is about a group of adept fighters who take part in the Dead or Alive tournament to further their goals, like Kasumi, the missing ninja on the run from her former clan.

Kasumi left her village to avenge her brother Hayate, after their uncle, Raidou, beat him and left him comatose and paraplegic. Since Kasumi had left her village against orders, her clan considered her rogue. She now had a target on her back and no home to return to. Both the brother she set off to avenge and her cousin Ayane were to find and kill her.

This saddened Kasumi but she never gave up hope. She didn’t hold a grudge against Hayate and Ayane, even though they attacked her at almost every occasion. She only asked that they allow her back home and for them to not fight her. Kasumi stayed kindhearted even though her world was crashing around her.

Yuffie Kisaragi — Compilation of Final Fantasy VII


Yuffie in Final Fantasy VII Advent Children

Final Fantasy VII is the most successful of the series by Square Enix. It tells the story of a young former SOLDIER, Cloud Strife, and his journey of self-discovery. While on this journey he links up with old friends and new ones, like the eccentric ninja Yuffie Kisaragi.

Even though in the original game Yuffie is an optional character, she’s still a bright spot for her friends during dark times. She first comes off annoying with her energetic nature and her quick verbal jabs. But when the team gets to know her, they see the loving and protective person that she is, like when she rescued Vincent Valentine from the WRO after he was shot in the chest.

As a kid, Yuffie heard about the powerful nation that Wutai was before it went to war with Shinra Inc. She grew up wanting to do something about her homeland’s treatment as a tourist resort. Her solution: become a materia hunter in the hopes that the orbs of mako would help her homeland and her people. Yuffie went headfirst into conflict to help her people, and she stuck to it. She’s a great support both as a friend and as a leader for the people of Wutai.

Aqua — Kingdom Hearts Series


Aqua in Kingdom Hearts 0.2

Kingdom Hearts is the successful series by Tetsuya Nomura. It’s a story that speaks of friendship and inner balance, teaching that darkness and light should coexist and not eclipse one another. A character that exemplifies this is Aqua.

Aqua, along with her friends Ventus and Terra, have what has to be the saddest hand dealt in the series. She watched as both of her friends lost their hearts to the darkness and even had to face them in battle. In the end, she made the ultimate sacrifice to save what’s left of Ventus and Terra’s beings — thus trapping herself in the Realm of Darkness, cursed to wander the desolate place for years.

Many people would buckle under this kind of fate, but Aqua never did. She never regretted her sacrifice or fighting for her friends. But she didn’t accept her fate either. Aqua showed a sense of resilience and will to not give up or give in to despair. In Kingdom Hearts 0.2, we see that she never gave up on finding a way out. It’s that kind of perseverance that shows why she’s such an important figure in the fandom.

Makoto Nijima — Persona 5


Makoto Nijima in Persona 5

Persona 5 is the latest installment in the Shin Megami Tensei Persona series. It tells the story of the protagonist, a young man who’s accused of assault and sent to live in Shibuya with his new guardian, Sojiro, for a years’ time.

One of the people he meets during his stay in Shibuya is Makoto Nijima. She’s an honors student and the class president. But this doesn’t stop her from having her share of insecurities. Makoto’s journey is one of the most relatable as she overcomes her fear of being useless and a burden.

In the beginning, we see she’s told that she has to be useful and an asset or she’s nothing. She gets these hurtful words from her older sister, her principal, and even her future friends. Instead of letting these jeers bring her down, she rises to the occasion. Makoto uses her intellect to establish herself as one of the most valuable assets to the Phantom Thieves. She proves that other people’s assessments of you don’t have to define you — that you define your own value and set your own benchmarks.

6 Fierce Female Fighters That Go Green for Girl Power

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Why Women Crave Chocolate—and How to Increase Your Willpower

You’re doing so well on your diet. You’re controlling your portions. You’re choosing healthy foods. You’re exercising. You’re losing weight. But then that stressful week happens. Your boss asks you to stay late. Your car breaks down, and your kids need you to drive them to extra practices. Your dog …

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Study: Black Women Have the Highest Amount of Student Loan Debt

It can already be challenging in a world where the gender wage gap still exists for college-educated women, but there’s yet another financial disparity in student loan debt that exists for black women.

Updated research from the American Association of University Women (AAUW) indicates that women hold two-thirds ($ 890 billion) of the country’s $ 1.4-trillion student debt, and black women are graduating with at least $ 30,400 in debt—compared with $ 22,000 for their white counterparts.

The research further shows that the “student loan gender gap has nearly doubled in the past four years, and women now graduate with an average of $ 2,700 more debt than men when earning a bachelor’s degree.”

The data, updated via the 2015-16 National Postsecondary Student Aid Study, also shows that women makeup 56% of enrolled college students but are grappling with a whopping 65% of outstanding student loan debt.

“Student debt levels have reached an all-time high, with women carrying a bigger burden of debt than men,” Kim Churches, CEO of AAUW, said in a news release. “This debt is an albatross for many women as they embark on careers and work to support their households and families. And, it only gets worse over time when coupled with the gender pay gap.”

Women were found to take two years longer than men to repay their student loans, and the reason is attributed, in part, to the gender wage gap. College-educated women who work full time make, on average, 25% less than their male counterparts who hold degrees, leaving women with less income to put aside to pay off loan debt. Black women, specifically, make less than even their white female counterparts, earning $ 0.63 for every dollar earned by white men, compared with $ 0.79 for white women, according to reports.

“The imbalances compound. Higher student debt, lower pay, child- and family-care costs, and other factors all add up to leave women at a deficit as they work to maintain financial security,” Churches added in the news release. “With women leading more households today, enough is enough. Solutions are needed now.”

The AAUW offers several recommendations for reducing the student loan gender gap, including the support of more income-driven repayment options and protecting projects like Public Service Loan Forgiveness, providing services such as child care at universities, and increasing state and federal funding for public higher-education institutions.

“With the Higher Education Act, Congress has the opportunity to set today’s students up for success—and that includes making sure they don’t graduate with crippling debt,” Deborah J. Vagins, senior vice president of public policy and research at AAUW, said in the release. “We need to support policies that make higher education accessible and affordable for all students, provide support and protection for student borrowers, and help eliminate the gender and race gaps in student loans.”

The post Study: Black Women Have the Highest Amount of Student Loan Debt appeared first on Black Enterprise.

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He scammed $1.8 million from women he met online! How to protect yourself.

Daylon Pierce is a consummate ladies' man who pretends to be a licensed stockbroker, and woos unsuspecting women through online dating sites. But when they hand over their assets to this self-proclaimed investment expert, he robs them blind.
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How Porn Made These Women Feel Empowered: ‘It Gave Me a New Sense of Confidence’

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Working in porn impacts how you see yourself, and though at times we can be our own worst critics, performing naked for all the world to see has had a surprisingly positive impact on some female performers, boosting their self-esteem. A number of young women who have found success in the adult industry once struggled with their own body-image issues—hardly surprising given the state of our looks-centric media.

According to reports on global beauty and confidence, 69 percent of women and 65 percent of girls feel “increasing pressures from advertising and media to reach an unrealistic standard of beauty.” Inundated with suggestive marketing on how to improve ourselves, that silent message to women everywhere is coming through loud and clear: don’t be subpar, be better. Even when it’s “body positive,” the marketing toward women focuses on physical appearance. One study done by the Kaiser Foundation found that 56 percent of commercials aimed at female viewers used beauty as product appeal compared to just 3 percent of the television commercials aimed at men.

Whereas mainstream media left some women feeling they couldn’t measure up, they’d never be pretty enough, thin enough or have an ass like Kim Kardashian, working in porn (a stigmatized occupation) had the opposite effect. Their appearance, and the graphic acts they performed, were sexually arousing, so much so in fact that someone was paying a lot of money for it. For some, that alone was validating. Others discovered a renewed sense of body confidence amongst consumers. For every body type and flaw, there’s a niche and adoring (paying) fans.

Read more at The Daily Beast.

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http://www.acrx.org -As millions of Americans strive to deal with the economic downturn,loss of jobs,foreclosures,high cost of gas,and the rising cost of prescription drug cost. Charles Myrick ,the President of American Consultants Rx, announced the re-release of the American Consultants Rx community service project which consist of millions of free discount prescription cards being donated to thousands of not for profits,hospitals,schools,churches,etc. in an effort to assist the uninsured,under insured,and seniors deal with the high cost of prescription drugs.-American Consultants Rx -Pharmacy Discount Network News

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Forbes Recognizes Kaiser Permanente as One of America’s Best Employers for Women

Forbes has named Kaiser Permanente to its inaugural America’s best employers for women list. This honor recognizes Kaiser Permanente’s focus on attracting and enabling women to contribute to the success of the organization while building successful careers.

“Kaiser Permanente has a long history of empowering and supporting women, both in and out of the workplace,” said Bernard J. Tyson, Chairman and CEO. “We are intentional about career satisfaction and advancement for women, evidenced by the leadership roles women play throughout the organization. The great work we do each day to make lives healthier would not be possible without our diverse workforce and the women of Kaiser Permanente serving in critical roles.”

Seventy-five percent of Kaiser Permanente’s employees are women. In our eight regions, three Permanente Medical Groups are led by female executive medical directors and five Kaiser Permanente Health Plan and Hospitals regional presidents are women. In May 2018, DiversityInc named Kaiser Permanente the top company for executive women.

“There were many ways Kaiser Permanente paved the way for me to be successful and advance in my career through training, mentoring, challenging assignments and thoughtful approaches to work-life integration,” said Julie Miller-Phipps, Southern California regional president for Kaiser Permanente Health Plan and Hospitals. “I’m proud to be part of an organization that is truly committed to an environment and business practices that result in equitable development and advancement.”

As one of several programs designed to support women in the workplace, WE@KP (the Women Empowered @ KP business resource group)  provides women opportunities for education, networking and development of leadership skills that enhance their work and life experiences. Among the physician groups, the Southern California Permanente Medical Group, for example, hosts an annual Women in Medicine symposium that provides networking opportunities and encourages female physicians to pursue leadership roles in medicine.

“To be honored and included in Forbes’ list of the best employers for women is a testament to Kaiser Permanente for upholding its foundational commitment to diversity and inclusion,” said Mary Wilson, MD, MPH, executive medical director of The Southeast Permanente Medical Group and a pediatrician. “The Permanente Medical Groups strive to treat all physicians equally, judging them on the quality of their work, regardless of gender, ethnicity, or other differences.”

Among the top 300 large companies that span all industries, Kaiser Permanente is one of 24 health care companies on the list. To compile the list, Forbes, in partnership with market research company Statista, surveyed 40,000 employees — including 25,000 women —  from companies with more than 1,000 employees. Respondents anonymously rated their companies and shared their opinions about working conditions, diversity and how likely they would be to recommend their employer to others. Female participants also answered questions about parental leave policies, pay equity, and other topics of interest to women.

The post Forbes Recognizes Kaiser Permanente as One of America’s Best Employers for Women appeared first on Kaiser Permanente.

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Kim Woodburn will face ‘two-faced maggot’ nemesis Coleen Nolan in explosive showdown on Loose Women

LOOSE Women is set to stage a major clash on today’s episode when Coleen Nolan is finally confronted by her nemesis Kim Woodburn.

The cleaner will come face to face with the woman she once blasted as a “two-faced maggot” when she appears as a guest on the lunchtime show.

Kim will return to the show on Wednesday’s episode

They starred together in the January 2017 series of Celebrity Big Brother where they barely interacted, but after the show became bitter enemies and now they will be reunited for what promises to be an epic clash.

A source said: “Kim hasn’t exactly sugar-coated her thoughts on Coleen before.

“It is going to be explosive with the two of them being on screen together again.”

The source added: “Expert fireworks.”

The pair didn’t clash in the CBB house, but they did afterwards

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Coleen last left Kim a sweet message trying to bury the hatchet, and it was rejected[/caption]

The pair’s feud began in the Channel 5 reality house with Kim believing she was being picked on by the other housemates and clashing with almost everyone.

And when Coleen went on to win the show, Kim wasn’t impressed, telling The Sun Online how she was furious that “Fag Ash Lil” had won.

She said: “I will say this now – How that woman won Celebrity Big Brother when Jedward were sitting there, I have no idea!

“Public, I don’t know how you let that boring, Fag Ash Lil’ – with that I know now to be a rotten mouth about her about me – win. She shouldn’t have won. It should have been Jedward.”


Coleen tried to end the row with a recorded message on Loose Women for Kim’s last appearance.

She told her: “I want to wish you all the best and no hard feelings. I hope that we can always be civil and always be polite.”

Shockingly, that didn’t happen with Kim asking why she bothered before calling her a “two-faced maggot” so it promises to be an exciting Wednesday lunctime.

It might even take Janet Street Porter to get her robes out of storage and become Judge Janet for the day to sort it out once and for all.


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Emma Watson Joins Greta Gerwig’s ‘Little Women’; Here’s Everything We Know

Emma Watson Joins Greta Gerwig's 'Little Women'; Here's Everything We Know

Loosely based on the life of author Louisa May Alcott and her three sisters, Little Women has proven to be an enduring literary classic. It tells the story of Meg, Jo, Beth and Amy March as they pass from childhood to adulthood. The original novel has inspired more than a dozen film and television adaptations.

Now a new film version is on its way from an unexpected source. Read onward to learn all we know about the latest Little Women adaptation.

Who is directing the new version?…

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Women More at Risk for Gallstones—How to Avoid an Attack

Margaret wasn’t feeling well. She was nauseated, with cold chills and sweating. She figured she must have gotten the flu, but then there was the pain between her shoulder blades. She didn’t think it was muscle pain, as she hadn’t done any heavy lifting lately, and besides, it felt a …

The post Women More at Risk for Gallstones—How to Avoid an Attack appeared first on Women's Health.

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Michael Cohen says he worked to silence two women ‘in coordination’ with Trump to influence 2016 election

Cohen pleaded guilty to five counts of tax evasion, one count of making a false statement to a bank and two campaign finance violations.
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http://www.acrx.org -As millions of Americans strive to deal with the economic downturn,loss of jobs,foreclosures,high cost of gas,and the rising cost of prescription drug cost. Charles Myrick ,the President of American Consultants Rx, announced the re-release of the American Consultants Rx community service project which consist of millions of free discount prescription cards being donated to thousands of not for profits,hospitals,schools,churches,etc. in an effort to assist the uninsured,under insured,and seniors deal with the high cost of prescription drugs.-American Consultants Rx -Pharmacy Discount Network News

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SPECIAL DONATION REQUEST UPDATE:

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Her Luncheons Help Women Take a Leap of Faith in Their Career

When Safiya J. Simmons came across an article titled “The Confidence Gap which emphasized how self-doubt continues to hold women back in their careers—she felt an overwhelming desire to create a space where women are equipped to take their careers and lives to the next level.

“There are so many spaces telling women who they should be. For instance, there’s Sheryl Sandberg’s “Lean In,” which encourages women to lead rather than follow; the old familiar parenting styles: Tiger mom and helicopter mom, which spotlight’s the highly involved—super aggressive parent; as well as the Bible’s Proverbs 31 which details the attributes of a virtuous wife or ideal woman. I wanted to create a platform that gives women the space to decide who they want to be and how on their own terms” said Simmons. With that passion, Simmons created The Leap Luncheon Series, a chance for professional women to have open and honest conversations with influential women over a meal.

Simmons’ is not an event planner, but since 2015 her faith in God and passion to help women free themselves from the opinion of others, has helped her host power lunches in Washington, DC, and New York City. She’s been surprised by the caliber of women volunteering their time to support other women of color ages 18 and up, who are just about to enter the workforce, under-employed, and those starting second and entrepreneurial careers.

“We’ve had broadcast journalist and executive producer, Soledad O’Brien, White House correspondent and CNN political analyst April Ryan, New York Times bestselling author and digital strategist Luvvie Ajayi, Former Editor at Essence Magazine Vanessa DeLuca, Attorney and CEO of IMPACT Strategies Angela Rye,CNN commentator and principal of the 360 Group LLC Symone Sanders, Congresswoman Marcia Fudge—and more, said Simmons. “These women didn’t know me or the Leap Luncheon Series, but they chose to spend some time with us. For that I’m grateful.”

In the midst of planning the next Leap Luncheon on September 19, in Washington DC,  Black Enterprise sat down with Simmons to talk about the rules of society and self-limiting beliefs that hold many women back from taking their career to the next level.

Leap Luncheon With Soledad O’Brien

You’ve hosted quite a few events, what have you been most surprised to learn about yourself?

I have been quite surprised by how much I’m learning about being a leader. I’m far from a perfect leader, but learning the art of delegation and trusting your team is something that I’m grateful for. I wouldn’t be able to pull off my luncheons without the ladies working with me. It’s a core group of women who help me with everything from venues to art to invitations. I’ve learned a lot about myself as a leader just by being obedient and doing these luncheons.

When it comes to women advancing in their careers, what do you believe many women overlook or underestimate as a tool to get ahead?

Sometimes we’re so focused on where we’re going that we overlook where we are. Whether you’re looking to start a business, get a promotion, or change careers, there’s something to be learned and gained where you are. Are there professional development and training opportunities? Can you find and secure a mentor or a sponsor where you are? Are there new responsibilities you can take on that will build your resume? Or can you begin to amass quantifiable and measurable wins that will build out your resume? Where you are is a critical part of where you’re headed. Milk it for all it’s worth!

What’s the traditional career advice that you believe is overrated?

“Find a good job with benefits and a W2, and stay there.” It’s overrated because we grow and change — if we’re lucky — nearly every day of our lives. The expectation that we’ll still get the same things out of our jobs that we did two or twenty years ago is erroneous and puts too much pressure on us to look for life where there may be none. The Bible says there’s a season for everything under the sun. Allow yourself to grow and change and see what works for who you are now. For me, that meant venturing into entrepreneurship. For others, that might mean going to a new company, pursuing a promotion, or looking for professional development opportunities. Give yourself permission to grow and change and then follow the direction of your passion — responsibly. I tell the Leap Ladies all the time, have a plan before you leap, no matter what your leap looks like. Don’t just jump out there. Be strategic and get ready to live your best life now!

It’s not until women define ourselves, for ourselves, that we’ll be able to assume our rightful places of power and influence in the boardroom, the bedroom, and every space in between. I believe in having radical faith and radical expectation. Nothing radical happens in a constrained space. The inspiration to be self-doubt. could begin in a box, but it’ll never flourish without space and an expectation of wonderful blessings.

The post Her Luncheons Help Women Take a Leap of Faith in Their Career appeared first on Black Enterprise.

Career | Black Enterprise

EMPLOYMENT UPDATE:

The New York Times Pays Tribute to Overlooked Black Women Who’ve Made History

In an attempt to right its past wrongs, The New York Times launched an obituary series titled “Overlooked” earlier this year to pay tribute to the women and people of color who were not recognized by the publication at the time of their deaths, despite their amazing contributions and strides in society.

“Since 1851, obituaries in ‘The New York Times’ have been dominated by white men. With Overlooked, we’re adding the stories of remarkable people whose deaths went unreported in The Times,” states the Times.

Edmonia Lewis

the new york times

Edmonia Lewis (Wikimedia/Creative Commons)

Included in “Overlooked” is Edmonia Lewis, the first black sculptor to be internationally recognized for her art. Lewis was born circa 1844 in upstate New York to a free black man from Haiti and a mother who was part Chippewa. After her parents died when she was 9 years old, she was adopted and raised by her two maternal aunts. According to the NYT, Lewis attended Oberlin College in Ohio and was mentored by leading activists and abolitionists. She later spent much of her adult life in Rome where she joined a community of American sculptors.

Her Roman studio was a required stop for the moneyed class on the Grand Tour. Frederick Douglass visited her. Ulysses S. Grant sat for her. She made busts of John Brown, Abraham Lincoln and Henry Wadsworth Longfellow (whose 1855 poem, “The Song of Hiawatha,” inspired her to create a series of marble sculptures on Hiawatha and Minnehaha), reads the NYT obituary.

Many of Lewis’ neoclassical-style sculptures are celebrated for their portrayals of black and indigenous people. For example, one of her most acclaimed pieces, The Death of Cleopatra, depicted the iconic Egyptian queen sitting lifelessly on her throne after committing suicide.

Her sculptures sold for thousands of dollars, and she had commissions from wealthy patrons on both sides of the Atlantic. When the United States celebrated its centennial in Philadelphia in 1876, she was invited to submit her work. Her piece, “The Death of Cleopatra” — more than 3,000 pounds of Carrara marble depicting the Egyptian queen with one breast bared and quite dead — created a stir for its commanding realism,  writes the NYT.

Yet, despite her talent and global recognition, Lewis was frustrated by the racial barriers she faced, particularly in the States.

In 1878, she told The New York Times: “I was practically driven to Rome, in order to obtain the opportunities for art culture, and to find a social atmosphere where I was not constantly reminded of my color. The land of liberty had no room for a colored sculptor.”


Sissieretta Jones

the new york times

Sissieretta Jones (Wikimedia)

Another unsung black woman honored in “Overlooked” is Sissieretta Jones, an opera singer who became the first African American woman to headline a concert at Carnegie Hall in 1893. Born circa 1868, she became the star of a touring company called the Black Patti Troubadours. However, to her dismay, she was dubbed “the Black Patti,” which compared her to white diva Adelina Patti.

She sang at the White House, toured the nation and the world, and, in a performance at Madison Square Garden, was conducted by the composer Antonin Dvorak, reads the NYT obit page.

 

But there were color lines she never managed to break, like the one that kept the nation’s major opera companies segregated, denying her the chance to perform in fully staged operas.

 

“They tell me my color is against me,” she once lamented to a reporter from The Detroit Tribune.

 

When another interviewer suggested that she transform herself with makeup and wigs, she dismissed the idea.

 

“Try to hide my race and deny my own people?” she responded in the interview, which was published by The San Francisco Call in 1896. “Oh, I would never do that.” She added: “I am proud of belonging to them and would not hide what I am even for an evening.”


Ida B. Wells

the new york times

Ida B. Wells Barnett, in a photograph by Mary Garrity from c. 1893. Wikimedia)

The Times kicked off “Overlooked” in March with a tribute to journalist Ida B. Wells, an outspoken civil rights activist and journalist. According to the NYT:

She pioneered reporting techniques that remain central tenets of modern journalism. And as a former slave who stood less than five feet tall, she took on structural racism more than half a century before her strategies were repurposed, often without crediting her, during the 1960s civil rights movement.

 

Wells was already a 30-year-old newspaper editor living in Memphis when she began her anti-lynching campaign, the work for which she is most famous. 

 

National Geographic, another publication founded in the 19th century, has also taken action this year to right its wrongs for its history of racist reporting. The April 2018 issue of the magazine included a scathing report detailing how the outlet overlooked and stereotyped people of color.

“[U]ntil the 1970s National Geographic all but ignored people of color who lived in the United States, rarely acknowledging them beyond laborers or domestic workers,” wrote the magazine’s Editor-in-Chief Susan Goldberg in the issue’s editor’s letter. “Meanwhile it pictured ‘natives’ elsewhere as exotics, famously and frequently unclothed, happy hunters, noble savages—every type of cliché.”

 

 

The post The New York Times Pays Tribute to Overlooked Black Women Who’ve Made History appeared first on Black Enterprise.

Lifestyle | Black Enterprise

BEAUTY DEAL UPDATE:

This Week in Women: Calling Out Sex Abuse in the Church and the Classroom

This Week in Women is part of a series produced in partnership between Ms. and the Fuller Project for International Reporting. This column is also part of a newsletter; sign up here to receive it regularly.

Signs from a 2010 protest during a papal visit to London. (Jasn / Creative Commons)

Breaking the Silence on Sexual Abuse

In recent years, Pope Francis—head of the Roman Catholic Church and its 1.2 billion Catholics worldwide—has shown a willingness to reconsider divorce, shed light on the plight of poverty and question the church’s stance against homosexuality. However, his progressive outlook ends when it comes to women. As he has made clear, the discussion to extend the priesthood to women “is closed.”

On Tuesday, we shared outrage and horror at the tragic cost of that ongoing refusal: Details of more than 1,000 cases of child sex abuse were revealed by a 1,400 page Pennsylvania grand jury report. 300 priests stand accused, while others knew and failed to act. Most of the victims were young boys, but plenty were also girls and young women.

It’s hard to believe that sexual asceticism and celibacy rules have nothing to do with what’s going on here—along with a perverted male toxicity whose outlet isn’t in machismo, but rather shame, deviance and exploitation.

Meanwhile, Britons are grappling with comments indicating that 200 rapes occur each year in British schools. Laura Bates, the founder of The Everyday Sexism Project, said that widespread access to pornography was distorting boys’ understanding of women.

In the U.S., a former ICE agent is accused of sexually assaulting two women and telling them the police wouldn’t respond if they reported him because he was a member of law enforcement. He has pleaded not guilty. In Russia, a dramatic reduction in the number of domestic violence cases reported to police is attributed to a law passed last year that partially decriminalized abuse.

Other Stories From the Week

We send you into one of the final weekends of summer with a tribute to Aretha Franklin, who passed away on Thursday. Here are some of her most inspirational quotes.

“Be your own artist, and always be confident in what you’re doing. If you’re not going to be confident, you might as well not be doing it.”

Vermont nominated the nation’s first ever transgender gubernatorial candidate this week, and Ilhan Omar, a state representative from Minnesota, won the Democratic primary in her quest to capture a seat in the U.S. House of Representatives in November. Omar came to the U.S. as a refugee from Africa over 20 years ago.

Meanwhile, Pakistani women braced for the rise to power of former cricket superstar Imran Khan, who has criticized feminism and pledged to make Pakistan a “truly Islamic state” when he becomes prime minister on Saturday.

The Border Patrol has appointed a new female chief for the first time in its history. Just five percent of Border Patrol agents are women. Tanzania’s police force is introducing gender desks staffed with detectives trained in domestic and sexual violence.

Tunisia’s president has promised to submit a bill to Parliament that would give equal inheritance rights to women.

Elle’s Jessica Roy travels to Jeddah, Saudi Arabia, to ride along with Saudi women as the country lifts its ban on women driving.

Devex profiles one of the world’s leading data researchers on violence against women.

Christina Asquith is the founder and editor in chief at The Fuller Project for International Reporting. 

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The post This Week in Women: Calling Out Sex Abuse in the Church and the Classroom appeared first on Ms. Magazine Blog.

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BEST DEAL UPDATE:

How Fenty Beauty Empowers Black Women

There’s a good chance you’ve heard about Fenty Beauty. After all, every girl around the block has!

Rihannas original cosmetic collection was released in September 2017 and since then it has changed the tide of the beauty industry.

More than RiRi’s popularity, the brand garnered attention for its inclusivity as it outsold all other brands by catering to women of all skin tones.The brand’s trademark product is the foundation the Pro Filt’r foundation that offers not ten or twenty shades of skin tones!

Instagram Photo

But rather it breaks all boundaries and offers 40 different shades of foundation for the women who had previously been ostracized by the beauty market.T his ‘beauty for all’ motto has hit all the right chords in the consumers!

Why are African-American women feeling empowered by Fenty Beauty?

Now the men reading this may roll their eyes and think this is just makeup. However, we would like to tell you that it may be just makeup for you but for the average women of color, this opens doors to a whole new world. Women with deep tones have finally found a product that speaks to them.

Here are the many reasons why this product matters:

The Campaign

True to her word, RiRi showed the world that she is not ‘all talk’. The brand advertisement steered clear of whitewashing the models and presenting a diverse cast of brand ambassadors. We saw diverse beauties like Duckie Thot, Halima Aden, Slick Woods and Leomie Anderson leading the pack.

Instagram Photo

This was the first time our women were represented on the front and center. Before now, a Black model was propped up in the side as an afterthought.

The Emotional Connect

Did you know girls were crying on the counters at Sephora? They had finally found their match!

Retailers may not have all the space for the ‘5o shades of beige’ on their shelves but the consumers definitely have a demand for it! The snide remarks from Sephora employees don’t matter when the brand is being showered with love from all over the world.
Instagram Photo
Previously, many Black women with a deep skin tone used to be sent away from the counter. Few makeup brands sold a foundation that perfectly matched their skin. Moreover, those belonging to a mixed background or a different ethnicity were too at a loss for the perfect shade.

However, Fenty Beauty debunked this myth and ‘made a formula that worked for all skin tones’.

The Power

Cosmetics have always given women power. It is seen as a tool to enhance their features and beauty. Fenty Beauty gives our women the power to rock a ‘perfect skin’ with a range that doesn’t make them ‘ashy’.

Here’s to the ‘no makeup’ look we had all only dreamed of!

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Life & Style – Black America Web

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Mapping the Male Supremacy Movement: Meet the Women of the Alt-Right

We’re going inside the male supremacy movement. This post is the fourth in a series produced by ADL in partnership with Ms. In each installment, we will explore a different aspect of what we’re calling the “male supremacy movement”—a network of formal groups and informal communities dedicated to subjugating women—and its intersections with the so-called alt-right’s racism. 


A woman protests white supremacy in Los Angeles after a deadly riot of white nationalists in Charlottesville in 2017. (Molly Adams)

While women’s place in the alt-right remains a hot button issue, the terms of the debate are narrow, to put it mildly, and would make any MRA very happy: One side argues that women need to focus on their “natural” duties of childbearing and supporting their husbands, while the other maintains that while women should be mothers and housekeepers first, women may use any additional time to advance the cause of the white race—in appropriately “feminine” ways, in the company of other women.

The latter group—which includes Red Ice broadcaster Lana Lokteff, and presumably her husband, fellow white supremacist Henrik Palmgren—believe that as long as white women are having children, being dutiful housekeepers and making sure their husbands are happy, they should be encouraged to use their “free time” for pro-white activism. “Deserving” white women should feel free to dabble in white supremacy, in other words.

In a 2017 interview with white supremacist and American Renaissance founder Jared Taylor, Lokteff opined:

Women want to be beautiful, they want a lovely home, they want to attract a mate and they want to be provided for and taken care of. That’s what the alt-right can provide, what nationalism can provide. As long as [alt-right] men are providing a nice home, women will fall in line.

Political engagement isn’t the answer for women, Lokteff contends. “Women aren’t that interested in politics. They are easily influenced; they go with the trends. I find I can easily bring them to our side. I just challenge them a little bit.”

And feminism is, of course, a huge turn-off. “The left is pushing this beauty ideal of the purple-haired, overweight feminist. No truly attractive women want to be associated with that.”

When Taylor asks Lokteff to define the “ideal” alt-right woman and wife, she responds: “She’s well-rounded, reads, is interested fighting back against anti-white politics, keeps a nice home, raises the kids well, teaches them about their tribal ethnic consciousness, has a good marriage. But then she might have time to do a blog post, or a video, or produce something here and there, to fight back against anti-white politics.”

Lokteff is peddling retrograde, demonstrably oppressive gender roles as “empowerment.” And women who embrace the alt-right are buying it. It’s not an accident that Lokteff, whose blonde-haired, blue-eyed look embodies the female physical ideal of the alt-right, couches her argument against feminism as an appeal of one “attractive” woman to another.

This is another common thread between misogynistic extremist movements: Men who feel ownership of women, or who feel they are owed deference and/or sex, consider conventionally attractive women “assets” or “prizes” to be paraded in photographs on Facebook and Twitter. Their value is even higher because they have chosen to attach themselves to “worthy” men—i.e. fellow white supremacists or incels.

In the alt-right world, white women who date or are friends with non-white men are dismissed and derided—or worse. In 2017, Andrew Anglin accused alt-right personality Lauren Southern of sleeping with a black man, and told her she should commit suicide. This is an extremely common response to any suggestion that a white woman is “betraying” her race; she’s considered “damaged” and generally useless.

The over-the-top bullying targeting Southern and Tara McCarthy, among other alt-right women, did prompt some women in the movement to call out their male counterparts. In 2017, “ethno nationalist” McCarthy chided “low status anonymous trolls trying to put us in our place” after the alt-right sphere attacked Southern when she suggested she wasn’t ready to have children at age 22. This kind of defense only emerges when the vitriol is directed at a fellow alt-righter. Generally speaking, alt-right women seem content to perpetuate the movement’s misogyny—under the guise of protecting “traditional” gender roles.

Jessica Reaves is the Senior Writer at ADL’s Center on Extremism and former reporter for Ms., TIME and the Chicago Tribune.

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The post Mapping the Male Supremacy Movement: Meet the Women of the Alt-Right appeared first on Ms. Magazine Blog.

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BEST DEAL UPDATE:

The Best Blogs for Women Law Students

We just rounded up all of our best law school resources for women onto one page, and we thought this would be a great mini-topic for today: For the lawyers out there, what do you think the best blogs for women law students are? Some of the ones that I would add for your consideration (in addition to Corporette, of course!) would be these:

Above the Law – If you want all the scoop on different law firms (particularly regarding bonuses, raises, and Dumb Memos), ATL is a must-read. They just launched a new podcast for women in the law called The Jabot and have a corresponding Facebook group for women in law. They also feature columns from women in the law like Jeena Cho, author of The Anxious Lawyer, as well as the self-proclaimed “Old Lady Lawyer,” Jill Switzer.

The Girl’s Guide to Law School – There are a ton of great resources for all law students here, including guides on Law School 101, how to write law review articles, and how to leave BigLaw.

Ms. JD Run in conjunction with the National Women Law Students’ Organization, Ms. JD features a blog and they run conferences and programs throughout the year.

The Careerist – Law.com can be a little overwhelming if you’re new, but I always find Vivia Chen’s writing to be witty and concise takes on matters of interest to women.

Honorable mentions – I’m not that familiar with her books or the blog, but Best Friends at the Bar looks like a great resource — I only just found it now, though. Also, Rebecca notes that she really liked the ABA’s Student Lawyer magazine, and April gave a shoutout to what looks like an incredibly thoughtful blog, A Lawyer’s Life.

Personal style blogs run by practicing lawyers

As a little subcategory, I can’t help but list some personal style bloggers who are also practicing lawyers! Readers, please share your favorites!

OK, ladies, let’s hear it: What do you think the best blogs for women law students are? (What do you think the best blogs for ALL law students are?) Do you follow any law school lifestyle bloggers like Brazen and Brunette, or The Legal Duchess?

Stock photo: Deposit Photos /  bst2012.

We just dropped our roundup of law school resources for women, so we thought we might also ask the readers: what are the best blogs for women law students? These are some of our favorites, including Ms.JD and The Girls' Guide to Law School -- but which are yours?

Corporette.com

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The problem with saying “women of color” when we’re specifically discussing Black women

The problem with saying “women of color” when we’re specifically discussing Black women


The problem with saying “women of color” when we’re specifically discussing Black women

A few months ago, I was confronted on Twitter about a piece that I wrote last year. It was a feature that I’d pitched, and it was framed as a discussion on how women of color inspire beauty trends.

But the article was centered around Black women, and Black women only.

Since then, I’ve seen how many friends and fellow writers point out the problem of using the term “woman of color” instead of “Black” if you are talking about Black women. Publications and individual people will use the phrases interchangeably—but they aren’t synonyms. When you say “woman of color” and actually mean “Black woman,” you’re not only being misleading—you’re essentially erasing (and likely offending) an entire demographic.

Representation is of major importance in media and writing, and saying exactly what you mean is just as important. When it comes to the headline for that piece, it was definitely my fault and I had to take responsibility. I understood that I wasn’t being personally attacked and reflected on my word choice.

I meditated on why, as a Black woman, I thought I had to use “women of color” in the first place.

I thought back to writing that article pitch. I realized I’d felt like the idea wouldn’t have been approved had I said I wanted to write a piece only about Black women. It felt like a risk that I literally could not afford as a freelance writer.

I thought back to one of the last job interviews I went on. It was for a staff writing position (on an all white team). I expressed that the site needed more Black content, and while I didn’t land the gig, I did get to pitch ideas focused on Black culture. The fact that I wasn’t hired full-time made me think that they only wanted those kinds of topics addressed in small increments. I figured that they preferred to talk about potentially viral Black stories. I couldn’t shake the notion that they were put off by my emphasis on Blackness and Black femme issues in my job interview.

Maybe if I’d said the site needed “content for women of color,” then it would have gone differently.

I’m also reminded of the full time administrative position I once held. Colleagues tiptoed around the word “Black” during the entire time I worked there. My skill as a writer was known in the office, and I was asked to pitch and write pieces “about diversity.” I was never specifically asked to highlight Black women or their hard work, but was essentially asked to be a spokesperson for all women who aren’t white.

This showed me that Black women and women of color are often clumped together by white people, and my coworkers saw no problem with that.

In an effort to stay low and take care of myself financially, I didn’t speak out. I even wrote a few pieces.

A Black woman protests in St. Louis following the police shooting of Michael Brown
Michael B. Thomas/ Getty Images

Though Black women and women of color are all groups who have historically been excluded from “feminist” progress, Black women have different experiences than other women of color. For example, according to Bustle in 2017, Black women are killed more frequently than any other race in America. Black women in America are most likely to die while giving birth because of racism in the medical field. Black women also have to deal with erasure from movements that they started, specifically people like Marsha P. Johnson in the Stonewall Riots.

Black women are not always given the chance to express the same emotional depth as other women of color. I’m thinking specifically about anger. When a Black woman expresses her anger, she is often dismissed as an “angry Black woman.” A Latina woman who expresses her anger will be reduced to the “feisty or spicy Latina.”

Both stereotypes are damaging, but I mention them to show that we experience racism differently: One of these women is demonized because of her anger.

There is also a metric ton of hatred towards Black women in other non-white communities—from Asian women donning Blackface, to the messy Twitter history of R&B singer Sabrina Claudio, to the treatment of Afro-Latina Amara La Negra on Love & Hip Hop, to the exclusion of undocumented Black immigrants in many immigrant spaces. If Black women are not always welcomed and supported by other communities of color,  then it’s completely logical why many Black women would desire to be addressed directly.

***

Until that day on Twitter, I hadn’t explicitly realized how my personal encounters unquestionably shaped how I approached my writing about Black women. I’m not excusing myself, but these are glimpses into how some people think Black women’s narratives will fare in the media.

Using “women of color” terminology instead of saying “Black” shows how Black women and our unique experiences are minimized.

People are so caught up in wanting to “be inclusive” that they don’t realize they are erasing people. Simply put, woman of color and Black mean different things—and moving forward we should be hyperaware of the fact that they can’t be used interchangeably.

The post The problem with saying “women of color” when we’re specifically discussing Black women appeared first on HelloGiggles.

HelloGiggles

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Women Leaders Are Dwindling – So How Do We Create New Female CEO’s?

LAST WEEK WE TALKED ABOUT THE WAGE GAP. TODAY WE ARE TALKING ABOUT THE LEADERSHIP GAP?

Last week, one of the iconic women of corporate America – Indra Nooyi – announced she was stepping down as CEO of PepsiCo after 12 years at the helm. As a result, the number of female CEOs fell again, and the number of female CEOS of color was reduced to a mere handful.


MANY ARTICLES HAVE NOTED THAT IN THE PAST YEAR, WE HAVE SEEN A 25% DECLINE IN WOMEN LEADING S&P 500 COMPANIES. ARE YOU CONCERNED ABOUT THE NUMBER OF WOMEN IN LEADERSHIP POSITIONS?

 I absolutely want to see more women in corporate America. To put the numbers in perspective, we have gone from 32 female CEOs last year, to 24 this year. The fact that there are 25% fewer women in leadership roles than there were last year tells us the trendline is going in the wrong direction. Without question it’s good for America and good for business where there’s no glass ceiling.

However, I would be cautious about reading too much into this particular move. Some of the women who have stepped down this year, like Indra Nooyi, are simply ready to retire. Others may have had issues related to performance. Some may be choosing to do something else. A lot of work remains, but this move in particular is not part of the bigger problem. In fact, under Indra, PepsiCo has been a leader in empowering women in their workforce.

WHY ARE SO FEW WOMEN BECOMING CEOS, AND HOW DO WE CHANGE THAT?

 The biggest problem we have is that there is simply not a bench for companies to choose from that this point. Most of corporate America has failed to create a  pipeline that allows successful women to reach the senior management roles. Just look at the numbers!

According to Catalyst, a nonprofit that advocates for women, while women make up half of the workforce, just 39 percent management roles were filled by women in 2017. And the number of women in senior roles decline from 23% in 2017 to 21% this year. These figures tell me that corporate America continues to admire the problem rather than doing something about it.

Diversity in the work force is the only thing that we are always working on in corporate America. Everything else is make or break. To fix the problem, people have to be rewarded for making progress, and held accountable it they do not.

WHY IS DIVERSE LEADERSHIP SO IMPORTANT?

First and foremost, it is good for business. Studies show that companies with diverse leadership are more profitable. To be a best in class company in the 21st century, you want to have a team that can interact with a global customer base, can build the best supply chain, and that reflects and understand the interconnected world we live in.

On top of this, studies show that if you want to solve a problem, you want to have a group of people with many different perspectives. Ultimately, diversity is a competitive advantage. Finally, it is just the right thing to do. Our companies should reflect our diversity as a country. There is the saying you can’t be what you can’t see. By increasing the number of women and people of color in leadership roles, we are allowing children from all walks of life to recognize they can be anything they want.

Mellody Hobson is President of Ariel Investments, a Chicago-based money management firm that serves individual investors and retirement plans through its no-load mutual funds and separate accounts. Additionally, she is a regular financial contributor and analyst for CBS News. 

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Lindsay Lohan thinks women who share their Me Too stories ‘look weak’

Seriously?

Credit: Rex

Words by Rebecca Fearn

Prepare for your eyeballs to roll so far back into your head they nearly go all the way round: Lindsay Lohan has said she believes women that discuss their Me Too stories of sexual assault ‘look weak’. Oh dear.

Speaking to The Times, Lohan boldly stated: ‘I’m going to really hate myself for saying this, but I think by women speaking against all these things, it makes them look weak when they are very strong women.’

She also told the publication that she thinks some women reveal their stories for attention: ‘You have these girls who come out, who don’t even know who they are, who do it for the attention’.

‘That is taking away from the fact that it happened’, she continued.

These admissions are hardly surprising when taking into account Lohan’s defence of disgraced producer Harvey Weinstein last year. Speaking in an Instagram video, she told followers: ‘I feel very bad for Harvey Weinstein right now. I don’t think it’s right what’s going on. He’s never harmed me or did anything to me’.

Despite making these misguided statements, the actor was adamant about the fact that she does in fact support her fellow women.

‘Look, I am very supportive of women’, she told The Times. ‘Everyone goes through their own experiences in their own ways.’

Hmmmm…

The post Lindsay Lohan thinks women who share their Me Too stories ‘look weak’ appeared first on Marie Claire.

Marie Claire

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Style Your Home’s Outdoors with All the Perfect Additions from MacKenzie-Childs! Save on Tables, House Letters & Chairs. Shop Now!

100 Muslim women who wear niqabs and burkas demand Boris Johnson’s exit

‘We have not forfeited our right to be treated fairly and as equal citizens in this country’

REX

People have been calling for the resignation of former foreign secretary Boris Johnson after he was accused of ‘vilifying Muslim women’ this week.

Johnson voiced his thoughts on the dress of Muslim women in a recent column for the Daily Telegraph, stating ‘It is absolutely ridiculous that people should choose to go around looking like letter boxes’.

Yes. The ex foreign secretary said women who walk around in burkas look like ‘bank robbers’ and ‘letter boxes’ – and unsurprisingly no one is very happy about it.

It was announced that the Tory party were investigating the complaints against Johnson, but that wasn’t enough for the public, with his office hit by a rally against his controversial comments, organised by Muslim Engagement & Development.

Today, 100 British Muslim women have come forward today against Johnson by sending an open letter to the chair of the Conservative party.

REX

Here is the letter in full…

Dear Brandon Lewis,

We, the undersigned, write to you as British Muslim women who wear the niqab or burqa.

We speak as free women who are able to speak for ourselves and make our own choices. Our decision to wear the niqab or burqa is not an easy one, especially given the hate that many of us experience on a regular basis. Nevertheless we do so because we believe it is a means to get closer to God.

We recognise that this is not the practice of the majority of Muslim women and that it is a very small number who make this choice in the UK. All personal choices should be respected.

Contrary to what you may have been told by sections of the media and columnists who profess to know what is best for us, we are not forced to make these clothing choices, nor are we oppressed.

As women who wear the niqab or burqa, we have not forfeited our right to be treated fairly and as equal citizens in this country. Yet we have representatives of our governing party who think otherwise and who use Muslim women in order to pander to far-right Islamophobes within the party, as Boris Johnson has done.

We understand that you have requested Mr Johnson to apologise.

As chairman of a party that seeks to represent the whole country, which protects individual liberty as a cherished British value, your call – we believe – is insufficient.

Given a deliberate choice was made to inflame tensions in a way that makes it easier for bigots to justify hate crime against us, we concur with Conservative peer, Lord Sheikh, who has demanded the whip be withdrawn from Mr Johnson.

Furthermore, given the responses from other MPs, specifically Ms Dorries, and the broader concerns that have been raised by the Muslim Council of Britain amongst others, we believe that there must now be an independent inquiry into Islamophobia in the Party to tackle this issue once and for all.

Our rights as equal citizens may be debated within wider society, but such vile language which has real consequences for us, should never be acceptable.

We are happy to speak to Members of Parliament to share our experiences and perhaps demystify some of the concerns they may have.

We look forward to hearing from you soon,

Yours,

Hawa, Bolton

Shenaz, Bolton

Aisha, Bolton

Nurjahan, Bolton

Asiya, Bolton

Rashida, Blackburn

Zarina, Bolton

Almas, Bolton

Saadia, Bradford

Sabera, Bradford

Aisha, Bolton

Shaheda, Batley

Noreen, Birmingham

Shahnaz, Luton

Hamida, London

Hajra, Dewsbury

Jameela, Bolton

Haleema, Bolton

Haneefa, Bolton

Memuna, Bradford

Firdous, Bradford

Kulsum, Bolton

Fatema, Bolton

Khadijah, Luton

Khoyrun, Portsmouth

Fatima, Portsmouth

Gulab, Portsmouth

Jiba, Portsmouth

Sadika, Portsmouth

Husna, Portsmouth

Saffiyah, Portsmouth

Nazma, Portsmouth

Asma, Portsmouth

Mayarun, Bolton

Zainub, Bolton

Farida, Batley

Yumna, London

Zubaidah, Newcastle

Farzana, Batley

Maaya, Bradford

Simra, Bradford

Rasheda, Leicester

Farzana, Dewsbury

Sajidah, Bolton

Bushra, Newcastle

Rukhsana, Blackburn

Maryam, London

Farzana, Blackburn

Maarya, Batley

Rasheda, Leicester

Aminah, Oldham

Maariya, London

Taslim, Bolton

Shehnaz, Bolton

Shamim, Bolton

Sumayah, Bolton

Badrunnisa, Blackburn

Farhana, Bolton

Fatimah, Leicester

Nasim, Bolton

Rizwana, Bolton

Ammaarah, Manchester

Neelofar, Dewsbury

Salma, Bolton

Lyba, Manchester

Razia, London

Muneebah, Manchester

Qudsiyyah, Manchester

Nida, Birmingham

Sidrah, Manchester

Sahar, Cardiff

Shamima, Newport

Pritima, London

Tahsin, London

Zaynab, Chadwell Heath

Amina, London

Shirin, Stratford

Sumey, Bradford

Arifa, Bradford

Farhana, Bradford

Asma, London

Zakera, London

Summayya, London

Nasim, Leicester

Shahida, Leicester

Nasima, London

Anisa, London

Abeda, Bradford

Nafisa, Bradford

Fatima, Bradford

Khadija, Bradford

Noreen, Bradford

Sarina, Bradford

Halima, Bradford

Azba, Bradford

Nabeela, Bradford

Zainab, Bradford

Ammarah, Batley

Humera, Batley

Asma, Blackburn

Aneesa, Batley

Waseeya, Chorley

Anisah, Preston

Nafisa, Bolton

Jamila, Blackburn

Anisha, Blackburn

Saheera, Blackburn

Shakila, Preston

Tahmina, London

Latifah, London

Nada, Birmingham

Shuhana, Swindon

Sidrah, Oldham

We will continue to update this story.

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Racism, Research and Barriers to Better Health Outcomes for Women

Once again this summer, I had the privilege of moderating sessions during the Spotlight Health Aspen Institute Ideas Festival. There were some surprises in a session titled “Breakthroughs and Challenges in Women’s Health” with importance for all women, and I want to share some of that information with you.

From Left: Linda Villarosa, Dr. Deborah Rhodes, Dr. Paula Johnson and Pat Mitchell.

With two esteemed physicians—Dr. Deborah Rhodes of the Mayo Clinic and Dr. Paula Johnson, who was chief of women’s health at Brigham and Women’s Hospital at Harvard University and is now the president of Wellesley College—and science journalist Linda Villarosa, we began our conversation with the important reminder that improving health care depends in large part on research.

Despite legislation passed over 20 years ago, women, and especially women of color, are still being left out of clinical trials. The health outcomes for women, and especially women of color, reflect this disparity.

Dr. Paula Johnson talked about the disparity between the resources for research on men’s diseases and those specific to women in her 2014 TEDWomen talk—and if you haven’t seen it, I highly encourage you to watch it.

Dr. Johnson explained that every cell in the human body has a sex, which means that men and women are different right down to the cellular level! As a result, there are often significant differences in the ways in which men and women respond to disease or treatment. It’s very important in research trials to differentiate between female and male subjects so we can tease out the differences.

Although we have made progress since the 1990s with more women included in late-phase trials, we’re still not there in phases one and two. This is important, she says, because how do we get to phase three? Phases one and three. In these early stages of research, female cells and female animals still aren’t being used. Why? She says one commonly cited reason is that female animals have an estrous cycle. Well, guess what, she says, so do we. What are we missing by not including female cells earlier in the research process?

One of the barriers to progress that perhaps we don’t think about as much is the problem with well-entrenched power paradigms, profit motives and institutional priorities. What happens when a doctor sees a need and solves it but the status quo is preferred over progress?

Dr. Deborah Rhodes sharing her research with the audience.

Dr. Deborah Rhodes—whose TED talk from TEDWomen 2010 is a must—spoke about the challenges to her attempts to introduce a new diagnostic protocol for women with dense breasts. Dr. Rhodes (who in spirit of full disclosure is my personal physician at the Mayo Clinic) has observed in her practice that about 50 percent of women were potentially missing a cancer diagnosis because traditional mammograms fail in detecting breast cancer in women with dense breasts. Mammograms depend on visually seeing cancer cells and in dense breasts this is more difficult because of the surrounding dense tissue.

As Dr. Rhodes says, in looking at entrenched paradigms in medicine, there is perhaps nothing more entrenched than the mammogram. She worked with physicists to come up with a new way to look for tumors using a tracer that has been safely used in cardiovascular medicine for decades that distinguishes tumor cells regardless of density. Her technique is FDA approved but you’ve probably never heard of it. It speaks to, as she says, “the extraordinary difficulties of upsetting something that is so precious to us as a mammogram.”

Earlier detection using her new test in women with dense breasts whose cancer may be hidden in a mammogram could spare women from toxic treatment—less advanced cancer means less chemotherapy—and, in more advanced cases, saving lives. Despite that, her research has been very, very difficult to fund. She says it’s a daily uphill battle to overturn the status quo. Doctors have invested years and years in learning how to read these difficult mammograms, and billions of dollars are invested in the current technology, resulting in a resistance to new technology and new ways of testing.

One of the more shocking statistics that Dr. Rhodes highlighted in her presentation was the disparity in outcomes for white women and women of color with breast cancer. White women are more likely to get breast cancer than black women, but black women are more likely to die of breast cancer. She says that is true particularly for black women under the age of 50 who are diagnosed with breast cancer. They are 77 percent more likely to die than white women. She points out that despite abundant data that informs us of these disparities, solutions are not being pursued.

Linda Villarosa explaining her process at Spotlight Health.

The same tragic disparity between what we need to know for better health outcomes and what is fully understood as life and death factors was the subject of Linda Villarosa’s recent cover story in the New York Times Magazine: “Why America’s Black Mothers and Babies Are in a Life-Or-Death Crisis.” In her incredible article, she noted that black women were three-to-four times as likely to die in childbirth than white women and black babies die at a rate that is twice that of white babies

Linda was one of the first journalists to put the maternal and infant mortality rates together and to investigate why black women and babies are so at risk, explaining, “a common theme here is that the data exists, but it has been ignored or beaten back.”

And further, she connected a condition identified earlier by Dr. Arline Geronimus called “weathering” that is a significant factor in the health outcomes for women of color. “The effect of racism—living with the near daily episodes of micro-aggressions and discriminations,” she observed, “have an adverse impact on health that needs to be better understood and incorporated into diagnosis and treatment for women of color.”

Shocking, yes, and deeply disturbing—but the good news is that the more we know about our own health and what impacts it adversely, the more proactive we can be as health consumers. As one of the panelists noted to this highly engaged audience at Aspen Institute: “Nothing less than our lives depends on being informed and demanding that our health care institutions and physicians are, too.”

Originally published on Pat Mitchell’s blog. Republished with author permission.

Pat Mitchell is known for her leadership in the media industry as a CEO, producer and curator. She partners with the TED organization to co-curate and host an annual global TEDWomen conference and is the chair of theWomen’s Media Center and Sundance Institute boards, a founding board member of V-Day, a member of the board of the Acumen Fund and a member of the Council on Foreign Relations. The first woman president and CEO of PBS, she most recently served as president and CEO of the Paley Center for Media; she is now a senior adviser to the organization. She is also the former president of CNN Productions, where she executive produced hundreds of hours of documentaries and specials, which received 35 Emmy Awards and five Peabody Awards. She was inducted into the Broadcasting and Cable Hall of Fame in 2009.

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Breakthrough Research Shows Black Women Need More Vitamin D

You may have seen our last post on vitamin D. We talked about how many women may not be getting enough. Researchers have called vitamin D deficiency a “pandemic,” stating that a lack of sun exposure (which is required for the body to make vitamin D) as well as low …

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TV’s 10 Best Women Detectives

Women detectives weren’t taken particularly seriously in the early days of television. With the majority of small-screen sleuthing done by men, the women merely made coffee and offered moral support to their colleagues. But as TV has caught up with the world at large, women have slowly gone on to play a more central role in some of the greatest shows of the last few decades. One of the greatest examples of this, is of course the crime genre. With a ton of iconic detectives being played by women, here are 10 of the best.

OK, it’s really 11 thanks to the inclusion of Cagney and Lacey… or maybe 13 due to a certain dynamic animated duo that we’ve added as a bonus at the end.

‘Pepper’ Anderson — Police Woman (1974-1978)


Angie Dickinson in Police Woman.

Police Woman made history, as it was the first ongoing American drama to focus on a woman. In this case undercover police officer ‘Pepper’ Anderson. As played by Angie Dickinson, Sgt. Anderson oftentimes went undercover to solve crimes for the Criminal Conspiracy Unit of the LAPD, posing as everything from a teacher and a nurse to a prostitute and a prison inmate. The show won Dickinson a Golden Globe, while it’s thought to be responsible for a surge in women applying for police jobs in the States.

Christine Cagney and Mary Beth Lacey — Cagney and Lacey (1982-1988)


Tyne Daley and Sharon Gless in Cagney and Lacey.

As the role of women in the home and in the workplace changed throughout the 1970s and on into the ’80s, so TV started to reflect that cultural shift. With Cagney and Lacey we see a tale of two very different detectives, Christine Cagney (Sharon Gless) a single woman focussed on her career, and Mary Beth Lacey (Tyne Daley), who was married with a kid, and struggling to balance family and work. The show revolved around them solving crimes, but also delved into their lives outside work in a way that hadn’t previously been seen onscreen. “Before Cagney and Lacey, we didn’t follow officers home to find out what they did when they took their badges off and emptied their guns” Daley recently told the Radio Times. “So the idea that these women also had lives outside of work was really interesting to play.”

Jane Marple — Miss Marple (1984-1992)


Joan Hickson as Miss Marple.

Agatha Christie is the undisputed queen of the whodunnit, and Miss Marple is one of her most celebrated creations. An elderly spinster and amateur sleuth, she appeared in a dozen novels and many more short stories, using her intelligence and understanding of human nature to solve murders. On the big screen, the character was played by Margaret Rutherford and Angela Lansbury (more on her in just a tick). But for our money, Joan Hickson is the most memorable of all the Marples, appearing in lavish BBC adaptations of every one of those 12 mysteries. Which is fitting, as in the 1940s, Christie saw Hickson in a stage version of Appointment with Death, and sent her a note saying “I hope one day you will play my dear Miss Marple.”

Jessica Fletcher — Murder She Wrote (1984-1996)


Angela Lansbury as Jessica Fletcher.

For 12 years, and over the course of 246 episodes, Jessica Fletcher solved crimes in her home town of Cabot Cove (where murder occurred all-too-regularly) and in locations all over the world. As played by the aforementioned Angela Lansbury, Fletcher was a successful mystery writer who moonlighted as a detective. With local law enforcement officers frequently arresting the wrong suspect, and Fletcher putting them right. Her adventures regularly attracted TV audiences of more than 30m in the States, while they landed Lansbury a record 12 Emmy nominations. None of which she won.

Jane Tennison — Prime Suspect (1991-2006)


Helen Mirren as Jane Tennison.

Prime Suspect is quite simply one of the greatest TV shows of all-time, and much of that is down to the character Jane Tennison, a Detective Chief Inspector who has had to work twice as hard as the men around her to get to that position, and who faces institutional racism every day of her working life. The firs series focussed on that issue, while later seasons tackled racism, alcoholism, prostitution and child abuse. The drama anchored by a career-best performance from Helen Mirren. And as the actress told The Independent, the character resonated with a segment of society that had previously been ignored: “She certainly spoke to a whole generation of successful and economically powerful women. They were a market who’d been ignored. They could buy big Mercedes and expensive mortgages and pensions and were a success in the workplace, but nobody had ever shown what it had been like for them to get there. Prime Suspect showed that. Instead of being a victim, Tennison barrelled her way through — as those women did in real life — without whining or going to tribunals.”

Catherine Willows – CSI: Crime Scene Investigation (2000-2015)


Marg Helgenberger as Catherine Willows.

America loves a police procedural, withe the likes of Law & Order, Cold Case, NCIS and Criminal Minds frequently dominating prime-time. So to represent this incredibly popular TV genre, we’re going for a brilliant detective in the most successful show of the lot; namely CSI‘s Catherine Willows. As played by Marg Helgenberger, Willows is a former stripper who works as a lab supervisor, solving crimes as part of the Las Vegas Police Department’s Crime Scene Investigation team. Combining intelligence and compassion with a no-nonsense attitude, Willows works her way up to Director of the Las Vegas Crime Lab. While the length and number of CSI seasons means we really got to know the Catherine away from the job, her complicated family life the source of much intrigue and drama.

Veronica Mars — Veronica Mars (2004-2007)


Kristen Bell as Veronica Mars.

From grown-up detectives to a teenage sleuth… Veronica Mars was a High School student who took to crime-solving when her sheriff Dad lost his job and set up Mars Investigations. Season 1 revolved around the overarching mystery of her best friend’s murder as well as various cases of the week, and Season 2 took much the same approach, while Season 3 found Veronica solving a pair of standalone crimes at College. Played by Kristen Bell, Veronica was quick-witted and whip-smart, with her journey from popular kid to outcast sleuth as compelling as the show’s mysteries. Stephen King called it “Nancy Drew meets Philip Marlowe,” while the fans loved it so much that they raised more than $ 5m for a belated celluloid sequel to the series.

Ellie Miller — Broadchurch (2013-2017)


Olivia Colman in Broadchurch.

Olivia Colman is Britain’s greatest living actor. That’s a fact. And Colman’s performance as Ellie Miller in Broadchurch might be her finest work. Starting out the first season happy, trusting and optimistic, the investigation into the death of family friend Danny Latimer gradually breaks her. Culminating in an incredibly powerful scene where she finally confronts Danny’s killer. We meet a very different Miller in Season 2, but one who remains very good at her job. While Colman’s spiky chemistry with David Tennant — who plays Ellie’s partner Alec Hardy — makes for one of TV’s most memorable onscreen duos.

Catherine Cawood — Happy Valley (2014-present)


Sarah Lancashire in Happy Valley.

More gritty British sleuthing, courtesy of an astonishing Sarah Lancashire performance in two hard-hitting Happy Valley seasons. Police Sergeant Catherine Cawood has had it tough. Divorced and living with her heroin-addicted sister, she’s still coming to terms with the suicide of her daughter, who killed herself after becoming pregnant by rape. When her rapist is let out of prison, Cawood makes it her mission to bring him down, no matter what the cost. Happy Valley isn’t always an easy watch, but Cawood in one of TV’s most brilliantly written and performed characters.

Jessica Jones — Jessica Jones (2015-present)

The second of the Marvel Netflix series’ to hit, Jessica Jones is also very possibly the best, thanks to the show’s complicated title character. As played by Krysten Ritter, Jones is a hard-drinking, fast-talking private eye who also possesses super-strength. Which makes her a formidable detective. The show is much darker than Marvel’s movie output, with Jessica dealing with PTSD from the mental and physical abuse she suffered at the hands of Season 1 villain Kilgrave (David Tennant). Yet in spite of the challenging subject matter, Jessica Jones is frequently hilarious, thanks to the show’s super-smart scripts, and Ritter’s marvellously deadpan delivery.

BONUS ENTRY: Velma and Daphne – Scooby-Doo (1969-present)


Daphne and Velma.

In spite of the fact that they’ve been doing detective work for nearly 50 years, Velma Dinkley and Daphne Blake look surprisingly sprightly. Together with their friends Fred and Shaggy — and Great Dane Scoody-Doo — they cruise around in the Mystery Machine solving hundreds of crimes. Most of them seem supernatural in nature, but these atrocities are actually usually carried out by embittered old men, who would have got away with it if it hadn’t been for those meddling kids. Brainbox Velma and Danger-Prone Daphne even appeared on the silver screen, with Linda Cardellini and Sarah Michelle Gellar playing the dynamic duo in a pair of successful films.

Why the Western Debut of ‘Detective Pikachu’ Is Such a Big Deal

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What Women Need to Know about Sports Injuries

The benefits of playing sports are well known, but the impact may be greater for females. According to the Women’s Sports Foundation, high school girls are less likely to get pregnant and more likely to do better academically if they participate in sports. Girls and women also have more confidence, …

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Study: Black Women Have the Highest Amount of Student Loan Debt

It can already be challenging in a world where the gender wage gap still exists for college-educated women, but there’s yet another financial disparity in student loan debt that exists for black women.

Updated research from the American Association of University Women (AAUW) indicates that women hold two-thirds ($ 890 billion) of the country’s $ 1.4-trillion student debt, and black women are graduating with at least $ 30,400 in debt—compared with $ 22,000 for their white counterparts.

The research further shows that the “student loan gender gap has nearly doubled in the past four years, and women now graduate with an average of $ 2,700 more debt than men when earning a bachelor’s degree.”

The data, updated via the 2015-16 National Postsecondary Student Aid Study, also shows that women makeup 56% of enrolled college students but are grappling with a whopping 65% of outstanding student loan debt.

“Student debt levels have reached an all-time high, with women carrying a bigger burden of debt than men,” Kim Churches, CEO of AAUW, said in a news release. “This debt is an albatross for many women as they embark on careers and work to support their households and families. And, it only gets worse over time when coupled with the gender pay gap.”

Women were found to take two years longer than men to repay their student loans, and the reason is attributed, in part, to the gender wage gap. College-educated women who work full time make, on average, 25% less than their male counterparts who hold degrees, leaving women with less income to put aside to pay off loan debt. Black women, specifically, make less than even their white female counterparts, earning $ 0.63 for every dollar earned by white men, compared with $ 0.79 for white women, according to reports.

“The imbalances compound. Higher student debt, lower pay, child- and family-care costs, and other factors all add up to leave women at a deficit as they work to maintain financial security,” Churches added in the news release. “With women leading more households today, enough is enough. Solutions are needed now.”

The AAUW offers several recommendations for reducing the student loan gender gap, including the support of more income-driven repayment options and protecting projects like Public Service Loan Forgiveness, providing services such as child care at universities, and increasing state and federal funding for public higher-education institutions.

“With the Higher Education Act, Congress has the opportunity to set today’s students up for success—and that includes making sure they don’t graduate with crippling debt,” Deborah J. Vagins, senior vice president of public policy and research at AAUW, said in the release. “We need to support policies that make higher education accessible and affordable for all students, provide support and protection for student borrowers, and help eliminate the gender and race gaps in student loans.”

The post Study: Black Women Have the Highest Amount of Student Loan Debt appeared first on Black Enterprise.

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Justin Theroux and Sam Heughan bow down to the women of The Spy Who Dumped Me, as we all should

Justin Theroux and Sam Heughan bow down to the women of The Spy Who Dumped Me, as we all should


Justin Theroux and Sam Heughan bow down to the women of <em>The Spy Who Dumped Me</em>, as we all should

Justin Theroux and Sam Heughan are excellent in The Spy Who Dumped Me. They alternate between high-octane action scenes and funny comedic moments with ease. But the true stars of The Spy Who Dumped Me are the women, both on and off camera—which is something that Theroux and Heughan celebrate.

In addition to Mila Kunis and Kate McKinnon playing best friends Audrey and Morgan, we can’t forget Ivanna Sakhno as Nadedja, the terrifying gymnast/assassin hybrid, or Gillian Anderson as Wendy, “the Beyoncé of the government” (as Morgan reverently deems her). And, of course, steering the ship is brilliant co-writer and director Susanna Fogel.

The Spy Who Dumped Me is ruled by women, and the men bow down—as we all should. I spoke with Theroux and Heughan about their experiences working with Kunis and McKinnon in particular.

“They’re amazing,” Theroux told HelloGiggles. “Mila’s got this really loose, hilarious kind of way of performing, which was fun to work with. Kate has this almost academic way of breaking down the comedy and creating alts on her script and different lines that she wants to try out. It is sort of ebony and ivory, in a way. They complement each other really well and have obviously great chemistry together. Watching them both work was really fun.”

#MilaKunis, trust us. @justintheroux is too good to be true. 😬 #SpyWhoDumpedMe

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When I asked Heughan to name the highlight of working with Kunis and McKinnon, he couldn’t narrow it down to just one thing.

“They are just so remarkable, individually, for their skills as actresses,” Heughan told HelloGiggles. “They’re really strong, extremely funny. Kate is hysterical. SNL is incredible, I was a big fan. Mila, I’ve watched her movies for many years and always been a big fan. To have them together—they’re just this great couple. This great friendship. And you can see it. They met to make this movie, they didn’t know each other before, but you feel like they’ve been friends for forever. They are just so much fun to work with.”

Walking into the weekend like 😏 #SpyWhoDumpedMe

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At times during The Spy Who Dumped Me, when Audrey and Morgan laughed, I often wondered if their giggles were genuine, coming from Mila and Kate rather than their characters. Heughan confirmed that more often than not, it was probably the women cracking each other up IRL.

“[Their laughter is] infectious. Especially Mila, she has a great laugh. As soon as she starts going, I think everyone goes,” Heughan continued. “And to be the straight guy opposite that is actually pretty tough. It was really hard. Obviously, the character Sebastian is pretty buttoned up and serious. He’s in a really tough situation, and we have these two extreme characters.”

Heughan said he learned a lot from working with both Kunis and McKinnon.

“Every take was different. They were constantly ad-libbing and making things up. As an actor, at first, it was pretty intimidating to be faced with that. But actually quite freeing as well. I learned a lot watching them work.”

Nothing brings friends closer than evading law enforcement. 🚓 #SpyWhoDumpedMe

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The Spy Who Dumped Me is now playing in theaters.

The post Justin Theroux and Sam Heughan bow down to the women of <em>The Spy Who Dumped Me</em>, as we all should appeared first on HelloGiggles.

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Women seeing baby animals have a reduced appetite for meat

Images of baby animals reduces people’s appetite for meat say researchers, who found that the effect is much stronger for women than for men. The findings may reflect women’s greater emotional attunement towards babies and, by extension, their tendency to empathize more with baby animals. Also, meat is associated with masculinity and images of tough men who consume meat for muscle building protein, along with prehistoric ideas of the male as hunter.
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City Girls’ JT & Resha, The Other Women Name Dropped In Drake’s “In My Feelings”

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Source: Jeff Hahne / Getty

Drake‘s smash hit “In My Feelings” is gearing up to be the song of the summer, with viral dance challenges and such making national news for the right and wrong reasons. While the mysterious “Keke” or “Kiki” has gotten much of the audio spotlight, the Miami rappers JT and Resha, the other women mentioned in the song, make up the musical duo City Girls.

The video for “In My Feelings” just made its debut this week and already sitting at 1 million views a day after its release. Filmed in New Orleans, the inventor of the dance that fueled the #InMyFeelings challenge, Shiggy, makes a cameo as does the infamous Resha, also known as Yung Miami, of City Girls along with a loving shout out to her partner, the currently incarcerated JT.

City Girls got their first big break as a guest act on the Quality Music Control 30-song compilation album, Control The Streets. The track “F*ck Dat N*gga,” which invokes the spirit of the raunchiest rap this side of 2 Live Crew, Trick Daddy, Khia, and Trina combined.

With an unapologetic sound that is no doubt immersed in the vibe of the 305, JT and Yung Miami were completely poised for stardom but JT entered into the prison system on June 29 for credit card fraud.

The City Girls Instagram page posted a video of a cartoon of Drake discovering the group and fawning over the ladies ahead of throwing them in his hook for the song. With Yung “Resha” Miami holding down the fort for her sister, the clip shows how fans can send letters of love and support to JT in prison and she promises to return all the love when she gets free.

Check out the clip below along with Drake’s “In My Feelings.”

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Photo: Getty

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Bold Moves to End Sexual Violence: Self-Defense and Self-Empowerment for Women Workers

Ms. is a proud media sponsor of the 2018 National Sexual Assault Conference, co-hosted by the California Coalition Against Sexual Assault, the Pennsylvania Coalition Against Rape and the National Sexual Violence Resource Center. This year’s NSAC theme is “Bold Moves: Ending Sexual Violence in One Generation.” Leading up to the event, we’ll be posting pieces by presenters and major speakers highlighting their plans to make those moves right here on the Ms. blog. Click the banner image above or this link for more Bold Moves posts.

Yo soy alguien. I am somebody.

At the first anti-sexual violence program designed by and for janitors who clean high rises and office buildings throughout California, 20 female janitors repeat the phrase and proudly proclaim that yes, they are somebody. Yes, they matter.

For some, it is their first time considering this idea.

Workers at a “Justice for Janitors” march. (SEIU / Creative Commons)

Ya Basta! Coalition instructors empower women. Our classes are more about self-exploration and building self-confidence than they are about the physical defense of your person. For four hours, we carefully take women through a journey of healing and empowerment. This special investment of time and resources is critical because we find that most of the women who participate have never had the time or the space to think about their emotional wellbeing, their physical body and the pain they carry.

The reality is that no one will denounce abuse at work if they don’t believe they aren’t worth more than the violent acts they absorb.

The women we work with have all experienced different levels of abuse, and many have deeply internalized it to the point of acceptance. Often, they adopt the dominant paradigm and blame themselves for the rape, assault, harassment and bullying that they experienced. The shame is overwhelming. The fear of being shunned drives women to bury the pain as deep as they can in their soul.

Even the fiercest, most confident worker warriors who have led fights for better wages, healthcare and safe working conditions find it too uncomfortable to talk about sexual violence. To reach these strong and hurting women, we have to change their normal way of thinking.

During class, we work to respectfully deconstruct the socialization we experience growing up in a Latino culture in countries that promote spoken and unspoken violence against women. We lovingly attempt to create space between the pain and shame they feel and the ideas at the root of those emotions. We talk about our shared culture and experiences immigrant women in the janitorial industry and build a community of trust.

Our hope is that they consider the perspective that none of the abuse of their person is their fault. There are monumental forces that indoctrinate women, even girls, to a submissive, marginalized role that strips us of our voice.

Through meditation and affirmation, the women in our classes begin to realize that they don’t have to carry the burden around with them alone anymore. They have the power to free themselves and denounce their abusers. Their pathway to healing begins once they can consider it is not their fault.

After the meditation, we strive to create an outlet for the women in our classes. ¡Yo soy alguien! Say it louder. Only after a psychological breakthrough does the physical release begin.

For the last hour, the women practice how to punch, kick and jab to protect themselves from potential attackers. They channel their pain, anger, and rage into a positive outcome—understanding the principles of self-defense. So much anger comes from feeling powerless. The self-defense training gives them power. The power to change your life, your workplace and the way you understand the world.

After class, women tell us that they wish they had the class sooner, that all of what we said is true, that it is what they experienced and they believed it. Often women struggle with feelings of guilt and resentment, as most have raised children and passed on violent traditions of marginalizing womenNow that we have seen this consistent pattern, we incorporate a message of empathy and compassion. We should not be judged for error when we knew no other way.

The power we teach goes far beyond self-defense. Our instructors are “promotoras”—women leaders who have been trained as community-based educators and are leading the fight to end violence in the janitorial industry. They have transformed their pain into power and are reaching out to their coworkers to invite them to embark on this journey and stand up against sexual violence in their workplaces.

We are creating an army of women—a support network committed to reaching as many female janitors as possible. As each women connects with her power, she will be prepared to denounce her abusers in a self-empowering way.

We want as many workers to transform their profound pain into a courageous, bold, proud light that celebrates the powerful person they actually are. And as we go from training to training, we’re making that internal shift one worker at a time.

Lilia García-Brower is the Executive Director of the Maintenance Cooperation Trust Fund, a California statewide watchdog organization whose mission is to abolish illegal and unfair business practices in the janitorial industry. She is also a proud founding member of the Ya Basta! Coalition which brings worker advocates and anti-sexual violence advocates together to end violence at work.

The post Bold Moves to End Sexual Violence: Self-Defense and Self-Empowerment for Women Workers appeared first on Ms. Magazine Blog.

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The crazy thing women are injecting to look younger

Executive coach Pamela Prather teaches her clients to project an air of confidence, working with them on everything from breath and vocal range to body language. But recently she began to feel self-conscious about one of her own body parts. “I was losing collagen in my hands; the veins were much more visible and reminded…
Living | New York Post

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The Week in Movie News: The Women of the ‘Terminator’ Reboot, New ‘Venom’ Trailer and More

The Week in Movie News: The Women of the 'Terminator' Reboot, New 'Venom' Trailer and More

Need a quick recap of the past week in movie news? Here are the highlights:

 

FIRST LOOK

Paramount promotes the women of the Terminator reboot: She's off to the side, but returning star Linda Hamilton is the star of Paramount's first look at the next Terminator movie. In general, the reboot's leading ladies, also including Mackenzie Davis (center) and Natalia Reyes (left), are a powerhouse trio. Read more about the movie here.

 …

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NBC Names First ‘Female Forward’ Class in Effort to Empower Women Directors

There will be powerhouse women in the director’s chairs of your favorite NBC shows thanks to a new initiative. NBC Entertainment recently announced the inaugural class of a program called Female Forward, and the initiative is set to increase the presence of women calling the creative and production shots for top shows.

“We’ve proven time and again that our pipeline programs discover undeniable talent who bring a fresh point of view to their work, and our first Female Forward class is no exception,” said Karen Horne, NBC Entertainment’s VP of programming and talent development and inclusion, in a news release. “Diversity in the director’s chair encourages inclusion at every echelon of a production, and our hope is that these 10 women will join the ranks of other women directors who have exponentially affected change by opening doors for those who follow them not only in their field, but across our industry.”

The finalists will be working on series including Brooklyn Nine-Nine, Chicago Med, Good Girls, Superstore, The Blacklist, Chicago Fire, Blindspot, A.P. Bio, and Law & Order: SUV. They were chosen from more than 1,000 applicants and are composed of industry professionals who have led projects including films selected at the Tribeca Film Festival, Santa Barbara International Film Festival, and Toronto International Film Festival, among others.

“As executives who have consistently been working to get more female directors on our shows, it’s so meaningful that one of our first big acts as co-presidents is to officially welcome this inaugural class of talented directors to the NBC family,” said Lisa Katz and Tracey Pakosta, co-presidents of NBC Entertainment’s scripted programming, in the release.

To qualify for the program, which was launched last August, the Female Forward candidates had to have directing experience in their fields—in mediums that could include feature films, music videos, commercials, digital content and theater—and they could have no more than one credit for scripted TV under their belt.

“What makes this moment even more significant is the realization that by next season our colleagues across the industry will have a larger pool of experienced women to choose from as they are staffing their shows, and that number will multiply as the program culminates year after year,” Katz and Pakosta added. “Our goal is to completely eliminate the often-heard excuse—which we strongly believe simply isn’t true—that the reason there isn’t parity in the field is that there aren’t enough qualified women, and we feel confident that this program will begin to change that narrative.”

The post NBC Names First ‘Female Forward’ Class in Effort to Empower Women Directors appeared first on Black Enterprise.

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“Hot” Women at Risk—7 Simple Ways to Cool Inflammation

They say that too much of a good thing can be a bad thing. Running, for instance, is considered generally good for your health. Overdo it, though, without allowing your body proper rest, and you could suffer injuries that sideline you for months. The same could be said of cherries. …

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6 Women Accuse CBS CEO Les Moonves of Sexual Harassment

Six women have accused CBS CEO Les Moonves of sexual harassment over the course of three decades, according to a report in the New Yorker.

Six women told the New Yorker’s Ronan Farrow — who won a Pultizer Prize last year for his reporting on allegations against disgraced Hollywood mogul Harvey Weinstein — that Moonves sexually harassed them between the 1980s and late 2000s. Four of the women alleged that Moonves touched them inappropriately including producer Christine Peters, and two women including actor Illeana Douglas allege he had physically intimidated them and threatened to ruin their careers.

In a statement provided to the New Yorker and subsequently given to TIME, Moonves acknowledged he erred in the past, but said he never misused his power at the network.

“Throughout my time at CBS, we have promoted a culture of respect and opportunity for all employees, and have consistently found success elevating women to top executive positions across our Company,” Moonves said. “I recognize that there were times decades ago when I may have made some women uncomfortable by making advances. Those were mistakes, and I regret them immensely. But I always understood and respected – and abided by the principle – that ‘no’ means ‘no,’ and I have never misused my position to harm or hinder anyone’s career.”

CBS said it is reviewing the allegations against Moonves, adding there have never been any misconduct claims or settlements against Moonves throughout his tenure at the network.

Aside from the claims against Moonves, the New Yorker also depicts the work environment at CBS as one fraught with unreported claims of sexual harassment and inappropriate behavior. In particular, several former employees reportedly allege that Jeff Fager, the former chairman of CBS News who is currently the executive producer of 60 Minutes, inappropriately touched colleagues, and made advances toward an associate producer when he was inebriated at a company party. The employees also allege that Fager turned a blind eye when other male employees engaged in similar behavior, according to Farrow’s account.

Fager said the incidents “never happened,” according to a statement from CBS. “There’s a reason these awful allegations have not been published before—despite the efforts of a few former employees who did not succeed at ‘60 Minutes.’ It is because they are false, anonymous, and do not hold up to editorial scrutiny,” he said. CBS did not directly address the allegations against Fager, but took issue with the depiction of the company as a whole.

“CBS is very mindful of all workplace issues and takes each report of misconduct very seriously. We do not believe, however, that the picture of our Company created in The New Yorker represents a larger organization that does its best to treat its tens of thousands of employees with dignity and respect,” the company said in a statement. “We are seeing vigorous discourse in our country about equality, inclusion and safety in the workplace, and CBS is committed to being part of the solution to those important issues.”


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Women in Animation, USC, UCLA and CalArts Partner on Parity-Diversity Symposium

Women in Animation has joined forces with USC, UCLA and CalArts to present the symposium “Breaking the Glass Frame: Women and Animation, Past, Present, Future” Oct. 5-7 at USC’s School of Cinematic Arts. “This is the first collaborative event between three of the world’s most prestigious animation programs: USC’s John C. Hench Division of Animation […]

Variety

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Feminists Aren’t Done Fighting Back Against Rape in the World’s Most Dangerous Country for Women

The Thomson Reuters Foundation this year declared that India was the most dangerous country for women in the world—and though government agents in the region are pushing back on the decision, women’s rights activists are pushing on in their fight to end an epidemic of sexual assault that continues to draw international headlines.

Attendees at the first regional training of the “Voices against Violence” in Pune, India. Urjasi Rudra for UN Women / Creative Commons)

The Indian National Commission for Women Chairperson, Rekha Sharma, rejected the survey results, claiming the sample size was too small and cannot be the representative of the whole country. But feminists in India said sensitizing lawmakers to the issue, breaking the silence and building collective consciousness are the keys to combat violence and discrimination against women—and they’re not backing down for the sake of national pride.

ElsaMarie D’Silva, one of the 548 people surveyed for the Reuters’ study, is the founder and CEO of Red Dot Foundation (Safecity), an organization that crowdmaps sexual harassment in public spaces. “Whilst we can debate the ranking, the sample size and the methodology,” said told Ms., “we have to wonder if these cases of sexual violence are acceptable or not and if it puts the rest of us at risk.” D’Silva recommended ensuring justice ecosystem where women suffering from sexual harassment and assault don’t face judgement, but instead find supportive and efficient legal processes at their disposal. She also emphasized encouraging bystander intervention and teaching sex-ed in schools and colleges in order to create social norms for non-violent communication, understanding consent and respecting boundaries.

Indian poet, fiction writer and womanist Kavya Sharma wasn’t shocked by the survey results. To her, they showcase the strength of a backlash to growing activism around ending violence in the country. “With it being the most unsafe country in this regard, it’s honestly no shocker,” she told Ms. “While after the heart-wrenching Nirbhaya case people were on streets fighting for their most basic rights, things only got worse. It’s so traumatizing to realize that most of the sexual harassment and rape cases are not even reported. On the ground level, I feel the police needs to be sensitized on the issue, many people shun these incidents away with the fear of being ‘judged’ by the society. Women, instead of fighting, are taught to just ignore the red signals, it’s a shame but sadly it’s the reality too.”

Award-winning author and feminist activist, Meghna Pant, has a simpler call to action: “Stop the silence so that you can stop the violence,” she told Ms. 

“It is difficult to start a constructive and proactive dialogue on sexual violence because our country makes it nearly impossible for women to speak out,” she observed. “A woman who does speak out is subject to harassment, criticism and, sometimes even, disbelief. She leaves herself open to public scrutiny: she is called names, she is judged for the clothes she wears, the job she does and the boyfriend she has. Her family is also drawn into this fracas. No wonder then that there’s always been this cloak of silence surrounding sexual molestation.”

Regardless of ranking, it’s clear that a culture shift is in order for the men and women of India—and feminists on the ground will not stop speaking out until they are heard and believed.

Kohinur Khyum Tithila is a journalist based in Bangladesh. She is a Fulbright scholar and received her second master’s degree in Magazine, Newspaper, & Online Journalism from Syracuse University, first master’s degree in criminology and criminal justice from Dhaka University, and bachelor’s degree in English from East West University. Kohinur writes about LGBTQ and women’s issues, feminism, crime, secularism, social justice and human rights. She is also addicted to anything caffeinated.

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For Black Women in South African Film Biz, Equality Still a Struggle

DURBAN   — When filmmaker Zamo Makhwanazi takes meetings with execs at some of South Africa’s biggest production companies, she finds herself asking a simple question: “Where are the black women?” For an industry grappling with questions of racial and gender transformation that cut to the heart of the current global debate, South Africa has […]

Variety

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How Black Women Can Show We’re Ready to Lead

Black women can achieve power in corporate America, if we get real about the barriers we’re facing, if we’re united in our quest to overcome them, and if we’re willing to engage advocates and allies to help us get there.

That was the message at a special session during this year’s Women of Power Summit for the 40 Bank of America employees in attendance.

“We did this entire research project on what’s keeping black women from advancing to the C-suite. And we wanted to take this research on the road,” says Calandra Jarrell, senior vice president of Global Diversity and Inclusion, who moderated the candid conversation “Black Women: Ready to Lead—Speaking Truth to Power.”

“We’re exploring black women’s pursuit of powerful jobs and what’s getting in the way—unique challenges that affect brown girls. And having real-talk dialogue about what it feels like to be black in corporate America and a woman at that,” Jarrell says.

That research, Black Women: Ready to Lead, was conducted by the Center for Talent Innovation and co-sponsored by Bank of America. It showed that black women are 2.8 times more likely than white women to aspire to a powerful position with a prestigious title.

But despite the intention, and the fact that almost half of black women (43%) are confident they can succeed in a position of power, the numbers of black women in top positions in corporate America just aren’t adding up.

“We’re not broken; it’s not about performance,” Jarrell says. “It’s about how do we gain the necessary exposure—the same things our counterparts already have. And how do we brainstorm what our company and other leaders can do to really empower us and give us an equal chance.”

The panel featured Tiffany Eubanks-Saunders, senior vice president and market sales executive for U.S. Trust; Michelle Avan, director, Supervision Executive Wealth Management for Merrill Lynch; Ebony Thomas, senior vice president of global employment branding and enterprise diversity recruiting executive; along with the company’s highest-ranking black woman, Chief Diversity and Inclusion Officer Cynthia Bowman.

black women in corporate america

The Black Women: Ready to Lead session at the 2018 Women of Power Summit

“As black women in corporate America, we experience it day in and day out that we have to work twice as hard to get half as much. If you think of all of the ethnicities and the genders, black women are literally the last in everything. We have to get real creative about how we can change the dynamic,” Eubanks-Saunders said at the event.

Other nuggets of wisdom were dropped during the conversation about how we can make sure all black women succeed:

Be honest about what more you could be doing. “If we’re gonna be real, real, real with each other, no we don’t always encourage each other. We need to be kind to each other, love up on each other, and say ‘I see you,’” Avan said. “We have an obligation to give to one another support and understanding and to put it forward to model for young women.”

Have the courage to ask for help. “Black girl magic is a gift and a curse. The whole notion of magic is that it’s supernatural—you see it but you don’t believe it. But that magic hurts us. It means we can’t be vulnerable. We can’t ask for help,” Thomas said. “We might have to expose ourselves if we want those allies to be a part of our journey.”

Take care of each other along the way. Sharing what we know, even when it comes to sensitive topics, it’s the only way we’re going to overcome disparities, like the pay gap. “If you have information, don’t just hold it to yourself. If you know it, I want to hear it. School me,” Avan said.

Speak up, even when you’re not the one affected. “We all have a role. We all have the power within us to make a difference. Even if it’s small, collectively we have a broader impact. If you’re silent on an issue, you’re condoning it,” Bowman said.

The session was part of a series of discussions dubbed “Courageous Conversations,” which have been organized by employee networks at the company since 2015 to bring employees together, create awareness of their different experiences, and encourage open dialogue.

More than 60,000 employees have participated in a Courageous Conversation to date, on topics such as social justice and the role of the majority in diversity.

It’s just one of the initiatives Bank of America, where more than 40% of the U.S. workforce is racially or ethnically diverse, has in place to help develop and support black employees.

The Black Professional Group, one of the company’s oldest employee networks with more than 10,000 members, is bolstered by the Black Executive Leadership Council, which works to advance talent and increase representation, and the Diverse Leaders Sponsorship program, which engages senior leaders to promote the visibility of diverse protégés.

Such openness and connection are essential to disrupting the forces that prevent true inclusion. Said Bowman: “If you don’t address the real heart of the issues and have a dialogue around the brutal facts, it’s hard to make progress.”

The post How Black Women Can Show We’re Ready to Lead appeared first on Black Enterprise.

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Study analyzes opioid overdose risk during and after pregnancy among Massachusetts women

A new study found that opioid overdose events decreased during pregnancy, reaching their lowest level during the third trimester, but then increased during the postpartum period, becoming significantly higher during the second six months after delivery.
Parenting News — ScienceDaily

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Sandra Oh’s Emmy Nomination is a Major Milestone for Asian Women

Sandra Oh made history yesterday when she became the first Asian woman ever nominated for an Emmy in the category of best leading actress in a drama series.

Oh, who was previously nominated for five Best Supporting Actress Emmys for her role as Christina Yang on Grey’s Anatomy, was nominated this year for her role as the titular character in the BBC drama series Killing Eve. In the series, she plays an MI5 agent who is tasked with finding an assassin, Villanelle—whom she later becomes mutually obsessed with over the course of eight episodes.

The show, hailed as a feminist thriller, is also a powerful source of queer representation. “What breaks through is the time and the focus of the show on these two characters,”Oh told The Hollywood Reporter. “It is focusing on female psychology and the female psyche and is doing that unabashedly in a thriller. I don’t think that we’ve seen that before.”

Although earning an Emmy nomination for a groundbreaking feminist role should be cause for celebration, Oh also sees it as motivation to keep fighting for better representation. “It cannot rest,” she said. “I don’t want to rest on the fact that a handful of us have had the opportunity and that it stops there. I want the movement to keep on going. I want the ripple to turn into a wave.”

Amy DePoy is a student at Yale University and an editorial intern at Ms. She loves feminism, reading and writing. She also loves all fruits, but especially strawberries. 

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How Black women in media and beyond are shaping the future

How Black women in media and beyond are shaping the future


How Black women in media and beyond are shaping the future

Since the start of this country, Black people have transformed their lived experiences into beautiful art that challenges societal and cultural perceptions of what it means to be Black in America. They’ve found light and joy in oppressive spaces through art forms like song and film. Their influential presence is felt throughout the world, ushering cultural change in an industry that has historically silenced their voices for speaking truth to power — as was the case with such legends as Dorothy Dandridge and Eartha Kitt.

During the 2018 BET Awards in June, Strong Black Lead — an initiative spearheaded by Black employees at Netflix — released an ad called “A Great Day in Hollywood,” invoking the spirit of “A Great Day in Harlem” (a photograph depicting popular jazz musicians of the 1950s). The 47 Black entertainers featured in the Netflix ad inspire future generations of Black creatives to trust their visions, despite the industry standards reinforcing society’s message of unworthiness: “We’re not a genre because there’s no one way to be black. We’re writing while black. Nuanced and complex; resilient and strong.”

Black women who appear in the ad, including Lena Waithe and Ava DuVernay, are examples of our culture’s creative legacy. Waithe and DuVernay utilize their art and platforms to educate viewers about political and personal issues, like the lived experiences of queer individuals and those suffering from mass incarceration, respectively.

When people of the African Diaspora are represented in media, it can transform perceptions of Blackness and challenge viewers to initiate social change.

Increased representation of Black experiences, as seen in the record-breaking films Black Panther and Girls Trip, showcased to the world that Black stories and voices matter. The intergenerational composition of the Netflix ad speaks to this larger cultural movement where Black creatives shape media narratives of their own lives and communities, continuing the historical innovations of artists before them.

This is also an accessible Black media movement where audiences can engage in conversations around Black popular culture through social media platforms like Twitter and Instagram. Young Black creators like Issa Rae, Quinta Brunson, and Franchesca Ramsey have transformed their social media presences into successful careers. Through skillful and humorous storytelling, this movement uplifts and supports work that exposes the harsh realities of being Black in this society.

In a way, this type of media brings to life the Afrofuturist dreams of author Octavia Butler — birthing a future where Black girls and women are given ownership of their lives and stories.

This movement spans beyond entertainment, too. Yes, we have Lena Waithe paving the way for Black women screenwriters, Beyoncé Knowles taking space at Coachella to celebrate Historically Black Colleges and Universities, and Janelle Monáe defining what it means to be a pansexual “free-ass-motherfucker.” But we also have Tarana Burke, who is advocating for Black women sexual assault survivors and helping get their voices heard by policymakers. We have elected representatives like Congresswoman Maxine Waters, as well as community organizers like Black Lives Matter co-founder Alicia Garza and BYP100 National Director Charlene Carruthers. When it comes to social justice, countless Black women are leading the charges in their own fields.

Angela Davis, the mother of Black feminist academic thought, said, “Black women have had to develop a larger vision of our society than perhaps any other group. They have had to understand white men, white women, and Black men. And they have had to understand themselves. When Black women win victories, it is a boost for virtually every segment of society.”

And thanks to the visions of today’s artists and activists, Black girls are growing up in an era when they can see Black women reclaim power structures that have long impacted their lives. Following the footsteps of elders who broke barriers before them, they are ensuring the future leadership of young Black girls across the world.

I believe there is an unspoken language and sisterhood among Black women. It’s evident in the magic of our voices and our desire to uplift each other, and it’s time for the world to not only hear the voices that have always spoken up — but to affirm and magnify them.

So to Ava, Lena, Beyoncé, Solange, and every Black woman changing the world through art and activism, this is a love letter to you. I — and so many others — see you, hear you, thank you, and celebrate you.

The post How Black women in media and beyond are shaping the future appeared first on HelloGiggles.

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TV’s new breed of killer women

After several decades of watching men commit the lion’s share of violence on TV, women have achieved true parity — getting a chance to shoot, stab, poison, castrate and otherwise dispose of anyone they want. Arya Stark (Maisie Williams), Cersei Lannister (Lena Headey) and Daenerys Targaryen (Emilia Clarke) have embodied this bloodsport since 2011 in…
Entertainment | New York Post

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First Black Woman on ‘America’s Test Kitchen’ And Her Mission For Women Chefs of Color

As the first woman of color on America’s Test Kitchen—a PBS TV cooking show, Elle Simone, doesn’t view her “test cook” role as just a job. She believes it’s part of her life’s mission to advance the representation for women of color and provide them with a platform for mentorship, sisterhood, and job placement in the culinary world. “Through my social enterprise SheChef, I’m most proud of the women chefs that I’ve been able to mentor directly, said Simone. Their products are on the shelves of Whole Foods, they’re cooking for celebrities, and food styling with Food52.

“I would like to see the full dismantling of the “good old boys club” ideologies. The ones that condone mental, verbal, and emotional abuse as a measure of gaining respect or shaping chefs. I want more support for those who are choosing to go against the grain of these concepts in order to create positive kitchen cultures. I would love to see our male counterparts stop pretending that it’s such a phenomenon that women chefs are equally capable, and often more so, in the kitchen.”

As a culinary activist, Simone is also passionate about creating safe spaces for all women. “The culinary industry is no stranger to the types of behaviors that spearheaded the “#MeToo movement” and since women are largely the minority of our industry, it is easy for us to slip under the radar,” she said. I’ve always felt that women chefs, especially those of color, needed a place for support and guidance; figuring out how and what that looked like, became a priority for me. I believe it’s great to create beautiful content and create social settings for women chefs but what good is any of that if we don’t feel safe, affirmed, and represented?

Below, Simone shares her insight on how she plans to bridge the culture cap for women of color in the culinary world.

Talk about your role on America’s Test Kitchen.

On the PBS show, America’s Test Kitchen, my role is that of a test cook. The test cooks at ATK work long hours to test and develop recipes to get them to the level of perfection that the company strives for. On the show, the test cook shares with the host some of the challenges of the recipe and the ways in which they overcame those challenges in testing; essentially, making all the mistakes so that the ‘home cook” doesn’t have to. I’m also the food stylist for all the food on ATK TV and our secondary show, Cook’s Country.

What is the biggest thing you’d like to see changed in the culinary industry, and how are you working toward making that change happen?

This year, I moderated two very important panels on the “good old boys club” topic. The first was offered by SheChef Inc. at SXSW in Austin, Texas, about how women create and curate culinary careers. Our panelist were women who have used their unique career paths to start their own food business and how they’ve been able to foster positive kitchen cultures. The latter was with WCR (Women Chefs & Restaurateurs) Conference in Minnesota, where we discussed ways in which women chefs can speak up and show up for each other; reinforcing and strengthening our leadership voices and skills. People can feel exhausted from hearing these conversations time and time again, especially over a long period of time. But my feeling is that until the culinary industry is safe and fully inclusive, the dialogue should continue.

You’re in the midst of launching the Art of the Hustle Event Series for people pursuing culinary endeavors, what’s the purpose behind those events?

These events are a place where women in culinary can have a platform to teach and share about ways they have become successful and also share the mindsets and actions that may have hindered them. The goal is for everyone to walk away with several new ideas to implement that can help sustain their business. I always hope that networking will happen but I’m hoping for a sisterhood that will become the pulse and vein of SheChef Inc.

What’s the one thing you wish you had known before going into the culinary world?

I wish I had known that there are many paths that can be taken in this industry. You don’t have to be a restaurant chef! You can be a purchaser of a food distributing company, you can be a food stylist, you can be a nutritionist! I wish someone would’ve told me that the possibilities were endless, perhaps also that as a black woman, it’d be a bit more difficult but that despite that, I could do anything I wanted.

 

The post First Black Woman on ‘America’s Test Kitchen’ And Her Mission For Women Chefs of Color appeared first on Black Enterprise.

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Women and Depression: Treatment Options

It’s been called the common cold of modern emotional life. And like treatments for the modern cold, there are many treatment options for this challenge. The Mayo Clinic suggests that about twice as many women as men experience depression, meaning about one in four or five women develop depression at …

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The Real-Life Women Embodied in Ruby on “Love Is__” | Love Is___ | Oprah Winfrey Network

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http://www.acrx.org -As millions of Americans strive to deal with the economic downturn,loss of jobs,foreclosures,high cost of gas,and the rising cost of prescription drug cost. Charles Myrick ,the President of American Consultants Rx, announced the re-release of the American Consultants Rx community service project which consist of millions of free discount prescription cards being donated to thousands of not for profits,hospitals,schools,churches,etc. in an effort to assist the uninsured,under insured,and seniors deal with the high cost of prescription drugs.-American Consultants Rx -Pharmacy Discount Network News

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10 Of The Most Generous Black Women In Hollywood

Hollywood can be a place associated with the superficial, but many stars use their platforms and their fortunes to help those in need. For many Black actresses who’ve made it to A-list status, staying in touch with the community is a way of life.

Here are our top picks for the most generous Black women in Hollywood.

TIDAL X: Brooklyn - Arrivals

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Beyoncé:

Beyoncé has quietly donated to causes special to her heart for years, choosing to keep her charitable actions under the radar. But they’ve still been extremely significant. From helping the victims of the Flint water crisis to the homeless, she’s given away millions of her own money to help those in need.

Most recently, when a devastating hurricane struck her hometown of Houston, Texas, the Grammy-winner’s charity BeyGOOD provided aid in the form of baby products, blankets, toiletries, cots and food to the victims who lost their homes and belongings. She also personally handed out food and posed for photos with the victims before hosting a star-studded telethon to raise millions for recovery,.

Oprah Winfrey:

Celebrity Sightings in Los Angeles - June 11, 2018

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From her Oprah Winfrey Leadership Academy in South Africa to the Angel Network to fueling the careers of entrepreneurs like Rachael Ray, Nate Berkus, Ava Duvernay and Iyanla Vanzant, Oprah is one of the world’s most renowned philanthropists.

 

Rihanna:

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Far from just her music and fashion, Rihanna has quickly become one of the most generous women in Hollywood, donating millions to build a cancer research facility in her native Barbados and raising massive amounts of donations from her Diamond Ball for women pursuing their education around the world. She’s been so generous with her wealth that she was named Harvard University’s 2017 Humanitarian of The Year.

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STD Rates are Increasing and Women Have the Most to Lose

Sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) are on the rise, with women at particular risk for serious long-term complications. The best tool for prevention is education. Increasing numbers The Center for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that nearly 20 million new sexually transmitted infections occur every year in this country, half among …

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8 Superheroes Who Would Be Lost Without The Women in Their Lives

Scott Lang is lovable in spite of all of his flaws, but no one’s going to accuse the Ant-Man of having his life together any time soon. It’s a miracle that he can even tie his shoes without Hope van Dyne, but, lucky for Scott, she remains in his corner (mostly). Don’t take any of that as a shot on the Marvel Cinematic Universe’s favorite gone-straight criminal, there are plenty of superheroes, just like Ant-Man, who would be nothing without the women who support them.

With Ant-Man and the Wasp buzzing into theaters next week, let’s take a look at eight superheroes who are strengthened, supported, and improved by the women in their lives:

Iron Man and Pepper Potts



Whether it’s in the comics or on screen, in a relationship or merely partners, Tony Stark is nothing without Pepper Potts. Billionaire, genius, playboy philanthropist he may be, but not knowing your own social security number is a little bit more restrictive than one might think. It’s not all Tony’s fault, Howard couldn’t function on his own either, but that’s what Jarvis and Peggy were for. As hopeless as he may be, let’s call it a good thing that Tony’s found his soul mate in the saint that is Virginia “Pepper” Potts.

Superman and Lois Lane



Lois and Clark are the quintessential comic book ship. Even when Superman ends up in other pairings for one reason or another, it always comes back to one woman: Lois Lane. Lois doesn’t give Superman his powers. She can’t stop bullets, or run faster than a train, but she is a huge part of Clark Kent’s most important power: his humanity. The Man of Steel might be able to snatch a plane out of the air, but he’s nothing without his ace reporter.

The Green Arrow and Felicity Smoak/Dinah Lance



Good old Oliver Queen has all the charm in the world and could split a strand of hair with that bow and arrow of his. He also happens to be a mess and a half without the women in his life. Dinah Lance is the perfect companion for Ollie’s comic book antics, falling in step with his swagger and having absolutely none of his nonsense. Television’s Oliver Queen might be a few shades darker than his comic book counterpart, but his sometimes agonizingly slow progress wouldn’t have even started without Felicity Smoak.

Zan and Jayna



It’s impossible to have a list of male heroes who can’t function without their female counterparts without including the Wonder Twins. Their powers literally don’t activate without each other! Jayna needs Zan for her powers as well, but with Zan only able to become objects or substances, his super sister is still critical to his functionality as a hero.

The Human Torch and the Invisible Woman



Despite his occasional efforts to act otherwise, Johnny Storm is a hero. Each member of the Fantastic Four makes the team work, but no one has pushed Johnny harder than his sister, Sue. She’s calm in all the ways that he’s rash, and in turn he helps her take risks that she might not have every now and again. Like the Wonder Twins, this sibling superhero pair compliments each other nicely, but it feels safe to say that Johnny wouldn’t be the hero he is without Sue Storm.

Hawkman and Hawkgirl



If there’s one thing Hawkman makes abundantly clear, it’s that he can’t survive without Hawkgirl. Hawkman and Hawkgirl are literally linked across time and space through the power of mutual resurrection. On Legends of Tomorrow, their relationship was less than healthy, but once Hawkgirl started to get her memories back things got a little less pushy on Hawkman’s part.

Spider-Man and Aunt May



They say behind every good man is the woman that raised him. That phrase couldn’t be more right when it comes to Peter Parker and his Aunt May. Uncle Ben might have been the one to bestow the knowledge of great responsibility to Pete, but it was May who had to keep on living and raising a teenager who was still trying to figure out how to deal with being a superhero.

Mon-El and Supergirl



Kara Zor-El might have been a touch discriminatory towards Mon-El because of his Daxamite heritage when the two first met, but eventually they overcame their families’ prejudices and found themselves in a pseudo-relationship. When Mon-El returned from the future, he was hero who had realized that he needed to use his powers for good. This was all because of Supergirl’s influence. He founded the Legion of Superheroes in her memory, making her the reason Mon-El became the hero she knew he could be.

All of this is to say that Scott Lang, lovable mess, isn’t alone in his need for a smart woman to help him out every once in a while. All of these incredible heroes acknowledge that there’s no shame in that either. Just another trait they all share that helps make them incredible.

Review: ‘Ant-Man and the Wasp’ Is Marvel’s Strongest Family Film

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The Surfing Women in Puerto Escondido Cup 2018

We are a few days from the Puerto Escondido Cup 2018, a big wave event and one of the most spectacular in the world due to the magnitude of the waves that develop on the Zicatela Beach in Puerto Escondido, Oaxaca, Mèxico, ranging from 6 to 20 meters in height.

Despite the fact that surfing is very well positioned among men, women have done their job and have won surf competitions since the 60’s. such as Australian Phyllis O’Donnell who won a world title in Manly, Australia in 1964.

Raquel Heckert_Polly Ralda Puerto Escondido video Shannon Reporting_0158

And now they are gaining ground in international big wave competitions; 6 female surfers from around the world have been invited to the Puerto Escondido championship:

 

Paige Alms (Hawaii)

Keala Kennelly (Hawaii)

Justine Dupont (France)

Bianca Valenti (USA) 

Felicity Palmateer (Australia)

Laura Never (Australia)

 

the alternatives:

Michaela Fregonese (Brazil)

Nicole Pacelli (Brazil)

Polly Rally (Guatemala)

Emily Erickson (USA)

Raquel Heckert (Brazil)

Isabelle Leonhardt (Mèxico)

 

Surfing is a sport that requires a lot of training, where the mixture of strength, endurance, and concentration are the main ingredients. The women, in addition to consistent surfing, also cross train at the gym to be fit, gain muscle, and have strength in their arms, legs, and core; this is often partnered with yoga, stretching, spinning and swimming.

Breath training, known as apnea, develops the ability to stay underwater longer without taking a breath. Something imperative to surfing bigger waves. This training works the lungs, a muscle just like other organs. Big wave surfers train to stay calm in uncomfortable situations, since entering into panic wastes energy and oxygen.

Californian competitors Bianca Valenti has trained to hold a static breath between 4-5 minutes.

In Puerto Escondido, the waves can be very dangerous because the sand is shallow, in such a way that the wave breaks with great force. Therefore, many surfers use impact vets during the larger swells, which reduce the severity of wipeouts and reduce risk.

About the Surf Open League

A platform that promotes surfers, professional surfing and the sports industry in Mexico with events and the most spectacular surfers in the world; with the vision of positioning Mexico as The surfing capital in Latin America.

The league annually promotes different big wave competitions and professional surfing, including World Surf League events with the big starts. Also has camps and surf clinics in Paradise of Mexico with special prices.

 

Event Details:

The Puerto Escondido Cup has evened the prize purse amongst the male and female competitors based on 24 men and 6 women surfers. This is a big win for women’s surfing to be included, and also have equal pay for equal play. The first #PuertoEscondidoCup female champion will be crowed this weekend in solid 12-15 ft beachbreak barrels.

Tune in Sunday, livestream will be shown here: Facebook.com/surfopenleague

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Take 15% Off Element products at Shop.Surf. Use Code: ELEMENT15

Trump considering two women for Supreme Court; will announce pick July 9

President Donald Trump plans to interview candidates for the vacant Supreme Court seat this weekend in New Jersey, he told reporters aboard Air Force One on Friday.


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http://www.acrx.org -As millions of Americans strive to deal with the economic downturn,loss of jobs,foreclosures,high cost of gas,and the rising cost of prescription drug cost. Charles Myrick ,the President of American Consultants Rx, announced the re-release of the American Consultants Rx community service project which consist of millions of free discount prescription cards being donated to thousands of not for profits,hospitals,schools,churches,etc. in an effort to assist the uninsured,under insured,and seniors deal with the high cost of prescription drugs.-American Consultants Rx -Pharmacy Discount Network News

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Where to Find Designer Plus-Size Clothing for Professional Women

Designer Plus Size Clothing for Professional WomenWondering where to find designer plus-size clothing for professional women? As readers have noted in the past, trendy, fast-fashion spots abound for plus-size work attire — so finding quality fabrics and classic styles for polished looks can be difficult. We wanted to do a roundup of high-end brands and websites that include investment pieces made of high-quality fabrics to add to your everyday workwear collection, plus a few options if you’re in the market for a date-night outfit or special occasion.

We recently rounded up where to find stylish plus-size suits for work, and we’ve done roundups in the past for the best workwear for plus sizes as well as workwear in size 16 and up — for more plus-size content, please sign up for for CorporettePlus, our newsletter! Signing up helps us gauge interest in the project, and we promise not to blast your email more than once a week at most. (Right now it’s more like once a month.)

We also want to hear from you: What are your go-to brands or fashion sites when seeking out designer plus-size clothing for professional women that’ll last, in terms of style and substance? Here are some of the interesting companies we know of in this space — we’d love to hear if you know of any others!


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    • 11 Honore: With the tagline “The runway, edited,” 11 Honore was created last year to give women access to designer brands in sizes 10–20, including pieces exclusive to the company. Those on offer include Theory, Badgley Mischka, Black Halo, Zac Posen, and Christian Siriano. Just to look at one category, dresses right now start around $ 325 and go up to $ 1500.
    • Anna Scholz: This brand with feminine styles is now sold exclusively at AnnaScholz.com; this pocket blouse or lace-trim tee might be lovely for work. Prices range from $ 25–$ 500.
    • And Comfort: One of the newest brands with plus-size fashion in mind has “custom milled [their] own premium organic and pima cotton,” which provides a high-quality, easy-to-wear line of basics up to size 28 that includes a mandarin-collar tunic shirt, apron dress, and wrap skirt. Prices range from $ 45–$ 150.
    • Basler: The German company was placed into liquidation last year and acquired by TriStyle Group, whose brands include Long Tall Sally and others. Not surprisingly, it seems to be in a time of transition (and has closed its brick-and-mortar stores), but a few pieces can be found at Saks (all on sale) and a few dozen (tops, blazers, sheath dresses) at OFF5TH. Prices range from $ 45–$ 615.
    • Gravitas: Founded in 2012 and available at Lord & Taylor as well as the company’s own site, Gravitas offers workwear basics in classic styles; many have a hidden shapewear component. Dresses are around $ 275.
    • Jibri: With sizes from 10–28, Jibri offers pieces that are handmade-to-order, including several wardrobe basics, a long-sleeved, mock-neck pencil dress, and full-sleeve satin flare dress. Celebrities who’ve worn this line include Jill Scott, Brittany Howard of Alabama Shakes, Tess Holiday, and Gabourey Sidibe. The yellow dress pictured is $ 230 and comes in a ton of colors, and is “made by hand in Atlanta.”
    • Kiyonna: Since 1996, American-made Kiyonna has been offering multiple colors, fabrics, and styles for plus-size fashions size 10–32, particularly their popular and flattering wrap dresses and cocktail dresses. (The brand also shows up in some of the high-end style boxes.)
    • Lafayette 148 New York: Available online and in department stores including Nordstrom, and at their own locations around the U.S., the high-end retailer sells blouses, suits, skirts, dresses, and other must-haves made from the finest European fabrics, up to size 24.
    • LoubenNordstrom‘s house brand is great for suiting basics. Prices range from $ 158–$ 380.
    • Marina Rinaldi / Persona by Marina Rinaldi: Part of the Max Mara family, the brand has more traditional dresses and more whimsical, casual options as well. You can find the brand at Nordstrom, Saks, and other designer stores; prices range from around $ 210–$ 1000+. Red dress pictured.

  • MM.LaFleur: A Corporette reader favorite, the workwear company extended its sizing last year by remaking its core pieces from scratch in sizes +1, +2, and +3, which correspond to a range of 14–22 (with a goal to add more styles). You can find tops, dresses, sweaters, and more. Pictured polka-dot dress.
  • navabi: This retailer (based in Germany) offers several different brands — too many to list here — that offer sizes 10 and up, categorized by work dressestrouser suits, and jackets and blazers. You can search by size, designer, or choose a trend that suits you.
  • Nic + Zoe: This brand is guilty of some… bold patterns, shall we say — but if that isn’t quite your style, some of their solids are great for workwear, including their popular Twirl dress and skirt, their four-way cardigan, the riding jacket, and the “Perfect” line of pants. You can find them at a bunch of retailers, including Nordstrom and Amazon.
  • Of MercerSpecializing in workwear — as they put it, “your nine-to-five (and then some) wardrobe” — Of Mercer extends to size 20 and allows you to search the site not only by size, color, and price but also categories such as “hourglass shapes,” “hips,” and “tall.”
  • PLVSH Style: With this retailer, you can either opt for a style box, or shop online for a range of high-end items size 14 and up. Prices range from $ 80–$ 280+.
  • Rita Phil Custom Fashion: Like the name suggests, this skirt designer can do custom orders, and the site’s FAQ page states there is “no size limit.” (BuzzFeed’s Kristin Chirico also gave it her seal of approval.)
  • Stizzoli: This Italian brand offers bold prints and patterns along with neutral pieces — both a bit trendy and more classic. You can find many Stizzoli pieces at Saks.
  • Universal Standard: This line has been receiving high praise from fashion mags, blogs, and our own readers for its workwear options. They are offering an executive workwear kit that includes eight pieces where you can choose the color and size for each piece, and they do the rest. Pictured at top (in navy) and in red.

Other Possibilities for Designer Plus Size Clothing for Professional Women

Readers, have you tried any nicer options for plus-size designer clothes workwear lately? What’s the number one thing you look for when you seek out investment pieces from plus-size labels? Fit? Fabric? Style? Do tell…

The post Where to Find Designer Plus-Size Clothing for Professional Women appeared first on Corporette.com.

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Burger King Apologizes for an Ad Offering Burgers to Russian Women Who Get Pregnant by World Cup Players

(MOSCOW) — Burger King has apologized for offering a lifetime supply of Whoppers to Russian women who get pregnant by World Cup players.

Critics assailed the offer, announced on Russian social media, as sexist and demeaning.

The announcement was removed Tuesday from Burger King’s social media accounts but was still circulating among Russian social network users. It promised a reward of free burgers to women who get “the best football genes” and “ensure the success of the Russian team for generations to come.”

In a statement Wednesday to The Associated Press, Burger King said, “We are sorry about the clearly offensive promotion that the team in Russia launched online.” It said the offer “does not reflect our brand or our values and we are taking steps to ensure this type of activity does not happen again.”

Ads in Russia often play on sexist stereotypes, notably ads around sporting events like the World Cup. Women’s rights activists have been increasingly speaking out against them.

Sports – TIME

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